Loading...

Follow DesignFaves.com - Design & visual culture for the .. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Nabhan Abdullatif is an illustrator and graphic designer from Oman. Abdullatif focuses on conceptual illustration and vector art, which is the use of geometrical primitives such as points, lines, curves and shapes to represent images. Abdullatif’s latest works are a collection of visual puns in which he uses everyday objects paired with clever captions.

In one cartoon, a flash drive is also the superhero Flash. In another, a triangle is ‘working out’ next to an oddly-shaped triangle, insinuating that it needs to ‘stay in shape.’ The images are modest but good for a chuckle.

 
Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Before photographs, life was documented through paintings. It was the only way to create images that captured life. However, following the invention of photography, painters had a greater artistic license to abstract and explore the medium. As we see a resurgence of photorealistic paintings, we often look for something in the works that takes them beyond a photograph.

Dutch artist, Jantina Peperkamp, begins her portraits with a photo shoot, which is followed by sketches and then acrylic paint. Although the work begins with a photograph, there is a distillation process as the painting develops. The artist explains, “All the unnecessary is stripped off with the intention to maintain only the essential.” Despite the realism of the works, we see the subtle manipulation of the image from which the artist draws the viewer’s focus.

Paintings may have been the precursor to photographs, but in works such as these we see that paintings can also become an evolution beyond photography.

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Creating delightful little cartoon figurines from wood, Yen Jui-Lin attempts to bring a smile to your face.

The Taiwanese artist meticulously carves facial features into wood and then crafting quirky characters out of them. Some pieces function as flower vases while others can be suspended onto a wall for show. The one-off objects also make for great gifts for children!

Check out some of the wood words below and find more on Jui-Lin’s Facebook page.


Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Looking for a new way to share a message?  Polish marketing and design agency Sek has come up with the Schossler Font. This new typeface is a clever attempt to show, rather than tell, your vision-based message taking advertising to a new level for eye industry entrepreneurs.

Eye surgeons are a dime a dozen so designing a marketing campaign around a typeface made from broken glasses stands out as an innovative idea. Dr. Anna Schossler, an ophthalmologist specializing in corrective surgical procedures, commissioned and used the typeface to advertise her services showing her eye-sight improving message to the world. 

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Between 1937 and 1949 J.R.R. Tolkien introduced Planet Earth to Middle Earth in The Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit – a world bursting with magical lands and witchcraft. As a homage, master LEGO builders David Frank and Alice Finch teamed up to recreate Rivendell – the elven outpost in Middle Earth, taking no less than 200,000 LEGO bricks.

“Because the landscape and vegetation are so important to the model, I came up with the idea of having it transition through the seasons,” says Alice about the colors displayed throughout the model. Being a master LEGO builder, Alice had just unveiled a massive Hogwarts model which took nearly twice the number of bricks as her Rivendell collaboration with David.

We’re excited to see what the LEGO building pair comes up with next!

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Toronto illustrator Brandon Celi is keen to use a visual metaphor or a bit of clever wit in his work. By combining unlike things into hilarious mash-ups, the illustrations are visual comedy. The surge protector taking the place of a bike lock makes us grin. The lint roller as a rolling pin makes us grimace, and then snicker.

His imperfect renderings have an endearing charm. These works are the opposite of photorealistic; they delight in the evidence of the hand painted. The flat color fields combined with the artist’s humor create a unique artistic vision.


Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The variety of iPhone chargers in the world is staggering, and there’s no stopping man’s creativity when it comes to developing a more creative one. An example of such a trend is the myPower prototype charger – a nifty little gadget that converts your daily run into useful iPhone energy.

Backup chargers require the user to pre-charge the backup itself. Fortunately, a team of researchers at Northwestern University have found a creative solution to the draining battery problem that lets you charge your phone as you go about your morning run. A 45-minute run gives your phone enough power to last up to eight hours!

Thank you, myPower, for giving us iPhone owners a great reason to get up off our butts and go for a jog.

Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

At first you can’t even tell can you? But this picture is more than it seems. It’s made using a style known as Pointillism. It’s the technique of making pictures out of thousands of singular dots. David Foster has a unique take on it though. Foster’s architect background shows through, using thousands of nails to comprise some pretty astonishing pictures.

He starts with a single photograph and augments it with pen and ink. This lays the foundation for every nail he’ll have to hammer, and that can be a lot. Sometimes up to 30,000 nails. Born out of his fascination with how little the brain needs to interpret an image, his nails certainly do come together with pin point precision.


Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Arthur and Eileen Newman have garnered a reputation for coming up with a sizeable collection of still life and landscape paintings during the span of two decades. From 1845 to 1880, they have accrued pieces that were particularly inspired by the Hudson River in all of its beauty. During the time, artists were able to fully capture the full emotions of “American” painting and art. The Newmans were able to collect paintings by various talents, such as Thomas Cole, Martin Johnsons Heade, Frederic Edwin Church, and many others.

Now, The Inspiration: “ The Hudson River Portfolio” captures the very same feelings. The showcase is on display courtesy of the New-York Historical and features works by William Guy Wall, who embarked on a personal trip to be captivated by the Hudson River Valley. See eight of his watercolor models and other related pieces at the exhibition.


Source

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Not designed for cyclists and pedestrians who have a fear of heights, Copenhagen’s new commuter bridge runs between two of the cities skyscrapers at an elevation of 213 feet. Architect Stephen Holl designed the Copenhagen Gate project in 2008, and construction will begin in 2016. The new construction will save pedestrians and cyclists the 2.2 kilometer commute of traveling around the water’s edge.

Each tower has elevators to transport pedestrians and cyclists to the bridge level. The bridge’s suspension system is split between each tower, and the halves meet at a seemingly disjointed midpoint. The architect explains: “Due to the site geometry, these bridges meet at an angle, joining like a handshake over the harbor.”


Source

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview