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In this episode, I answer a listener question with the listener on the line!

My friend Nicky Roberts (near-miss Welsh learner of the year 2018) meet up with me at last year's Welsh national festival and during our long chat he asked this question:

When do you stop being a learner and consider yourself a speaker?

Is it a problem to hold on to your identity as a "learner" and hide from speaking your target language?

This week, I brought Nicky to the show to talk about it.

Thank you to Nicky for this episode introduction.

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Special Guest: Nicky Roberts.

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“The merit of all things lies in their difficulty.”

  • Alexandre Dumas

In this podcast, Lindsay and I discuss what makes a language easy or hard to learn, and share our own Top 5 easiest languages. Listen to find out more.

Want to Join The Discussion?

We have a full blog article to go with this episode, where you can leave a comment to tell us your own thoughts:
Click or tap here to read the full blog article on www.fluentlanguage.co.uk

Thank you to the Fluent Language Learners Facebook Group for their contributions. You can join this group if you also want to talk about languages over there and check in regularly with other learners.

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

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In today's episode, my retreat group from the summer retreat in Munich

  • What happens when you only speak your target language for a week?
  • How do you prepare for a language retreat?
  • What is the most important mindset you can have while doing language immersion?
  • What happens after the retreat?

My guests also share tips on creating an immersion environment no matter where you live.

Are you eager to experience a language retreat for yourself?

Head to www.fluentlanguage.co.uk/retreats to discover the upcoming retreats - in Hamburg (June 2019) and the Loire Valley (June 2019).

Special Guests: Anne Semmler and Renato and Cristina.

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Don't forget that German Uncovered is open for enrolment - check it out here. The course closes on April 11.

This episode, I'm bringing you an interview with experimental psychologist and author Dr Roger Kreuz. Along with Richard Roberts, Roger is the co-author of my favourite language learning book ever, Becoming Fluent.

“People think about fluency as perfection as opposed to something that’s achievable by almost anybody with some effort. There really is a different way of thinking about it that makes all this much more achievable.”
Roger Kreuz

I've previously raved about this book on my blog (see link section), and in this interview I was excited to get the opportunity to discuss the psychology of language learning with Roger.

Click here to get my free Becoming Fluent book notes and action plan

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Special Guest: Roger Kreuz.

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Click or tap here to get the free guide to building your language learning habit

Thank you to Bonnie Z for this episode introduction.

Today’s question comes from Elizabeth - here's a summary of what she's asking:

I am attempting to learn Japanese. I’m trying out different methods in order to establish a routine that works best for me. This is starting to frustrate me because I feel like I am going in circles without making any real progress in the language.

I absolutely love Japan, and so I’m trying hard to stay motivated and keep going, but the lack of progress is starting to zap my enthusiasm.

Is this type of “wheel spinning” typical when you are a first time, self-directed language learner?

OMG ELIZABETH I LOVE THIS QUESTION!!!!!!

You’re taking your first baby steps into indie learning and choosing what is right for you, and that’s just super strong and amazing.

In today’s episode, I’ll take the opportunity to talk you through a few key steps as I teach them in the Language Habit Toolkit, my all-in-one package to help you create a great language learning routine.

The idea of this language HABIT is so important because of what a good habit signifies.

5 Steps To Establishing Your Language Learning Habit Assess your resources - are they right?

You want a guiding resource, some input resources, and a few reference materials.
Learn more about this in my blog article "No More Hoarding!".

Aim for higher levels of COMFORT not skill Work with the right goals

There are two types of goals you need for language learning:
Vision Goals and Path Goals

Track what you do

If your goal is the habit, progress is coming closer to the language being an absolutely irremovable part of your life. Progress isn’t always about knowing one more word of vocabulary, but instead about one tiny little degree of comfort.

My most basic check-in is the “daily contact”, keeping me feeling accomplished even on super busy days.

Review Regularly

This is where we find out what’s real and what’s not, and that means whether you are actually spinning your wheels. The key is to answer questions like

  • What went well, what didn’t go well
  • Was there any surprise
  • What do I want to do next
  • Where am I in relation to my goals

TRUST IN YOURSELF you’re doing an awesome job Elizabeth!!

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

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Inspired by one of the discussion panels at Women in Language, Lindsay and I dedicated this episode to creativity in language learning.

We shared 9 cool ideas that you can use for your own language learning routine, and then got to the deeper question:

Why do you feel like creative language learning activities aren't "real learning?"

Make sure you read the in-depth blog article on fluentlanguage.co.uk to join our conversation about creative language learning routines.

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Get in Touch

Send us an email to kerstin@fluentlanguage.co.uk or say hi on Twitter (@thefluentshow) or Instagram (#thefluentshow).

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¡Hola Radioyentes!

This week I'm answering a listener question (asked in Spanish AND English!):

 When is it the right time to start learning another language?

The question came from Tomás, 45 years old and a native speaker of Spanish. Tomás has good English and regular exposure through books and TV, but he feels unsure about whether he's ready to add a new language like German or English.

This has happened to me a few times, and I’ve also studied up to 3 languages at the same time.

In this episode, I reflected on what matters most when you are facing this question and shared 3 core rules for you:

1. When you don’t practice a language, you’ll lose a bit of it

Not practicing a language doesn’t mean that you’ll never remember it again. In fact, you are unlikely to ever go all the way back to zero.

But it does mean that your progress will slow down and if you don’t do anything, it means that you will forget some of what you practiced in the language most recently. Remembering that memory is all about repetition and exposure, it seems likely that you’d lose what you were last exposed to.

So maybe as a rule of thumb expect that you’ll step down one level. But if you’re already a few years in, you won’t lose all those years.

If you stop actively studying after 3 months = it can feel like nothing sticks.
If you stop actively studying after 5 years = it will not all disappear.

2. Make sure you adjust your expectations for both languages

You could be learning five, ten languages at once and in fact there are ways in which this will absolutely propel you forward. But don’t expect the results of a sprint when you are in fact practicing a triathlon. Progress is not linear - it’s not always what you expect or predict, and often your destination changes

3. Declare your intentions

Once you have worked out your goals and you got in touch with what you really want, you get to decide and move forward. Your decision is not forever.

And as far as I can see, you are in an absolutely perfect position. Good luck!

Support This Podcast

Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

Thank you to Maria for this episode introduction.

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Alessia, 17 from Verona asks:

How to switch quickly from a language to another? Is it just a question of practice?

Click or tap here to read the full show notes in my blog article on www.fluentlanguage.co.uk

The short answer is that yes, there’s a huge element of practice involved. Sorry, no one likes to hear that there isn’t a secret shortcut!

But that doesn’t mean we can’t look into a few ways to practice that could help you get more comfortable and process language faster. Listen in to hear my tips and ideas for switching as efficiently as possible.

Thank you to Rebecca from Irregular Endings for this episode introduction.

Support This Podcast
Like all podcasts, the Fluent Show is supported by your online reviews and word of mouth.

If you liked this episode, please tell someone about it. Click here to tweet about the show, go to your Podcasts app and leave us a review, or simply text a friend about the Fluent Show. Thank you!

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