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Dear FSC friends, this is Urizen Freaza.

Instant film is magic. Plain and simple. What you see turns into something that you are touching. An image turned into an object. How crazy is that? I'm still amazed every single time this happens in front of my eyes.

And Roid Week is the celebration of this magic. In my opinion, it's about sharing that amazement with others, but that's me. I once heard someone say “everyone is looking for a tribe.” In that case, I guess the people on Roid Week are mine!

Here's a roundup of the photos submitted to Film Shooters Collective and the ones tagged as #fscpolaroid on Instagram. Please go check the artists’ profiles, and if you like, follow them and show them love. And more importantly, check the Polaroid Week pool on Flickr , on Twitter , and on Instagram .

And if these polaroids speak to you... the next Polaroid Week is in October! Grab your favorite instant camera and join us! I tell you, it's fun.


Untitled | Polaroid SX70 | Impossible Color SX70 | Joann Edmonds
Alien love bomb | @altfinnicle1
Summer '18 | @kylaplewes
Ghost Surfer | @instant_surf
Untitled | @iowamy
99 Red Balloons | @hammroids
Untitled | @roo_roo_s
More Bristol | @adambellfilm
In a puddle | @lincera
Untitled | @louwest
Heartblossom Girl | @jennifer_rumbach_polaroids
Untitled | @auspices
As The Crow Flyes V | @crowflys
#5 Cloud chakra | @ykm_12.44_
But there's always a theme | @leavesoftheprotea
Aigle | Carmen De Vos
Thomas on very rare Polaroid | @jens_brehm
Mother Earth whispers our fate... | Ben Innocent Connect

Urizen Freaza was born in Tenerife in 1982 and is since 2010 based in Berlin. He's a self-taught photographer and film-maker. Self-taught meaning that this is a path he's still walking, while hoping there is always more path to walk. He's a member of the Film Shooters Collective and part of the team behind the analogueNOW! festival in Berlin. See more of his work on his website and on Instagram.

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As a videographer by trade, I prefer using vintage lenses with manual focus and aperture. They often have a nice tactile feel in the hand, render very pleasing out of focus areas, and are ubiquitous and affordable online.

Ektar 2016

M42 mount lenses, or sometimes called Pentax screw mount (or even Thread Mount, as in TM), were made by a variety of manufacturers, notable brands include Zeiss Jena and Pentax Takumar. Matching them onto a modern camera body, I can get great high definition video with a lot of character.

As my collection and appreciation of m42 lenses increased, I thought it would be nice to have a suitable film camera to go with them for stills. After a few sessions on ebay, I had acquired a Practika LTL3 as well as a Spotmatic, both of which I enjoy using very much.

However, as is the case with many ebay purchases, I took a chance on these without knowing if the meters worked, and alas, neither did. I've done sunny 16 before, but mostly, I prefer having a meter. I could probably have found a shop to fix them, or perhaps even tried to do it myself, but having spent next to nothing on those, I kept looking, hoping to find a body that was in better shape, or just hadn't been used so much...something newer.

And that's when I discovered the Voigtlander Bessflex TM. An m42-mount SLR with a battery powered TTL meter (1600 max), but otherwise a fully mechanical camera with a split-image prism finder, and maybe the best part - this thing was manufactured from 2003-2007! That's practically brand new by film camera standards. At a glance, I would think it was made in the 60s or 70s. There's a all-black version, but mine is silver with black grips, all metal body, eye level pentaprism...very simple and straightforward layout, classic SLR style.

I love this camera. I often shoot wide open so the split image finder is very helpful.

I wish it was 45 degree as opposed to horizontal, but the finder itself is quite bright, and also includes a circular microprism, so sometimes I don't even need the split. The meter is activated by pushing up on a switch located next to lens. My left thumb is naturally there anyway so activating it is a breeze. The meter readings are a simple red plus-minus if you're off, or a green dot if you're on. The button will deactivate itself after a few minutes, or when the shutter fires, to prevent excess battery use.

+ / - meter readings

It has a 1/2000 copal shutter, and includes a bulb setting for long exposures. The sound of the shutter and mirror is soft and springy... similar to, but less loud than the Praktica. There is mechanical self-timer, which also doubles as a mirror-up. For flash, there is a pc connection on the side, but no hot shoe on top. Apparently there is an available accessory shoe that mounts to the viewfinder, but I have not seen one anywhere online. I don't do a lot of spontaneous flash, so for me this is not really an issue. You could always use a bracket. Flash sync goes up to 1/125.

dials

A protruded rubber grip on the back provides nice traction for my right thumb when shooting or holding it. The shutter button is perfectly positioned and very smooth, and is also fitted with a standard remote thread if you want to use a plunger.

As I mentioned, other than the meter this thing is fully mechanical. To load/remove film, you pull the winder up out of the iso dial and tug it up further to pop the door open. The film counter is on top next to the shutter and there's also a window on the back to see what you're shooting. I do find this helpful especially because the iso dial is just a wee bit loose. It hasn't been a problem while shooting, but it has been bumped in my bag a few times, so I double check it against the window when I pull it out.

So, what's wrong with the Bessaflex TM? This is very basic camera, and compares closely to the Spotmatic in design and handling. Prices for a good condition Spotmatic today? $20-$80 US. Prices for a Bessaflex? $450-$600. Wow! For such a simple camera (and for me), that's a lot. For that money you could get a nice Nikon F5...if that's what you want.

Like much of my camera stuff, the Spotmatic and the LTL3 probably get lonely sitting on the shelf unused most of the time. Occasionally I take them out for a spin, but it's rare, because the Bessaflex TM is the the perfect camera for my 35mm film shooting: modern enough to be convenient and reliable, simple enough to keep me grounded in the basics, compatible with my favorite prime lenses from a variety of manufacturers. I love the build quality of this thing, and although it wasn't a bargain, it's decades newer than most of my other cameras. When I'm shooting 35, I'm shooting the Bessaflex.

Connect

Brad Lechner is an image-making, story-telling, problem-solving dad & husband who produces and edits videos by trade. Otherwise, he’s likely playing soccer, daydreaming about the next family vacation, or scouring ebay for old cameras. Visit bradlechner.com to see some of his work.

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This week’s roundup had no theme. I think the photos ended up centered around Steffi Jannasch’s Dreamscape, all of these photos definitely make me feel like I’ve wandered into a dream. I’m melting into Aida Ebrahimi’s horizon then surfacing in Cassie Corridoni’s flowers, and finally crossing Steffi Jannasch’s Dreamscape bridge to walk along Ioana Tăut’s hazy beach day. It would be a dream I wouldn’t ever want to leave.

Thank you all for these fantastic submissions, and please keep submitting.


Over the Horizon | Holga 120N | Aida Ebrahimi

Kristel Collison

Untitled | SX-70 | Alek Lindus

Cornish Blue | Hasselblad 500CM | Ektar | Rick Davy

Cabin in the Snow | Yashica T5 | Daniel Stoessel

Dreamscape | Canon EOS 50E | Steffi Jannasch

Lighthouse with a View | Polaroid Land 350 | FP-100C | Ioana Tăut

SUBMIT

Every week the FSC features an article with a Curated Photostream that is open to all.  You may only submit one (1) photo and it *must* be a jpeg file and no larger than 20 MB. Please title the file "Title_Camera_Film_YourName.jpg" so that we may properly credit you if your photo is selected. Remember to check our Submit page to see all currently open photostreams. 

My next curation is May 27, 2019, and there will be no theme, it will be open to all film formats. You may submit your image here

CONNECT

Abigail Crone is a Polaroid photographer from Pennsylvania. She’s almost always wandering down a city street or through a nearby forest with a camera hanging around her neck.  You can see more of her work here or follow her on Instagram.

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Embush’s Gate
4x5 glass plate orotone, Ilford FP4, 2 sec, f16
Peter O’Donnell, 2018

The modern Orotone can be created in a number of ways, the most popular using a coating of liquid emulsion on a glass plate with a gelatine base. This method produces some excellent results with a minimum of effort. Rollei produces an excellent product and an equally comprehensive set of instructions.

Rollei Black Magic is a light-sensitive silver. It can be spread on the most surfaces.

I went about it a little differently…

When it comes to learning a new process, I can be a bit of a pedant and will research as much of the history of a particular technique I can in order to get a better understanding. Orotones piqued my interest as the original process of creating a positive on a glass plate as defined by Niepce de Saint Victor (1805 –1870) was apparently lost in the French revolution. But researching photographic publications of the mid to late 1800s led me to two American photographers, Whipple & Black, who improved on the original process. John Adams Whipple (1822 –1891) is better known for his astronomical photography but like many of photography’s early practitioners, he was one of the true geniuses of the craft.  

Whipple and Black's recipe is well documented along with an easy to follow technique for producing albumised glass plates. With a little conversion to today’s units of measure, their recipe when followed will allow you to produce plates that can be exposed in camera for a working negative of acceptable density or contact printed to make a positive. Because of the dramatically slow speed of the sensitised plate, using them in-camera proved to be quite impractical but interesting, to say the least.

With a little research you can easily find workable recipes and methods to all, the now, alternative processes

I began my love affair with photography shooting film and although we parted company in the mid-nineties, our relationship was rekindled again almost 10 years ago, firstly as a hobby, but now I no longer shoot digital for my own work, it’s all large format film and I am again, totally besotted. Once I started using film again that curious pedant in me led me to research and learn salt printing. Salt prints are a wonderfully honest image that has a simple understated beauty. I wanted to take this simplicity and apply it to the glass plate.

The basic process of creating an orotone is quite simple, but as with all alternative processes it does require some patience and tenacity and I’ll say it now: the cleaner you work, the better your result.

Firstly, a salted albumen solution is prepared. The older this solution is, the better. My current stock of albumen is well over a year old and perfectly usable. If you do not have the time to wait for your albumen to mature, you can use powdered egg white, but make sure you get it from a catering supplier and without any additives. Egg white sold as a protein supplement will usually contain additives that will not work.

It all begins with eggs and lots of them

 Regardless of how you make your albumen solution, it is necessary to filter before use.

Filtering is essential to ensure a clean plate

Next, a glass plate is prepared by grinding the sharp edges of the glass and washing thoroughly. When dry, the albumen is flowed on the glass much like collodion. I do find myself usually having to employ the assistance of a glass rod to help with the coverage and also to remove any small bubbles or particles in the albumen. Once the plate is coated with albumen, Whipple and Black suggested curing over a naked flame but I use a hot plate instead, it works just as well, and I don’t get to burn my fingers.

The albumen is flowed on the plate

Cured and cooled, the plate is now ready to be sensitized. This is done by immersing the plate in a bath of an acidic solution of silver nitrate. The plate once immersed in the silver nitrate solution becomes light sensitive and must now be stored in darkness. One of the benefits of having an acidic solution of silver nitrate is that the plates can be stored for a few days before use, allowing you to prepare your plates in batches. 

Exposures are made much like salt and albumen prints. The negative is placed in contact with the plate and exposed to UV light. The quality of your light will make a difference and if it's not raining, opt for natural light if you can. Exposure times are dependent on the density of your negative and light available. Forty minutes plus exposure times are not unusual for UV lamps and fifteen minutes plus for natural light. 

When the exposure is completed, processing can begin. The plate is washed and then toned using a gold toner before fixing. Toning is essential, as even a weak fixing solution quickly erodes an image. When processing is completed you will have a glass plate positive image similar to a magic lantern slide. 

Toning is essential

The orotone gets its brilliance from the metallic coating applied to the plate. Originally a suspension of metallic powder such as brass and copper in oil were used to coat the plate. Gold, silver and copper foils were also used. You can still use these methods, but I favour a more straight forward solution. There are many modern iridescent mediums available and a heavy body acrylic works very well and is available in a variety of colours and tones. The acrylic medium also has the advantage of being able to be removed if so desired.

Before and after coating with metallic pigment

Orotones were also known as the poor man’s Daguerreotype, elevating the traditional two-dimensional image to a higher plane, I find them truly mesmerising. The beautiful sense of depth created by the glass is intensified by the iridescent radiance of the metallic pigment, transforming the rendered subject into something quite ethereal. 

Old Mill

Gates

Escape

Clare Glens

Fall na Herra

Dead Tree

Out of the Woods

Beech Tree

Connect

Peter O’Donnell lives in Limerick, Ireland and now that he’s in his fifties feels he is perfectly entitled to be cranky. You’ll find his website at peterodonnell.com

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As there numerous reviews out there (both good and bad) of the Soviet made Jupiter-12 lens, I thought I might share some of the experiences I’ve had with mine, instead of trying to do a more technical lens review.

About 5 years ago, on a whim, I bought a beautiful 1957 Zorki 4 rangefinder. At the time (and still now) I prefer using a 35mm focal length over the more common 50mm. I had read some good things about the Jupiter-12 35/2.8, so within a few months of buying the Zorki, I started looking for a L39 (Leica Thread Mount) copy of the Soviet made Zeiss Biogon copy.

Rightly or wrongly, Soviet made camera equipment has received very mixed opinions. More often than not, it doesn’t enjoy a great reputation. People will often refer to buying Soviet made camera gear as playing “Russian Roulette”. I may just be lucky, but my experiences have all been generally positive. Shortly after I started my search, I found a rather sad looking 1956 KMZ made silver Jupiter-12, but the seller was in the US (which meant quicker shipping and easier returns) and the listing claimed it was working well. I decided to buy it, and within a week I was out shooting a test roll with it. Initially, I have to admit that I was rather underwhelmed with the lens, and my early results weren’t that good. The lens seemed to work okay, I just didn’t really like what I got from it. I really think that it takes 3 or 4 rolls of film, and a bit of time to get comfortable with a new lens or camera before it starts to gel with you. At the time though, I hadn’t really gotten into using rangefinder cameras, and so the Zorki and Jupiter-12 sat in my camera cabinet, unused for a few years.



In the fall of 2017, I pulled the Zorki out (see my article here) and started using it again. This time, the camera and the Jupiter-12 just clicked with me, and I started getting results I was really happy with. All throughout 2018, the Jupiter-12 was nearly my most used lens, and I made some of my best photos with it.




Physically, the Jupiter-12 is a strange lens. As mentioned above, it’s a copy of the prewar Zeiss Biogon 3.5cm f/2.8, which is a non-retrofocus wide-angle lens. Because of non-retrofocus design, the front element is fairly small and sits deep within the lens barrel, while the rear element is rather large and protrudes way out the back of the lens. The rear element comes out so far that there are some cameras (some Voigtlander Bessa R series cameras) you can’t use the lens on because the rear element will impede the shutter curtains. Some of the Canon rangefinder cameras have light baffles inside the lens mount that the Jupiter-12 will run into if mounted. Another quirk with the Jupiter-12 is that the aperture is adjusted by turning the filter thread and the aperture values are marked on the inside front near the front element.

The Jupiter-12 was made in both L39 mount and Kiev/Contax mount. Optically they are (I believe) the same. The Kiev/Contax mount version should fit all Kiev rangefinder cameras, but I think will not fit the postwar Contax cameras. I believe the Kiev mount Jupiter-12 will also fit some of the Nikon rangefinder cameras, but the lens mount might scratch the front of the camera when it’s mounted.




If you’re using a Leica screwmount camera (or even a Leica M body) and you’re looking for an affordable 35mm lens, I highly recommend finding yourself a Jupiter-12.

This photograph, and the previous 4, were made with the Canon 7 and Jupiter 12

Connect

Film photographer, Colton Allen is based in Oregon. Connect with him on Flickr, Instagram, and Facebook. You can also see more of his work right here on our website.

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One of my recurring themes in photography is contrasting opposites. I am currently working with various themes such as the concept of nature vs the industrial and / or body parts vs the whole in street photography. To this end I asked you to explore the contrast between light and dark, or good and evil in whatever way that may have resonated with you. Below are your submissions.


Aida Ebrahimi - Overpass | Lubitel
Ben Osborne | Light Inside A Cage | Nikon AF-L35
Cassie Corridoni
Greg Maslak | Winters Last Stand | Leica M4-2
Ho Man Cheng | Two Paths | Rolleicord III
Joe Castillo
JP Campbell | In The Cafe | Pentax ME Super
Kristel Collison
Lucy Wainwright | The Ents | Olympus XA4 | Superia 200
Malcolm Tremain | Portents | Olympus XA2
Michael Fauscette | Up The Staircase | Leica M6
Nico Maietta
Rajmohan | Two way | Leica M5
Tom Klauss | Paledays | Leica M5 CONNECT

I'm Film photographer Marc Nagainis and am based in Ottawa, Canada.  You can see more of my work and my ongoing series on my website.  

I’ll be back on May 15th ish 2019. For my next curation I will be asking for your interpretation of the theme Regret. I’ll say nothing more. Do your worst, show me your best. Submit your image on the submissions page.

SUBMIT

Every week the FSC features an article with a Curated Photostream that is open to all.  You may only submit one (1) photo and it *must* be a jpeg file and no larger than 20 MB. Please title the file "Title_Camera_Film_YourName.jpg" so that we may properly credit you if your photo is selected. Remember to check our Submit page to see all currently open photostreams. 

Upcoming Curations include…

ABIGAIL CRONE, curator:  My next curation is April 29, 2019, and there will be no theme, it will be open to all film formats. You may submit your image here

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The Hills of Home

I have a real soft spot for landscape photography and it's one of the main things I do, so I wanted to see how you do it! I asked you about the hills of your home - or, at a pinch, the hills of your holiday - and you sent in some really gorgeous images. Just pure beauty and grandeur and drama and atmosphere. So simple, and so difficult. Thank you. I'm really grateful, and I'm inspired, and I'm getting my boots on and packing a rucksack!


Winter is Here | Voigtlander Vito C | Nigel Haycock
I miss u already | Mortti Saarnia
My First Time in Tyrol | Land Camera 350 | FP100c | Ioana Taut
Flatlanders' Mountain | Lubitel 2 | Jen Zehner
kokkari | holga CFN | alek lindus
Tunnel View | Pentax 67 | FujiPro 400H | Chris McCarty
fading | lomo lca | austeja laurinaviciute
Jukkasjärvi | Olympus Trip 35 | Rocio Fuhr
Corsica | Pentax K1000 | Lucas Pownall-Deppeler
On the other side of the mountain | Minolta srt | Acros | Efrain Bojorquez SUBMIT

Every week the FSC features an article with a Curated Photostream that is open to all.  You may only submit one (1) photo and it *must* be a jpeg file and no larger than 20 MB. Please title the file "Title_Camera_Film_YourName.jpg" so that we may properly credit you if your photo is selected. Remember to check our Submit page to see all currently open photostreams. 

My next curation is April 29th, I'd be glad to see your vernacular images. Show me the strange beauty of the ordinary. You may submit your image here

CONNECT

Lucy Wainwright is a film photographer and trainee art psychotherapist living in Derbyshire. 

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Nothing cures the winter blues like the sight of a spring garden. Hope these beautiful photos get you thinking of all the warm days ahead, and that they inspire you to take your camera outside to appreciate all of that extra sunlight.


Morrocan | Nikon F3 | Austeja Laurinaviciute

Cityscape | Madison Thain

Exposition Park | Nikon FM | Andrew Salamunovich

Underneath | Canon AE-1 | ChrisMcCarty

Untitled | Canon FTb | Kodak Aerchrome | Andrew Gammell

Bärlauch | Polaroid SX-70 | Impossible Project Film | Ioana Taut

Morelia | Minolta SRT 101b | Franco Carino Zanotti

SUBMIT

Every week the FSC features an article with a Curated Photostream that is open to all.  You may only submit one (1) photo and it *must* be a jpeg file and no larger than 20 MB. Please title the file "Title_Camera_Film_YourName.jpg" so that we may properly credit you if your photo is selected. Remember to check our Submit page to see all currently open photostreams. 

My next curation is April 29, 2019, and there will be no theme, it will be open to all film formats. You may submit your image here

CONNECT

Abigail Crone is a Polaroid photographer from Pennsylvania. She’s almost always wandering down a city street or through a nearby forest with a camera hanging around her neck.  You can see more of her work here or follow her on Instagram.

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After years of avoiding Austin during SXSW - getting caught up in the grouchy zeitgeist of locals who can barely stand the traffic and crowds on a regular day I guess - in 2018 I decided to not let that stop me. It was St Patrick’s Day, it was Spring Break, and I wanted to soak it all up. The day I had, in the sun, surrounded by happy people, makes me regret avoiding the St Patrick’s Day parade during the years I spent in New York.





I suppose it goes against the usual ethos of a street photographer to not want to put themselves into the fray for the sake of photos, but life’s all about ebb and flow. It had been some months since my last trip to South Congress, and recently I was shocked to realize that I hadn’t been there since the March 17th I’m sharing with you today. It had almost been a calendar year!





It was lively, crowded. Music was everywhere, thanks to SXSW. . . . .



Not everyone was smiling and jolly. . . . . not at the time I photographed them, anyway. Life metaphors!





Riding, walking, rolling, hanging out: it was all happening on South Congress Avenue on St Patrick’s Day last year!







South Congress is fun to photograph. It’s fun to just be there - wandering, shopping, eating, drinking, hanging out. Austin has a lot of hearts (downtown and Zilker Park are two others) and this is one of them that for me never gets old. I’m thankful that so far the changes happening there haven’t altered the character of the place too much. (Long time residents would probably disagree with me; I can only compare it with how it was 8 years or so ago.) I hope the city will keep that in mind as time (and development) races on.

Where am I this year for St Pat’s? I’m writing this a few days in advance, so I really don’t know. I might be out photographing. I might be at home in my PJs. Wherever I am, I’m definitely wearing at least a little bit of green. And wherever you are, I hope your day is full of happy, and, as the Irish saying goes “May the road rise up to meet you. May the wind be always at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face.” And all that good stuff.

All photographs Hasselblad 500 cm and Kodak Tri-x.

Connect

Film photographer Amy Jasek is based near Austin, TX. See more of her work on her website and her Instagram.

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Alternative portraits. Alternative processes. Alternative poses or subjects. Portraiture is my one great love in photography, and a subject i very seldom pursue. Why? I think i’m scared, too shy, too afraid of the interaction. In order to make a really good portrait, you have to get in there, get personal. You have to make a connection with your subject, and I have a hard time looking into someones soul for more than a few awkward seconds. Oh, but i do love taking a portrait.


Bette Machete

A pretty basic candid portrait here. I like the colour saturation and the skin tones. I’d have liked to see the shot cropped tighter to her face. I like that the subject is not staring into the lens. Makes me wonder what she is thinking.


Ceren Kilic

I like the moody ethereal quality to this image. It makes me wonder if its a double exposure or not. I know its not… The depth of field is exciting.


Chris McCarty - Ruski

A pretty standard available light portrait here. Nothing out of the ordinary at all. A classic pose, great lighting, a striking model. Overall a good candid image. Again, I think it would have been more effective cropped to the subject.


Daniel Stoessel - Twice.

There we go, theres some meat! A mirror image? a double exposure? Not sure at all. I do however like it. I't’s got a sense of mystery to it.


Dan Moga

Well played Sir. Effective posing conveys movement and interest. Well composed in available light. A good use of background colour and shadow.


Greg Maslak - Man on the Street.

I think we’ve all seen this guy at one time or another. I like the shot, I like the setup. I like the Cosby sweater.


Jennifer Zehner - Lili-Ane (in blue).

An interesting Cyanotype. A great alternative use of the process. Well done and thank you for sticking to the theme.


Lucy Wainwright - Fugitive sleep

Well played Lucy. I really like this. Well crafted.


Natalia Sliwowska - Denislav The Illustrator

A very unique portrait. Just a bit out of the ordinary. I like the symmetry and the directionality. The eye is drawn to the subject.


Sophie Auffret - Deux.

I’m not entirely certain what draws me to this one. It’s a bit off centre and indistinct. I do love the colours tho and the overall moody tone.


Tom Simmermaker - Mike.

Available light again. Good colour, a bit of an alternative pose. Could have used some cropping.


Trent T - Malorie's Flower

I like the tonal contrast in this image as well as the subtle movement.

CONNECT

I'm Film photographer Marc Nagainis and am based in Ottawa, Canada.  You can see more of my work and my ongoing series on my website.  

I’ll be back on April 7th ish 2019. For my next curation I will be asking for your interpretation of the contrast between dark and light… evil and good… light and shadow… Do your worst, show me your best. Submit your image here.

SUBMIT

Every week the FSC features an article with a Curated Photostream that is open to all.  You may only submit one (1) photo and it *must* be a jpeg file and no larger than 20 MB. Please title the file "Title_Camera_Film_YourName.jpg" so that we may properly credit you if your photo is selected. Remember to check our Submit page to see all currently open photostreams. 

Upcoming Curations include…

LUCY WAINWRIGHT, curator:  My next curation will be March 18. I would be really glad if you would send me pictures of the hills and mountains of your home. Or your holiday! Any analog process will work. Thank you so much! You may submit your image here.

ABIGAIL CRONE, curator:  My next curation is March 25, 2019, and the theme is Gardens, it will be open to all film formats. You may submit your image here

RUBY BERRY, curator: My next curation is April 1 and the theme is Trickery. Show me your fools, your trompe l'œil, your magic, your jokes. Be the fool or the fooled. You may submit your image here.


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