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Workshop: Hidden messages in London’s typography Image courtesy of Sarah Hyndman

What: Graphic designer, author and typography extraordinaire Sarah Hyndman is back with another series of her “type tasting” workshops, where visitors come to pick apart the personalities, quirks and meanings behind different typefaces. This time, she will be analysing the letterforms distinctive to London, such as those featuring on street, shop and transport signs, looking at the history behind them and discovering their “hidden messages” and meanings. The sessions are two-and-a-half hours long and take place at Hyndman’s studio in an old Victorian chocolate factory, near Dalston, East London. You don’t need to be a typographic aficionado, either – the sessions are open to anyone from beginner to professional level.

When: 23 June 2019, 10.30am-1pm, and 3pm-5.30pm.

Where: Type Tasting, first floor, The Chocolate Factory, Farleigh Place, Hackney Downs, London N16 7SX.

Info: Tickets cost £65. Drawing materials will be provided, as will tea, coffee and snacks. Head to Type Tasting.

Book: The Graphic Design Play Book Image courtesy of Laurence King

What: What better way to engage people in graphics than through games? This fun activity book, compiled by Paris-based graphic designers Sophie Cure and Aurélien Farina, looks to “explore visual thinking” through a range of pen-to-paper tasks, such as puzzles, spot the difference, drawing and dot-to-dot. The various activities look to demonstrate to design novices how great typography, signage, poster design and branding is made – and for experts, aims to be a bit of joyous, light relief from their real-life briefs. The book comes complete with a pull-out section of stickers, die-cut templates and coloured paper, and is filled with examples of work by the likes of Otl Aicher and Gerd Arntz. Who says activity books are just for kids?

When: Released 24 June 2019.

Where: Available UK-wide.

Info: The book costs £14.99 and is available via Laurence King’s website.

Awards: Design Week Awards 2019

What: We’ve shaken up the format of our prestigious design awards this year, doing away with the seated dinner, and taking on a different venue at the Science Museum’s spectacular new space, Illuminate. In 2019, we’re awarding designers across fields as broad as branding, copywriting, strategy, retail interiors, apps and social projects. There are also new categories, such as best in-house team, and the winners have been chosen by a sterling, independent judging panel including 4Creative’s Alice Tonge, Made design director Ruth Wassermann and Gal-dem designer Chani Wisdom. Tickets to the evening event are now sold out, but if you don’t have one, we’ll be revealing winners online the next day.

When: 20 June 2019, 6pm-11pm.

Where: Illuminate at the Science Museum, Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2DD.

Info: Look at this year’s shortlist here, and find out more about the Design Week Awards here.

Exhibition: Women’s Work Image courtesy of the Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft

What: 20th century, female designers have long been overlooked for their male counterparts – this new show at Sussex’s Ditchling Museum of Art and Craft shines a light on the work of craftswomen who ran successful businesses in the 1920s and 1930s. The exhibition showcases more than 100 pieces, looking at a broad group of makers, including textile designer Enid Marx, weaver Elizabeth Peacock and potter Denise Wren. The show will look at their work in context of the two World Wars, examining how the likes of silversmith Catherine Cobb monopolised on the demand for stainless steel cutlery after the war years. The craft show is accompanied by a series of hands-on workshops and events, including ceramics moulding, block printing, clay jewellery making, hand stitching and material dyeing sessions.

When: Until 13 October 2019.

Where: Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft, Lodge Hill Lane, Ditchling, Hassocks BN6 8SP.

Info: Entry to the exhibition is included in museum admission, which costs £6.50. Head to the Ditchling Museum of Art + Craft.

Festival: London Festival of Architecture Image courtesy of the London Festival of Architecture

What: Back for another year, the month-long festival sees 400 events taking place across the capital, including architectural tours, exhibitions, talks, workshops and more. Why not embark on a walk of East London following the River Thames, perusing the past and future developments of the riverfront on an illustrated guide, or visit an exhibition showcasing hypothetical buildings constructed out of paper by practices including Zaha Hadid Architects and Sarah Wigglesworth? Alternatively, you can check out Musicity’s audio art installation, which has worked with musicians and recording artists to create mini soundtracks to suit 15 locations across London, which can be accessed via Musicity’s smartphone app.

When: Until 30 June 2019.

Where: All across London.

Info: Some events are free and some are ticketed. Head to the London Festival of Architecture.

Other things to catch: Image courtesy of TypoCircle

Typo Talk with Dave Buonaguidi: Design collective and talks’ organiser TypoCircle is back with the cricket player-turned-advertising guru, who founded creative studios including 4Creative and Karmarama. 27 June 2019, 7pm, at St Brides Library, 14 Bride Lane, London EC4Y 8EQ. Tickets cost £19, and £12 for TypoCircle members. More info here.

Serpentine Pavilion 2019: Japanese architect Junya Ishigami has designed this year’s installation, creating an experimental structure in keeping with his eclectic style, which has been inspired by roof panelling. Open until 6 October 2019, at Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London W2 3XA. Admission is free. More info here.

Manga: The British Museum’s latest blockbuster exhibition looks at the Japanese illustrative art of manga comics, cartoons and anime. Running until 26 August 2019, at The British Museum, Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 3DG. More info here.

The post Picks of the month: the best design events to catch in June appeared first on Design Week.

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Glasgow-based studio Tangent has given the Edinburgh International Book Festival an illustrative campaign for this year, which looks to tell “stories” through comic strip-style imagery.

The Edinburgh International Book Festival was started in 1983 as a biennial event, then changed to annual in 1997. It is one of the largest literature festivals worldwide, this year featuring more than 900 authors across 800 events, talks and workshops, including novelists, poets, scientists, comic creators, illustrators, historians and musicians.

The event has a core brand — also designed by Tangent, which centres around an “E” symbol with the festival name set in a serif typeface — but changes its campaign ever year in time for the event. Tangent has worked with the festival for 10 years, and created its current core brand, which launched in 2017.

This year, the studio has worked with US illustrator Rose Wong to create a comic strip-inspired campaign that aims to reflect the festival’s 2019 theme of “We Need New Stories”.

The theme looks at the idea of truth and multiple perspectives, questioning “simple” narratives such as those endorsed by politicians in recent years, like “Take Back Control” (the Brexit campaign) and “Make America Great Again” (Donald Trump’s presidential campaign).

Through hosting talks by a wide range of individuals, it looks to celebrate the idea of listening to a diverse range of views, says Nick Barley, director at the festival, from “scientists and politicians to mythmakers and poets”.

The studio has worked with Wong to create five, reversible comic strip “narratives”, which tell a different story depending on whether they are read forwards or backwards.

Each narrative features a character embarking on a journey and looks to express how the “meaning of the journey becomes something completely different” when presented in an alternative way, says Andrew Stevenson, co-founder at Tangent.

The imagery is metaphorical, with the five comic strips looking to reflect different themes, including: how the internet has affected human relationships; acceptance and tolerance of other people’s opinions; community and working as a collective; sharing resources with those less fortunate; and human consumption, and being more ethical and sustainable.

The illustrations feature several elements of Wong’s signature style, such as minimal, line-drawn people illustrations, repetitive motifs of flowers and other objects, and the use of pastels.

This has inspired the palette of the overall festival campaign, which uses pastel blue, purple, pink, yellow and green across touchpoints such as print posters and advertising banners. The use of purple also hints towards the festival’s core branding, which features this colour.

Alongside this, the campaign uses the same serif typeface as the festival’s logotype, alongside a secondary, bold, sans-serif type, surrounded by dots and encased within frames, to further imbue the look of comic strips.

“The pastel colours with tinges of the festival’s brand colours give the whole campaign a lightness of touch,” says Rachel Loughran, account executive at Tangent. “We coupled this with fairly bold typography set in all-caps, as this felt like a good fit for the comic book style.”

She adds that changing the campaign annually aims to help the festival feel “fresh and new” each year. While it looks to be accessible for a wide range of ages and demographics, it also needs to “specifically appeal to authors, thinkers and artists”, she says – and for this reason, has been designed to be open for interpretation.

“We aim to create work for the client that is unconventional and leaves enough room for the audience to engage with the design and draw their own conclusions,” she says. “The main point of this year’s festival theme is that global events can be interpreted from multiple viewpoints and perspectives, and that simple black-and-white readings can be misleading – we really wanted the campaign to reflect this ambiguity.”

The campaign brand is currently rolling out across all touchpoints, including the website and social media, print marketing materials, merchandise and clothing, and will be present on signage throughout the event.

Edinburgh International Book Festival runs from 10-26 August 2019 across Edinburgh, Scotland. Some events require tickets, while some are free.

The post Edinburgh International Book Festival 2019 tells alternative stories appeared first on Design Week.

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Mary Duggan Architects has designed a new two-floor events space at the Science Museum London, which aims to conjure the “spirit of creation and discovery” found in the rest of the museum.

Originally an atrium in the main building, the space was converted to twofloors in the 1970s and was engineered in a way which could potentially support a heavily-used area. It is located on levels four and five.

The interiors of the new space are a “jigsaw of co-existing technical functions – designed from scratch – which can fluidly adapt to each scenario”, according to Mary Duggan Architects’ partner Mary Duggan, who has designed the space with flexibility in mind.

By identifying key areas that would be used most frequently, Duggan was able to conceive ways to divide the space. A central circular section for example is formed naturally when organising a dinner set-up for 250 people. This is delineated with a grey-green floor colour and translucent floor-to-ceiling curtain which can be pulled around its outline.

A conference set-up provides a different orientation which can be marked out with the use of more see-through curtains that segment the space.

Many of the architectural details and operational fittings can still be seen. This is a deliberate move, which Duggan says “will help people feel the spirit of creation and discovery that the Science Museum showcases.”

She adds: “The framework on level five has been left exposed, displaying the technical detailing of the logistics proudly rather than succumbing to the aesthetics.”

Displaying exposed components rather than masking them helps to place emphasis on innovation and technology, according to Duggan.

The overall “practical yet modernistic” feel incorporates a light steel staircase, “barely-there curtains” and storage solutions designed to hide away every piece of furniture that is not being used.

As the name Illuminate suggests, the two-floor space is a transition from dark to light. The fourth floor is a blackout space where lighting can be controlled and the fifth floor has a floor to ceiling panoramic window at one end, which brings in natural light and exposes a view of London’s skyline.  Previously, there were only two tiny corner windows.

The name Illuminate has also been chosen as it indicates “shining a light on a subject”, “a sense of enlightenment”, and “possibility and progression”, according to the museum.

Duggan says that as a whole, Illuminate “is almost choreographed” with the space’s footprints and thresholds, “enabling a clear journey” for anyone using it and is a place where “everything has a clear purpose and place”.

The post Science Museum’s Illuminate space designed as adaptive “jigsaw” appeared first on Design Week.

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Image courtesy of Frederik Petersen

The design industry is not a hotbed of diversity. Recent research from the Design Council shows that nearly four fifths of designers are male, only a tenth are from BAME (black, Asian and minority ethnic) backgrounds, and over half of the workforce holds a degree, compared to a UK average of only a third of the population. As a result, there is a “growing expectation” among employers for designers to be educated to university level, the report has found.

Some creative organisations are trying to change this, and disrupt the existing demographic of the creative industries. One of these is D&AD Shift, a scheme set up specifically to help those without degrees get design jobs.

Another is Store – a London-based organisation made up of artists, architects and designers, which puts on workshops and courses, public events and exhibitions, as well as undertaking social design projects themselves.

Textured tumblers, made during May’s workshops, image courtesy of Paul Plews and Clerkenwell Design Week

The group’s latest venture is “Store Store” – a physical shop in King’s Cross’ new Coal Drops Yard district, which sees students from local state schools make their own products, which then go on to be sold in-store.

This is achieved through a series of month-by-month workshops taking place mostly within the store, but also at professional architectural and design studios, where students can learn about specific processes and ways of making.

“Store brings together practitioners who share a common goal – getting more young people from disadvantaged backgrounds into applied creative courses, and addressing the social imbalance in art, design and architecture education,” says Kevin Smeeing, Netherlands-based product designer and one of the programme’s participating tutors.

Every month sees a new set of workshops start at Store Store, alongside different creative practitioners available to teach. The after-school club is open to any students aged between 15 and 18 from local state schools in Camden and Islington, who have shown an interest in architecture, art and design, and who are potentially considering studying them at university, says Smeeing.

Hangers made during May’s workshops, image courtesy of Fabio Hendry

Store promotes the scheme to as many local schools as possible, he says, in a bid to engage teachers and encourage them to get their students involved.

“We mostly reach out to local students, as we want to operate as a social space for the local community,” he says. “We have built a widespread network of contacts at London’s state schools. We reach out to art, design and technology teachers, often organising events and dinners with them to promote and share what we do. We also publicise the scheme to anyone who visits the Store Store shop, and promote it on social media.”

In keeping with selling items in a retail environment, the focus of Store Store so far has been on product design, with the aim of teaching young people modern industrial techniques.

As well as learning new skills, the workshops hope to help participating young people build up their portfolios and educate them on all aspects of the product development process, says Smeeing, from conception through to design, prototyping, manufacture and retail.

Image courtesy of Fabio Hendry

Last month’s workshops saw products sold during London Craft Week, including porcelain ceramics, created using virtual reality (VR) and 3D-printing, hooks and hangars made using industrial production techniques, and glassware made through 2D design and lampworking methods.

Smeeing hopes projects such as Store Store make art and design skills more tangible for young people from all backgrounds and enable them to get their hands on equipment and training they would not otherwise have access to.

“I think it’s important that young people learn product design skills, and explore other artistic practices, as engaging with the arts is essential for the development and wellbeing of every student,” says Smeeing. “Funding cuts to the arts have made these fields less accessible, so we want to give opportunities to those students who are unable to access the arts otherwise.”

Store is currently undertaking its June after-school clubs on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5-7.30pm at the Store Store in Coal Drops Yard, Stable Street, King’s Cross, London N1C 4DQ. For more information on the initiative, head here.

Image courtesy of Kevin SmeeingImage courtesy of Marta Fernàndez CanutVases made using virtual reality techniques, during May’s workshops

The post Store Store: the project trying to change the “social imbalance” in design appeared first on Design Week.

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Courtesy of Vorda

Diversity has always mattered – but now, it feels to be an increasingly important issue, not only morally, but because diversity has proven to significantly impact financial performance and business success. It increases innovation, creativity, employee satisfaction, loyalty and dramatically widens your talent pool.

As a seasoned human resources (HR) director, my personal area of interest is gender diversity and specifically, how we can make it easier for design businesses to encourage and support more women to get into leadership roles.

In early 2018, my work in this area was granted a fresh perspective; I became a mum. Always highly respected as an empathetic HR person, I believed I truly understood the challenges of working mums. The birth of my own child gave me a startling reality check. Looking back, I was naïve and wholly ignorant. At times, I was insensitive. I understand now why conversations between us (the business) and our employee (the mum) typically ended with both sides feeling frustrated, unsatisfied and with a feeling that they hadn’t been heard.

Talking to colleagues in the industry, these experiences remain real. There are many ways business owners can easily start making a positive difference to women getting into leadership roles. Here is some of my best advice on how to rethink maternity so that it benefits everyone.

If she wants flexible working, give it a try

Sometimes, it feels like flexible working and mum are synonymous. Perhaps because almost every woman I know has requested to or does work flexibly once they become a mum. Why? Parents need flexibility to enable them to bring up their child and to manage childcare and the excruciating childcare costs (in London, this is £323 a week for full-time nursery). It’s not because they care about their job any less. In fact, for many mums, work becomes even more important after they have children.

When it comes to flexible working, it’s all too often a negative conversation between employer and employee. And this is surprising given the abundance of research that defies any notion that flexible working is a bad idea. It’s also an invaluable and inexpensive way for you to support mums (and other carers).

Flexible working comes in many shapes and sizes and with an open mind and adult conversation, you can make it work for you, your employee and your clients. And if you’re in any doubt, simply trial the new arrangement for three months before you commit to it permanently.

If you do it for her, you don’t need to do it for everyone

When I hear about flexible working (and other) requests being refused, I often hear: “Well, if I do it for her, I’ll have to do it for others.” This is either a common misconception or just plain lazy – it’s not true and it doesn’t help anyone.

Legally, you are well within your rights to take each case as it comes and review any request within the business circumstances at that time. By saying yes to one person, this does not mean you are setting a precedent infinitum.

With this in mind, when a mum requests a different working pattern, first trust that her request is reasonable (after all she’s the one doing the job and knows its demands and is therefore best placed to know whether she can deliver it within the bounds of her request), discuss it with her within the context of your business right now, sharing any concerns you have, and then decide whether or not you can make it work for her.

Use her keeping-in-touch days

Women can work up to 10 paid days during their maternity or adoption leave as “keeping in touch (KIT) days”, without it affecting any statutory pay. They are a brilliant way to support your employee to confidently transition back to business. Have a conversation with her and get creative about how she might use her KIT days.

Perhaps she can join an immersion day or an annual client review. Maybe she can attend training on the new customer relationship management (CRM) system or finance system that’s been implemented while she’s been away. Maybe she can take a day in the office to clear the inevitable 1,000+ emails that will have stacked up and reacquaint herself with her commute, her team and her clients.

And KIT days aside, remember to invite her to team and company events or socials; they’re a great way for her to stay engaged, although she’ll only know about them if you invite her.

Offer her a maternity buddy

No woman’s maternity experience is ever the same but for most mums, returning to work after maternity or adoption leave is a tough transition; physically, mentally and emotionally.

You can provide invaluable support during this transition by linking a new mum with another mum in the business or industry. An experienced mum can offer reassurance and advice on juggling work and childcare. She’ll give a new mum confidence and self-belief and can be a useful reality check.

A maternity buddy can also be a conduit to you; a voice to let you know if a new mum is struggling being back, providing you with honest feedback, which her colleague may find difficult to share if she’s feeling vulnerable.

Take time to understand how you can best support her

You’ll likely have a maternity policy in place that informs how you manage maternity transitions. See this as covering basic human needs (unless of course, your policy covers all needs and eventualities or simply states: “our policy is to treat each of you as an individual”).

Every mum is an individual with individual experience and circumstances. Every mum will need something different to support her to return to work as her best self and to perform at the highest standards. In my recent survey of over 200 women returners, these were some of the things they needed: a clear work plan, return to work coaching to rebuild their confidence, access to post-natal support (Peppy, for example), a private room with a fridge for breast pumping, and flexibility.

Have a conversation with your employee about what she needs and do all you can to accommodate this. You’ll get the return on your investment, and some.

Create a warm welcome

And finally, a small and very simple thing: give her a warm welcome back. By this I mean: make sure she has a workspace with pen and paper ready for her; make sure her IT and phone are set-up and working so that she can immediately access everything she needs; be there when she arrives to say hello; plan her first week back and send a company-wide email welcoming her; and let everyone know what she’ll be working on. She may be an existing employee but a great deal has changed for you and her since she’s been off.

Tackling gender imbalance isn’t easy. We have deep roots to unearth but you can begin to make a difference today by being empathetic, conscientious and flexible. I promise the investment will be worth it.

Are you a mum designer who has returned to work? Share your experiences in the comments below.

The post How design businesses can help mums return to work appeared first on Design Week.

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Firefox has revealed its new logo of a circular flame symbol, after the free internet browser put two potential brand systems out to public scrutiny last year.

The browser is owned by software company Mozilla, which itself underwent a rebrand in 2016, where company staff and the public gave feedback on seven different brand concepts designed by UK studio, Johnson Banks.

The chosen concept, picked in 2017, incorporates the “://” symbols used in internet urls as the crux of the identity.

Mozilla then underwent a similar process to decide on the new branding for its browser, Firefox, last year, allowing the public to leave comments on a blog post about two suggested identities.

The two Firefox brand systems that were shortlisted included one centred around an abstract, diamond-shaped logo, created by an in-house design team and Hicks Design, and another centred around a circular, flame logo, created by Ramotion. These were the overarching brands, while a series of other icons were also created to fit into these identity systems and to represent different Firefox services.

The circular flame by Ramotion has now been chosen, but further refined since the concept was revealed last year.

Further icons have been designed as part of the identity to represent services such as the browser itself, encrypted file sending, password protection, and email monitoring systems to check for data breaches.

The new system aims to represent Firefox’s “entire family of products”, says the company, and “support its evolving product line” beyond the internet browser.

For this reason, the previous, overarching Firefox brand of a flame-cum-fox symbol set against a blue globe has been ditched, with the fox retained only within the icon for the browser specifically.

A new, expanded colour palette incorporates a gradient across orange, red, purple, blue and green, and the shapes now used across the icons have also been used to create background patterns, illustrations and motion graphics.

A new, sans-serif typeface has been incorporated for product names, which sit under each individual icon, chosen for its “modern” quality and “rounded feel” that aims to reflect the rounded shape of the icons, says Firefox.

The final identity has taken 18 months to develop, with contribution from Johnson Banks, Hicks Design, Ramotion, Firefox’s in-house design team and public feedback.

Collaborating with the public on the Mozilla and Firefox rebrands is in keeping with the company’s open-source ethos, given that its software is free for anyone to download and use.

The post Firefox focuses on fire and drops the fox in new branding appeared first on Design Week.

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Barcelona-based design studio Summa has rebranded Spain’s national postal service Correos, in a bid to help it appear modern, “up-to-date” and shake off perceptions of public companies being “old and slow”.

Correos, Spain’s national postal service, was founded in the 1700s, and is completely state-owned. It now has over 50,000 employees, 10,000 postal centres and sends 5.4 billion pieces of mail every year.

Its first rebrand in over 15 years, the new identity pays homage to the original process of mail delivery from the 18th century, which involved postmen playing a horn to alert people to come to the town plaza and collect their mail.

The new logo features a refined post-horn symbol – a cornamusa in Spanish – which now features wider counters and more white space, a retouched crown on top, and a simplified cross to aid readability, says Summa’s creative director, Pablo Amade.

This replaces a previous version of the horn symbol, which was also accompanied by the name “Correos” set in an overlapping, sans-serif type. Now, the logo is simply the symbol.

“Back in the old days, there were no postcodes or street numbers – postmen would play the horn to announce their arrival to the town,” says Pablo Amade, creative director at Summa. “The cornamusa is a universal symbol in postal services, and it has a navigational role, like a red cross or a parking symbol.”

Correos has long been associated with the colours yellow and blue, so this core colour palette has been kept but refined, with the studio making them slightly darker.

A new sans-serif typeface — Cartero — has been developed alongside type foundry Monotype, and used for supporting copy on advertising posters and other touchpoints.

It replaces sans-serif Soho Gothic, and aims to be more legible across both out-of-home and digital environments, while also appearing “human and warm”, says Amade. The new type has been set in light, regular and bold across different applications.

The overall aim of the public service’s new identity is to help the company appear more modern, as well as enable it to be “recognisable” with only a few, key brand components and without the need to use the company name.

Amade says this has been achieved through stripping back the logo and colour palette, removing the logotype, and simply using the blue symbol against a yellow backdrop.

“We want people to perceive Correos as an up-to-date company, as the digital company that it is today,” he says. “Being a public company, it was perceived as old and slow. By painting a van in full yellow with nothing else but just a symbol, any vehicle or mailbox can become an icon.”

Alongside the main brand elements, a suite of animated icons and illustrations has been created for use online, and a new range of people photography, focusing on a diverse mix of customers.

A navy blue and yellow pattern, made up of various graphic components of the horn logo such as circles, stripes and crosses, has also been used across the visual identity, to help give “life and dynamism” to it when used across merchandise and on signage at events. A handstamp set within a roundel has been developed, to frank mail.

The new branding is currently rolling out across all touchpoints in Spain, including Correos’ website and social media, print marketing and advertising materials, physical touchpoints such as post-boxes, mopeds and courier vans, wayfinding and signage at events, and smaller touchpoints such as merchandise, uniforms and tape used to package boxes.

The post Spain’s 300-year-old postal service gets a rebrand appeared first on Design Week.

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Salad grown underground in a laboratory; proteins derived from soil mould; cheese grown from human bacteria – these are all perfectly edible foods, showcased as part of the Victoria and Albert (V&A)’s Bigger than the Plate exhibition.

The show, which recently opened at the London museum, delves into the future of food, looking at how, as consumers, we can make more sustainable and responsible culinary choices.

Split into four, curatorial sections – visible by a change in aesthetic as people pass through the space – of “compost”, “farming”, “trading” and “eating”, the exhibition takes visitors on a journey of the food cycle, from producing and reusing waste, to growing food, transporting it, to the final product being delivered as a meal.

Bigger than the Plate hopes to challenge people’s preconceptions of where their food comes from, how it is grown and what they are willing to eat, offering novel examples of less wasteful options. At the same time, it does not aim to preach to its visitors or sell certain lifestyle choices, says May Rosenthal Sloan, who co-curated the project alongside Catherine Flood.

“We are not didactically telling people what they should be eating, or telling people off for their choices,” Sloan says. “I hope people take away the scope for a better food future, and a sense of where they want to exist in that debate.”

Image courtesy V&A Museum London

The space has been designed by the V&A’s in-house team, and changes as visitors move through, reflecting the different topics.

Compost, which focuses on human and food waste and how it can be better used to aid biodiversity and sustainability, has a natural feel to it, using earthy colours such as peach and yellow. It features a huge, peach gauze curtain tracing visitors’ routes around the section, which looks to imitate human intestines, says Juri Nishi, senior exhibition designer at the V&A, and 3D designer for the show.

“The curtain relates to the idea of human digestion, and how we are all part of the ecological story of the future,” she says. “The curators have these strong messages about how eating is about personal consumption and having agency, so we’ve used tactility and the atmosphere of the space to reflect that.”

Daily Dump, image courtesy V&A Museum London

In keeping with the idea of consumers having control over their waste, featured projects include those that look at how individuals can contribute positively to the food cycle. Daily Dump is a project founded in Bangalore, India, which sees various hand-crafted terracotta pots and compost kits sold to the public to help them separate out their waste and use it to grow vegetables and other food through home-composting.

GroCycle’s Urban Mushroom Farm also looks at how unlikely waste can be turned into edible products through composting – with waste coffee grounds used to make oyster mushrooms.

Farming looks at ways in which we can change how we grow and farm food. As this section focuses on human intervention, the space is much more “grid-based”, says Judith Brugger, senior graphic designer at the V&A and 2D designer for the show, reflecting the idea of manufacturing.

Projects look at how we can farm more sustainably and sensibly – the data-driven MIT Food Computer, for instance, can replicate natural conditions to grow crops in artificial environments, while Bicitractor is a pedal-powered tractor that could be used for small-scale farming.

While many of the featured exhibits are product and innovation focused, some are artistic expressions of the rich, farming history in the UK. Art collective Fallen Fruit has created a 12-metre squared wallpaper that visualises the V&A’s history of growing fruit trees. Whether proactive projects or purely visual, all the show’s pieces aim to establish the relationship between art, design and food, which Sloan describes as a “stubborn” subject.

“There is a trajectory of designers moving away from making stuff for an oversaturated market and towards making meaningful interventions in the world,” the co-curator says. “One of the most exciting things is the collaboration between designers working with scientists, artists with chefs and farmers, local communities with activists. Food is a stubborn subject that bleeds across disciplines and doesn’t fit into clear boxes.”

Planetary Community Chicken, by Koon Van Menchin, image courtesy of V&A Museum London

One project that shows the connection between art and science is the Planetary Community Chicken, by Belgian artist Koon Van Menchin. He was concerned about how farmers have “designed” poultry over time, so that different countries have their own specific varieties, meaning gene pools have been narrowed. To make a statement about bio – and cultural – diversity, he initially bred a Belgian chicken with a French one on the border of the two countries.

Over 20 years, he then carried on doing this with birds from different countries, and the result is a huge, chicken family tree sprawled across one wall of the exhibition space, showing the variety of birds he has produced from cross-breeding.

“The scientific community started paying attention to what he was doing and realised the chickens he was producing were genetically diverse, disease-resistant, strong and beautiful birds,” says Sloan. “It’s a really amazing example of science following art. He has helped poultry farms all over the world to safeguard their futures by injecting genetic diversity into their stock. The project is both creative and playful, and really productive.”

The aesthetic of the trading section has been inspired by the shape of crates used to carry and transport produce from farm to consumer, says 3D designer Nishi, with rectangular and square block shapes featuring across wall graphics and captions.

It explores how food is bought, sold, exported and marketed, with a strong focus on how graphic design and advertising has been used to promote food, questioning how genuine promotional campaigns are. One project with a critical eye is Supernatural, by London-based artist Uli Westphal, which includes huge, composite images compiling multiple “idyllic” graphics taken from supermarket food packaging, making a statement about false advertising.

Finally, eating places the focus firmly back on the visitor by offering novel ways of consuming, and challenging preconceptions of what constitutes food. It also analyses the wider concept of group eating, looking at it as an activity that helps to form human relationships and inspire conversation and debate.

This is depicted through an 11-metre long dinner table displaying different projects, from cutlery designed for those with disabilities and reduced dexterity, to utensils formed into peculiar shapes, which explore how structure, shape and tactility can enhance the taste of food.

Loci Food Lab, by Center for Genomic Gastronomy, image courtesy of V&A Museum London

One of the show’s most shocking pieces challenges notions of what we are willing to eat – Selfmade, a selection of cheeses that have been cultured from human bacteria, including from celebrities such as chef Heston Blumenthal.

Perhaps the most interactive exhibit of the whole show is a live, food bar called the Loci Food Lab – where chefs and waiters serve visitors sustainable canapés of their choice, made from ingredients such as vegetables classed as “too ugly” for local supermarkets, dried and powdered fish, and salad grown underground in South London.

The show attempts to open visitors’ eyes to how we can all mitigate food waste, production and consumption, and fittingly, the design team has also thought about the waste produced by the exhibition itself. Large-scale, temporary shows such as Bigger than the Plate are notoriously wasteful, with a lot of production power and many materials invested only for it all to be ripped down months later.

Urban Mushroom Farm, by GroCycle, image courtesy of V&A Museum London

To alleviate this problem, the team has committing to reusing materials after the show’s run is over, either in future V&A exhibitions with smaller budgets, or by donating them to schools, theatres and other museums – the mesh curtain used in the first section, for instance, could form part of a stage set, says 3D designer Vishi.

“Large-scale exhibitions can be difficult in terms of sustainability, as a lot of the art has been commissioned especially for the show,” she says. “We purposefully chose quality materials, so that we can donate materials for other uses.”

Equally, the team has tried to make sustainable choices with materials, says 2D designer Brugger – the graphic panels, used to hold captions throughout the show, have been made from two compostable materials; a bi-product of corn production, and recycled paper cups, made into printable paper by GF Smith.

Image courtesy of V&A Museum London

To limit the carbon footprint of certain projects, co-curator Sloan adds that some of the international projects have been recreated in London studios, rather than shipped across the world, such as Daily Dump, the terracotta pot project based in Bangalore, India.

“The positives of this are twofold,” says Sloan. “It’s about sustainability, but also transfer of knowledge, skills and experience from India to the UK – we hope the project will now continue to be made by a London potter.”

And while Bigger than the Plate does not aim to tell people how or what to eat, she says, the hope is to make visitors more open-minded to what constitutes food and food production, and more aware of the options that could be available to them in future – without the need to compromise on taste.

“Food is something we all have a stake in – our food systems are changing,” says Sloan. “With the help of creative practitioners, we’ve tried to reimagine a food future that is more sustainable and biodiverse, but also more delicious, which is still so fundamentally important. I hope anyone who eats – which is all of us – can get excited, take things away, and feel more knowledgeable and better armed for the future.”

Food: Bigger than the Plate runs until 20 October 2019 at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, Knightsbridge, London SW7 2RL. Tickets cost £17 and £13 for concessions.

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Barcelona-based design studio Summa has rebranded Spain’s national postal service Correos, in a bid to help it appear modern, “up-to-date” and shake off perceptions of public companies being “old and slow”.

Correos, Spain’s national postal service, was founded in the 1700s, and is completely state-owned. It now has over 50,000 employees, 10,000 postal centres and sends 5.4 billion pieces of mail every year.

Its first rebrand in over 15 years, the new identity pays homage to the original process of mail delivery from the 18th century, which involved postmen playing a horn to alert people to come to the town plaza and collect their mail.

The new logo features a refined post-horn symbol – a cornamusa in Spanish – which now features wider counters and more white space, a retouched crown on top, and a simplified cross to aid readability, says Summa’s creative director, Pablo Amade.

This replaces a previous version of the horn symbol, which was also accompanied by the name “Correos” set in an overlapping, sans-serif type. Now, the logo is simply the symbol.

“Back in the old days, there were no postcodes or street numbers – postmen would play the trumpet or bagpipe to announce their arrival to the town,” says Pablo Amade, creative director at Summa. “The cornamusa is a universal symbol in postal services, and it has a navigational role, like a red cross or a parking symbol.”

Correos has long been associated with the colours yellow and blue, so this core colour palette has been kept but refined, with the studio making them slightly darker.

A new sans-serif typeface — Cartero — has been developed alongside type foundry Monotype, and used for supporting copy on advertising posters and other touchpoints.

It replaces sans-serif Soho Gothic, and aims to be more legible across both out-of-home and digital environments, while also appearing “human and warm”, says Amade. The new type has been set in light, regular and bold across different applications.

The overall aim of the public service’s new brand is to help the company appear more modern, as well as enable it to “shout” more loudly with a more “recognisable” brand. Amade says this has been achieved through stripping back the logo and colour palette, removing the logotype, and simply using the blue symbol against a yellow backdrop.

“We want people to perceive Correos as an up-to-date company, as the digital company that it is today,” he says. “Being a public company, it was perceived as old and slow. By painting a van in full yellow with nothing else but just a symbol, Correos is now shouting, and any vehicle or mailbox can become an icon.”

Alongside the main brand elements, a suite of animated icons and illustrations has been created for use online, and a new range of people photography, focusing on a diverse mix of customers.

A navy blue and yellow pattern, made up of various graphic components of the horn logo such as circles, stripes and crosses, has also been used across the visual identity, to help give “life and dynamism” to it when used across merchandise and on signage at events. A handstamp set within a roundel has also been developed, to frank mail.

The new branding is currently rolling out across all touchpoints in Spain, including Correos’ website and social media, print marketing and advertising materials, physical touchpoints such as post-boxes, mopeds and courier vans, wayfinding and signage at events, and smaller touchpoints such as merchandise, uniforms and tape used to package boxes.

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Salad grown underground in a laboratory; proteins derived from soil mould; cheese grown from human bacteria – these are all perfectly edible foods, showcased as part of the Victoria and Albert (V&A)’s Bigger than the Plate exhibition.

The show, which recently opened at the London museum, delves into the future of food, looking at how, as consumers, we can make more sustainable and responsible culinary choices.

Split into four, curatorial sections – visible by a change in aesthetic as people pass through the space – of “compost”, “farming”, “trading” and “eating”, the exhibition takes visitors on a journey of the food cycle, from producing and reusing waste, to growing food, transporting it, to the final product being delivered as a meal.

Bigger than the Plate hopes to challenge people’s preconceptions of where their food comes from, how it is grown and what they are willing to eat, offering novel examples of less wasteful options. At the same time, it does not aim to preach to its visitors or sell certain lifestyle choices, says May Rosenthal Sloan, who co-curated the project alongside Catherine Flood.

“We are not didactically telling people what they should be eating, or telling people off for their choices,” Sloan says. “I hope people take away the scope for a better food future, and a sense of where they want to exist in that debate.”

Image courtesy V&A Museum London

The space has been designed by the V&A’s in-house team, and changes as visitors move through, reflecting the different topics.

Compost, which focuses on human and food waste and how it can be better used to aid biodiversity and sustainability, has a natural feel to it, using earthy colours such as peach and yellow. It features a huge, peach gauze curtain tracing visitors’ routes around the section, which looks to imitate human intestines, says Juri Nishi, senior exhibition designer at the V&A, and 3D designer for the show.

“The curtain relates to the idea of human digestion, and how we are all part of the ecological story of the future,” she says. “The curators have these strong messages about how eating is about personal consumption and having agency, so we’ve used tactility and the atmosphere of the space to reflect that.”

Daily Dump, image courtesy V&A Museum London

In keeping with the idea of consumers having control over their waste, featured projects include those that look at how individuals can contribute positively to the food cycle. Daily Dump is a project founded in Bangalore, India, which sees various hand-crafted terracotta pots and compost kits sold to the public to help them separate out their waste and use it to grow vegetables and other food through home-composting.

GroCycle’s Urban Mushroom Farm also looks at how unlikely waste can be turned into edible products through composting – with waste coffee grounds used to make oyster mushrooms.

Farming looks at ways in which we can change how we grow and farm food. As this section focuses on human intervention, the space is much more “grid-based”, says Judith Brugger, senior graphic designer at the V&A and 2D designer for the show, reflecting the idea of manufacturing.

Projects look at how we can farm more sustainably and sensibly – the data-driven MIT Food Computer, for instance, can replicate natural conditions to grow crops in artificial environments, while Bicitractor is a pedal-powered tractor that could be used for small-scale farming.

While many of the featured exhibits are product and innovation focused, some are artistic expressions of the rich, farming history in the UK. Art collective Fallen Fruit has created a 12-metre squared wallpaper that visualises the V&A’s history of growing fruit trees. Whether proactive projects or purely visual, all the show’s pieces aim to establish the relationship between art, design and food, which Sloan describes as a “stubborn” subject.

“There is a trajectory of designers moving away from making stuff for an oversaturated market and towards making meaningful interventions in the world,” the co-curator says. “One of the most exciting things is the collaboration between designers working with scientists, artists with chefs and farmers, local communities with activists. Food is a stubborn subject that bleeds across disciplines and doesn’t fit into clear boxes.”

Planetary Community Chicken, by Koon Van Menchin, image courtesy of V&A Museum London

One project that shows the connection between art and science is the Planetary Community Chicken, by Belgian artist Koon Van Menchin. He was concerned about how farmers have “designed” poultry over time, so that different countries have their own specific varieties, meaning gene pools have been narrowed. To make a statement about bio – and cultural – diversity, he initially bred a Belgian chicken with a French one on the border of the two countries.

Over 20 years, he then carried on doing this with birds from different countries, and the result is a huge, chicken family tree sprawled across one wall of the exhibition space, showing the variety of birds he has produced from cross-breeding.

“The scientific community started paying attention to what he was doing and realised the chickens he was producing were genetically diverse, disease-resistant, strong and beautiful birds,” says Sloan. “It’s a really amazing example of science following art. He has helped poultry farms all over the world to safeguard their futures by injecting genetic diversity into their stock. The project is both creative and playful, and really productive.”

The aesthetic of the trading section has been inspired by the shape of crates used to carry and transport produce from farm to consumer, says 3D designer Nishi, with rectangular and square block shapes featuring across wall graphics and captions.

It explores how food is bought, sold, exported and marketed, with a strong focus on how graphic design and advertising has been used to promote food, questioning how genuine promotional campaigns are. One project with a critical eye is Supernatural, by London-based artist Uli Westphal, which includes huge, composite images compiling multiple “idyllic” graphics taken from supermarket food packaging, making a statement about false advertising.

Finally, eating places the focus firmly back on the visitor by offering novel ways of consuming, and challenging preconceptions of what constitutes food. It also analyses the wider concept of group eating, looking at it as an activity that helps to form human relationships and inspire conversation and debate.

This is depicted through an 11-metre long dinner table displaying different projects, from cutlery designed for those with disabilities and reduced dexterity, to utensils formed into peculiar shapes, which explore how structure, shape and tactility can enhance the taste of food.

Loci Food Lab, by Center for Genomic Gastronomy, image courtesy of V&A Museum London

One of the show’s most shocking pieces challenges notions of what we are willing to eat – Selfmade, a selection of cheeses that have been cultured from human bacteria, including from celebrities such as chef Heston Blumenthal.

Perhaps the most interactive exhibit of the whole show is a live, food bar called the Loci Food Lab – where chefs and waiters serve visitors sustainable canapés of their choice, made from ingredients such as vegetables classed as “too ugly” for local supermarkets, dried and powdered fish, and salad grown underground in South London.

The show attempts to open visitors’ eyes to how we can all mitigate food waste, production and consumption, and fittingly, the design team has also thought about the waste produced by the exhibition itself. Large-scale, temporary shows such as Bigger than the Plate are notoriously wasteful, with a lot of production power and many materials invested only for it all to be ripped down months later.

Urban Mushroom Farm, by GroCycle, image courtesy of V&A Museum London

To alleviate this problem, the team has committing to reusing materials after the show’s run is over, either in future V&A exhibitions with smaller budgets, or by donating them to schools, theatres and other museums – the mesh curtain used in the first section, for instance, could form part of a stage set, says 3D designer Vishi.

“Large-scale exhibitions can be difficult in terms of sustainability, as a lot of the art has been commissioned especially for the show,” she says. “We purposefully chose quality materials, so that we can donate materials for other uses.”

Equally, the team has tried to make sustainable choices with materials, says 2D designer Brugger – the graphic panels, used to hold captions throughout the show, have been made from two compostable materials; a bi-product of corn production, and recycled paper cups, made into printable paper by GF Smith.

Image courtesy of V&A Museum London

To limit the carbon footprint of certain projects, co-curator Sloan adds that some of the international projects have been recreated in London studios, rather than shipped across the world, such as Daily Dump, the terracotta pot project based in Bangalore, India.

“The positives of this are twofold,” says Sloan. “It’s about sustainability, but also transfer of knowledge, skills and experience from India to the UK – we hope the project will now continue to be made by a London potter.”

And while Bigger than the Plate does not aim to tell people how or what to eat, she says, the hope is to make visitors more open-minded to what constitutes food and food production, and more aware of the options that could be available to them in future – without the need to compromise on taste.

“Food is something we all have a stake in – our food systems are changing,” says Sloan. “With the help of creative practitioners, we’ve tried to reimagine a food future that is more sustainable and biodiverse, but also more delicious, which is still so fundamentally important. I hope anyone who eats – which is all of us – can get excited, take things away, and feel more knowledgeable and better armed for the future.”

Food: Bigger than the Plate runs until 20 October 2019 at the Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, Knightsbridge, London SW7 2RL. Tickets cost £17 and £13 for concessions.

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