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悬钟穴 Xuanzhong (GB 39): What Does Xuan Zhong mean? Why is it named that? What Can This Point be Used for?
by Tina Chen, L.Ac.

Xuan 悬 =Suspended Zhong 钟 = Bell
Xuanzhong (GB 39), Suspended Bell is the hui meeting point of the marrow. Classic indications are to treat deficiency conditions relating to the bone or wei zheng (atrophy syndrome) and other conditions such as dizziness, tinnitus, sore throat, etc related to kidney deficiency. It can also be used to treat neck pain on the GB channel.

This is a point that can strengthen the Kidney and help with its multiple functions. One of the reasons why it’s named such is that when the Kidneys are strengthened, the bones can then be strong enough to hold a heavy Suspended Bell.

Another reason why it’s called Suspended Bell is that in nourishing the Kidney, it can then pump the water upwards to the throat and treat Kidney yin deficiency type of sore throat or dry throat. After needling this point, one should feel a sensation in the throat, and then saliva should be produced. It’s an excellent point for cancer patients with dry throat and mouth as well as chronic respiratory issues involving dry, sore throat or hoarseness of the voice. With the use of this point, one’s voice can be as loud as the suspended bell and be heard from miles away.

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Jin 津 and Ye 液 (Body Fluids) and Tuo 唾 and Xian涎 (Saliva): What are the differences and How Does It Affect Your Herbal Prescription by Dr. Liao, Chien-Fu, translated by Tina Chen

The next up Chinese speaker for eLotus in December 2019 is Dr. Liao, Chien-Fu who sees 120 patients a day. I worked with him while he came to lecture in the US in 2017 and am helping with translation for his class. I came across something very interesting again that I thought I’d share w you. This guy is great. He explains the most complicated thing in the simplest way and many times in his lecture after his explanation, I think to myself “Why didn’t I think of that?”

Today’s I want to share his thoughts on the difference between Jin and Ye (body fluids) and Tuo and Xian? I never thought much about this since it seems like it’s just terminology that we learn in school but never very practical in the clinic since Jin and Ye are just fluids and when yin is deficient, just tonify yin. Well, there is more to it…let me explain what he said in class.

What exactly is Jin, and what is Ye? We all know what they are in terms of TCM, but if you explain it in Western medicine terms, Jin is fluid that your body needs to in order to function properly like saliva. Ye is fluid that your body doesn’t need, such as tears, sweat, nasal discharge, etc.

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Abdominal Acupuncture

Abdominal Acupuncture, created by Dr. Zhiyun Bo, is an easy modality to learn and apply. It is not only gentle and relaxing, it is also very effective because it works with the qi in the core of the body. In addition, it directly affects the digestive system.

The following overview to Abdominal Acupuncture is compiled from the online courses by Dave Shipsey (in English), and online resources by Dr. Zhiyun Bo (in Chinese).

INTRODUCTION

Abdominal Acupuncture utilizes a hologram of the abdomen of a tortoise on its back. Abdominal points prescriptions follow the same concept of herbal prescriptions in which there are Jun, Chen, Zuo, Shi (Chief, Deputy, Assistant, Envoy) points, with each playing an important and essential function.

  • Chief points treat the patient’s chief complaints, and regulate and harmonize the organs. Usually 1-2 points are selected.
  • Deputy points enhance the organ regulating effects of the Chief points.
  • Assistant points enhance Chief and Deputy functions, as well as regulate affected channels.
  • Envoy points provide symptomatic relief. They often image the corresponding pain areas, and can also be guiding points.

There is no set number of points to use for each category above, however, there are usually more Envoy points than Chief points. Depending on the condition, some point prescriptions may only contain points from one or two of the categories.

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