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Deschutes Brewery Blog by Erika Sommer - 1M ago

Our web store is in the process of an upgrade. Exciting! We expect to be up and running again on April 15. Can’t wait until then? You can find our merch at our Bend Pub, Bend Tasting Room, Portland Pub, and Roanoke Tasting Room.

If you want to purchase a gift card while our web store is offline, please contact our Bend Tasting Room at 541-385-8606 and they will hook you up.

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post Web Store Closed first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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Deschutes Brewery Blog by Erika Sommer - 3M ago

We are making it really easy this time around. Da Shootz!, the phonetic spelling of Deschutes, is an easy-drinking, low ABV beer. We are proud to introduce this new pilsner to the world. We want to tell you all about it so you can be a Da Shootz! trivia master and know all about the beer.

The Name: Da Shootz!

Fact: Deschutes is difficult to pronounce. If you aren’t from Oregon or a Francophile, chances are you need a lesson in how to pronounce our name. Da Shootz! is our gift to the world. There, now you know how to say Deschutes.

Long ago, when started distributing in Hawaii, our sales manager, Chris, made plans to have a brew with a retailer who confirmed their outing by enthusiastically saying “shoots.” Chris was confused. The lesson he learned later was that in Pidgin, “shoots” is a phrase of agreement or “let’s do it!”

The Specs

It all started with Wyerman pilsner malt and German hops, but we knew we had to dig deep to provide our consumers with something distinctly refreshing. Our brewmaster, Veronica Vega, had been talking to Breiss for years about a low protein malt that’s grown in the US. It’s a unique malt and is flavor-driven. So, the fact that we could do both low calorie AND flavor has us very excited.

  • ABV = 4%
  • Calories = 99
  • Carbs = 4.2
The Design

So, now we taught you how to say our name, say our name. What better idea than to highlight the beautiful flora native to Oregon. Dive deep into our package and you will find plant life such as:

Artistic Oregon flora that appears on Da Shootz! packaging

Is Da Shootz! not feeling like it was meant to be? Try it and tell us what you think.

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post Da Shootz! Is Here! first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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The word “Friendsgiving” first appeared on the interwebs in 2007, and it refers to the time near or on Thanksgiving when you eat yourself silly with a group of friends because you are not able to make it home for the holidays, or you just don’t want to deal with Grandma who is always talking about politics.

Usually, if you are invited to attend “Friendsgiving” you are expected to bring a potluck item and just because you love to eat, doesn’t mean you love to spend hours in the kitchen to prepare that perfect dish to wow all your friends.

Here are a few easy dishes made with Deschutes beer (even better) that you can bring to any “Friendsgiving” that everyone will enjoy if you are on a budget, don’t have much time to prepare, and because hey…not all of us love cooking:

Beer and Bacon Brussels (an annual classic):
Ingredients
2 lbs Brussels Sprouts
6 oz thick cut bacon, chopped
1 shallot, peeled and sliced
3/4 bottle, Mirror Pond Pale Ale (you drink the rest)
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
Pinch crushed red peppers

Directions
-Trim the ends of each Brussels Sprout, removing excess leaves. Cut the sprouts in half, leaving the smallest sprouts whole
-Place a large skillet over medium heat. Add the chopped bacon and saute until crisp
-Add the sliced shallot. Saute another 2-3 minutes to soften. Then add the Brussels Sprouts. Stir and sear the sides of the sprouts for 4-5 minutes.
-Pour the beer into the skillet. Add the salt and both peppers. Bring to a simmer and lower the heat a little. Stir and simmer until the beer has reduced to a glaze and the sprouts are cooked through–12-15 minutes.

Black Butte Porter Dried Cherry Stuffing:
Ingredients
3/4 C butter
1 large onion, chopped
3/4 C mix of cremini and shiitake mushrooms
3 celery stalks, chopped
9 C soft bread cubes
1 tsp salt
1 Tbs fresh thyme, chopped
1/2 C dried cherries, heated just until warm
1/2 C Black Butte Porter

Directions
-Melt butter over medium-high heat
-Cook mushrooms and onion in butter for 6 to 8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until translucent. -Remove from the heat.
-Gently toss mixture and remaining ingredients, until bread cubes are evenly coated
-Grease 3-quart casserole or rectangular baking dish, 13x9x2 inches, place stuffing in casserole or baking dish.
-Cover with lid or aluminum foil and bake at 325°F for 30 minutes; uncover and bake 15 minutes longer

Fresh Haze IPA Cheesy Mashed Potatoes
Ingredients
3 medium russet or Yukon gold potatoes (about 1lb), peeled, cut into fourths
2 unpeeled cloves garlic
1/3 C Fresh Haze IPA
2 Tbs butter, melted
1/4 C shredded pizza cheese blend (1oz)
3 Tbs sour cream
3 slices bacon, crisply cooked, crumbled
Salt and pepper

Directions
-In 3-quart saucepan, place potatoes and garlic; add enough water (salted if desired) to cover. –Heat to boiling. Reduce heat to medium-low; cover loosely and boil gently 15 to 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Drain; shake pan with potatoes over low heat to dry.
-Mash potatoes and garlic until no lumps remain. Add beer in small amounts, beating after each addition.
-Add remaining ingredients. Mash vigorously until potatoes are light and fluffy…YESSSSSS!

See! We told you they were easy. Let us know what your friends think of these simple sides, and if you have easy recipes ideas of your own, put them in the comment section below. Cheers and Hoppy Friendsgiving from the Deschutes Brewery Family to yours!

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post 3 Friendsgiving Easy Potluck Ideas first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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Jubelale is to Deschutes Brewery as the Shamrock Shake is to McDonald’s. When the weather takes a cold nosedive, our fans ask, “where is Jubelale?” It’s a FAN-ily tradition!

This year marks the 31st release of Jubelale and to those of you who may not know, this is the first beer we ever put into bottles (yup, you heard that right!), straight from taps at the Bend Public House back in 1988. Just picture it…the staff behind the bar fillin’ bottles and jammin’ to Taylor Dayne.

Whether you’re a fan of the spiced-notes, dried fruit, and toffee flavors or the unique art on the bottle label (or of both), fans and Deschutes Brewery co-owners rejoice excitedly over the release of this festive winter ale.

If you’ve been on a tour of our production facility in Bend, you have seen our Jubelale Hall of Fame boasting original art pieces that were transformed to labels for this beer (if you haven’t toured with us, add it to your beer-bucket list).

Traditionally we commission local artists to create special artwork for the packaging, but this year, in celebration of 30 years as an independent, family and employee-owned brewery, the artist is (drumroll please………….) yours truly!

With brushes dripping bright paint colors, paint water guns, and paint-filled balloons in hand, our Deschutes Brewery family gathered during our 30th anniversary week of celebration, to craft an abstract expressionistic piece that speaks to what we are all about —–

COMMUNITY!

Tell us what you think of this year’s creation in the comment section below and enjoy this marvelous brew with all of your holiday traditions, whatever they may be!

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post Jubelale: It’s a FAN-ily Tradition first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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Bikes, Beer, and Two Parties This Year!
The Halloween Cross Crusades bike races and warehouse party shenanigans return to Bend once again.
 
This is the one weekend a year where our brewery campus turns into an interactive CX race course and we move mass amounts of beer pallets around in our warehouse to make room for live music, DJs, and performers who hang upside down from the ceiling rafters.
The stoke factor has been high for this event since we started back in 2010. Here are some stats that may blow your mind! Over the last 7 years:
  • 14,886 raving fans in attendance
  • 183 entertainers/acts
  • 397 kegs kicked
  • And $61,500 raised for local non-profits

So this year, we had to raise the bar even higher! On the CX course, expect a new sandpit, a tricky off-camber section on a side hill, and a tight course with lots of cornering, a steep railroad tie run-up, and the lively and raucous atmosphere that can only happen on a course held at the largest brewery in Oregon!

Come for the races, stay for the PARTIES!

Yes, we said p-a-r-t-i-e-s! We’ve got 2 nights of heart pumpin’ music and eye-poppin’ entertainment to wow you, Friday, November 2nd and Saturday, November 3rd. The theme this year: INSTINCT… think animals in the wild, blending with your surroundings, and enjoying beer in its natural habitat. As always, “you do you” on the costume front!

Friday Night

A giant fusion of hip-hop inspiration from the past 30 years! Be sure to check out Digable Planets jazz-hip-hop fusion, Landon Wordswell solo artist with intricate rhyme, God-Des inspiring, yet fierce singer/rapper, and Central Oregon DJ, bPollen.

Click here for Friday tickets!

Saturday night

An electronic lineup of sexy, soulful infectious groove brought to you by the best from the west. The DJs are incredible including beats from El Papachango & Dakini Star, JoaqoPelli, Sweet Anomaly, OCTABÄN, and Motorhome.

Click here for Saturday tickets!

In addition, we always WOW you with entertainers from all across the globe. Be sure to find various acts from Arc in Movement and new this year, a roller dance group from the Bay Area.

And as always… lots more… and we mean it!

See you here!

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post Bikes, Beer, and Two Parties This Year: Instinct 2018 first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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Listening to a Podcast has made it easy to learn free information about what interests you with just a tap of an app on your smartphone.

From crime and cooking (not related, but there are usually knives involved in each), to science and beer, you can fill your noggin with knowledge all while working out at the gym, walking the dog, or on your commute to and from work.

Since we’re focused on the beer over here, and we think you are too, we thought we’d pass along some beer podcast recommendations from the pros!

Whether you want to dive deeper into beer styles, improve your homebrew skillz, or find which beer will pair best with the steak dinner you have prepared, we’ve got a great list for you.

Keep in mind, these podcasts are not just a few dudes chattin’ it up about their lives while getting more drunk with every sip of brew, but an overall list of professionals in the industry of craft beer, who take the time to research and conduct meaningful interviews for those really looking to expand their knowledge of the craft.

Brewer’s Recommendations:
  • Good Beer Hunting: Award-winning interviews with a wide spectrum of people working in, and around, the beer industry. Exploring the world of starting-up, brewing beer, and connecting with the wider world.
  • Master Brewers Podcast: interviews with the industry’s best & brightest in brewing science, technology, and operations. Host John Bryce dives into topics relevant to breweries of all shapes and sizes, worldwide
  • Let’s Talk Beer: We are hitting the road talking with brewers and beer personalities from around the globe. Listen to what they have to say.
  • And check out The Brewing Network offering a vast array of great podcasts like:
  • Brewing with Style: The world’s first radio program dedicated to brewing classic styles of beer. From recipe design to fermentation techniques, Brewing with Style covers everything you need to brew classic styles of beer at home.
  • Can You Brew It: Can You Brew It is dedicated to homebrew cloning your favorite commercial beers – complete with pro-brewer interviews, full recipes and a finished-product comparisons.
  • The Homebrewed Chef: for beginners and experts alike, The Home-Brewed Chef is the only show of its kind focusing on cooking and pairing with craft beer. In each episode learn to recognize compatible flavors, cook with and pair gourmet food with world class beer.
  • Bikes and Beer: Oh yes, believe it. Finally, the two worlds of biking and brewing collide – to be clear, not in the form of drunk bike riding. Commuters and shredders alike, tune in to the latest in craft beer delivered to you by people who understand your love for man-powered, two-wheeled contraptions.
  • And a favorite of most of our brewers, Sour Hour (some of our head brewers were guests on this one including Veronica Vega and Ben Kehs): The Sour Hour is an in-depth look into the process of making wild ales. With the help of some of the best mixed-fermentation brewers in the world, the show discusses the techniques to make world class sour beer.

We hope you give them a listen, and in the comment section below, let us know which podcasts are your favorites (beer-centric or other). Cheers!

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post Listen and Learn – Beer Podcast Recommendations from the Pros! first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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Beer Birth Announcement: Fresh Haze IPA is Born to the Fresh Family

We were so inspired by your love of Fresh Squeezed IPA, we added a new member to the growing fresh family: Fresh Haze IPA.

Hazy beers are sweeping the nation, and the love of all beers juicy and hazy inspired our innovation team to jump on board the haze craze to bring forth your new favorite IPA.

Brewers began testing batches of an experimental hazy IPAs over a year and a half ago, gathering your feedback from samplings at our pubs and tasting rooms. From that feedback, we’ve refined our recipe using hop blends to get a burst of citrus and juicy flavors, and a grain mix of malted and unmalted wheat plus flaked barley to get the haze. In addition, our brewers adjusted the water chemistry using brewer salts to get that smooth full-bodied mouthfeel we’ve grown to love in a hazy beer.

The Result?

We couldn’t make it fast enough! Kegs were being tapped left and right so we knew we finally had another winner!

And so it was, Fresh Haze IPA born into the Fresh Family in 2018. This bundle of hazy juiciness is headed your way on draft, and in 12 oz and 19.2 oz cans.

Try it today and join the #ChaseTheHaze conversation.

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post Fresh Haze IPA is Born to the Fresh Family first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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Deschutes Brewery Blog by Gina Schauland - 7M ago

Fresh Hop Daydreams

By Amos A. Amarillo

It all started with a “how can I help?”
One team, one dream, right?
Little did I know Assistant Brewmaster of the Portland Pub Jake Harper would take me up on my offer. He said, “…well…actually…I need someone to pick-up some fresh hops for me in Yakima. I can’t grab the hops and have the brew ready for them at the same time.”

“Twist my arm, please!” A fresh hop trip to the center of the American hop universe during harvest season? That really just sounds like something I’ve been wanting to do for over a decade. (I continue to love my job.)

My mission: Drive from Bend to Yakima. Collect 200 pounds of some nearly-exclusive fresh Sabro hops. Drive from Yakima to the Portland Pub. Deliver those fresh Sabro hops to Jake, all before 1 PM on a gorgeous Wednesday in September. Extra credit: help Jake brew Black By Hopular Demand, a fresh hop Cascadian Dark Ale.

The trip from Bend to Yakima is always a startling one. It begins with rocks, rolling hills, few trees, and less water. A handful of small towns. Lots of farms. Repeat. With a sense of solitude and time for contemplation on the side. Contrast this scene with the dramatic transition you experience as you descend into the Yakima Valley. The air literally changes from dry to moist. It feels heavier, full of life. You can smell the plants. There’s more stuff here. And people. And activity. Fecundity is precisely the right word for it. If you’ve ever been in the middle of the temperate rain forest that is the Olympic National Park, you know exactly what I mean.

The land of plenty – apples, grapes, peaches, pears, apricots, corn, onions, tomatoes, potatoes, huckleberries for days, and hops. Lots of hops. Oh my!

Needless to say…I arrived at the John I Haas hop farm in a state of child-like wonder. And it only compounded as hop farmer-breeder-scientist Scott showed me around the farm. Harvest season was in full swing. The color vibrant green painted everywhere you look. A pungent spicy-sweet aroma to flavor every in-take of breath. Truckloads of hops from the fields delivered every fifteen minutes to the people and machines that would separate hop from vine. The whole operation brought out the twelve-year-old kid in me, much like the bottling line at the Brewery does every time I witness it do what it does.

Yet what captured my imagination most was the future. The future of hops – the experimental hop plots. Hop farmer-breeder-scientist Scott shared that of the sixty-or-so experimental hops he’s working with, probably only three or four varieties will make it to “market”. And it takes years. The experimental hops on the vine this year may not make it into most brewers’ kettles for five to ten years. (Unless you’re lucky, like us, and get to trial experimental hops every year – like Citras, before they were called Citras ten years ago.) He literally works in the future. Visionary, artist, scientist, statistician, and part-prognosticator, all rolled into one. The fresh Sabro hop I was charged with collecting took ten to twelve years to develop; while Jake has been brewing with it for several years, it’s just now beginning to interest the rest of the brewing community.

200 pounds of fresh Sabro hops converted the mini-van I was driving to the Portland Public House into a rioting bus of flavors and aromas. While the word on Sabros suggested distinct tangerine, coconut, tropical fruit, and stone fruit aromas, what really knocked my nose around was fresh-cut cedar and mint. Holy moly. Three delicious hours later Jake greeted me at the side door of the Portland Public House, with that glee in his eyes I always imagined St. Nick would possess on Christmas Eve. He couldn’t wait to get his hands on those Sabro gems.

We moved the fresh Sabro hops into position to add into the hop back as soon as the time was right. In they went. The heat and steam of the brewhouse punctuated the intense aromas I had just been surrounded with in the riot bus; and introduced some of those lovely coconut and tropical fruit notes I had been daydreaming about. Heady.

Afterwards…Jake pulled some cooled wort for us to taste, this soon to be Cascadian Dark Ale, Black By Hopular Demand, featuring nearly-exclusive, fresh Sabro hops. This exercise always requires a crystal ball, a little imagination, and a grand sense of possibility, as the wort merely reflects a glimmer of what a finished beer might taste like. OMG. Roasty, chocolatey, mint, coconut, a little citrus here, a little licorice there. And vibrant. Intense.

The power of fresh hops, supplied by the vision of a master hop grower, combined with the unrestrained creativity of Assistant Brewmaster Jake Harper, have constructed an incomparable brew that makes all of our futures a little brighter, and far more delicious.

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post Fresh Hop Daydreams first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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Hello, I’m Gina and I am left-handed.

If you’re a left-hander you know, not all objects are created equal. In the 40 years I’ve been on this planet, I’ve learned to live in a right handered world. If you’re not a “lefty” you may think, there’s really no difference, but if you are, you will understand that the struggle is real.

Here’s a list of items that favor the “righty.” After reading them, you may better understand our plight…

The Ladle – some of them have a spout on the left side. Soup pours perfectly for right-handers, but give a ladle to a lefty and “no soup for you” as it spills abruptly into your bowl and onto the table and possibly onto the floor.

Scissors – we’ve all heard about this one. Don’t run with them and don’t cut anything with your left hand. There are never any left-handed scissors available when you need them, so we do have to learn to cut with our right hand and that never turns out well.

Sitting at a Restaurant Booth – please have the lefty sit on the wall side of the booth on the left, or next to another lefty as elbows will be battling in an epic fork and spoon war to the mouth.

Manual Transmission – working that stick shift with your right hand and left brain isn’t easy. I tried it once. #EpicFail #AutoTransFromHereOnOut

Stringed Instruments – No. we can’t just turn it upside down and play, silly. You’ve gotta restring that baby for us…

The Ink Smudge – as a left-hander, you can spot another lefty a mile away when they begin to write. Back in the day before computer keyboards, we had to use writing utensils. Lefties go from left to right dragging the side of their hand through the pen’s fresh ink or chalk or whiteboard words on causing a beautiful art piece to emerge on the hand that is difficult to wash off. I was actually given a metal contraption in the 3rd grade (by Mrs. Harris, you know who you are…) that held a pencil in my right hand and was meant to smoothly guide me to the “right-side.” Yeah, that didn’t happen and my teacher gave up because she couldn’t even read my name. And while we’re on this topic, we are also not for spiral notepads. Try to take notes comfortably with a piece of metal jabbing your hand…

The Coffee and Beer Mug – If you want your logo to be read by the drinker, consider putting it on both sides of the glass. In our eyes, all we see is a blank canvas.

We do have one hero, a man who tried to change the world for us and spread the gospel of the left-hander. That man was Ned Flanders from The Simpsons. If you remember his store, the Leftorium, it gave us all hope that the world would soon be different. Well, not long after, the store saw its demise and according to Simpsons Wiki, Ned had to downsize to a simple kiosk, the Leftorium Express, due to the success of a nearby full-sized competitor, Southpaw Superstore. However, in the episode “Opposites A-Frack”, Ned was seen working in his full-sized store once again without a continuity explanation. Finally, the Leftorium went out of business due to being unable to compete with online shopping, and Ned struggled to maintain a job until he joined Springfield Elementary School as the new fourth-grade teacher, he was our voice, our rock, and he will never be forgotten.

We do seem to go unnoticed in most parts of the world keeping a low profile and trying not to complain, and believe it or not, we are rare at only about 12% of the world’s population. All we are asking is for a little recognition and some more uni-hand objects but until then, be sure to reach out, help us cut those papers, pour soup, or volunteer to drive around every once in a while. Then the world will be al”right.” Haha!!! And if you know one, wish us a happy left-handers day today, August 13th, 2018. Cheers!

Featured photo courtesy of The Simpsons

Blog by: Gina Schauland, Associative Marketing Manager, Social Media

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post Left Handers Day: The Struggle is Real first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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Our brewers named this beer before it was even made – it happens all the time with babies, right?! Cultural Diversity speaks to the different yeast strains in the beer. And just like the human race is a mixed culture (cheers to so many unique baby names), so is beer. Read on for the first-hand account of how this label’s art came to be from our own, Thomas Buttles.

Shape Tasting

Tasting notes are something many are familiar with; words used to describe a beverage or food (straw, grass, red berry, etc.). The words and concept impart an idea that the taste and flavor all happen in an instant – a quick snapshot in time.

Imagine this, you’re about to take a drink of your favorite beer (obviously from Deschutes), and it’s been a while since you’ve enjoyed it. You take that sip, let it linger in your mouth, feeling the carbonation on your tongue, and then swallow feeling it cascade away. It is an experience that lingers for more than just a moment. Using words to describe this brew, which could be used to describe so many others would almost be a waste.

Patrick Reuter, Dominio IV owner and winemaker (Carlton, Oregon), originally developed the concept of Shape Tasting over 25 years ago to visually describe wine when words failed to more accurately capture the experience. At its simplest, Shape Tasting is a visual description of sensory analysis. At its most complex, it’s based on the principle of cross-modal perception, where sensory experiences can be translated to shapes and colors. A combination of defined shapes and colors create a language that is then depicted graphically with the x-axis as time, and y-axis as a palate. Patrick has turned this process into a kind of science throughout his career.

Translation

Deschutes Brewer Thomas Buttles, having known Patrick Reuter through family connections and experienced Shape Tastings upon many occasions, was curious as to how his own passion might translate to this visual experience. The room was warm, the conversation lively, and the bottles and glassware numerous; a hodgepodge of friends (including fellow Deschutes Brewer Kyle Kotaich), and family gathered at Patrick’s home in Fall of 2016. How does one translate a language that describes wine so perfectly to represent beer? An intense discussion of the differences between beer and wine ensued – How do you portray hops? What about residual sugar? Where does the carbonation fit in?

In the end, a rough draft of the language for beer was developed; ready to be tested and refined.

Language

With this new language in hand, Patrick met with a group of Deschutes brewers at the Bend Pub to introduce the concept. From there, a handful of brewers continued to meet and advance this new concept of visual sensory analysis with beer. Beer Shape Tasting eventually began to produce something, not unlike Patrick’s own experiences, unique visual descriptions of the beer at hand.

Cultural Diversity

The final label for Cultural Diversity is a collaboration of Shape Tastings from six brewers, including Thomas Buttles, Veronica Vega, Kyle Kotaich, Ryan Kern, Richard Hall, and Chris Dent. Of course, this example of Shape Tasting, reflected on the label, was the product of industry and departmental collaboration.

Tasting Cultural Diversity, you’re first greeted by a burst of starfruit, with the acidity ringing in a light pop of red berry – sending the sour notes wild. After these fruity qualities calm down, the acidity lifts the pallet to hints of graham cracker and tannins, leaving you ready for your next sip.

Pretty cool, right?! You can pick up a bottle of Cultual Diversity at our Bend Pub, Portland Pub, Bend Tasting Room, and Roanoke Tasting Room. Cheers!

Good Beer Brings People Together - Deschutes Brewery This post Cultural Diversity: A Mixed Culture Beer first appeared on Deschutes Brewery.

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