Loading...

Follow Utah Family Law - Divorce and Family Law Done R.. on Feedspot


Valid
or
Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook

I can answer this question the way Utah law handles it.

First, there is no “contract” for disowning a child and terminating the obligation to support the child, but there is a way to petition the court for an order for relinquishment of both one’s parental rights and termination of parental obligations.

You can find an introduction and overview of this process in Utah here:

Voluntary Relinquishment of Parental Rights

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

The post Is there a contract that says you can disown your child and waive all rights to child support? appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

What precautions have you taken to avoid custody battles over your frozen embryos?

In Utah, the Utah Code contains these provisions regarding frozen embryos:

  • 78B-15-707. Parental status of deceased spouse.

If a spouse dies before placement of eggs, sperm, or an embryo, the deceased spouse is not a parent of the resulting child unless the deceased spouse consented in a record that if assisted reproduction were to occur after death, the deceased spouse would be a parent of the child.

  • 78B-15-706. Effect of dissolution of marriage.

(1) If a marriage is dissolved before placement of eggs, sperm, or an embryo, the former spouse is not a parent of the resulting child unless the former spouse consented in a record that if assisted reproduction were to occur after a divorce, the former spouse would be a parent of the child.

(2) The consent of the former spouse to assisted reproduction may be revoked by that individual in a record at any time before placement of eggs, sperm, or embryos.

To read about frozen embryo disposition contracts, you may wish to start here:

PRE-EMBRYO CUSTODY BATTLES: HOW PREDISPOSITION CONTRACTS COULD BE THE WINNING SOLUTION, 38 Cardozo L. Rev. 1879

Note by Ashley Alenick Volume 38, Cardozo Law Review, page 1879 (June, 2017)

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/What-precautions-have-you-taken-to-avoid-custody-battles-over-your-frozen-embryos/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

The post What precautions have you taken to avoid custody battles over your frozen embryos? appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

What is it like to have divorced parents as a child?

Generally worse than having non-divorced parents.

I do not state that to offend divorced parents. Most (not all) divorced parents who are honest with themselves would agree with me.

Most divorced parents who, when they themselves were children, experienced their own parents’ divorce would agree with me too.

To be sure, there are some marriages that are better off ending in divorce. There are married people who would be better off divorced, and some children would be better off if their parents divorced.

But generally speaking, kids of divorced parents have it worse than kids of parents who are not dysfunctionally married. And the reasons why are no mystery.

The family is the fundamental building block of a sound society. Like it or not, kids who don’t have strong families are at a disadvantage. If you go through life trying to deny it (instead of doing your best to compensate for it), you’ll spend a lot of time and suffer a lot of pain and frustration needlessly.

Children do best when reared by a loving mother and father. They learn about teamwork, compromise, sacrifice, delayed gratification, and civil dispute resolution, just to name a few. Girls learn to love and pick good men if they have and observe a good father. Boys learn to love and pick good women if they have and observe a good mother. Children have a better life, a better upbringing with the support of two parents than with the support of just one.

There are plenty of people who were reared by a single parent due to divorce or death and yet grew up happy and responsible citizens. Obviously, a single-parent upbringing and being a child of divorce does not condemn a child to a life of certain and severe misery, but it’s rarely an easier path to physically and psychologically healthy children than is being reared by two married parents.

Divorced parents—no matter how devoted they are to their children—typically have less time to spend with their children because they have to shoulder all the burdens of parenthood and earning a livelihood essentially by themselves. Children of divorce generally have less parental oversight and supervision, so they often (not always) learn less self-discipline and good habits. Idle hands and minds become the devil’s workshop.

May I offer a few words of advice too?

If you are a child of divorce and hunger for more human contact (regardless of how much you love or dislike your divorced parent(s)), please don’t look for love in all the wrong places. Many bad choices made in childhood have irreparable consequences. Evil people exist who know how vulnerable kids of divorce feel, and they prey on them. So stay alert.

But don’t be afraid to accept real care and love either. Don’t retreat into your shell. Resist feeling like a second-class person; that feeling is not real. Seek out good examples of maturity and good character as your mentors. It’s not just OK to see these people as “supplementary” parents, it’s smart. Look to God. And look to grandparents, aunts and uncles, ministers, neighbors, teachers, coaches, counselors, parents of your friends. If they are willing to help, let them help. You deserve to seek out and grasp every benefit of trying to be a good kid who is growing into a good adult. It may feel counterintuitive, but people who know they’ll benefit from help and get it are stronger than those who are too proud to admit they need help and refuse it.

If your divorced mom and/or dad feel disrespected by your efforts, explain to them that you’re doing this as much for them as for you. You know they are shouldering the work of 2 (or perhaps 1 and 1/2) parents and know that at times you may really need more than they can give. All parents—married or otherwise—need the help of other good influences in their children’s upbringing. A humble and wise divorced parent will not resent you for getting the help and direction you may need on those occasions when Mom or Dad can’t (or won’t) provide it all.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/What-is-it-like-to-have-divorced-parents-as-a-child/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

The post What is it like to have divorced parents as a child? appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A lot of people think that “no-fault divorce” means that your spouse cannot get a divorce unless you’ve done something wrong (i.e., something to cause your spouse to “deserve” a divorce from you).

Actually, no-fault divorce is just the opposite.

No-fault divorce means that you don’t have to prove your spouse is at fault to get a divorce. You can get a divorce simply because you no longer wish to be married anymore.

Until no-fault divorce was made legal, you could not file for and get a divorce unless your spouse had committed one or more of the recognized “marital faults”. Each state is different, but in Utah (where I practice law), the “fault” grounds are:

  • impotency of the respondent at the time of marriage;
  • adultery committed by the respondent subsequent to marriage;
  • willful desertion of the petitioner by the respondent for more than one year;
  • willful neglect of the respondent to provide for the petitioner the common necessaries of life;
  • habitual drunkenness of the respondent;
  • conviction of the respondent for a felony;
  • cruel treatment of the petitioner by the respondent to the extent of causing bodily injury or great mental distress to the petitioner;
  • incurable insanity

As you can imagine, that made getting a divorce virtually impossible if the acts or omissions of your spouse didn’t fall into one of the “fault” categories, and many, many unhappy couples who wanted to divorce could not divorce for this reason. That’s why no-fault divorce was created.

In Utah, the no-fault phrase invoked to seek a divorce is “irreconcilable differences of the marriage.”

With no-fault divorce having been around for almost 50 years now (California was the first U.S. state to pass a no-fault divorce law when Governor Ronald Reagan signed it into law in 1970, New York was the last state to pass a no-fault law in 2010. Utah enacted no-fault divorce in 1987) and the increase in divorce it has brought with it, some have come to question the wisdom of no-fault divorce, but there is no indication of going back to the fault-based days of divorce.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/What-is-no-fault-divorce/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

The post What is no-fault divorce, and how does it work? appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

After more than 20 years doing this work:

– I know what you want;

– I know what you believe you want; and

– we both know what you truly need (whether you are willing to admit it yet).

At least half of divorce distress results from confusing wants with need. No matter how bad your divorce is, it almost surely won’t deprive you of your most basic physiological needs. You don’t need to be married to get air, water, or basic food, clothing, and shelter.

What is my point? It’s this: don’t see divorce in the wrong light. Don’t expect more from divorce than it can give. Don’t expect from divorce what it cannot deliver.

Safety and/or Security

Except in rare situations where a spouse threatens violence if you divorce, the divorce likely won’t deprive you of physical and emotional safety. Indeed, many people seek (and obtain) greater physical and emotional safety through divorce.

If you seek a divorce to escape a violent marriage, divorce itself will do very little. Even if the court issues you a protective order, the inside joke among lawyers is that the piece of paper won’t stop fists, knives, or bullets.

A divorce won’t really leave you much safer economically either. Generally, a divorce will cut all of your marital assets in half, with 50% going to you, 50% going to your spouse. If you are ordered to pay alimony and child support, a big chunk of your income will be taken for years (in some cases, for life). But if you are an alimony or child support recipient, don’t get smug. Without your ex-spouse voluntarily paying, you can hardly count on getting paid in full and on time each month. And if your alimony or child support paying spouse loses his/her job or dies, your divorce decree won’t save you.

Maintaining the Status Quo

With rare, rare exception, divorce affects and usually changes to some degree every aspect of your lifestyle, even of your identity. Trying to keep everything as it was is impossible; the court can’t do it, nor is the court terribly interested in even trying.

If you think that divorce will “save” you the “cost” that your spouse is to you, you will likely soon realize just how much you spouse did for you that you now must either do without or pay someone else to do. All those minor repairs around the house. The yard work, the snow shoveling, the cooking, the cleaning, making the doctor and dentist appointments and getting the kids to and from. Unless your spouse is a total slug, you’re going to suffer a loss. Few people have the “luxury” of divorcing without feeling the financial pinch of all the services their spouse used to perform. So don’t think that divorce will save you money. Between 1) all the money you’ll spend to compensate for the loss of your spouse’s services and perhaps 2) alimony, divorce is going to cost you. And if you think alimony will put you on easy street, that illusion will evaporate as quickly as the money you find yourself having to spend just to meet basic needs.

Respect? Sympathy?

Divorce is a time when we often want sympathy, we may even feel as though we need it. But the court is not in the business of sympathizing or acting on sympathetic impulses. Get your sympathy and your empathy from your loved ones.

If you seek to gain your unappreciative/demeaning spouse’s respect through divorce, bear in mind: you cannot compel respect under even the most favorable of circumstances, and divorce is far from the most favorable of circumstances.

Freedom

You are as free now as you’re ever going to be. More often than not, any gains you obtain in divorce will come at a cost to you as well. Divorce can free you from marriage, but that won’t give you more freedom.

Power

While it is possible to have the court exercise its power for your benefit, court order power over your ex-spouse is largely in proportion to the extent your ex-spouse obeys the court’s order.

Revenge

Before you embark on a journey of revenge, dig two graves.

What Cost Revenge? Are you wanting to litigate to get even? If so, is revenge worth $20,000 or more? Worth a year or two of your life and time and attention? And as much as I hate to put it this way, I must: even if you’re not the vengeful type, is it even really worth $20,000 and up to roll dice in the hope you’ll get simple justice? Might you be better served spending that money on things you can control? Might you be better served building yourself back up, instead of trying tear your spouse down? The best revenge is to be unlike him who performed the injury.[1]

Change

Divorce will necessarily break up a family and damage or destroy other close relationships; as a result, rarely will you come out of divorce unscathed emotionally. There may be some permanent damage, but it’s not total damage. You cannot avoid it, but you can treat it, you can recover from it. You can (and should) make new friends–new friends that you’ll need in new circumstances. You can–and will–develop and deepen the relationships that survive divorce. You are loved and will continue to be loved.

Divorce cannot defeat you unless you let it. The same hammer that shatters the glass forges the steel. If we banish hardship we banish hardihood.[2] Bad breaks, therefore, need not break a good man [or woman]; they may with God’s help even make him better.[3]

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

[1] Marcus Aurelius

[2] Hugh B. Brown, “Salvation Is My Goal,” New Era, Dec. 1974.

[3] Neal A. Maxwell, All These Things Shall Give Thee Experience, pp. 40-41.

The post Confusing Want with Need – don’t expect what divorce cannot deliver appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

No, but . . .

A fiancee is nothing more than a potentiality. The couple is “engaged” to be married, but not yet married, not yet husband and wife, and so they have no legally recognizable status that is any different from people who are not engaged to be married.

But if by “fiance” you mean the woman with whom you’ve living for the past three or more years and/or with whom you have had a child or two, then you are, in a sense, a family, even if your marriage was not solemnized (“solemnized” means in this sense a formal marriage ceremony recognized by law). You have some rights as parents, but not as spouses. Because the relationship has not been formally entered into between you and the other member of the couple and without being recorded and recognized by the government, you are still not considered a “family” in the sense that a formally married couple is.

Cohabiting couples (with or without children), however, can in some states have their un-solemnized relationship recognized after the fact as a marriage if the state recognizes common law marriage. Common law may be established by meeting certain legal requirements such as declaring the intent to be regarded as married and cohabiting, rather than as a result of obtaining an official license and engaging in a formal ceremony.

In Utah, an un-solemnized relationship can be recognized as a marriage, if the factors of the statute are met. That statute is:

Utah Code § 30-1-4.5. Validity of marriage not solemnized.

(1) A marriage which is not solemnized according to this chapter shall be legal and valid if a court or administrative order establishes that it arises out of a contract between a man and a woman who:

(a) are of legal age and capable of giving consent;

(b) are legally capable of entering a solemnized marriage under the provisions of this chapter;

(c) have cohabited;

(d) mutually assume marital rights, duties, and obligations; and

(e) who hold themselves out as and have acquired a uniform and general reputation as husband and wife.

(2) The determination or establishment of a marriage under this section shall occur during the relationship described in Subsection (1), or within one year following the termination of that relationship. Evidence of a marriage recognizable under this section may be manifested in any form, and may be proved under the same general rules of evidence as facts in other cases.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/Is-a-fiancee-considered-family-by-law/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

The post Is a fiancee considered family by law? appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In the jurisdiction where I practice law (Utah), the question is not whether an abused spouse who makes more money than the abuser must pay alimony to the abuser, but whether it would be, under the totality of the circumstances, equitable for an abused spouse who makes more money than the abuser to pay alimony to the abuser.

In Utah, the factors that bear on whether alimony is awarded, how much is awarded, and for how long are cited below in footnote one [1], but the main factors are 1) the financial condition and needs of the recipient spouse; 2) the recipient’s earning capacity or ability to produce income, including the impact of diminished workplace experience resulting from primarily caring for a child of the payor spouse; 3) the ability of the payor spouse to provide support; 4) the length of the marriage; and 5) whether the recipient spouse has custody of a minor child requiring support.

So, for example, if the wife’s income is appreciably greater than the husband’s, and the abusive ex-husband’s abuse consisted of infrequent and relatively mild emotional abuse (such as name-calling), that would probably not be enough “fault” on the part of the abusive husband to justify denying him alimony.

But if the abusive ex-husband’s abuse consisted of chronically beating the hell out of the wife, terrorizing her, shamelessly and recklessly cheating on her in serial extramarital affairs, and/or grossly neglecting the basic needs of life of the wife, etc. that might constitute enough fault as to justify denying him alimony.

The fault of the husband would essentially need to be so egregious as to justify denying him the financial support he would otherwise merit.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/By-law-does-a-woman-have-to-pay-an-abusive-ex-husband-alimony/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

[1] Here are the alimony factors for Utah:

· the financial condition and needs of the recipient spouse;

· the recipient’s earning capacity or ability to produce income, including the impact of diminished workplace experience resulting from primarily caring for a child of the payor spouse;

· the ability of the payor spouse to provide support;

· the length of the marriage;

· whether the recipient spouse has custody of a minor child requiring support;

· whether the recipient spouse worked in a business owned or operated by the payor spouse; and

· whether the recipient spouse directly contributed to any increase in the payor spouse’s skill by paying for education received by the payor spouse or enabling the payor spouse to attend school during the marriage.

· The court may consider the fault of the parties in determining whether to award alimony and the terms of the alimony. “Fault” means any of the following wrongful conduct during the marriage that substantially contributed to the breakup of the marriage relationship:

  • engaging in sexual relations with a person other than the party’s spouse;
  • knowingly and intentionally causing or attempting to cause physical harm to the other party or a minor child;
  • knowingly and intentionally causing the other party or a minor child to reasonably fear life-threatening harm; or
  • substantially undermining the financial stability of the other party or the minor child.

· the standard of living, existing at the time of separation, although the court shall consider all relevant facts and equitable principles and may, in the court’s discretion, base alimony on the standard of living that existed at the time of trial.

· In marriages of short duration, when no child has been conceived or born during the marriage, the court may consider the standard of living that existed at the time of the marriage.

· The court may, under appropriate circumstances, attempt to equalize the parties’ respective standards of living.

· When a marriage of long duration dissolves on the threshold of a major change in the income of one of the spouses due to the collective efforts of both, that change shall be considered in dividing the marital property and in determining the amount of alimony. If one spouse’s earning capacity has been greatly enhanced through the efforts of both spouses during the marriage, the court may make a compensating adjustment in dividing the marital property and awarding alimony.

· In determining alimony when a marriage of short duration dissolves, and no child has been conceived or born during the marriage, the court may consider restoring each party to the condition which existed at the time of the marriage.

· Alimony may not be ordered for a duration longer than the number of years that the marriage existed unless, at any time before termination of alimony, the court finds extenuating circumstances that justify the payment of alimony for a longer period of time.

· Unless a decree of divorce specifically provides otherwise, any order of the court that a party pay alimony to a former spouse automatically terminates upon the remarriage or death of that former spouse. However, if the remarriage is annulled and found to be void ab initio, payment of alimony shall resume if the party paying alimony is made a party to the action of annulment and the payor party’s rights are determined.

The post By law does a woman have to pay an abusive ex-husband alimony? appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

You don’t want to incur the judge’s wrath, right?

You want the court to think well of you.

So your plan is not to make any waves.

You won’t make bold claims. You won’t take unpopular stands.

You won’t raise objections for fear of appearing unpleasant. You won’t correct errors for fear of embarrassing the judge and suffering retaliation.

You believe and hope that the court will reward you for being submissive, unassertive, pliant, and docile.

And that’s tragic.

Not just tragic. Stupid tragic.

Expect the court to reward you for being a doormat and the system will chew you up and spit you out.

Now don’t be a pest. Don’t make an ass of yourself.

But nothing ventured, nothing gained. Success is meaningless without the risk of failure.

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

Do what the fearful person does and you’ll get (and deserve) what the fearful person gets.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

The post Not just tragic. Stupid tragic. appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
If my current attorney stinks, can I hire a new one?

Great question. And one that many clients are afraid to ask (or afraid to get an answer). But the answer is good news:

You are not stuck with the attorney you started out with.

Yes, you can fire your attorney.

I’ve made two videos about the power and freedom you have to fire an attorney you’re not satisfied with[1]:

You Can Fire Your Attorney, Even in Court If Necessary

You Can Fire Your Attorney at Any Time!

Unless your attorney is so bad (i.e., doing you more harm than good) that you’d be better off with no attorney than another moment with the bad attorney, it’s best that you not fire your current attorney before you have found an attorney you want to replace your current attorney.

Once you have found the attorney you want to replace your current attorney, you hire the new attorney, and then notify your old attorney that he/she has been replaced. Make sure it’s in writing too.

If you’re uncomfortable with telling your attorney yourself, “You’re fired,” then you can ask your new attorney to break the news. Your new attorney is permitted to do so (and your new attorney should have no objection to doing so).

Your new attorney will then give notice to the opposing party and the court of the substitution of counsel, so that everyone in the case is aware of the change.

Replacing your attorney is your right, it’s not hard, and if you have a lousy attorney, you should replace your attorney with a good one as soon as possible. Your attorney is your representative, and if your attorney is doing a bad job, then your attorney is making you look bad.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

[1] Bear in mind that I practice divorce and family law in Utah, so make sure you learn the rules in your jurisdiction, but the principles should be similar in most jurisdictions (and note: while I am the one who wrote the script for these videos, the man in the video is Brian Godfrey, who was my legal assistant at the time).

The post If my current attorney stinks, can I hire a new one? appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Questions:

  • If we go to mediation, can I hire an attorney after to review the documents from mediation before I sign anything?
  • What if I hire an attorney before we meet with a mediator? Do I have to tell the mediator that I have an attorney?
  • Will the attorney want to be at mediation?
  • Just trying to figure out what will be the best plan. My husband claims he doesn’t want an attorney. He said if I get an attorney he will get one too. I don’t want this to be a drawn out pissing match. He’s hurt, sad, and angry and I just want to fair, yet have my kids and my best interests protected. Thoughts?

Answer:

Yes, you can go to mediation without a lawyer and (and if you do, I would recommend you notify everyone in advance of this; it’s the only decent thing to do, and it preserves your credibility) notify your spouse that you have come to discuss and negotiate the issues and reach agreement, but that you will not sign any final, binding agreement unless and until you have reviewed any proposed written settlement agreement with an attorney. If you choose to go to mediation without an attorney, this is the way I’d recommend you do it.

You do not have to tell the mediator or your spouse that you have an attorney, if you elect to attend mediation without an attorney.

I would recommend you attend mediation with an attorney, as opposed to going to mediation without a lawyer and then planning to review any proposed written settlement agreement with an attorney. Telling your spouse you won’t reach agreement without first taking more time to review a proposed settlement with an attorney can chill the attitude of compromise and settlement.

Your attorney should, in my opinion, want to be at the mediation settlement conference to help you negotiate and negotiate quickly and fairly to a settlement.

Your husband claims he doesn’t want an attorney? No surprise there. Nobody really wants an attorney (unless perhaps the attorney is a big help and free of charge). My feelings aren’t hurt; attorneys have come to be viewed–accurately–as providing too little value for the money they charge. But not all attorneys are that way. You can find an attorney whose ROI (“return on investment”) is well worth it, and that kind of attorney is worth seeking and hiring.

I think people get it all wrong when they see “If you get an attorney, then I will!” as an antagonistic sentiment. Both parties having good (meaning skilled, knowledgeable, sensible) helps the negotiation process work better, faster, and inexpensively. Both parties make far better informed decisions. Bringing a lawyer to mediation should not have the same effect as would bringing a gun–and if it does, you and your lawyer are doing more harm than good to the settlement process.

Mediations aren’t a time to negotiate by threat (although there is nothing wrong with standing one’s ground and taking the position of “this is my bottom line: if this isn’t acceptable to you, I believe I will do at least this well, if not better, if the case goes to trial”–just make sure you really mean it and not use it as an idle threat; bluffs are easy to call). If you and/or your husband see hiring a lawyer as a threat, as a purely defensive move, then you are not wanting to win by settlement, you want to “beat” the other in settlement, and that is sure to result in anger, frustration, stalemate, wasted time, and wasted money.

Think through your objectives. Know what matters to you most. Think through the various ways to achieve your objectives; the more creatively you think the more likely you will be to find a way. Be honest. Be fair. Be flexible. Prepare a comprehensive settlement proposal well in advance of mediation and send it to you husband or his attorney, if he has one. Negotiation by ambush will likely result in a tremendous waste of time and money, and reduces the efficacy and likelihood of success in mediation and negotiation process.

Utah Family Law, LC | (801) 466-9277 | eric@divorceutah.com

The post A Spouse’s Questions about the Divorce Mediation Process appeared first on Divorce Utah.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview