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A November 2018 article in the BMJ reported a study concluding what many lawyers have known for a long time: patients who use sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are twice at risk of having lower limb amputations than other diabetes medications. The scientists also reported that SGLT2 inhibitors are also linked to diabetic ketoacidosis.

What Are SGLT2 Inhibitors?

Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are medications that lower blood sugar in adults who have type 2 diabetes. They are used to complement diet and exercise. SGLT2 inhibitors may be available as a single-ingredient product or combined with other diabetic medications including metformin. They reduce the amount of glucose being absorbed by the body through the kidneys. This helps to reduce blood sugar by removing excess glucose through urine.

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A lawsuit recently filed in the U.S. District Court District of New Jersey alleges that someone received stomach cancer as a result of taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) Prilosec, Nexium, and the variations of both drugs. PPIs are used to treat many different stomach conditions, but can create even worse problems in the stomach as well. Before informing yourself on this lawsuit, you must first inform yourself on PPIs, specifically Nexium and Prilosec. You must also inform yourself about their potential side effects.

  1. What are Proton pump inhibitors?

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medications that reduce the amount of stomach accident found in the stomach lining. They help relieve symptoms of acid reflux, a condition in which food or liquid goes back up to the esophagus. PPIs can also help treat a stomach ulcer. In addition, they can also treat lower esophagus damage resulting from acid reflux. PPIs can be used to treat heartburn as well. They come in various brand names such as Prilosec, Nexium, Prevacid, AcipHex, Portonix, Dexilant, or Zerid.

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On July 13, 2018, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recalled Valsartan because they contain the contaminant N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). The FDA noted that valsartan products pose an unnecessary risk to patients. There are seven things you should know about this recent recall.

  1. What is NDMA?

NDMA is a contaminant. According to the EPA, it is a semivolatile organic chemical. It can be either naturally occurring or synthetically made. It is not currently produced in the United States. NDMA can be unintentionally produced through chemical reactions, especially those that involve alkylamines. It is also an intended by-product of chlorination of wastewater through use of chloramines. These chloramines are used to disinfect the water. There is a risk that NDMA is a possible drinking contaminant.

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Researchers from Louisiana State University’s Health Science Center and Seattle Children’s Hospital were given a five-year federal grant by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study whether or not muscle power training exercises can improve the walking abilities of children with cerebral palsy (CP).

Is this exciting? It really is.  Anything that can advance the ball for people with cerebral palsy is wildly exciting.

How will this study be conducted?
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