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In the third and final edition of our streetwear series of Foundfluencer, I caught up with Kish Kash – a true bonafide legend in the UK sneaker game.

Kish started off as a sneaker lover and has now turned his passion into a full time career. We spent a morning with him in his favourite London deli, Truffles, to find out more about how he likes to work with brands, his definition of an ‘influencer’, just exactly how many pairs of trainers he has and how you can influence for positive change, just like his Spair Max day concept. Ladies and gentlemen, meet Kish Kash:

Foundfluencer E03 - Kish Kash - Vimeo

Keep following us to find out the next sector Foundfluencer will focus on. If you’re in need of a hand with any upcoming Influencer activations, get in touch and find out how we can take your brand to the next level!

The post Foundfluencer: Kish Kash appeared first on FOUND.

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Working in this industry, one of the most common questions a client asks is; can you measure ROI (return on investment) and will there even be one? The answer, to both, is yes! One of the biggest myths in Influencer Marketing is that you cannot measure ROI.

According to Influencer Intelligence’s report, Influencer Marketing 2020, proving the ROI of influencers is a big challenge for 84% of marketers. But is it really more challenging to measure Influencer campaigns than it is to measure an advertising or paid social campaign?

Credit: Influencer Intelligence

In order to determine the true success of a campaign, first you need to identify what success means to your brand/client. In order to do this, it is important that you identify the KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) at the beginning of an Influencer campaign, rather than at the end. It’s worth reframing ROI so that it doesn’t simply mean the number of sales made; success can be defined as the number of website sessions, sign-ups and even an increase in social following for the brand.

It’s also important to flag that Influencer Marketing should first and foremost be used to raise brand awareness and to help sway a purchase decision, as this is where this form of marketing truly shines. 61% of consumers aged 18-34 have at some point been swayed in their decision making. However, as this industry grows and budgets increase there is an increased pressure to secure sales and prove a monetary ROI for all influencer campaigns.

Let’s say the main KPI for a brand is sales. Direct sales are very simple to measure. Influencer marketers can easily track the direct uplift by utilising utm tagged tracking links in their influencer’s posts on platforms such as Instagram Stories, YouTube and Facebook. However, this only measures the direct sales. This means only the sales from users who swipe-up and purchase without ever leaving the app are accounted for and, as all marketeers know, unfortunately that’s not the average consumers’ purchase journey – it can actually take up to 60 days for the average consumer to make a purchase after serving them with content to drive purchase intent. This means that sales taking place outside of the trackable links are harder to trace.

Not all purchases will be done directly from app… some consumers can take up to 60 days to make that all important purchase.
Source: Square

A way to overcome this is by providing your influencers with discount codes. This not only allows you to track sales directly as well as at a later date, it also allows you to identify the specific influencers that drove sales. In terms of your CPA (Cost per Acquisition/Sale), you should be aiming for anything under £5.00. Whilst you won’t always get the fullest picture due to the untraceable purchase paths, if you strategise and track correctly (always made easier with the help of a reputable agency), you will definitely be able to get an understanding of what return you’re getting on a budget invested into influencer marketing.

CPE (cost per engagement) should also not be forgotten, especially if your KPI is brand awareness. To measure CPE, you need to calculate the engagement that the influencer’s post has driven – likes, shares, comments, sticker taps, followers gained, swipe-ups and sign-ups are just some of the factors that should be taken into account here. Note, engagements are actions taken by the influencer’s followers. A healthy CPE is typically under £0.10 – if your influencer is getting you anything less than £0.05 then you’re definitely onto a winner.

Above all – every successful campaign should drive followers to take action which is what we pride ourselves at here at Found. So, whether you’re after sales, sign-ups or subscribers – get in touch and get Found!

The post Can You Measure ROI On Influencer Marketing? The Measurement Myth. appeared first on FOUND.

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We’re delighted to announce that we’ve been awarded 10th place in this year’s Great Place to Work Awards (medium category) for companies of 51-250 employees.

This is a tremendous achievement and one that we are very proud of. Being recognised in this way is fantastic validation for all the hard work that we’ve done to create a culture that allows our people and our performance to flourish.

Ranking 10th makes us the highest ranked digital agency in our size category, and we’re delighted to be heralded as an employer of choice and one that flies the flag for inclusion and diversity in the workplace.

We’re always looking for passionate and talented people to join our team. If you’re interested in a role at Found or would like more information on what makes Found such a great place to work then check out our careers page.

The post Found ranked 10th in Great Place to Work Awards – The No.1 Digital Agency in our category appeared first on FOUND.

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You’ve done it. You’ve collected every potential keyword under the sun on your chosen research topic. You’ve used AdWords, you’ve looked at competitors and you’ve been checking out industry forums. Hopefully, you would have used my previous blog as a guide to finding as many keywords as humanly possible.

Depending on what you’re researching and how specific you were with your initial keyword research you might be left with lots of irrelevant keywords, this is because the tools we use aren’t perfect, and they don’t know your company or your clients as well as you do.

This means it’s time to remove all the unnecessary codswallop from your list.

Now this is the real challenge, that can often be rather time-consuming and manual but in order to get a good understanding of the search volume surrounding the product/service you want to target it’s a necessary step. 

So, buckle up and let us dive into phase two headfirst. 

Step 1: General admin

Paste all of your keywords that you’ve collected into a spreadsheet. Keep all the data that comes with the keywords that AdWords spits out, as this might come in handy with future analysis, however, for the moment we’ll just be focusing on the search volume and the keywords.

Create a filter on the top row, this will be used to search through the dataset throughout.

Delete any keywords with a search volume of 0.

Step 2: Remove duplicates

This is an obvious step but can often be overlooked which leads to rather disastrous implications. Imagine leaving two of the same keywords with large search volumes in a search landscape document could drastically impact your future strategies. Yikes!

In Excel it’s dead easy.

Highlight your dataset, Data > Data Tools > Remove Duplicates

Done. 

Step 3: Remove irrelevant branded keywords

First of all, you need to remove the branded keywords from the dataset. Often when using AdWords, you may find the keywords it spits out is full of brands and other company names. These are phrases that more often than not you won’t rank for and so you’ll want to avoid targeting.

Quickly skim through your dataset making a mental note of any other brand you see. Search for these brands in the search bar and remove all of these from your list. 

Step 4: Remove irrelevant locations

Quite often a few of the usual tools you might use for keyword analysis include locations that are irrelevant. The same scenario as the branded keywords skim through and remove any you won’t be looking to target.

*Handy Tip* 

Sorting your keywords by a-z can help you stop a large chunk of irrelevant keywords in one go, helping to speed up the process.

Step 5: Remove irrelevant years

There’s no use in ranking for top iPhone X deals 2016 this year. It’s 2019, get with the programme sister.

Step 6: Arrange by character length

Keywords that are just 1 word tend to be very generic and can often be extremely hard to rank for. It’s worth removing these from your list as realistically targeting them is going to be a waste of time.

Create a temporary column next to the keyword column insert the following formula 

=LEN(B1)-LEN(SUBSTITUTE(B1,” “,””))+1 to find the number of words in the keywords. Next, order the values in this column and delete any that have just one keyword straight away. This will get rid of a load in one go.

You should also go the opposite way and check for keywords that are too long and delete these too.

Step 7: Correct search intent

Are you looking for informational or commercial keywords, or perhaps both? If you are looking for these get rid of the unnecessary keywords.

*Handy Tip* 

Although you might not need the other keywords, they might come in handy later. Instead of deleting them, copy them into another document. This could save you time during future keyword research.

Step 8: Get manual

Hopefully you should have drastically hacked away at your long list of keywords from your research. Now its time to go through manually and check the words that are left.

This involves scrolling through and checking that the words will provide useful for your needs. Unless you’re a complete master of your subject you’ll need to check lots of these keywords, a simple google to check the SERPs will help you along the way.

I find having two tabs on your screen and a good playlist makes the process more manageable.

So, there you have it, the ultimate guide to filtering and removing unnecessary keywords from your keyword research. Try these techniques to speed up this sometimes-time-consuming process so that you are left with a lovely list of highly relevant keywords.

The post A beginners guide to keyword research part II appeared first on FOUND.

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Every year, Facebook hosts the F8 conference to update developers and creators on new features and the future of the platform. Given the headlines that have dominated in the last year or so, it wasn’t surprising that this year’s keynote from Mark Zuckerberg had a heavy emphasis on the issues of privacy. The overall trend of the conference appeared to be shifting the platform into a more community-led environment.

But what does this mean for marketers? Here are the key takeaways that brands should note of:

Instagram shopping rolls out to influencers. Source: Instagram

Measuring ROI from influencer activity is about to become a lot easier. Having tested the new in-app shopping function with selected brands, influencers and publishers are now going to get in on the action. This will allow influencers to tag products in posts that followers can tap and instantly buy. The feature is still in beta in the US so likely won’t be widely available worldwide for at least a few months, but it does show promise that proving ROI from influencer and Instagram activity is about to become a whole lot easier. 

Paid may be more important than ever due to the shift away from newsfeed.

Facebook had previously said that it intended to move away from the newsfeed format. A new structure has already begun to roll-out, named “FB5”, a cleaner feed with prominent spaces for groups and events. More content from Groups will also start to appear in the newsfeed, suggesting another algorithm change that could have negative impact on organic reach for brand pages. 

Make sure to optimise social for discovery. Source: Facebook

Facebook’s new Events tab is designed to make it easier for users to find out what’s happening in their local area and get recommendations. This offers plenty of opportunities for brands and small businesses to connect with users at a local level. Ensuring that page and location information is up to date and creating event pages for launches or activities will be an even more important part of social media management. 

Opportunities in messaging platforms. Source: Facebook

Messenger will be getting a desktop version that includes features from the app such as audio and video calls. By encouraging desktop use, I wouldn’t be surprised to see some new ad units and formats available for advertisers either.

On the subject of new ad formats, Ads Manager will be getting new lead generation templates designed to drive users into a simple Q&A or book an appointment with businesses on Messenger. 

WhatsApp should also be on the radar for brands, with a new Business Catalogue function that allows users to browse products from within the app. 

Vanity metrics could be on the out.

Instagram chief Adam Mosseri spoke about the popularity of Stories and what could be learned from it. He announced that the platform will be reducing the focus on follower counts and testing hiding the number of likes that content receives. 

Although both are essentially vanity metrics, it’s not clear how this could impact identifying influencers for brand partnerships. Followers and engagement certainly should not be the primary reason to work with someone, particularly with the risk of fraud, but it can be a good indication for who to include on long lists. 

Find the full list of new features and announcements from F8 here: https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2019/04/f8-2019-day-1/

The post All the Facebook F8 announcements you need to care about appeared first on FOUND.

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“Learning to write programs stretches your mind, and helps you think better, creates a way of thinking about things that I think is helpful in all domains.”

Bill Gates, Co-chairman, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Co-founder, Microsoft

This is a call to every digital marketing analyst; from every intern learning the ropes of Google Ads Editor to a veteran SEO director manually grouping keywords, to all content creatives who are simply out of ideas.

You shouldn’t be manually mapping redirect pages – it’s not scalable. If you’re downloading the same data, every month for your monthly reports, well there’s a better way. The way you are writing ad copy is manual when you could be doing it automatically.

You have great ideas. What if you could also access the whole of Reddit in just a few lines of code, map a million redirects in less than an hour or change thousands of lines of ad copy before your next tea break?

Micah Sanders from Heroes. He’s a technopath, which means he can telepathically communicate with technology. Coding with his mind basically.

Learning to code is learning to talk to machines. When you go to another country and speak their language you get a warmer experience. When you converse with your computer in its native tongue, it will extend to you a transformative range of capability.

I’ll just say this. There’s a reason top companies like Stripe teach newcomers to code. Stop searching for other people’s ad scripts and write your own. You have good ideas too and you should be able to see them through. As Found’s data scientist, I believe that you can.

“Learning to code is useful no matter what your career ambitions are.”

Arianna Huffington, Founder, The Huffington Post

Okay so now you’re thinking *but I* could never learn to code. But I’m telling you that if you try, you can do it .

The Internet is awash with online training material and all popular programming languages typically have big, supportive online communities.

If I have convinced you to believe in yourself then read on, otherwise thanks for reading as much as you did.

Where do you start? Online courses are a great place to learn the basics but you learn a lot more effectively by coming up with a project. I think the most important thing you can do is to *complete* some personal projects. You’ll learn way more working on projects you’re interested in than crushing courses online. For me learning is much more permanent when you go through the struggle of trying to solve a problem.

Your project can be anything you want. Personally, I’m working on a side project for our after-work football club at Found that will split the active players into evenly balanced teams based on how they rate each other against a set of skills.

The IT Crowd – my football sentiment.

I will face challenges and frustration along the way, as it goes with learning anything new (albeit my first challenge is not knowing and not wanting to know a thing about football). I’ve never really understood the offside rule but I know it’s just because I don’t want to. It’s all a part of the challenge, on the other side I will know much more than when I started. I’ll be offside myself for having done it.

Just think, today you learn something small, say, how to slice a string. Tomorrow you learn how to make a list of strings. The next day, the thing you’re learning about doesn’t make much sense anymore. Damn that’s frustrating. But picture yourself in a year’s time. Wow you got so good! And you’re saving so much time. All your friends are like, “T-bone, you can code? That’s cool I guess.” They’re acting like they’re not impressed because they’re jealous

Back on track.

“Coding is the language of the future, and every girl should learn it. As I’ve learned from watching girls grow and learn in our classrooms, coding is fun, collaborative and creative.”

Reshma Saujani, Founder, Girls Who Code

So, learn the basics and then learn as you go.

Once you start learning to code, you’re going to run into problems that you don’t know how to solve. This is normal and part of the process. Like I said, you don’t really learn unless you struggle through it. That said, you won’t always be able to move forward without some help. So how do you find that help?

First off, forget books. They aren’t a great place to start here, because the number and types of errors they can cover is so small and specific.

Online is the easiest place to find help. Most devs look for solutions on Stack Overflow (SO) or just google the error message (if they have one). Tip: using Google to search Stack Overflow often yields more relevant results than searching SO itself. Other solutions are to find newsgroups or forums dedicated to the language you’re using.

The startup cost may be high but you’ll thank yourself in the long run. Repeating processes in the same old way you’re accustomed to might feel quicker than sitting down and learning to code, but that is only true at first. Long-term, you will save yourself so much time and be capable of achieving so much more.

There’s a world beyond your spreadsheets. Don’t you dare say VBA, leave that legacy for financial institutions. The ability to code is like having a superpower. Things that took you five days to do can be cut down to five seconds. You don’t need to learn how to build and deploy complex machine learning apps, but wouldn’t the ability to take a set of data and take it by the horns multiply your employability and productivity? You’re not looking to usurp the role of data scientists, you’re dominating the digital marketing skills pool.

“That’s me taking the bull by the horns. It’s how I handle my business. It’s a metaphor. But that really happened.” – DodgeBall: A True Underdog Story.

Honestly, you don’t need to have a computer science degree to get stuck into coding. If you try it and give it a good go but decide it’s not for you, programming will dramatically improve your way of thinking anyway. You will have lost nothing by trying.

In my opinion, a coding junior is better than any spreadsheet wizard because their means of accomplishing tasks is so much more efficient and full of potential. The time stone, when wielded properly, can reveal many different futures; it would definitely foretell one future a year from now where you learned to code and became awesome.

“Whether you want to uncover the secrets of the universe, or you just want to pursue a career in the 21st century, basic computer programming is an essential skill to learn.”

Stephen Hawking, Theoretical Physicist, Cosmologist, Author

If I have convinced you to dip a toe then congratulations and I have three options to help you get started, in no particular order.

JavaScript

Get started with programming straight in your browser with JavaScript. It’s fun and mainly used for front-end development i.e. making websites look awesome and do all the cool things. A good foundation in JS will set you up to grasp Google Analytics, Google Tag Manager and Google Ads/Sheets scripts with a high level of proficiency.

JavaScript – https://scrimba.com/g/gintrotojavascript

R

Is there a way to order pizza with R? The answer is, of course, “Of course there is a way to order pizza. This *is* R.” R might be a little tricky to pick up at first; it has an incredibly supportive and active community and you can do anything from simple data tasks to machine learning to beautiful visualisations to self-contained, scalable web applications. BBC use R to produce their data visualisations. The Coursera course run by John Hopkins University in the US is the place to get stuck in.

R Prohttps://www.coursera.org/learn/r-programming


Python

Everybody talks about Python and there’s a reason for that.  The choice between R and Python will come down to personal preference, intended use or just what your colleagues around you tend to use more often. It makes sense to go with Python if your data team like to use Python as well.

There are a few good places to start that I’d recommend here:

MiT  Computer Science Intro Course on EdX (my personal favourite): https://www.edx.org/course/introduction-to-computer-science-and-programming-using-python-0

Google’s Python Intro Class they give to their employees:

https://developers.google.com/edu/python/

The post You can learn to code appeared first on FOUND.

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TikTok (formally Musical.ly) has been grabbing a lot of headlines over the past few months due to its rapid growth and safety fears. With over 500 million monthly active users worldwide, it’s certainly starting to capture the attention of brands looking to reach social audiences in new and engaging ways. But should you be including it in your social strategy?

2018 – the year Tik Tok blew up

Tik Tok has risen to staggering heights very quickly, with the app now having been downloaded over 1 billion times. According to Business Insider, over 664 million of those downloads came in 2018, resulting in it beating Instagram for yearly downloads in the on-going race for dominance in the social platform arena.

As far as non-game app downloads go for 2018, only WhatsApp, Facebook and Facebook Messenger were able to beat Tik Tok – which came in at an impressive 4th place. It’s also worth noting that customers on Tik Tok spent over $50m on App purchases, highlighting the potential that is there for brands capable of influencing consumer intent while using the App.

Getting down with the youth

TikTok’s short-form video format is a huge hit with younger audiences, with the majority of engaged users aged 24 and under. While the likes of Facebook and Instagram have wide reaching and established audiences, TikTok’s appeal to the younger demographics offers unique opportunities for brands to connect with the typically harder to reach youth market.

One brand that was quick to adopt the platform was Guess, who launched the #InMyDenim hashtag challenge. The campaign featured a branded Guess video on the app for 24 hours, inviting all users to participate in the challenge and engage with the brand. Results were incredibly positive, attracting over 25 million impressions, 5,550 challenge responses and a click through rate of 16.5%.

Aside from branded content campaigns, there is also a huge opportunity to tap into the new social influencers emerging from the platform. Many popular creators can boast over 1 million subscribers and with the platform still being in relative early days, fees are significantly lower compared to working with YouTube or Instagram personalities.

Paid social opportunities

At the start of 2019, TikTok began talking to agencies about plans for a self-managed ads platform. The pitch deck (published on Digiday) included options for brand takeovers, in-feed videos, hashtag challenges and custom lenses.

Source: Tik Tok

At the moment, TikTok’s ads offering appears to still be in Beta but it is clear that they intend to roll out some sort of service this year. However, until issues with verifying users’ ages have been addressed, options will likely be limited for brands.

If you’re keen to explore options on TikTok and youth marketing for your brand, get in touch and our team will be happy to help.

The post Tik Tok – Why It Should Be On Your Radar appeared first on FOUND.

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With a 1,500% increase in searches for ‘influencer marketing’ in the past 3 years, finding the best platform to host your influencer campaigns has never been more important.

There’s several to choose from including Facebook, TikTok and Snapchat -but the two leading the race are most definitely Instagram and YouTube.

But what are the real differences, if any, between these two platforms, which are home to millions of content creators?

Instagram:

Instagram should be thought of as 2019’s equivalent of a glossy magazine. Instagram is one of the most commonly used platforms of our generation which resulted in over 2,114,307 posts disclosing a brand partnership via #ad in 2018, according to the Klear State of Influencer Marketing Report.

Credit: Jakob Owens

Instagram is loved by content creators and influencer marketers because it offers:

  • Highly digestible content.
  • Easily understood insights and report metrics.
  • Ability for brands to organically repost content with ease as well as white label content for paid social where applicable.
  • Low cost to work with influencers when compared to other platforms including YouTube.

As well as this, most brands have an Instagram presence of their own which means that by working with influencers on this platform can also grow their own follower count thanks to tagging and brand mentions by the creators.

YouTube:

YouTube has stolen our attention for different reasons. It’s an entirely different beast in the sense that we don’t particularly care if the content is easily digestible, in fact we want the opposite. With over 1.9 billion users logged in monthly and 8/10 of 18-49 year olds consuming YouTube hosted content monthly, many of us are now opting for YouTube over TV.

We want to binge on long form content from our favourite creators and the longer the better, much similar to Netflix. This has led to brands wanting to capitalise on this, and rightly so.

Credit: Leon Bublitz via Unsplash.com

YouTube has been the platform preference for thousands of influencer campaigns thanks to its:

  • Informative nature – if your product has lots of note-worthy features YouTube is your winner. This is why it is particularly popular for tech focused brands and products.
  • Long life span – the beauty of YouTube is your content doesn’t get lost on an ever-growing feed. Instead, if you tag your content correctly your videos can still be visible in years to come.
  • Ability to provide sales – thanks to the ability to provide direct links in the description box, creators on YouTube just need to ask users to scroll down to buy the products/services mentioned in their video. An easier option that linking in the bio of an Instagram profile or alternatively linking in IG stories which vanish after 24 hours.

So, what do we recommend for our clients and future clients? The answer is unfortunately there is no one size fits all. Every platform has pros and cons. Every campaign should be bespoke, and this should even apply to the platform it lives on.

For example, if you are a tech brand who have a new cutting-edge product that has endless features, I would suggest a YouTube first approach and focus on working with influencers who live and breathe tech as only they will do your product justice. If the same tech brand has launched a product that is more focused on aesthetics and doesn’t require deep dive into its features, explore the opportunities that Instagram can offer. Seed your product to influencers and content creators of all genres, tech, lifestyle, home, travel etc. Don’t pigeon hole yourself. If your target audience is not niche, don’t work with niche influencers on niche channels and platforms. 

Regardless of the platform you chose, creativity and authenticity cannot be compromised on, these two factors are still key ingredients in the recipe of a successful campaign. If you’d like to get some more information for what is going to best work for your next big campaign, reach out and contact us today!

The post Influencer Marketing: It’s an Instagram Vs YouTube World appeared first on FOUND.

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With a 1,500% increase in searches for ‘influencer marketing’ in the past 3 years, finding the best platform to host your influencer campaigns has never been more important.

There’s several to choose from including Facebook, TikTok and Snapchat -but the two leading the race are most definitely Instagram and YouTube.

But what are the real differences, if any, between these two platforms, which are home to millions of content creators?

Instagram:

Instagram should be thought of as 2019’s equivalent of a glossy magazine. Instagram is one of the most commonly used platforms of our generation which resulted in over 2,114,307 posts disclosing a brand partnership via #ad in 2018, according to the Klear State of Influencer Marketing Report.

Credit: Jakob Owens

Instagram is loved by content creators and influencer marketers because it offers:

  • Highly digestible content.
  • Easily understood insights and report metrics.
  • Ability for brands to organically repost content with ease as well as white label content for paid social where applicable.
  • Low cost to work with influencers when compared to other platforms including YouTube.

As well as this, most brands have an Instagram presence of their own which means that by working with influencers on this platform can also grow their own follower count thanks to tagging and brand mentions by the creators.

YouTube:

YouTube has stolen our attention for different reasons. It’s an entirely different beast in the sense that we don’t particularly care if the content is easily digestible, in fact we want the opposite. With over 1.9 billion users logged in monthly and 8/10 of 18-49 year olds consuming YouTube hosted content monthly, many of us are now opting for YouTube over TV.

We want to binge on long form content from our favourite creators and the longer the better, much similar to Netflix. This has led to brands wanting to capitalise on this, and rightly so.

Credit: Leon Bublitz via Unsplash.com

YouTube has been the platform preference for thousands of influencer campaigns thanks to its:

  • Informative nature – if your product has lots of note-worthy features YouTube is your winner. This is why it is particularly popular for tech focused brands and products.
  • Long life span – the beauty of YouTube is your content doesn’t get lost on an ever-growing feed. Instead, if you tag your content correctly your videos can still be visible in years to come.
  • Ability to provide sales – thanks to the ability to provide direct links in the description box, creators on YouTube just need to ask users to scroll down to buy the products/services mentioned in their video. An easier option that linking in the bio of an Instagram profile or alternatively linking in IG stories which vanish after 24 hours.

So, what do we recommend for our clients and future clients? The answer is unfortunately there is no one size fits all. Every platform has pros and cons. Every campaign should be bespoke, and this should even apply to the platform it lives on.

For example, if you are a tech brand who have a new cutting-edge product that has endless features, I would suggest a YouTube first approach and focus on working with influencers who live and breathe tech as only they will do your product justice. If the same tech brand has launched a product that is more focused on aesthetics and doesn’t require deep dive into its features, explore the opportunities that Instagram can offer. Seed your product to influencers and content creators of all genres, tech, lifestyle, home, travel etc. Don’t pigeon hole yourself. If your target audience is not niche, don’t work with niche influencers on niche channels and platforms. 

Regardless of the platform you chose, creativity and authenticity cannot be compromised on, these two factors are still key ingredients in the recipe of a successful campaign. If you’d like to get some more information for what is going to best work for your next big campaign, reach out and contact us today!

The post Influencer Marketing: It’s an Instagram Vs YouTube World appeared first on FOUND.

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Another awards ceremony and ANOTHER win for Found.

The end of 2018 saw a flurry of award wins for the Found Team, with us winning the Best PPC Campaign and the Best Use of Search (Retail) for our work with client Bonmarché, at the 2018 UK Search Awards. Also, our very own CEO, Tina Judic, was awarded Marketing Agency Leader of the Year at The Drum Agency Business Awards.

Last week it was time for The Drum Search Awards 2019. Not wanting to buck the trend, we are delighted to announce we’ve been awarded the trophy for Best B2C Campaign – SEO, for our work with AllClear. A fantastic achievement and one that we’re all extremely proud of here at Found.

Credit: Dom Martin

If you’d like to have a chat about how we can assist you with your digital marketing campaigns, reach out andconnect with us today.

The post Found Wins At The Drum Search Awards 2019 appeared first on FOUND.

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