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Robin Sharma, a well-respected leadership expert, once said: “The business of business is relationships.” As much as we sometimes get lost in profit margins, project details, and marketing strategies, the truth is that relationships are at the very heart of what makes a business work.

While coworker relationships—within your own office—are certainly important, so too is the relationship that your staff has with your clients. These relationships can have a major impact on everything from staff morale, to the quality of their work, to your company’s reputation.

How can you help your staff form mutually beneficial relationships with your clients? Here are a few ideas.

Teach them to communicate.

Communication is key in any relationship, and when it comes to relationships with clients, it’s absolutely vital. Strong lines of communication will benefit the relationship between your staff and your clients as they are able to discuss problems, share honest feedback, and stay on the same page about everything. Your staff should be able to communicate their questions and concerns in a professional, articulate way, and they should be able to listen carefully and thoughtfully to client responses. If your staff struggles with effective communication, consider holding a training session or seminar on the subject. (Yes, it’s that important.)

Encourage open-mindedness.

Often, your employees and your clients will clash in more ways than one. There could be times when their differences make it extremely difficult for them to work together. Encouraging your employees to be open-minded to other ideas, other methods, and other preferences can help things move more smoothly. You can do this by emphasizing teamwork on a daily basis within the office and by encouraging “out of the box” thinking.

Don’t over-promise.

Your employees need to know how to be realistic with your clients if they are going to maintain a positive relationship with them. Making promises they can’t keep is a surefire way to jeopardize the relationship. If anything, your employees should underpromise and overdeliver; exceed the client’s expectations and they’re bound to be more happy with the work (and with your staff). 

Don’t complain about clients.

Your employees look to you as an example, and trust us—they hear all those complaints you make about your clients. Make a sincere effort to cut out these complaints and model the attitude you want your employees to have. It will bring a more positive vibe to your office and will help foster stronger client relationships.

Invest in professional training.

We briefly mentioned this when we talked about communication, but professional training can be invaluable when it comes to your staff’s ability to interact with your clients. You could try hiring a customer service expert to hold a training during lunch, or you could sign everyone up for an online seminar on a relevant topic. Making this investment will show your employees how much this means to you, and will give them valuable tools to use as they hone their relationship-building skills.

Related: What To Look For When Hiring an Internal Recruiter

Client relationships are hardly ever simple, but they’re crucial to business success. Help your staff form better relationships with clients, and you’re sure to see positive results. 

The post How to Help Your Staff Form Relationships With Clients appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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Very few things in business are more important than hiring the right people. So when you’re hiring an internal recruiter—a person that will play a big role in your future hires—the stakes are extra high. 

If your company is constantly making hiring decisions or regularly adding personnel, an internal recruiter might be your best bet for making sure that your new hires meet your company standards in terms of professional competency and culture fit. 

Of course, you need your recruiter to match that description as well. So how can you be sure you’re getting what you need when you hire an internal recruiter?

We have a quick list of things you should look for when making this important hire.

Great organization skills.

Your internal recruiter is likely going to have a lot on their plate at any given moment. They may be juggling several different candidates for several jobs, all at once. This makes it absolutely vital that your internal recruiter is highly organized, even when multitasking. 

Exemplifies company values.

In many instances, your recruiter will be the first point of contact a potential employee has with your company. For this reason, you want your recruiter to be an example of your company’s values. Hopefully, when a candidate is able to get a taste of what your company culture is like, right from the beginning, they’ll be attracted to it, and therefore more interested in working with you.

Personable and persuasive.

A recruiter needs to make a good first impression. That means that they probably need to be someone who likes interacting with people—even strangers. Your internal recruiter should also be more than a little persuasive; after all, they are essentially trying to “sell” someone on the idea of working for your company. 

Talent for spotting talent.

A great recruiter should be able to look at an online profile or resume and have a good idea of whether or not that candidate is worth pursuing. Sometimes, this is about more than simply whether or not the candidate meets education and experience requirements, and a recruiter needs to be able to spot true talent that goes beyond the ordinary.

Passion for their industry (and yours).

People that love their jobs are usually better at them, and recruiters are no exception. When looking for your internal recruiter, find someone who is passionate about making great connections and exceptional hires. Along those same lines, your recruiter should also have a certain level of excitement about your industry and your company. This will prove invaluable when it comes to convincing someone else to join your team.

An internal recruiter can be a fantastic addition to your staff, but only if you can find the right one. EDI Staffing can help you there. With over two decades of experience in the staffing industry, we can help you find an internal recruiter who will help you make great hiring decisions for years to come. Contact us at 508-802-4512 for more information.

The post What to Look for When Hiring an Internal Recruiter appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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When you need to fill a position at your company, it’s important to know exactly what you’re looking for. Of course this applies to the type of employee you’re looking for—skill set, work ethic, etc.—but it also applies to the type of employment offer you’re wanting to extend.

While you might think that all hires are essentially the same, the fact is, there are several different staffing options available to employers that you might want to consider when looking to fill a position. Read on for a quick overview of your options when it comes to staffing.

Direct hire

This is the most common type of hire and is often what people think of when they think of hiring someone. More often than not, a direct hire results in a full-time employee joining a company for long-term employment. When a direct hire is made, the employee is added to the company’s payroll, is subject to company policies, and is eligible for full-time employee benefits.

Because of the long-term commitment involved, direct hires are often done thoughtfully and carefully. It may take time for an employer to make a direct hire. An experienced staffing agency can help move the process along by matching qualified candidates with open positions, narrowing a company’s pool of potential hires.

Short-term hire

A short-term hire is one that is not expected to last beyond a certain period of time. These hires can be made to help companies manage those times when they are short-staffed (such as when an employee is on extended leave), or when work volume is unusually high. They may be full-time or part-time positions.  

Short-term hires can be useful for employers and employees alike. Employers get the benefit of the extra help without the long-term commitment, and employees are provided with good work that helps build their experience and resume, while keeping the flexibility of impermanent employment.

Because the need for short-term hires often rises quickly, it’s beneficial for companies to use a staffing agency when making this type of hire. A staffing agency will be able to find a qualified candidate quickly, which can be invaluable when a business is in a pinch.

Contract-to-hire

Contract-to-hire offers the best of both the above options. A contract-to-hire agreement essentially allows for temporary employment for a set period of time, after which the employee will either be hired by the company full-time, or let go to find a better fit. 

A contract-to-hire arrangement gives both employer and employee a chance to test the fit (professional and cultural) of the employee within the workplace, giving both parties an “out” if either is unhappy with the other. 

As beneficial as they can be, contract-to-hire positions can be difficult to fill. An employee may not know if the employer is serious about the potential for a long-term hire, and an employer might have a hard time finding a candidate who is willing to take on this type of work. Because of this, using a staffing agency to fill a contract-to-hire position is in the best interest of everyone involved.

A full-time hire is not your only option if you think you’re ready to grow your staff. Consider these other options first and decide what your company truly needs. And feel free to contact EDI Staffing at 508-802-4512 if you have any questions or concerns about the staffing process. We’re here to help!

The post Staffing Options: Short-Term Hire, Contract-to-Hire, and Direct Hire appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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Losing your job is a challenge. The transition from “employed” to “unemployed” can be difficult in many ways, affecting everything from your morale and confidence to your financial stability and way of life.

While a terminated employee bears the brunt of losing their job, letting go of employees can be tricky for employers as well. Turnover can be costly for employers in a number of ways, and more often than not, they want to make sure that even employees who are leaving their ranks are cared for appropriately.

This is where the idea of a severance package comes in. Although severance packages can vary widely from company to company (and even from employee to employee), there are some general principles surrounding severance packages that every employee should be aware of. 

What is a severance package?

Simply put, a severance package is compensation an employee receives when their employment is terminated. 

Who receives a severance package?

Most often, they’re offered to people who are laid off, rather than those who quit or are fired for cause. This, however, depends on the company, and on your employment agreement. 

How much can I expect to receive from my severance package?

The package often includes compensation beyond the employee’s last paycheck. Standard practice is to pay the employee 1-2 weeks’ pay for every year they were with the company. Beyond this, severance packages may also include retirement account benefits, continuation of medical benefits, stock options, accrued PTO payments, and so on.

What other stipulations are included in a severance package?

Severance packages often include other stipulations that usually serve to protect the company from action taken by the terminated employee. 

For example, the severance package may prohibit the employee from taking legal action against the employer. Or, by accepting the severance, an employee may be waiving their ability to collect unemployment benefits (which can be costly for employers). There may even be non-compete clauses that prohibit the employee from getting a job with a competitor until a certain period of time has passed.

If you are offered a severance package, make sure to read the agreement carefully so that you know what you are agreeing to. If the language of the agreement is unclear, you may want to contact a lawyer to help you decipher it. 

Can I negotiate my severance package?

Possibly. This largely depends on the company’s policies and procedures. Some companies have an established severance package that leaves little to no room for negotiation. Others handle severance on a case-by-case basis, and you may be able to argue for more severance pay. Either way, it doesn’t hurt to ask. 

Other quick facts about severance:

  • Severance pay is NOT a given, but an optional agreement between employer and employee.
  • Severance pay is taxable.
  • Some severance packages include giving the employee help with finding a new job. Even if there is little wiggle room for negotiation in your severance agreement, this could be something to ask for. 
  • Severance pay can be paid as a lump sum, or in installments. If you prefer one over the other, that is something to consider when evaluating your severance package.

In the end, severance pay can be beneficial to both employer and employee. If you are faced with the reality of losing your job and negotiating severance, familiarize yourself with company policies and state laws to make sure you are treated fairly. 

The post What You Need to Know About Severance Packages appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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Personnel is any business’s greatest asset—but it can also be their biggest liability. As much as a great employee can lift a company up, a bad employee can bring a company down. 

While some of these detrimental employees can be identified from a mile away, sometimes, there are more subtle indicators telling you that one of your employees might be toxic. Identifying toxic employees quickly is critical to minimizing the damage they can do.

We can help you spot those toxic employees so you can weed them out before they wreak havoc on your staff’s effectiveness, morale, or profitability. Here’s how to spot a toxic employee.

They never take ownership.

Toxic employees tend to blame others when things go wrong. If an employee is constantly blaming coworkers and clients for missed deadlines or botched projects, the truth might be that the employee just struggles to take ownership. Great employees are the ones that are able to own up to their mistakes, so that they can learn from them later. If you have an employee who doesn’t do this, it might be a sign that they’re toxic.

They are always involved in office drama.

Office politics, gossip, and other drama can really take a toll on the effectiveness of your team. While some employees are able to avoid most office drama, others always seem to be involved in it, in one way or another. This latter group has a higher tendency to be more toxic.

They consistently miss deadlines.

Falling behind every now and then is understandable. Consistently missing deadlines? Not so much. This could be an indicator that the employee isn’t taking their job seriously, and that they value their own time and schedule over the needs of the company. This type of employee tends to be toxic, setting a bad example for others while also potentially causing the entire team to fall behind.

They don’t communicate when there’s a problem.

It’s one thing to face a challenge or obstacle at work. It’s another thing to pretend like it doesn’t exist. Toxic employees will often fail to communicate when things are going wrong, perhaps because they’re unwilling to take ownership of the problem (see above). While communicating about problems in early stages could potentially help the team avoid those problems (or at least minimize the consequences), a lack of communication can cause problems to snowball, making them simultaneously more serious and harder to solve.

They’re excessively pessimistic. Everyone has bad days, but toxic employees seem to have bad…well, lifetimes. If you have an employee who is constantly complaining about everything from the weather to the coffee in the breakroom, then you could have a toxic employee on your hands.

They don’t take feedback well.

The best employees are the ones who accept feedback humbly and do what they can to make any needed improvements. Toxic employees, on the other hand, are much more likely to push back against any sort of criticism or negative feedback. This demonstrates a sort of narcissism that makes it very difficult for these employees to overcome their weaknesses and progress within the company.

Toxic employees can have a huge negative impact on your company. Use this guide to identify toxic employees more quickly. Then you can take steps to improve their attitude/performance, or, if necessary, let them go. Trust us: you’re better off without them. 

For helping finding top IT talent that fits with your team and can have a positive impact on your company, contact EDI Staffing. We have over 20 years experience helping companies find and hire professionals.

The post How to Spot a Toxic Employee appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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Data shows that the popularity of temporary IT staffing continues to grow. This article by Staffing Industry Analysts (SIA) points out that temporary IT staffing is the predominant form of IT staffing in the U.S., and that the area has experienced continued growth over the past ten years.

Why does temporary IT staffing continue to increase in popularity? As experts in the area ourselves, we have a few ideas.

IT talent is hard to find.

It’s increasingly difficult to find talented professionals that are able to keep up with the ever-changing demands of the IT world. The SIA article points specifically to cybersecurity specialists, cloud architects, and data scientists as being particularly hard to find in the current market. Because of this talent shortage, companies are often forced to make temporary hires to meet immediate needs. 

Temporary staffing allows for greater flexibility.

Hiring a full-time employee is a big commitment. Unless a company is absolutely sure that they need a full-time IT person on their staff, it might make more sense for them to make a temporary hire.

Staffing agencies deliver top talent.

Another reason temporary IT staffing continues to grow is that more and more businesses are recognizing the value of using a staffing agency to their benefit. With unemployment so low, it can be hard to find talented IT professionals who aren’t already happily employed elsewhere. A staffing agency, however, can help match temporary IT workers with searching companies, setting up a win-win situation for both parties.

IT needs continue to grow.

Companies simply can’t ignore the need to get on the IT train anymore. Technology is absolutely vital to the success of many companies, big and small. This is yet another reason why temporary IT staffing is on the rise—because more and more companies are identifying very real IT needs and recognizing the gaps in their infrastructure that keep those needs from being met. 

As temporary IT staffing is on the rise, EDI Staffing is up for meeting the demands of our clients. With over two decades of experience in the staffing industry, along with specialization in IT-related fields, we can help companies find temporary IT hires that will fit their specific needs and qualifications. For more information, contact us today. We look forward to working with you.

The post Explaining Expected Growth in Temporary IT Staffing appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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Quality is just as important as quantity when it comes to your workday. Sure, getting in a full day is crucial, but those hours mean nothing if you can’t figure out how to use them productively.

Productivity in the workplace is a tricky topic, because a productive workday is going to look different for everyone. The more we learn about productive work habits, however, the more we realize that there are some commonalities when it comes to increasing productivity.

Most notably, we’ve identified several things that could be cut out of your workday that will make you instantly more productive. Saying goodbye to these things could deliver the productivity boost you’ve been waiting for.  

  • Coming in late. Want to get your day off to a good start? Then get to work on time. You want to make the most of every minute if you’re going to increase your productivity. When you show up on time, you’re demonstrating—to yourself, your colleagues, and your boss—that you’re reliable, respectful, and committed to your work. Starting out with this mindset (rather than a rushed, stressful one) is more likely to lead to a productive day. 
  • Notifications. It’s hard to be truly productive when you’re constantly interrupted by pings, dings, and rings. While it’s perfectly fine to have your notifications on during a break or at lunch, notifications during work time are going to do nothing but distract you, pulling your mental capacity away from your work and making it harder to be truly productive. Turn off the notifications and your productivity will benefit from it.
  • Multitasking. An article in Forbes points out that “the brain cannot effectively or efficiently switch between tasks,” and also that it takes a considerable amount of time to recognize “new” stimuli. Plus, it says, retention rate is lower when you multitask, so any work you do get done might be done incorrectly, or you might forget how to accomplish the task for next time. In these ways and more, multitasking hurts your productivity. Focus on one task at a time; in this case, less really is more. 
  • Constant email checking. For many of us, checking email “real quick” is pretty automatic. It’s much too easy to open up your inbox just to see if something new has come through. But even those few seconds of distraction can pull you away from the task you should be focusing on. Instead of checking your email constantly throughout the day, set aside a few chunks of time to check your inbox and respond to important emails. You’ll be much more likely to finish your other tasks effectively if they aren’t being interrupted by email checks.
  • Sugar crashes. It’s hard to be productive when you really just feel like taking a nap. Diets high in sugar and carbs can lead to spikes in your blood sugar…which can then lead to sugar crashes that leave you feeling tired, foggy, and anything but productive. Watch what you eat and how it affects you, and be mindful of foods that might cause these extreme highs and lows. When you cut those out of your workday, you can increase your productivity.  
  • Decision fatigue. Decision fatigue affects many people in very real ways, one of which is that you might feel overwhelmed, unfocused, or hectic. If you’re a person who suffers from decision fatigue, do what you can to cut back on the number of little decisions you make throughout your day. Even things like what clothes you’ll wear or what you’ll eat for lunch can occupy mental space that should be used for being productive. Make decisions ahead of time to avoid getting worn down over the course of the day. 
  • Unnecessary meetings. Unnecessary meetings can cut down your time and your morale. These meetings often accomplish nothing, and can sometimes throw off an employee’s workday so much that the time following a meeting is unproductive as well. Cutting back on unnecessary meetings can help make the meetings you do have more effective, and it just might increase overall productivity, too. Want help determining whether or not a meeting is necessary? Our useful checklist can help you decide.  
  • Perfectionism. Trying to be perfect all the time is exhausting. If you’re constantly stressed about doing everything perfectly, you’re more likely to get the opposite result: you’ll be more unproductive. Perfectionism can lead to a “stuck” feeling that keeps you from finishing projects because they aren’t “perfect.” Putting this pressure on yourself isn’t likely to benefit your performance, your work, or your mental health, so it’s time to let go of perfectionism and simply put in your best effort. You’ll be much more productive that way.

Cutting these things out of your workday may not feel like a drastic change, but it could help you notice a drastic improvement in your productivity. Let go of the things that are holding you back, and you’ll be ready to move forward.

The post 8 Things to Cut Out of Your Workday that Will Make You Instantly More Productive appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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EDI Staffing has been proudly serving our clients since 1994, providing exceptional staffing solutions for companies looking for top EDI, EAI, and IT professionals.

Now, EDI is pleased to announce the opening of a new services division: recruiting.

EDI Staffing can now help companies hire their own in-house recruiters and similar professionals. With this new offering, EDI hopes to better help our clients meet their long-term hiring needs and effectively grow their teams.

As part of this expansion, EDI can now help companies find and hire:

  • Recruiters
  • Technical recruiters
  • Talent acquisition specialists
  • Sourcing specialists
  • Contract recruiters
  • Talent acquisition coordinators
  • Recruitment managers
  • HR staffing specialists
  • And more

We are looking forward to leveraging our years of experience in the staffing industry to help our clients hire talented recruiting professionals that will move their businesses forward.

If you’d like to learn more about EDI Staffing’s new recruiting division, or talk to us about finding a recruiter for your company, feel free to contact us! We’d love to help you find the right match for your team.

About EDI Staffing

Founded in 1994, EDI Staffing has grown from humble beginnings to become a top provider of staffing solutions for various industries. Using honest, resourceful, and creative techniques, we offer solutions that help our clients address their technological needs through short-term and permanent placements, along with consulting and professional services. By operating through our company values—accountability, innovation, integrity, teamwork, and work ethic, we have helped customers nationwide find top talent to fill many different positions.

The post New Recruiting Division at EDI Staffing appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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Employee engagement is crucial to doing good work, delivering great results, and maintaining high morale among your staff. But these days, with distractions coming at all of us from every direction, keeping employees engaged is no easy task.

The result: employees who dread their work, do the bare minimum, and maybe even cut corners or make mistakes. In other words: not exactly your dream team.

The good news, however, is that there are things you can do to improve employee engagement, and they aren’t necessarily expensive or complicated. Here are four of our best tips for keeping employees engaged.

  • 1. Acknowledge or reward a job well done. No one likes feeling like their hard work is going unseen or unappreciated. If your employees feel like their best efforts are going to go unrecognized, they aren’t going to be motivated to continue doing their best.

    Develop some kind of system to acknowledge a job well done. Whether it’s positive praise given in front of the whole team, a physical reward (like movie tickets or a gift card), or simply a glowing performance review, make sure you take the time to recognize when one of your employees goes above and beyond.
  • 2. Encourage communication. Employees will be more likely to remain engaged with their work if they feel like they are able to make valuable contributions to the company as a whole. Encourage people to speak up if they have questions or concerns about processes, policies, or practices that affect the way work is done within your company.

    Keep in mind that this door swings both ways. You should be as transparent as possible with your employees about company challenges or setbacks. This will help them feel like trusted members of a team, rather than subservient workhorses.
  • 3. Set the example. Are you constantly groaning about your clients in front of your employees? Do you take more days off than you should? Do you interrupt employees who are working on their daily tasks?

    If so, you are setting a bad example when it comes to workplace engagement. Show your employees that you are enthusiastic about your job. Maintain a positive attitude, and express excitement over upcoming projects and new challenges. If you do, it’s more likely that your employees will follow suit.
  • 4. Create an efficient environment. If employees are constantly having to work around old technology, slow software, and the like, they’re more likely to end up frustrated on a daily basis. Even things like desk chairs, keyboards, and room temperature can start to take a toll on employee morale if problems go on for too long.

Work to create an efficient, updated environment that works the way it’s supposed to while keeping everyone comfortable and happy. It may require a little investment on your part, but it could go a long way in making sure your employees have a work environment that fosters engagement rather than complaining.

Employee engagement is important, but increasing it doesn’t have to be hard. Follow these four tips to help your employees feel valued and heard, and their engagement will increase as a result. 

Looking to hire new IT talent for your team? EDI Staffing can help! With over 20 years experience finding and placing the top IT talent, we can help you find the top candidates for your company. Contact us today to speak with a recruiter and begin your search!

The post Increase Employee Engagement With These 4 Tips appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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One of the biggest keys to business success is building a great team—and building a great team doesn’t happen by accident. You’ve got to be deliberate about the kinds of employees you’re looking for. You have to be able to identify who on your current team lives up to your standards, and who needs to be let go.

It’s not an easy job, and many things can get in the way of making objective decisions about who on your staff is working out…and who isn’t.

That’s why it can be useful to have a framework to fit your employees into, to help you step back and take an honest look at how each of your employees fits within your company.

While we acknowledge the fact that it’s almost impossible that people will fit perfectly into these “boxes,” we find that this is a helpful framework when trying to determine how employees contribute to your business.

This is the framework of Multipliers, Adders, Subtractors, and Dividers. (Note: this framework comes from the book The Power of People: Four Kinds of People Who Can Change Your Life by Verna Cornelia Price.)

Multipliers have a positive impact that seems to spread.

They encourage others, and other people seem to work harder because of their efforts. They are happy in their jobs and actively  take steps to progress and grow. They seem to have a collective effect on the company, not only accomplishing their own tasks, but pushing the group as a whole toward bigger goals.

Adders are people that do a good job, consistently.

You can generally count on them to do their tasks well and on time. They individually add value to your company by doing the job they were hired to do. Adders are often hard workers who follow directions and get things done.

In contrast, Subtractors tend to fall a bit behind.

They may not be wreaking havoc on your business or on your profits, but in one way or another, they end up costing you a little more than they’re earning you.

And then there are Dividers.

Just as Multipliers have a collective, positive effect on the company, Dividers have a collective, negative effect on the company. Dividers tend to bring other people down, whether it’s through negativity, criticism, constant complaining, or creating office politics. Dividers can cause serious problems within your team dynamics.

Obviously, Multipliers and Adders are great people to have on your team. They move things forward and do good work. If your business is going to be successful at all, you need to have some Multipliers and Adders in the mix.

Subtractors shouldn’t be considered lost causes. Underperforming employees who are not having a significant negative impact on your company should be encouraged and helped. You may be able to turn them into Adders, or even Multipliers, by helping them identify and work on their weak spots.

Related: Is This Meeting Necessary? Use This Checklist To Find Out

Dividers should be handled with care. More often than not, once someone is identified as a Divider, it might be best to let them go and find a replacement. Hiring a new employee is a hassle, but it’s worth it to rid your company of someone who brings the whole organization down.

Being able to identify your employees’ places in this framework can help you as you work to build a team that will work hard—individually and collectively—to accomplish your company’s goals. Try it out and see what you learn!

The post Adders, Subtractors, Multipliers, and Dividers: Employee Types to Watch For appeared first on EDI Staffing.

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