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Making consistently delicious espresso coffee at home should be enjoyable and easy to repeat. But while a repeatable system is key, it can also lead to getting stuck in unnecessary habits without taking time to step back and consider what could be changed to make your coffee taste even better. You’ll never hear us say that there is one unchanging ‘best’ way to make espresso because the wonderful world of coffee preparation is all about improvement. What the industry deemed best practice 5 years ago is most definitely different today — and will probably be vastly different in another 5 years. With that in mind, here are five simple changes that will make your coffee taste better at home. And they might even make the process a little easier.

Weigh grinds (coffee in).

Weigh beverage (coffee out).

#1 Worth the weight

Baristas in super busy specialty coffee cafes use scales to measure two important variables: dose into your portafilter and dose out into your cup (the yield). And here’s the thing — if a café using 50+ kilos a day can fit weighing into their work flow, then there’s no reason why a home barista can’t do it either. If you want to take your home espresso to the next level, then dosing in and out is of utmost importance. For dosing in, you need to either get yourself a scale to weigh the coffee grinds going into your portafilter or dosing cup. Or you could simply buy a grinder that weighs for you; did someone say Baratza Sette 270Wi? For weighing out, there’s no better scale than the Acaia Lunar. You’ll also notice that we provide suggested espresso recipes for every one of our coffees. As a general rule, just go with 22g in, 44g out in 29 seconds.

#2 Get Smart

We all want to be environmentally responsible these days, but the flipside of turning your coffee machine off to save energy is the painful wait for it to warm up first thing in the morning. Perhaps it’s time to step into the 21st century and get yourself a Wi-Fi enabled Smart wall plug so you can turn your coffee machine on and or off at any time, from anywhere in the world. You can even use the Smart plug app to set a custom on/off schedule. This app is so intuitive that you can even set weather scenarios (when the temp drops below X, turn my coffee machine on), but that feature is probably best used with your electric blanket ( thank me later). So, no more waiting for your machine to warm up when inviting friends over or saying, “Hey honey, did you turn the coffee machine off?” while lying on a beach in the Maldives. Just open the app and voila! And for those super lazy ones out there; if the thought of opening the app is too annoying, just ask Google, Siri or Alexa to turn it on for you. They’ve got your back.

Image credit: @peak_water

#3 Better water, better coffee

Espresso is made of two ingredients — coffee and water. And one of them is widely neglected: water. It really is a crucial ingredient as it has enormous influence on the final taste. Otherwise you’ll find yourself using good ol’ tap water and wondering why your coffee tastes like you’re licking the back of a spoon. The solution? Ensure you use quality filtered water. Options range from an undercounter water filtration system that can also be tapped for drinking water to a standalone water jug with an inbuilt filter that you can buy from any supermarket. There’s even a coffee version hitting the market in the coming months which you may be interested in: Peak Water Jug.

#4 Heat your cups

Debate rages around how much you should heat your cups and which part of the cup you should heat. There’s no debate, however, around the overall concept. It’s widely accepted that pre-warming your cups creates the perfect receptacle for delicious coffee. The temperature of your espresso largely affects its flavour profile, and a perfect shot hitting a cold cup can immediately affect your coffee’s body and sweetness. This is why most people prefer to drink their espresso immediately and why good baristas mix in steamed milk immediately after brewing. So how do you heat your cups?

Option #1 is to store them on top of your espresso machine on the designated rack for cup warming and storage.

Option #2 is to half fill your cups with hot water from your hot water spout or kettle. Personally, I like this method as it creates the perfect warm bed of ceramic for my espresso to cascade into, but doesn’t overheat the rim of my cup for when I devour it. But just remember with this method that if you’re drawing the water out of the hot water spout of your espresso machine, you will need to give it a bit of time to heat back up to temp.

#5 Grind on demand

I decided to make this my last point on purpose because I’m sure 99% of readers already do this . But if not —

STOP USING PRE-GROUND COFFEE!!

You’re better than that! Honestly! I can’t emphasise enough how critical this is. Buying pre-ground coffee will accelerate the staling process in a big way. It’s like leaving your bread exposed on the counter overnight and expecting your sandwich to be soft and fresh the next day. With pre-ground coffee, the first thing you’ll notice is that the grinds will lose their fragrance. As does your brewed coffee. The resulting brew is often referred to as ‘flat’. As the natural oils in coffee oxidise, the flavour of the brew changes considerably, from pleasant to unpleasant — it can even become offensive and rancid. For the 1% out there who are still buying pre-ground, it’s time to treat your coffee like all your other produce because #freshisbest. If you’ve read this article to this point, and if you’re in the market for a domestic grinder, send us an email with the secret password ‘Purple Monkey’ and we’ll reward with a 10% off deal. You’ll notice the difference instantly. Promise!

Perhaps it’s time to take a step back from your espresso making routine and evaluate the reasons behind some of your steps. The five improvements mentioned above could help, or there could be others. Most importantly, be open to new ideas and new techniques. But remember: every idea or change needs to be backed with a reason why. So if it’s advice from a friend, a pro-barista or even the internet, just ask why. And if you want to know what we teach, you can book into one of our Fundamentals: Espresso barista courses or check out this summary article: How to make killer espresso.

The post Five tips to make your morning coffee taste better. appeared first on Five Senses Coffee.

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Five Senses Coffee by Hannah Sexton - 1M ago

Drinking coffee and impacting people positively is literally Five Senses’ two favourite things. So it’s no surprise we get incredibly excited when CafeSmart rolls around – circle Friday 9 August 2019 on your calendars!

Friday 9 August 2019, lock it in!

Here’s how you can support this great initiative:

Cafes: sign up and rally your customers!
Coffee Lovers: find a participating cafe and enjoy a delicious coffee!

CafeSmart + Five Senses: Impact Report 2018

In 2018, we recruited 58 wholesale cafes to signup for CafeSmart, rasing $14,761 in funds for local grassroots homeless services. One of the things we love about CafeSmart, is that funds raised go to grassroots projects in their local area! Here’s just some of the great things achieved through last year’s campaign:

Yellow Bernard, Hobart TAS – $1,543.65 raised

($963 via coffee sales and $580.65 customer donations)
Helped Support: All Round Health – Homeless Healthcare are a mobile street clinic, helping those that are sleeping rough on the streets of Hobart. This program receives no government funding and relies on clinical staff volunteering their time and funds from events like CafeSmart. With flu cases (and death toll) surging across Australia, the work these folk do to administer fluvax shots to those most at risk is as crucial as ever.

“The Street Clinic receives no government funding – the response we received was that it was ‘too innovative’, and that Hobart doesn’t have a homelessness problem. So StreetSmart funding is vital to our service. Last year funds went to having more bandages, flu shots, antibiotics and other consumables, as most interventions entail a form of wound dressing.

On our run we catch up with those that do not access any social services and just touch base and ensure all is well. On occasion we may provide antibiotics, it is this cohort of people that the equipment will be most beneficial for. Then we head out to some neighbouring suburbs for those that are in living in their cars. On our route we may also deviate as the regulars that we meet may advise us of a new person that has arrived, and we will go and find them.”
David Patras, All Round Health and Community Care -Tasmania

Blk.Mlk Specialty Coffee, Mildura VIC – $630 raised

Helped Support: Zoe Support Australia provides pre-birth support for young, pregnant women in Mildura. They currently work with close to 200 vulnerable young mothers and children who need support.

“CafeSmart donations contributed to the ongoing role of the Housing case manager, to address the demand for sustainable private rental assistance for young homeless mothers focusing on long term sustainability for current leases. The manager will also coordinate essential material supplies to assist the young women and their babies.”
Anne Webster, Zoe Support

Little Angel, Perth WA – $495 raised

Helped Support: Street Law WA who provide free access to specialist legal services for those experiencing homelessness. CafeSmart funding help them to assist young people who are experiencing homelessness requiring mental health support with legal advice and ongoing casework assistance.

Primal Joes, Cronulla NSW – $403 raised

Helped Support: Dandelion Support Network works with many support agencies and social workers to provide items greatly needed for struggling families. Accepting donations, volunteers then process and pack support bundles – making sure all items donated are in good working order. Many of these items are critical to the health and safety of babies and children – think highchairs, car seats, prams, bedding, toys and baby clothes.

John Mills Himself, Brisbane QLD – $581 raised

Helped Support: Youth Housing Project offer support services designed to assist homeless young people to make the transition to an independent, self-managed lifestyle. In particular, the funds raised from CafeSmart went towards suppling household items to young people moving into the Youth Housing Project so that they can make their unit a home. The young people can then take these items when the move on from Youth Housing Project into their independent homes!

The post CafeSmart 2019 appeared first on Five Senses Coffee.

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‘A clean machine is a happy machine’. It’s undoubtedly true that machines which are cleaned properly will produce better tasting coffee. Getting rid of all the gunk that builds up in the internal parts of the machine will ensure your coffee tastes its sweetest. It will also reduce the bitterness caused by the build-up of coffee oils. Just as importantly, a well-maintained coffee machine will run more smoothly and last for longer between services, servicing the machine will also be easier and major problems will be less likely to happen (although they still can).

But how do you clean a coffee machine properly? Surprisingly, many baristas (pro or home enthusiasts) haven’t been trained to perform this essential duty correctly. Follow the easy steps below to make sure you’re performing this vital function properly.

Clean your portafilters

The first job is to clean the portafilters. Traditionally, baristas have been trained to soak their portafilters in a bucket of chemicals for ten minutes. Below is a newer method which is faster, easier and more effective at cleaning the inner spout area of the portafilter. Doing this daily will ensure that grime doesn’t build up in those hard-to-reach places.

  1. Place half a scoop of cleaning chemical in each filter basket.
  2. Insert portafilters into the group head and dispense water from the group for 30 seconds.
  3. Remove portafilters and rinse using the water tap on the espresso machine. This step is to remove external oil and soap.
  4. Remove the basket and wipe it clean all over – both the group handle and basket should be free of oil.
  5. Use your bench cloth to wipe the group head seals. (Be careful; they’re hot.)
Backflush

To clean the internal parts of your espresso machine, you need to follow a process called ‘backflushing’. Every time the pump of a coffee machine turns off after making an espresso, the machine draws a bit of coffee and water back inside the group head due to a siphon effect. Backflushing with chemicals helps to remove any oils or grime which build up in the internal piping of the group heads. Coffee cleaning chemicals are typically quite strong products, and we don’t want any residue to be left in the internal part of the machine. For this reason, a rinse cycle backflush is an important follow up process.

  1. Place half a scoop of cleaning chemical in each blind filter basket.
  2. Insert portafilters into the group head. (Lock them tightly.)
  3. Activate the group heads for ten seconds, and then deactivate for ten seconds.
  4. Cycle the group heads on and off three times.
  5. Remove the blind portafilters and dispense water from the group head for ten seconds. Then rinse out the blind portafilters.
  6. Insert clean portafilters into the group heads and repeat the backflush process without chemicals to rinse the insides of your espresso machine.
Clean your group heads

Depending on the manufacturer of your espresso machine, the shower screens of the group heads may be held in place by a screw. If this is the case, you need to drop the shower screen to clean it because grime builds up there daily. In addition, you need to clean the group heads’ rubber seals with a cloth to remove any ground coffee that has built up there as well.

  1. Wipe the shower screen with your bench cloth.
  2. Using a screwdriver, remove the shower screen screws.
  3. Place the screws on the top grate of the coffee machine (so you don’t lose them.)
  4. Rinse and wipe the shower screens under running water.
  5. Use your bench cloth to wipe the group-head seals. (Be careful; they’re hot.)
  6. Re-attach the shower screens to the group head and screw them in until they’re just tight.

We recommend performing the above sequence daily in a café environment, and at least once a week for the home barista. Here’s to enjoying great coffee from a machine that’s in tip-top condition.

For an downloadable version of the above brew guide, click below. Or mention it on your next coffee order as we’d be happy to include this handy little postcard that can sit by your espresso machine.

Note: this article was originally posted in 2017, but has since been refreshed.

The post Machine Cleaning: A lean, clean coffee machine appeared first on Five Senses Coffee.

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A relationship that turns out to be solid, year after year, especially when it spans the globe is something special. We’ve been buying from SanCoffee in Brazil since 2012, and we’re looking forward to continued involvement – so let’s get to know this steady relationship better!

Brazil is built for relationships.

Brazil is the coffee economic powerhouse of the world and, while they lack the high altitudes many other growing regions around the world enjoy, they more than make up for it with their amazingly efficient operations, organised production lines and the application of precision agronomy and processing. Not many countries can match the scale of production, the volumes produced and the consistency delivered. Applying good business practices, both with the coffee production and the profitability for the farm, means relationships with producing groups can be beautifully stable – but don’t mistake that for low quality commercial green or ‘boring’ coffees!

SanCoffee and friends.

SanCoffee is a producer group based in Santo Antonio de Amparo, located in southern Minas Gerais, Brazil. Comprised of over 20 fazendas (estates), many of whom are well known in their own right; often placing in the Brazil Cup of Excellence. Some of these estates might even ring a bell – Samambaia, Guariroba, Mumbuca, and Vila Boa to name a few!

So SanCoffee is a COLLECTIVE and the estates supply coffee that SanCoffee then mills and exports, right? Kinda.

Most coffee is sold through SanCoffee, but estates also have the option of selling their coffee separately. For example, Henrique Dias Cambraia (you may remember him from our MICE stand) is the president of SanCoffee and the family owner of Fazenda Samambaia. He supplies to SanCoffee, but keeps some lots separate to sell as Samambaia, and has recently been experimenting with processing methods which we have purchased directly from him. Several of these lots featured both at MICE and in our Limited Release program – examples of estate coffees sourced at a higher quality scale.

The SanCoffee Lab

Richo Cupping - 2016

Cupping - 2013

How SanCoffee benefits estates.

Short answer: more resources and shared knowledge. SanCoffee have a centralised lab, warehouse and dry mill, as well as a dedicated team of Q Graders who manage the quality for all the member estates. Working as a group through the central lab enables estates to share and gain from the collective’s many years of combined experience. More so, having total control of their warehouse and dry mill enables complete traceability and precise milling specifications for customers. The specialty graded coffee comes into the warehouse where samples are kept and profiles noted. There are shelves on a giant wall in the cupping lab where each estates’ name is listed, along with descriptions of the various coffees they offer. From here, companies like us work with the lab and choose the coffees which best fulfill the taste profiles we are looking for.

Mechanical harvesters.

Washing vats at Samambaia, human for scale.

Meticulously planted seedlings

As these estates are run like small factories, technology and agronomy have become key to maintaining quality. You’ll find some of the team working closely with the IAC (Instituto Agriconomico de Campinas), a coffee research institute in Brazil. In a meticulously kept nursery, different coffee varieties, not yet used commercially, are grow and evaluated. SanCoffee have also moved to storing all their coffee in giant polypropylene bags. One of these large bags can house about 60 normal jute bags. The benefits of this are two-fold; it reduces the storage space needed and are made of much better material for storing coffee – the polypropylene bags are firmly woven together, giving just a bit of breath-ability.

Beyond the benefits already listed, SanCoffee as a collaborative export partnership have managed to mitigate the influence of a dangerously low market price. And in most cases, premiums to growers are 30-50% higher than both the local and C price market rates. SanCoffee and its members continue to mobilise and collaborate to strengthen the ability for its members to sell at above local market rates, in turn championing economic sustainability.

The Estates.

A producer group who can provide consistent large volumes of coffee alongside some innovative and awarding winning smaller lots is every coffee buyer’s dream! SanCoffee and the member estates, supply the backbone of some of well-love house blends, as well as some bangin’ lots both as single varietals and experimental processing types.


Santo Antonio Estates
This is a blend of member’s coffee and forms the tasty base of our Crompton Road blend. Ultra reliable and consistent, this blend is created each year for us to hit a certain flavour profile from SanCoffee’s base of producers/members. You know how we have house blends that aim to hit a taste profile all year round, regardless off the different origins that go into it? Similar concept!

Henrique Dias Cambraia, 2011

Samambaia field label - 2013

The beautiful converted guest house, built ~ 1900s

Fazenda Samambaia
Both gorgeously kept and historic, this estate is operated by Henrique Cambraia. We’ve got a couple of coffees from this estate – the larger lot is a natural processed single variety called Topazio. This variety has been sourced for its inherent ability to perform both as a base and with a surprising level of sweetness and deep complexity. As Samambaia processes all their own lots, it is the central hub from which many experimental lots are produced including all the lots we have featured both as Limited Release and at MICE this year.

Fazenda Guariroba
While we don’t usually purchase directly from this estate, when our friends at SanCoffee mentioned they have placed 8th in this year’s COE, we jumped at the chance to support the group! Fazenda Guariroba is owned by Homero Aguiar Paiva, a 5th generation coffee farmer who has purchased this 19th century established farm in more recent times. Homero, a civil engineer by trade continues to progress all quality-driven aspirations of his farm with the help and guidance of his agronomist brother Renato Paiva.

The post Get to know: SanCoffee & friends appeared first on Five Senses Coffee.

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Each year the coffee world descends upon one unsuspecting city, bags full of new products, coffee, and a slew of ideas ready for trade. This year, Boston MA, USA was the unsuspecting location. Five Senses Coffee has made a point of travelling to the SCA Trade show for a number of years now, as we’ve always found the exercise to be incredibly valuable; seeing new products up close with their developers, and conversing one-on-one has helped us immensely in selecting manufacturers to partner with. The two biggest success stories would undoubtedly be our existing relationships with Synesso and Marco Beverage Systems – product manufacturers that we may not have engaged with otherwise.

Today we’re running through the top 5 “things to watch” in the coffee tech landscape. These are the products that take everything we know and love, and add a touch of ingenuity for an even better result.

Image credit: @poursteady

1. The Poursteady

Utilising an undercounter boiler from our ever-reliable friends at Marco, the Poursteady is a fully automated single-cup brewer, with a jet that moves along a conveyor belt, at lightening fast speed to pour 1, 3, or 5 cups of filter coffee at a time! Through a tablet interface, you can choose pour patterns, yield, and time with the ability to load different recipes to each “station”. This unit was first previewed at SCA 2017, however they’re now ready for distribution in Australia – our first unit is on the water as we speak! Follow our Instagram, @5sensescoffee, to catch all the updates.

Poursteady at Supercrown - YouTube

Image credit: @peak_water

2. The Peak Water Jug

Manual brewers rejoice! The molds are made, the injection is happening, and units are shipping in a couple of months! Our first order is in, and you can register your interest here: Peak Water Jug. We spent a solid chunk of time with Maxwell Colonna-Dashwood for the low-down. The Peak is gravity fed and has a slew of different filters and membranes to give you delicious, consistent brewing water. The filter cartridge units are fully replaceable and extremely user friendly. A comprehensive run-through with the mastermind behind this can be found here – (link). Maxwell was super generous with his time in explaining in detail how and why this unit is so great, and we’re extremely happy to be able to share that with you!

Peak Water at SCA 2019 - Vimeo

Peak Water at SCA 2019 from Five Senses Coffee on Vimeo.

Image credit: acaia.co

3. The Acaia Pearl S

Our San Franciscan partners at Acaia back at it again! They originally shot to coffee-fame after a successful Kickstarter campaign for the Pearl scale back in 2013. Since then, the Pearl has received some firmware love, they’ve released the compact Lunar scales that now sit on espresso drip trays around the country, and they’ve teamed up with another one of our key partners, Baratza, to create the ultimate grind-by-weight domestic grinder.

Since then, Acaia have re-imagined the original Pearl scale – now called the Acaia Pearl S. They’ve beefed up the build quality with metal framing, upgraded the smarts inside, and built a new “Brewguide” app to accompany it. This will allow roasters (such as yours, truly!) to upload a brewing recipe to the cloud for home-users to access, upload to their scale, and follow along. The scale will prompt you with instructions as you go along to ensure your coffee is tasting tip-top every time. Our first delivery of these scales are en route with a mid-June/July ETA. Sign up to the wait-list to be notified first when stock arrives: Acaia Pearl S Scale.

Image credit: @cometeer

4. The Cometeer

The “Delivered to your door” style of food supply is about to service the coffee industry. Using a secret brew method, this company will purchase beans and brew it to a roasters’ specifications before reducing to a syrup and snap-freezing it. Paired with a foam box and dry-ice, this bundle is ready to be delivered to your door.

Made to fit into Keurig cup machines (similar to Nespresso), they’re a little different to the pods we’ve seen so far. The coffee pod is left clean, ready for recycling, and the cup quality is far superior to any pod machine I’ve ever tasted. The machine doesn’t actually have to do any brewing – it simply heats up the frozen syrup, ready for serving. They’re not looking at Australia just yet – the debate is out as to whether there is an environmentally and commercially efficient way to deliver such a product within Australia. The price for convenience may be too much to stomach for consumers as we move toward a more environmentally conscious society, but time will tell!

Duvall Machine at SCA 2019

5. The Duvall

Espresso brewing has just been thrown a curveball! The Duvall machine uses a belt-driven, syringe-style pump which allows the machine to control flowrate through pressure exertion. This means brew pressure is truly variable and dependent on your grind setting. Imagine a pretty standard recipe of 44g out over 27 seconds at a standard 9 bar; if your grind setting is too fine, your extraction will still take 27 seconds, but will be exerted to 9+ bar pressure. If your grind setting is drastically too course, you may just brew that shot at as low as 3 bar. This opens the door to all sorts of recipe development options. Availability in Australia remains an unknown at this stage, but until further updates are available, Daily Coffee News did a fantastic write-up on the machine here: Duvall Espresso’s Revolutionary FC-1 Machine Goes With the Flow.

L: Marco FRIIA | R: Ratio 8 Brewer

That’s the wrap! There’s a good dozen honorable mentions, and I could go on for hours about what I saw and loved at the show, but my word-count is long-gone. If you’re looking for more things to get inspired about, consider looking at the Marco Friia Range – dispensing hot, cold and sparking water out of one tap! The Ratio Eight is making batch brewing sexy again, and the new S range from Mazzer is adding some really great user-friendly additions, as well as reducing their grind retention – all with the same Mazzer reliability.

Seeing a world trade show that size and scope, along with the crowds that the World Barista & Brewers Championships brings was certainly a spectacle! It really brings the “who’s who” of coffee out and about, and it was exciting to be given the opportunity to rub shoulders with industry leaders. For those who feel like Boston is a bridge too far, WBC is on home turf next year at the Melbourne International Coffee Exhibition in May 2020. I hope to see you there!

The post SCA Boston: 5 things to watch in coffee tech appeared first on Five Senses Coffee.

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Don’t find yourself staring through the window of a closed cafe over the Easter break… Here’s where to grab a coffee!

Drift ∙ Margaret River
@driftcafe.mr
All weekend: 7am – 2:30pm

Duck Duck Bruce ∙ Fremantle
@duckduckbrucefreo
Good Friday: 8am – 12noon
Sat & Sun: 7am – 3pm
Easter Monday: 8am – 12noon

F5 Coffee Co ∙ Belmont
@f5coffeeco
Good Friday: 7am – 12noon
Saturday: 6am – 3pm
Sunday: 7am – 3pm
Easter Monday: 7am – 12noon

Hoopla Espresso ∙ Kensington
@hoopla_espresso
All weekend: 7am – 1pm

Howdy Coffee ∙ Bayswater
@howdycoffee
Good Friday: 7am – 11am
Saturday: 6:30am – 1pm
Sun & Mon: 7am – 11am

Hush Specialty Coffee ∙ Fremantle
@hushspecialtycoffee
All weekend: 7am – 4pm

Mooba ∙ Wembley
@moobawembley
Good Friday: 8am – 2pm
Saturday: 6:30am – 4pm
Sunday: 8am – 4pm
Easter Monday: 8am – 2pm

Ninth & Merchant ∙ Inglewood
@ninthandmerchant
Good Friday: 8am – 12noon
Saturday: 7am – 10pm
Sunday: 7am – 3pm
Easter Monday: 7am – 12noon

Apollo ∙ West Melbourne
@theapollocafe
All weekend: 8am – 2:30pm

Boosa ∙ Bentleigh East
@boosa716
Good Friday: 7am – 3pm**
Sat- Mon: 8am – 3pm
** $1 from every coffee sold will be donated to Royal Children’s Hospital or Monash Children’s Hospital – your choice!

blk.mlk ∙ Mildura
@blk.mlk_specialty_coffee
All weekend: 8am – 2pm

Coffee Traders ∙ Mornington
@coffeetradersmornington
All weekend: 7am – 4pm

Down The Street ∙ Frankston
@downthestreetfrankston
All weekend: 7am – 1pm

Eden Espresso ∙ Malvern
@edenespresso
All weekend: 8am – 3pm

Lenny ∙ Albert Park
@lenny_3206
All weekend: 8am – 2pm

Miss Ruby ∙ Bentleigh
@missrubycafe
All weekend: 8am – 4pm

Moby ∙ Armadale
@moby3143
All weekend: 8am – 2pm

No. 19 ∙ Ascot Vale
@no.19society
All weekend: 8am – 4pm

Touchwood ∙ Richmond
@touchwoodcafe
All weekend: 8am – 4pm

Willow ∙ Kingsville
@willowkingsville
Good Friday: CLOSED
Saturday: 8am – 3pm
Sunday: 8am – 12noon
Easter Monday: 8am – 3pm

The Brook Eatery ∙ Cherrybrook
@thebrookeatery
Good Friday: 7am – 11pm
Saturday: 7am – 11pm
Sunday: CLOSED
Easter Monday: 7am – 11pm

Elbow Room Espresso ∙ Chatswood
@elbowroomespresso
Good Friday: CLOSED
Saturday: 6am – 3:30pm
Sunday: 6:30am – 3:30pm
Easter Monday: 6am – 3:30pm

Goodfields Eatery ∙ Lindfield
@goodfieldseatery
All weekend: 6am – 5pm

Ooomph ∙ East Gosford
@ooomphcafe
All weekend: 8am – 1pm

ShotLab ∙ Newport
@shotlabespresso
All weekend: 6am – 1pm

Utopia Coffee House ∙ Wollongong
@utopiacoffeehouse
Good Friday: CLOSED
Sat & Sun:: 8am – 3pm
Easter Monday: CLOSED

Valhalla Social ∙ Glebe
@valhallasocial
Good Friday: 7am – 4pm
Saturday: 7am – 4pm
Sunday: 8am – 2pm
Easter Monday: 8am – 3pm

Wedge Espresso ∙ Glebe
@thewedgeespresso
Good Friday: 7am – 4pm
Saturday: 7am – 4pm
Sunday: 8am – 2pm
Easter Monday: 8am – 3pm

West Juliett Cafe ∙ Marrickville
@westjuliettcafe
Good Friday: 8am – 3pm
Saturday: 7am – 4pm
Sunday: 8am – 2pm
Easter Monday: 8am – 3pm

South Australia
CREAM ∙ Brighton SA
@cream_jrb
All weekend: 8am – 4pm

Mad.Good ∙ Highgate SA
@mad.good_cafe
All weekend: 9am – 2pm

Pickle in the Middle ∙ Unley SA
@pickleinthemiddle_
All weekend: 8:30am – 3pm

Pixie and the Hawk ∙ Torrensville SA
@pixieandthehawk
Good Friday: CLOSED
Saturday: 8:30am – 2pm
Sunday: 7:30am – 3pm
Easter Monday: 8:30am – 2pm
Queensland
Morning After ∙ West End QLD
@____morningafter
Good Friday: 7am – 2pm
Saturday: 7am – 2pm
Sunday: CLOSED
Easter Monday: CLOSED

Mr Browns Tuckshop ∙ Labrador QLD
@mrbrownstuckshop
Good Friday: 6am – 11am
Sat & Sun: 6:30am – 1pm
Easter Monday: 6am – 11am
Tasmania
Seven Monks ∙ Kings Meadow TAS
@sevenmonks
Good Friday: CLOSED
Saturday: 7:30am – 2:30pm
Sunday: 8am – 1:30pm
Easter Monday: CLOSED

Sweetbrew ∙ Launceston TAS
@sweetbrewespresso
Good Friday: CLOSED
Sat & Sun: 7am – 2pm
Easter Monday: 7am – 3pm (coffee only)

The post Where to get your coffee fix over Easter 2019 appeared first on Five Senses Coffee.

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Unexpected Beginnings.

Like every good superhero backstory, Communal Shamba came about through a chance encounter with something extraordinary. It’s 2016. Keremba Warioba and Dr Mkunde Chachage, two home-town Tanzanians who had spent the last 10 years working and studying in Melbourne, stumbled in to one of our Curated Cupping events. While their family back home grew coffee, they had virtually no coffee experience – but they had a strong passion for agriculture and social impact. After quite a few discussions, we were inspired to offer support in getting their fledgling business off the ground. In fact, we went all in and committed to purchasing their first harvest, before tasting it. This allowed the growers to make some production changes with a GUARANTEED payment at the end. Luckily, the first delivery was delicious – you may even remember it from our Limited Release line up!

Kerembe & Mkunde – Founders of Communal Shamba

Community Impact.

After returning to Tanzania in 2017, Keremba and Mkunde partnered with co-op Mkulima Kwanza and, two harvests in, the business is bringing recognition and funds into a community historically mired in commercial coffee. It’s not just delicious though – backed by Dr Chachage’s medical know-how, funds from the coffee program are being directed towards much needed local health clinic support. Great coffee and positive impact? Right up our alley!

In 2018, Dr. Mkunde Chachage earned a double recognition as ‘Best Scientist in Tanzania’ by the National Institute For Medical Research (NIMR) and ‘Best Research Scientist’ at her research center for her continuous effort finding permanent solutions for HIV, TB and Co-Infections.

Five Senses on the Ground.

Mid Harvest 2018 and Five Senses visited Mkulima Kwanza, the first ever coffee buyers they’d met. Gathered around the sorting tables, we naturally began to talk of the ripeness of the cherries laid in front of us. These were some of the first conversations about selective picking they’d ever had, but the Mkulima Kwanza leadership immediately took to action and the very next day we were proudly shown bulging bag after bag of pristine, ripe cherries. The results of this selective picking – aptly named Kipenzi or ‘Beloved’ in Swahili – are delicious. This is the kind of coffee we’re super proud of, delivering tasty brews and great results on the livelihoods of the Mkulima Kwanza coop.

Communal Shamba in Aus.

This takes us to MICE 2019, where Kerembe join us to chat all things Communal Shamba. To be drinking a tasting flight of ultra small lot coffees, while casually chatting to the guy who made it happen, is an uncommon experience in the greater specialty coffee world. With so much love flying around the stand for the work Communal Shamba do, and with 20% of all coffee sold at the stand going to help build a local health clinic, we’re looking forward to a happy, healthy & delicious future in Tanzania!

The Coffees.

Coffee always will be a seasonal product and have limited availability, but we’re proud to offer the following coffee:

Kipenzi

Previous coffees from Communal Shamba we’ve featured:

Communal Shamba

The post Get to Know: Communal Shamba appeared first on Five Senses Coffee.

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Unexpected Beginnings.

Like every good superhero backstory, Communal Shamba came about through a chance encounter with something extraordinary. It’s 2016. Keremba Warioba and Dr Mkunde Chachage, two home-town Tanzanians who had spent the last 10 years working and studying in Melbourne, stumbled in to one of our Curated Cupping events. While their family back home grew coffee, they had virtually no coffee experience – but they had a strong passion for agriculture and social impact. After quite a few discussions, we were inspired to offer support in getting their fledgling business off the ground. In fact, we went all in and committed to purchasing their first harvest, before tasting it. This allowed the growers to make some production changes with a GUARANTEED payment at the end. Luckily, the first delivery was delicious – you may even remember it from our Limited Release line up!

Kerembe & Mkunde – Founders of Communal Shamba

Community Impact.

After returning to Tanzania in 2017, Keremba and Mkunde partnered with co-op Mkulima Kwanza and, two harvests in, the business is bringing recognition and funds into a community historically mired in commercial coffee. It’s not just delicious though – backed by Dr Chachage’s medical know-how, funds from the coffee program are being directed towards much needed local health clinic support. Great coffee and positive impact? Right up our alley!

In 2018, Dr. Mkunde Chachage earned a double recognition as ‘Best Scientist in Tanzania’ by the National Institute For Medical Research (NIMR) and ‘Best Research Scientist’ at her research center for her continuous effort finding permanent solutions for HIV, TB and Co-Infections.

Five Senses on the Ground.

Mid Harvest 2018 and Five Senses visited Mkulima Kwanza, the first ever coffee buyers they’d met. Gathered around the sorting tables, we naturally began to talk of the ripeness of the cherries laid in front of us. These were some of the first conversations about selective picking they’d ever had, but the Mkulima Kwanza leadership immediately took to action and the very next day we were proudly shown bulging bag after bag of pristine, ripe cherries. The results of this selective picking – aptly named Kipenzi or ‘Beloved’ in Swahili – are delicious. This is the kind of coffee we’re super proud of, delivering tasty brews and great results on the livelihoods of the Mkulima Kwanza coop.

Communal Shamba in Aus.

This takes us to MICE 2019, where Kerembe join us to chat all things Communal Shamba. To be drinking a tasting flight of ultra small lot coffees, while casually chatting to the guy who made it happen, is an uncommon experience in the greater specialty coffee world. With so much love flying around the stand for the work Communal Shamba do, and with 20% of all coffee sold at the stand going to help build a local health clinic, we’re looking forward to a happy, healthy & delicious future in Tanzania!

The Coffees.

Coffee always will be a seasonal product and have limited availability, but we’re proud to offer the following coffee:

Kipenzi

Previous coffees from Communal Shamba we’ve featured:

Communal Shamba

The post The Truth About The Flat White appeared first on Five Senses Coffee.

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Unexpected Beginnings.

Like every good superhero backstory, Communal Shamba came about through a chance encounter with something extraordinary. It’s 2016. Keremba Warioba and Dr Mkunde Chachage, two home-town Tanzanians who had spent the last 10 years working and studying in Melbourne, stumbled in to one of our Curated Cupping events. While their family back home grew coffee, they had virtually no coffee experience – but they had a strong passion for agriculture and social impact. After quite a few discussions, we were inspired to offer support in getting their fledgling business off the ground. In fact, we went all in and committed to purchasing their first harvest, before tasting it. This allowed the growers to make some production changes with a GUARANTEED payment at the end. Luckily, the first delivery was delicious – you may even remember it from our Limited Release line up!

Kerembe & Mkunde – Founders of Communal Shamba

Community Impact.

After returning to Tanzania in 2017, Keremba and Mkunde partnered with co-op Mkulima Kwanza and, two harvests in, the business is bringing recognition and funds into a community historically mired in commercial coffee. It’s not just delicious though – backed by Dr Chachage’s medical know-how, funds from the coffee program are being directed towards much needed local health clinic support. Great coffee and positive impact? Right up our alley!

In 2018, Dr. Mkunde Chachage earned a double recognition as ‘Best Scientist in Tanzania’ by the National Institute For Medical Research (NIMR) and ‘Best Research Scientist’ at her research center for her continuous effort finding permanent solutions for HIV, TB and Co-Infections.

Five Senses on the Ground.

Mid Harvest 2018 and Five Senses visited Mkulima Kwanza, the first ever coffee buyers they’d met. Gathered around the sorting tables, we naturally began to talk of the ripeness of the cherries laid in front of us. These were some of the first conversations about selective picking they’d ever had, but the Mkulima Kwanza leadership immediately took to action and the very next day we were proudly shown bulging bag after bag of pristine, ripe cherries. The results of this selective picking – aptly named Kipenzi or ‘Beloved’ in Swahili – are delicious. This is the kind of coffee we’re super proud of, delivering tasty brews and great results on the livelihoods of the Mkulima Kwanza coop.

Communal Shamba in Aus.

This takes us to MICE 2019, where Kerembe join us to chat all things Communal Shamba. To be drinking a tasting flight of ultra small lot coffees, while casually chatting to the guy who made it happen, is an uncommon experience in the greater specialty coffee world. With so much love flying around the stand for the work Communal Shamba do, and with 20% of all coffee sold at the stand going to help build a local health clinic, we’re looking forward to a happy, healthy & delicious future in Tanzania!

The Coffees.

Coffee always will be a seasonal product and have limited availability, but we’re proud to offer the following coffee:

Kipenzi

Previous coffees from Communal Shamba we’ve featured:

Communal Shamba

The post The Espresso Menu Explained appeared first on Five Senses Coffee.

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Much love to all who joined us at the Lake St Coffee Olympics last week! To quote our tech legend Beau “Awesome. It was the best and biggest gig we’ve had at the Barista Academy”. While most barista competitions focus on one particular strength like latte art, brewing or tasting coffees, we were looking for the barista who would come out on top across a gruelling pentathlon of coffee!

Upon entering the main arena (barista academy), a big crowd of spectators observed / heckled the latte art skills of all 18 athletes, with a thanks to Rie (National Latte Art Championships judge) and DC (bulk competitor experience) casting a critical eye over the latte art put forth. Vicky was an absolute power house taking the win in both Latte Art and Speed-Dial challenge, dialling in a Mazzer in less than 5 minutes!

Next in the gauntlet, baristas had to become human scales and dose-by-eye. Trying to hit targets in whole beans, ground coffee and the yield of their shots, all by eye, took many a seasoned barista back to yesteryear before Acaia scales were a staple tool. Chihiro and Restu impressed with the best results in this game.

Done with espresso events, athletes moved to the barista academy back porch to for all things filter. Calvin’s speedy palate took him to victory in the cup tasters with 3/5 correct, the fastest. In the final event, baristas were given free reign of our brew gear with the simple task of making ‘the tastiest brew’ with the Hakuna Matata coffee from Ecuador. Thanks to Ren (National Brewers Cup Judge) and Matt (a seasoned barista competitor) for taking on the tricky job of drinking delicious coffee to try and find the most delicious – top brew spot was taken out by Anna with her [insert brew device] brew.

Final Olympic standings were:
1st Calvin Tang, taking home a copper Moccamaster Classic
2nd Vicky Chuaybamrung-Haynes, scoring a Baratza Sette 270Wi
3rd Anna Chou, earning herself an iKegger

BONUS: While the total scores were tallied up, a ‘loudest splurer’ minigame was held with the winner, Ru, hitting an impressive 93db.

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