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PEWAUKEE, Wis. – July 20, 2018

Doobert.com is excited to announce the latest innovation in animal rescue technology to help animal rescues and animal shelters across the country to find one another and work together to save animals. “We realized that the thousands of animal shelters and rescue organizations in the U.S. did not have a tool to find new partners to source animals from, or send animals to, so we decided to build it,” said Chris Roy, founder of Doobert.com.

Animal shelters and animal rescue organizations can sign-up for free to create their organization profile. Once they are registered, they will have full access to the powerful functionality of Doobert which will allow them to search and partner with other Doobert organizations across the United States. In addition they will also be able to see what animals other organizations have available to transfer out and if they are able to transfer in (if they have space available).

For more information about the Doobert.com platform, please visit https://www.doobert.com/about

The post Search for new Doobert Partners – It’s like Match.com for animal rescues appeared first on .

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We know how it goes.  You spent your last dime on dinner last night with your friends and now you’re stuck at home, broke with nothing to do.  But not to worry, you can still save animals by being an animal rescue transport coordinator otherwise known as superheroes in the industry.  No need to get in your car and head to your local animal shelter when you can relax in the comfort of your own home.

While there are thousands of passionate animal rescue transport volunteers flying dogs and driving cats around the country, there are definitely not enough qualified rescue transport coordinators organizing all of these trips successfully.  The job of an animal rescue relay transport coordinator is a tough one but one that doesn’t require you to do a lot of driving or spend a lot of money.  Tell us more you say.

If we’ve piqued your interest, you should start with the animal rescue transport coordinator training that Team Doobert developed.  We introduce you to the basics of being a good TC including how to coordinate the transports, what the rules and regulations are, and how to deal with those weird pilot quirks and terminology that they use when flying animals around.  Once you’ve completed the training we would also recommend you check out the Animal Rescue Professionals Associations’ certification on transport.  Becoming a Certified Animal Rescue Transporter (CART) will demonstrate your knowledge to your colleagues and fellow rescuers.

Then you’re ready to dive into it.  Strap on your cell phone belt and dust off your organization and communication skills ‘cause you’re gonna need ‘em.  The best way to describe the role of a TC is that of a wedding planner.  You’re behind the scenes, coordinating the players, cuing the music, updating the caterers on the timetable, and ensuring the brides are in plenty of photos.  Sure there’s drama when you have animal rescue volunteers, and multiple animal rescue organizations involved, but you’re ready for that and the photos and videos everyone shares more than makes up for the drama.

Give it a shot and then come tell us what you think. We’re pretty sure you’ll be addicted like the rest of us.

The post No time? No money? No problem! How you can save animals with a zero-dollar budget appeared first on .

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The post Leg 14 appeared first on .

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What a wonderful animal rescuer you are. You signed up at your local animal shelter to help by fostering a cat. You envisioned the days of the two of you snuggling together as you watched reruns of Sex in the City, sipping Cosmopolitans and playfully batting at a feather on a stick. You never imagined your cat foster experience would end up like THIS!!

If you’ve run into a snag or two with your cat fostering, fear not because there are plenty of resources out there to help you.

Your local animal shelter – Remember that packet of information and phone number that they gave you when you picked up your foster cat from the shelter? Time to dig it back out of the back of the drawer and give them a call. You may not know it but your friendly neighborhood animal shelter has tons of resources and even experienced animal behaviorists that can shed light on your zany cat problems. From peeing outside the litter box to racing around the house like a NASCAR stock car, they can likely steer you in the right direction for where to begin to diagnose your cat woes.

Only a mouse away – Depending on the problem, you can find a wealth of information online about cat behavior problems and potential solutions. Amazing organizations like Best Friends Animal Society and Maddie’s Fund are dedicated to your success and have produced tons of information to help you. Here’s just a few of our favorite resources:

  • Best Friends Cat Foster Care Manual – Best Friends Animal Society is a well-known name in many parts of the United States.  As leaders in the animal welfare and advocacy movement, they have a wealth of resources for you on cat and even kitten fostering.
  • Maddie’s Fund Foster Blogs – Maddie’s fund is focused on education and providing programs to help animals get adopted.  They have a pretty active blog and you can read all sorts of posts about how to care for foster cats and how to resolve some of the challenges you may be having.
  • Cat Adoption Team – Out west near Portland, OR, the Cat Adoption team is an expert organization when it comes to fostering and adopting cats.  They’ve successfully placed more than 40,000 cats since they started in May of 1998 and they have the resources to prove it.

Remember that fostering a cat not only helps socialize it for adoption, but it also helps the shelter by freeing up a space for another resident.  It’s probably likely that the problems you’re having with your foster friend are treatable and fixable so don’t despair and make sure to reach out for help.

The post How to solve issues when fostering a cat appeared first on .

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“Do what you have always done and you’ll get what you have always got.” –Sue Knight

One of the best things in life is that it’s always changing. Whether it’s a new iPhone, a service we never thought we needed, or just the passing of the years, every day brings something new and challenges our status quo for how things are.

One of the most difficult things about building and running an animal rescue software platform like Doobert is making the functionality easy and intuitive to understand and use by a wide variety of users from a myriad of backgrounds. I am often more challenged by how to explain the powerful features and life-saving technology behind Doobert, then I am to actually come up with the concepts and program them. And considering that one of the biggest challenges that I have is to get animal rescue organizations and volunteers to understand and utilize Doobert, if the interface is not intuitive, they often leave, never to come back and they go back to their old ways of doing things often to the detriment of the animals.

Sometimes we spend our time and energy looking for the perfect solution instead of considering the tools and options that we have right in front of us. We have a vision in our heads’ of how something should work and when we encounter things that do not fit the mold, we pass on them and move onto the next. Things that are right in front of our eyes do not get a passing glance given the lens by which we are evaluating them.

I have been told by local animal shelters across the country that rescue relay transport is not an efficient way to transport animals yet the hundreds of volunteers that participate in rescue transport every week continue to do it and make an impact on the lives of animals. I receive random inquiries from people and organizations across the country trying to find a pilot to fly a dog who scoff at the idea that ground transport could achieve the same objective albeit with a little more planning and coordination.

We often look for perfection to the detriment of progress. Sometimes good enough is GOOD ENOUGH. Sure that technology or service may not be exactly what we are looking for but does it solve the problem? Maybe that animal adopter or foster home doesn’t meet all of the criteria we normally look for but do they love animals and want to help provide a good home?

Consider how you apply progress instead of focusing on perfection. You’ll often find that the solutions you may have overlooked can take your animal rescue activities in a new direction you never thought possible.

The post Think progress not perfection appeared first on .

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17 kittens rescued from the streets of South Floridaa during the worst kitten season ever went to their new lives in the Boston area. James Carney and Kathleen Brodie were an amazing Doobert team, assisted on the first leg by a non Doobert driver Margaret. All kitties arrived safe and healthy in time for a well deserved dinner. Thank you James, Kathleen, and Margaret for helping to save these precious lives.   

The post Rescued Kittens went from White Plains NY to Natick Mass appeared first on .

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Have you ever found yourself trying to explain rescue transport and how you spend your weekends to those that are not familiar with animal rescue relay transport?  “What do you mean you were out driving dogs around?  What kind of crazy person does that for fun?”  Here’s your quick guide to explaining your passion for animals and rescue transport to your Mom.

  • “Amazon doesn’t do pet transport…yet!” – We know you had the same thought as we did when Amazon started shipping things with drones but it hasn’t happened yet. There’s no drone for animal rescue transport yet. (we know…we checked)
  • “I enjoy the cool breeze on my face, and warm breath on my neck.” – Driving on the open road with the window down is a great feeling. As is feeling the warm breath of a dog sitting on the seat behind you knowing that you’re taking him somewhere safe as a part of his rescue transport.
  • “I have to fulfill those community service hours somehow.” – Ok, ok. We kid around sometimes too ya know.  But rescue relay transport is a legitimate way to fulfill some of those requirements and help save rescue animals at the same time.
  • “You and Dad always wanted to go for a Sunday drive so now I do, just without you.” – What else are you going to do on a Sunday…watch baseball?  Why not volunteer to save animals instead?
  • “I’m just making up for all those bad things I did as a kid.” – Your dark secrets are safe…for now.
How do you explain it?  If you’ve got a better explanation we’d love to hear it.

The post How to explain animal rescue transport to your mom appeared first on .

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What a great bunch of dogs. A couple of them are going to be BIG dogs. Well behaved all of the way through LEG 19 into Harrisburg PA.

The post #DBT5491 : Sat, Jul 07 – Sun, Jul 08 – From Forest, MS to Effort, PA appeared first on .

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Fostering a dog is one of those rewarding experiences that often carries some mis-conceptions with it from those not in the know. So, here’s the truth about the good, the bad and the ugly of fostering a dog so you have all of the details and can make the right choice for yourself.

The good: Fostering a dog is one of the best ways that you can help out at your local animal shelter. We know how hard it is to work regular volunteering hours at the local shelter so providing a temporary loving home to a rescue dog is something that helps both you and the companion animal and it’s a great way to give back to your local animal shelter.

The bad: One of the potential bad sides of fostering is you might fall in love once you get to know your foster dog friend and your fostering relationship turns into one of commitment and forever. Wait, is that a bad thing? Most people that do animal rescue would of course say no but once you adopt your new furry friend you may not be available as a foster home for the shelter again. So bad is all in the perspective I guess.

The ugly: The ugly side of fostering a dog is that you will embody the word “advocate.” You will likely spend all of your free time socializing your dog and taking them out to meet potential adopters in the park, on walks and in dog friendly restaurants. You’ll of course want to hold potential adopters to a higher standard that is worthy of the foster dog that you have cared for so lovingly over the weeks and months and you will want to be a part of scrutinizing the application, grilling the adopter on “where were you last night” and demanding to know what brand of food they will feed your canine friend. You will realize what it means to love another being more than yourself and cry when it’s time to part ways along your journey. But you will know your purpose has been served and that your skills will be needed again soon to help the next foster dog find their forever match.

For information on cat fostering, click here

You are the matchmaker. You are the one that makes the difference.

The post Dog fostering: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly appeared first on .

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“Leadership is not about titles, positions, or flowcharts. It is about one life influencing another.” –John C. Maxwell

Have you ever stopped to consider the beauty of possibility in animal rescue? Can you imagine what the world will look like when we get there?

Many people rescuing animals have been doing it for so long they get lost in the mundane day-to-day and lose that sparkle in their eyes when they try to consider why they spend their precious time, energy and money helping save animals. They may not realize that with each passing day we get closer to achieving our objectives that are focused on positive outcomes for animals. So just for a few minutes, I invite you to ponder the possibility of zero euthanization of otherwise healthy companion animals, simply due to constraints of space. Open your mind and visualize what that world would look like.

Depending on your role in animal welfare your visualization of zero euthanization may be different from others in the profession. Perhaps you are a staff member at a local animal shelter, or maybe you offer your home as a safe haven for a foster dog needing a place to crash. Maybe you are a rescue relay transport driver or a pilot flying dogs. Regardless of the role you play, your life will be different in this new world.  Change is often hard for us to deal with but this change will be a welcome one if you are ready to accept it.

Our new world of possibility has local animal shelters across the country with empty cages because there is no overpopulation of unwanted companion animals in every community. The hundreds of rescue relay transports taking place across the country every week are no longer needed because dogs and cats are not in danger of being euthanized simply due to their location. The community cats live in harmony with their neighbors and after appropriate spay and neuter are allowed to roam free without being harassed, poisoned or shot at. Puppy mills, dog fighting rings, and hoarding situations are all gone replaced by reputable breeders and organizations monitoring the health and well-being of all companion animals.

So the logical question is, “What’s next?” Where should we pivot the dedication of the tens of thousands of passional animal rescue volunteers to? What will become of the ~3,000 local animal shelter organizations and ~25,000 animal rescue organizations in the United States? Maybe we collectively start expanding our horizons to support the efforts of passionate animal rescue professionals in other countries around the world sharing with them our time, experience, and resources to help them resolve their local animal challenges. Or maybe we collectively band together to support changing legislation for animals increasing the penalties for animal abuse and providing programs to support humans who love their animals but may not be able to afford proper care of them.

What do you think?  Where should we shift our focus to continue helping save animals?

The post Ponder the beauty of possibility appeared first on .

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