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The Episcopal Diocese
of New York

1047 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10025
Tel: (212) 316-7400
info@dioceseny.org
 

Communications Contacts

Mr. Nicholas Richardson
Director of Communications, Editor, Episcopal New Yorker


Office: 212-316-7520
Fax: 212-932-7323
nrichardson@dioceseny.org

Mr. Andrew Gary
Assistant to the Chief of Finance and Operations, Communications & Editorial Assistant, Safeguarding Online Manager


Office: 212-932-7322
Fax: 212-932-7323
agary@dioceseny.org

The Rev. Victor Conrado Appointed New Canon for Congregational Vitality and FormationWill start August 15, 2019

July 11, 2019.

Bishop Dietsche today announced the appointment of the Rev. Victor Conrado to serve as the Canon for Congregational Vitality and Formation for the Diocese of New York.

Conrado will provide leadership to the arenas of Congregational Development, Vitality and Formation and Latino Ministries in the Diocese.  He comes to the Diocese having most recently served as Associate for Ministries for the Diocese of Chicago in which capacity he was responsible for congregational development and congregational transition, and as Associate Rector at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Glen Ellyn where he was responsible for starting a Spanish-language ministry and for Christian formation.

Born in Colombia, Conrado received his MDiv at the Jesuit Theological Seminary in Nairobi, Kenya in 2000 and was ordained to the Priesthood in Colombia in 2001.  He emigrated to the US and was subsequently received into the Episcopal Church by the Bishop of Chicago in 2009 and his orders were received in 2011.  He brings a great deal of experience in congregational vitality and formation and is trainer for the College for Congregational Development.

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The Episcopal Diocese of New York 1047 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10025 Tel: (212) 316-7400 info@dioceseny.org Communications Contacts Office: 212-316-7520 Fax: 212-932-7323 nrichardson@dioceseny.org Office: 212-932-7322 Fax: 212-932-7323 agary@dioceseny.org The Right Reverend Andrew ML Dietsche Bishop of New York Easter Sunday • April 21, 2019 The Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine New...

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The Episcopal Diocese of New York 1047 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10025 Tel: (212) 316-7400 info@dioceseny.org Communications Contacts Office: 212-316-7520 Fax: 212-932-7323 nrichardson@dioceseny.org Office: 212-932-7322 Fax: 212-932-7323 agary@dioceseny.org Delivered at the Holy Eucharist with Reaffirmation of Vows and Consecration of Chrism Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine Holy...

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The Way of Love and Lambeth: Bishop Glasspool speaks to the House of Bishops Bishop Glasspool with Bishop Shin (l) and Bishop Dietsche (r). Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service Bishop Mary D. Glasspool, bishop assistant, shared these remarks during the March 14 morning session of The Episcopal Church’s House of Bishops’ retreat at Kanuga: The Way of Love and Lambeth The Right...

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The Episcopal Dioceseof New York 1047 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10025 Tel: (212) 316-7400 info@dioceseny.org Communications Contacts Mr. Nicholas Richardson Director of Communications, Editor, Episcopal New Yorker Office: 212-316-7520 Fax: 212-932-7323 nrichardson@dioceseny.org Mr. Andrew Gary Assistant to the Chief of Finance and Operations, Communications &amp.

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The Episcopal Dioceseof New York 1047 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10025 Tel: (212) 316-7400 info@dioceseny.org Intake Officer The Rev. Canon Nora Smith Canon for Transition Ministry, Intake Officer Cell: 917-319-3959Office: 212-316-7421 nsmith@dioceseny.org Statute of Limitations for Clergy Sexual Misconduct Allegations Suspended for Three Years Nearly a year ago, the Presiding Bishop...

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The Episcopal Diocese
of New York

1047 Amsterdam Avenue
New York, NY 10025
Tel: (212) 316-7400
info@dioceseny.org
 
FileAction
MacLeod.pdfDownload 
Otis.pdfDownload 
Stevenson.pdfDownload 
    Bishop's Crosses to Bruce J. MacLeod, Jr., Jeannine Otis, and Douglas B. Stevenson

    At the 242nd Diocesan Convention November 9, Bishop Dietsche awarded the Bishop's Cross to Cathedral Trustees President Bruce J. MacLeod, Musician Jeannine Otis, and SCI Center for Seafarer's Rights leader Douglas B, Stevenson, Esq. The texts of the citations follow. Pdfs of the citations as presented to the recipients may be viewed or downloaded by clicking on the links in the left sidebar.

    Bruce J. MacLeod, Jr.

    Bishop Dietsche and Bruce MacLeod

    It was at this Diocesan Convention 145 years ago that Bishop Horatio Potter called for a charter to build a great cathedral for the Diocese of New York and established the first Board of Trustees.  In 1892, on the Feast of Saint John, ground was broken in Morningside Heights, and ever since, the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine has witnessed the glory of God, been a center of culture and theological inquiry for this great city, and a convening authority for the Diocese of New York

    Ours is the largest Gothic building on Earth, and one of the three largest cathedrals.  Today it is but two-thirds finished, and the burdens of caring for this institution and growing it are extraordinary.  Twenty years ago, the daunting financial challenge and the demands of a building like no other, but no longer new, revealed that the future of the cathedral was wholly imperiled.  In the years since, Bruce McLeod, as President of the Board of Trustees of the Cathedral, has brought the experience of a life lived in professional building development, and the spiritual maturity shaped by his life and labors at Christ’s Church in Rye, to lead this institution through those challenges and into the judicious development of fallow portions of the Cathedral Close.  This has stabilized this church.  Bruce then leveraged those assets to build sufficient endowed funds to secure the life and continuity of the cathedral for the next century, if not indefinitely.  It is not too much to say that on his watch the Cathedral Church of Saint John the Divine has been saved.

    His leadership has bridged the temporal and the spiritual.  It has been the privilege of this bishop to walk a road with Bruce in which we have engaged what can only be called the reawakening of the love and shared common life of the Diocese of New York and its cathedral.  Within the extraordinary complexity of these two institutions, Bruce has brought voice and vision to the miracles and wonders God can do through institutional health and genuine Christian partnership.  When the day comes that Bruce lays down the reins of his leadership, he will leave behind a profoundly transformed institution, and the gratitude of a bishop and diocese, and a dean and church.

    Therefore, in recognition and gratitude for his witness to the spiritual possibilities of institutional leadership, and the costs and joys of that leadership, offered to the glory of God, we, on this 9th day of November 2018, in the seventh year of our consecration, do award him

    The Bishop’s Cross

    The Right Reverend Andrew ML Dietsche
    XVI Bishop of New York

    Jeannine Otis

    Jeannine Otis

    At the age of 12, Jeannine Otis appeared as a soloist with the Detroit Philharmonic Orchestra.  Four years later she was accepted to Wellesley College, as the first African-American to be a Presser Music Scholar.  She went on to receive professional degrees in theater education and performance.  On stage, and in theatre and church, she has partnered with performers across the musical spectrum from Kool and the Gang to Pete Seeger, to the Helsinki Philharmonic, to a variety of hip-hop artists to the Vienna Opera House.  Her book “The Gathering” described her work with incarcerated teens.  Through music she has engaged in ministry that has helped some of the least among us find their voice and expression and live into their creative fullness.

    For over 25 years Jeannine has been the Music Director at Saint Mark’s Church in-the-Bowery, where she once performed with Allen Ginsberg, and more recently for Rural and Migrant Ministry as well, and where she has explored the fullest range of sacred music across all traditions and offered herself to the exercise of shared congregational worship.  Among her offerings to that parish and the larger church has been her annual, heralded Good Friday Blues.  She has been recognized and honored by the City Council of New York and the NAACP and was awarded a Reggie for her performance in The Cradle Will Rock.

    In 2018, the Reparations Committee of the Diocese of New York inaugurated the first season of a three-year journey from shame to hope across the scope of American racism.  This first chapter has been called The Year of Lamentation, and through intellectual inquiry, stage performance, music and dance, these twelve months invited us to enter together into the hard truth of human suffering that is the fruit of racism, and to abide for a while in the stories of slavery and racial violence.  Jeannine has shepherded the musical expression of the Year of Lamentations and has brought the fullness of her own musical gifts to this exploration of the keening, broken heart; of the soaring, hopeful soul, as we have heard her at this convention.  It may be fairly said that she has been the soulful musical voice of Lamentation among us.  Indeed, New York Magazine described Jeannine as having a voice that can lead us to the Promised Land.

    Therefore, in recognition and gratitude for the sacred heart of her musical expression, and her commitment to the enlarging of the human spirit through music, offered to the glory of God, we, on this 9th day of November 2018, in the seventh year of our consecration, do award her

    The Bishop’s Cross

    The Right Reverend Andrew ML Dietsche
    XVI Bishop of New York

    Douglas B. Stevenson, Esq.

    Douglas Stevenson and Bishop Dietsche

    Seamen’s Church Institute is a ministry by the, founded out of the Episcopal Diocese of New York in 1834, Church to ships and the mariners who serve on them.   This ministry began as “floating churches” berthed along the New York City waterfront and grew to serve mariners out of facilities in Lower Manhattan and Port Newark.  Along with direct chaplaincy to mariners aboard the 3400 ships that dock in Port Newark every year, and the creation of training facilities for seafarers who traverse both the world’s oceans and America’s rivers, the Center for Seafarer’s Rights stands as the third leg of this ministry.

    Under the leadership of Douglas Stevenson, the Center for Seafarer’s Rights provides the only full-time, free legal-aid program in the world for merchant mariners.  The labor of seafarers, disproportionately drawn from the developing world, is among the most dangerous work in the world: hard labor in the wilderness of violent storms and roiling seas, and sometimes under unscrupulous ship owners.  And all of this happens far from the watching eyes of protective government and institutions.  SCI and the Center for Seafarer’s Rights are watching when no one else is.  When this bishop asked Doug many years ago what it is that he does, he described the experience of chaplains aboard ships in Port Newark shaking the hand of a seaman and coming away with a folded note in his palm: “Help me.  This ship is unsafe.”  

    For over twenty-five years Douglas Stevenson has given himself to the safety and well-being, and to the demands of human justice, for those in peril on the sea.  The Center for Seafarer’s Rights provides legal services of every kind to mariners in port, but Doug also advocates for and negotiates on behalf of seafarers trapped on abandoned ships, or subject to the threat of international piracy.  He was pivotal to the creation of the Maritime Labour Convention of 2006, establishing international regulations for the protection of seafarers.  His work has taken Doug from boardrooms to classrooms to the decks of container ships; to an eight-day journey through the perilous waters of Pirate Alley off the coast of Somalia; and to the chambers of the United States Supreme Court.  In every place, Doug is a voice for the voiceless, the rememberer of the forgotten.  He is the world’s leading authority on seafarer human rights.

    Therefore, in recognition and gratitude for his witness to the dignity of every human being, and the inalienable rights of the least among us, offered to the glory of God, we, on this 9th day of November 2018, in the seventh year of our consecration, do award him

    The Bishop’s Cross

    The Right Reverend Andrew ML Dietsche
    XVI Bishop of New York

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    The Episcopal Diocese
    of New York

    1047 Amsterdam Avenue
    New York, NY 10025
    Tel: (212) 316-7400
    info@dioceseny.org
     

    Communications Contacts

    Mr. Nicholas Richardson
    Director of Communications, Editor, Episcopal New Yorker

    Telephone: 212-316-7520
    Fax: 212-932-7323
    nrichardson@dioceseny.org

    Mr. Andrew Gary
    Assistant to the Chief of Finance and Operations, Communications & Editorial Assistant, Safeguarding Online Manager

    Telephone: 212-932-7322
    Fax: 212-932-7323
    agary@dioceseny.org

    Mr. Wayne Kempton
    Archivist & Historiographer

    Telephone: 212-316-7419
    Fax: 212-316-7405
    archives@dioceseny.org

    Bishop Dietsche Writes on the Tree of Life Massacre and the Responsibility of Gospel Witness

    October 29,2018

    My Dear Brothers and Sisters,

    All good and well-meaning people in America and across the world are horrified and heartbroken over the mass shooting that took place at Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh this weekend. This may have been the largest assault on American Jews in our history, and has happened at a time when there remain many among us, including some of the victims of Saturday’s massacre, who lived through and can remember the Holocaust in Europe of the 1930s and 1940s. Vicious, violent anti-Semitism has been a continuous dark current through western culture century after century; it has erupted in some of the most horrific chapters of our history, and some of the most extreme campaigns of human brutality; and, on Saturday we were reminded in the most painful way that this sheer evil continues to reside in the deep pathology of American religious, racial and ethnic hatreds. 

    Every community of faith, and the larger society around us, are recoiling at this violent crime of religious hatred in our midst. Everywhere are prayers for the dead and wounded, for the bereaved, and for a shattered community. The people of Tree of Life, and of Squirrel Hill in Pittsburgh, will know, I am certain, the compassion and love of the much larger body of people who feel the deep wound of this violence alongside our Jewish brothers and sisters in Pittsburgh. To all of them this diocese extends our love and grief and the embrace of our common humanity. And the rich fabric of constant prayer. 

    But this terrible act came at the end of a week when we saw some fourteen or more bombs sent through the mail to political leaders and the news media. That those bombs brought no loss of life is a grace, but the fact of them, sent by an extreme far-right politically motivated attacker, has shaken the foundation of a country preparing right now to exercise the sacrament of its democracy. 

    Something essential and needed in our common life is coming undone. Some foundation upon which we believed we stood is crumbling. Some thread, by which we were bound together, has been cut, and we are falling away from one another into warring camps and tribal divisions. I have had vestry persons in our parishes tell me that their congregations are so divided that “we can’t even talk to each other anymore.” At church! Everywhere is the fear that those treasured democratic values and bonds of community by which we have ordered our common life across our differences, by which we have endured and survived crisis upon crisis throughout our history, may now be spinning away from us. Who are we actually? And what may we become?

    In the face of such a societal crisis, and in this vacuum of political leadership, it is more important than ever that we, the church, be the church. That we choose the gospel witness. We must make now, as ever, no peace with evil, and continue our conviction in the love of God for all people through our Lord Jesus Christ, and for the generosity and freedom and equality and compassion and welcome that this love of God requires of us. These principles must inform everything we do as a church: when we are being pastors and caregivers to one another; when we pray for those who do not pray for us; when we pray for the victims of hate; when we are reaching out to the least, the last and the lost among us; when we are learning in interfaith commonality the thousand faces of God; when we stand as one in advocacy for racial and ethnic and gender and LGBT equality; when we come before the altar to receive the absolving, reconciling love of God in Christ and then turn to this broken world to make our peace. And, too, when we look across the political and cultural divide and extend ourselves for the possibility of something new. To invite, beckon and call those whom we might otherwise name adversary or opponent or enemy into the enfolding love of communion. That we may make every sacrifice for the sake of the Kingdom. So that we may be repairers of the breach. This is what our Presiding Bishop meant in his royal wedding sermon: “love is power.” The power to transform. That simple proclamation, which galvanized the world, is our hope for the world; that the love of God, and the powerful expression of it in your life and mine, may make all things new. 

    With every good wish, I remain

    Yours,

                                                                        

    The Rt. Rev. Andrew ML Dietsche
    Bishop of New York

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    The Episcopal Diocese
    of New York

    1047 Amsterdam Avenue
    New York, NY 10025
    Tel: (212) 316-7400
    info@dioceseny.org
     

    Communications Contacts

    Mr. Nicholas Richardson
    Director of Communications, Editor, Episcopal New Yorker

    Telephone: 212-316-7520
    Fax: 212-932-7323
    nrichardson@dioceseny.org

    Mr. Andrew Gary
    Assistant to the Chief of Finance and Operations, Communications & Editorial Assistant, Safeguarding Online Manager

    Telephone: 212-932-7322
    Fax: 212-932-7323
    agary@dioceseny.org

    Mr. Wayne Kempton
    Archivist & Historiographer

    Telephone: 212-316-7419
    Fax: 212-316-7405
    archives@dioceseny.org

    The Rev. Deacon Eugene Bourquin Appointed Pastoral Missioner to the Deaf

    Sept 26, 2018

    The Rev. Deacon Gene Bourquin

    Bishop Dietsche announced today the appointment of the Rev. Deacon Gene Bourquin as Pastoral Missioner to the Deaf, "to serve as a pastoral caregiver to people who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing, blind, or experiencing other sensory loss (hereafter, Deaf), and as a missioner for strengthening the Diocese’s evangelism and ministry to the Deaf, including helping congregations to improve their outreach, welcome, and incorporation of people with sensory challenges.

    "Gene comes to this ministry with an exceptional depth of experience," the bishop wrote. "For nearly three decades, he worked at a national rehabilitation center for deaf-blind youths and adults as a sign language interpreter, travel instructor, researcher, and director of community services. Fluent in American Sign Language, he holds numerous certifications, a master’s degree in deafness rehabilitation, and a doctorate in health administration."

    Complete Announcement Text

    Deacon Bourquin's contact info:
    gbourquin@dioceseny.org.
    646-832-6003

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    The Episcopal Diocese
    of New York

    1047 Amsterdam Avenue
    New York, NY 10025
    Tel: (212) 316-7400
    info@dioceseny.org
     

    Transition Office Contacts

    The Rev. Canon Deborah (Deb) Tammearu
    Canon for Transition Ministry

    Telephone: 212-316-7421
    Fax: 212-932-7368
    dtammearu@dioceseny.org

    Mr. Alito Orsini
    Liaison to Canon for Ministry, Liaison to Canon for Transition Ministry

    Telephone: 212-316-7414
    Fax: 212-932-7368
    aorsini@dioceseny.org

    Communications Contacts

    Mr. Nicholas Richardson
    Director of Communications, Editor, Episcopal New Yorker

    Telephone: 212-316-7520
    Fax: 212-932-7323
    nrichardson@dioceseny.org

    Mr. Andrew Gary
    Assistant to the Chief of Finance and Operations, Communications & Editorial Assistant, Safeguarding Online Manager

    Telephone: 212-932-7322
    Fax: 212-932-7323
    agary@dioceseny.org

    Mr. Wayne Kempton
    Archivist & Historiographer

    Telephone: 212-316-7419
    Fax: 212-316-7405
    archives@dioceseny.org

    Change in Transitions

    The Rev. Canon Deborah Tammearu

    The Rev. Canon Deborah Tammearu to Retire Dec 31; The Rev. Nora Smith to Be New Canon for Transition Ministry

    Bishop Dietsche announced Sept 21 that Canon Deborah Tammearu would step down from her role as Canon for Transition Ministry at the end of 2018, and that the Rev. Nora Smith, currently serving on the Bishop's staff as director of Strategic Programs, will take her place.

    The Rev. Nora Smith

    "This is a poignant moment for both Deb and me," the Bishop wrote in his message to the diocese, "as she was the first person I invited onto my staff after becoming your bishop, and in the years since has helped shepherd the call of new clergy leadership for at least half the churches in the diocese."

    For the full text of Bishop Dietsche's announcement, please click here.
     

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