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TUESDAY, July 10, 2018 -- Stick or spray-on sunscreens are essential tools against skin cancer, but it's important to use them the right way, a dermatologist says. "Sticks are easy for under the eyes and the backs of the hands, while spray sunscreens are often easier to apply on children," Dr. Debra Wattenberg said in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. "However, it's important to take precautions when using stick and spray sunscreens to ensure the best protection for you and your family," she added. Wattenberg is an associate clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. As with lotion sunscreens, choose sticks and sprays that are broad-spectrum, water-resistant and have an SPF (sun-protection...
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SATURDAY, June 30, 2018 -- During the summer when people trade in their jackets and jeans for flip flops and bathing suits, more skin is exposed to the sun's harmful UV rays. Dr. Katherine Gordon, assistant professor of dermatology at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, said summer is the perfect time for people to get in the habit of checking their skin for signs of cancer. "We recommend that everyone get in the habit of checking for signs of skin cancer at regular intervals year-round, though understandably people are more likely to be thinking about skin cancer in the hot summer months," Gordon said in a medical center news release. "You'll want to check your skin from head to toe, including areas like the scalp and between your toes, so it's helpful...
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On June 27, 2018, the Food and Drug Administration approved encorafenib and binimetinib (Braftovi and Mektovi, Array BioPharma Inc.) in combination for patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAF V600E or V600K mutation, as detected by an FDA-approved test. Approval was based on a randomized, active-controlled, open-label, multicenter trial (COLUMBUS; NCT01909453) in 577 patients with BRAF V600E or V600K mutation-positive unresectable or metastatic melanoma. Patients were randomized (1:1:1) to receive binimetinib 45 mg twice daily plus encorafenib 450 mg once daily, encorafenib 300 mg once daily, or vemurafenib 960 mg twice daily. Treatment continued until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The major efficacy measure was progression-free survival (PFS)...
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BOULDER, Colo., June 27, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Array BioPharma Inc. (Nasdaq: ARRY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Braftovi capsules in combination with Mektovi tablets for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma with a BRAFV600E or BRAFV600K mutation, as detected by an FDA-approved test. Braftovi is not indicated for the treatment of patients with wild-type BRAF melanoma. "We are thrilled with the approval of Braftovi + Mektovi, which help fill a critical unmet need for patients with advanced BRAF-mutant melanoma, a serious and deadly type of skin cancer," said Ron Squarer, Chief Executive Officer, Array BioPharma. "As presented at ASCO, Braftovi + Mektovi is the first targeted treatment to demonstrate...
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TUESDAY, June 26, 2018 -- Flight attendants may face higher-than-average risks of breast and skin cancers, a new study finds -- though the reasons why aren't yet clear. Harvard researchers found that compared with women in the general U.S. population, female flight attendants had a 51 percent higher rate of breast cancer. Meanwhile, their rates of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers were about two to four times higher, respectively. The study, which included over 5,300 U.S. flight attendants, is not the first to find heightened cancer risks among airline crews. But it's one of the largest and most comprehensive to look at the issue, according to lead researcher Eileen McNeely. What's still unclear is why the pattern is being seen. And because it's what's...
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:Basel, April 30, 2018 - Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved TafinlarĀ® (dabrafenib) in combination with MekinistĀ® (trametinib) for the adjuvant treatment of patients with melanoma with BRAF V600E or V600K mutations, as detected by an FDA-approved test, and involvement of lymph node(s), following complete resection. The FDA granted the combination Breakthrough Therapy Designation for this indication in October 2017 and Priority Review in December 2017. "Since the initial approval of Tafinlar and Mekinist in metastatic melanoma in 2013, the combination has become an important therapy for many patients carrying a BRAF mutation in both melanoma and lung cancers," said Liz Barrett, CEO, Novartis Oncology. "Today's...
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THURSDAY, May 31, 2018 -- A computer can beat even highly experienced dermatologists in spotting deadly melanomas, researchers report. The study is the latest to test the idea that "artificial intelligence" can improve medical diagnoses. Typically, it works like this: Researchers develop an algorithm using "deep learning" -- where the computer system essentially mimics the brain's neural networks. It's exposed to a large number of images -- of breast tumors, for example -- and it teaches itself to recognize key features. The new study pitted a well-honed computer algorithm against 58 dermatologists, to see whether machine or humans were better at differentiating melanomas from moles. It turned out the algorithm was usually more accurate. It missed fewer...
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THURSDAY, May 31, 2018 -- Where fear of skin cancer has little effect, vanity may succeed. In a new study, sun worshippers who were shown computer images of how their face would age after years of ultraviolet (UV) light exposure often decided to quit the tanning habit. In fact, "a single, 10-minute exposure to one's own face, digitally aged, with and without excessive UV exposure, reduced indoor and outdoor tanning behaviors over the next one month," said study author Aaron Blashill. Blashill is an assistant professor in the San Diego joint doctoral program in clinical psychology at San Diego State University/University of California. The new study included just over 200 college students. The researchers enlisted a computer program called "APRIL Age Progression...
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SATURDAY, May 26, 2018 -- Learning how to do a skin self-exam could save your life. "Skin cancer is one of the few cancers you can see with the naked eye," said Dr. Ali Hendi, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "Yet sadly, many people don't know how to be their own hero when it comes to skin cancer, including what to look for on their skin or when to see a board-certified dermatologist," he added in an American Academy of Dermatology news release. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. One in five Americans develops skin cancer, and one person dies every hour from melanoma, the deadliest form of the disease. To check your skin, use a full-length mirror to examine your...
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FRIDAY, May 25, 2018 -- Summer sun brings childhood fun, but experts warn it also brings skin cancer dangers, even for kids. "Don't assume children cannot get skin cancer because of their age," said Dr. Alberto Pappo, director of the solid tumor division at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. "Unlike other cancers, the conventional melanoma that we see mostly in adolescents behaves the same as it does in adults." His advice: "Children are not immune from extreme sun damage, and parents should start sun protection early and make it a habit for life." So, this and every summer, parents should take steps to shield kids from the sun's harmful UV rays. Those steps include: Avoid exposure. Infants and children younger than 6...
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