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(University of Copenhagen) New study from the University of Copenhagen reports that political discussions about genetically modified foods have ignored concerns among Danes that GM foods are 'unnatural'. This is very regrettable, according to Jesper Lassen, a researcher who has investigated public attitudes about genetic modification for the past 25 years.
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(University of Missouri-Columbia) Meteorologists have known for some time that rainfall forecasts have flaws, as failure to take into account factors such as evaporation can affect their accuracy. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have developed a system that improves the precision of forecasts by accounting for evaporation in rainfall estimates, particularly for locations 30 miles or more from the nearest National Weather Service radar.
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(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) A new Food-PRICE study finds persistent nutritional disparities within the food choices of those receiving assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) compared to those not receiving SNAP assistance.
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(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) For decades, biologists have believed a key enzyme in plants had one function -- produce amino acids, which are vital to plant survival and also essential to human diets.But for Wellington Muchero, Meng Xie and their colleagues, this enzyme does more than advertised. They had run a series of experiments on poplar plants that consistently revealed mutations in a structure of the life-sustaining enzyme that was not previously known to exist.
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(University of Plymouth) Members of the public are more likely to blame the global marine litter crisis on retailers, industry and government, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.
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(The Company of Biologists) Mantis shrimp pack powerful punches to smash the shells of the snails upon which they dine and now it turns out that they aren't simply hammering at random. Mantis shrimp position their prey prior to pulverisation and target fragile regions of the shell to gain access to the snail within.
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(University of British Columbia) The world's system for allocating fish stocks is being outpaced by the movement of fish species in response to climate change, according to a study undertaken by an international team of marine ecologists, fisheries and social scientists, and lawyers.
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(Rutgers University) Climate change is forcing fish species to shift their habitats faster than the world's system for allocating fish stocks, exacerbating international fisheries conflicts, according to a study led by a Rutgers University-New Brunswick researcher. The study, published online in the journal Science today, showed for the first time that new fisheries are likely to appear in more than 70 countries all over the world as a result of climate change. History has shown that newly shared fisheries often spark conflict among nations.
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(Imperial College London) The discovery changes our understanding of the basic mechanism of photosynthesis and should rewrite the textbooks.It will also tailor the way we hunt for alien life and provide insights into how we could engineer more efficient crops that take advantage of longer wavelengths of light.
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(University of East Anglia) New research suggests that the combined social and ecological results of increased agricultural intensification in low and middle-income countries are not as positive as expected.The study, led by researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and University of Copenhagen, is the first to bring together current knowledge on how agricultural intensification affects both the environment and human wellbeing in these countries.
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