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The school holidays are just around the corner. Which can only mean one thing. 

Rain.

There. I said it! 

Nothing brings on a deluge of biblical style rain than a school holiday. Not that I'm complaining. As a gardener, it is essential that we have a few showers, preferably of an evening. That would be wonderful. But as a busy mum, with the prospect of juggling work and children for six weeks, rain is not great. 

However, our latest addition to our range is a perfect gift / activity for rainy days. Fabric Pots are a fab way to update interiors and we've created our own gift boxed version to provide a perfect present for those that love to make and do. 

Choose from four of our most popular fabric designs, and we'll send you fabric, cut to size, ready to make a beautiful fabric pot, along with everything else that you might need. Pins, needle, thread and measuring tape, all included! While we've provided really easy, step by step instructions in the gift box, we've also recorded a v. simple guide and placed this on our youtube channel. Brace yourself for my dulcet tones and Kentish twang!! But accents aside, sometimes it's nice to listen to instructions rather than read them. I for one, always find it easier to take in information that is spoken to me rather than written down. So, we hope this is a helpful added extra. 

The finished pot is lined - patterned fabric on one side and plain on the other. It can easily hold a house plant complete with a saucer, but you can use these handy little fabric storage sacks in all kinds of 'situations'. It is perfect for keeping makeup in as well as pencils and pens. It doubles up beautifully as an alternative to the fruit bowl. 

Once you've made your fabric pot, we'd love to see your finished article and how you use it in your home! Just email across your finished project, or tag us on Instagram / Facebook. It will be a treat to see them! 

Check out the new Fabric Plant Pot Kits here. 

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This summer, our deckchair hire service has gone into overdrive. In the last month, our deckchairs have been hired for an outdoor cinema evening, lots of weddings, a christening, one surprise party and a children's party. So. Much. Fun! 

There is something very joyful and fun about seeing a cluster of deckchairs set out on a lawn, ready for a party. Our bright, bold patterns are often mixed for the hire service, but it is just as common for customers to choose maybe just one or two designs to coordinate with their wider scheme. We've also delivered our deckchairs to indoor events, when the weather has been less than kind and the need to create an alternative brand of sunshine inside has been on the cards! 

We aim to offer a friendly, personal service, delivering and collecting chairs at times to suit partygoers and hosts alike. Some people love to keep hold of the deckchairs for a couple of days, others can't wait to clear up and have them taken away! Either way, we really don't mind and will always aim to be with you at the set date and time of your choice. 

With all this beautiful weather, it's really easy to forget that it is still only June! With a good dose of luck, we'll be enjoying this gorgeous sunshine throughout the summer months. 

For more information on hiring our deckchairs for your upcoming party or celebration, please email: Liz@denysandfielding.co.uk. 

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Greenhouse / Glasshouse

I think there comes a point in the life of every forty something woman when you start coveting a greenhouse of your own. Maybe it isn't a female thing. Maybe it has more to do with a stage in your life. You move from Wendy House to Tree House; House Party (or, in my musical case Acid House) to First House; then the house and finally glasshouse. Next up is assisted-living house. But let's not go there just yet. 

Instead, let's keep with the glasshouse and have a dream for a while. 

It is the combination of light, warmth, earthy smells and gorgeous greenery that does it for me. I just love them. I fell in love the one at Down House. Parham House in Sussex has a glasshouse brimming with tropical plants and flowers that is just a treat. And if you haven't already been, the thirteen recently restored glasshouses at The Walled Nursery will literally send you over the edge. In a good way. Absolutely beautiful. 

However, as I've recently discovered, the art of growing and cultivating under glass is a whole new level of horticulture that I have little experience of. 

Building a glasshouse

While I've loved the idea of having my own greenhouse / glasshouse for years, it's been strictly off the cards with his nibs. "No way" I think was the phrase when I last suggested we purchase a little, bijou glasshouse. 

Cue wail. 

"Not a priority. Too costly. You know who will end up having to clean it..." were just three of the so called 'reasons' behind the objection. Planning permission denied. 

Boo. 

And then, a little twist of fate occurred. My lovely friend Emma happened to mention she was pulling down her old shed. Now, that lovely old shed was made from panes of glass from the old school boy's loo block. Emma happens to live in the same house that was previously occupied by a thrifty caretaker of said school. 

And I spotted an opportunity. 

Cue a quick phone call to Dad who can literally make something out of nothing.  

With little more than a pallet, a lot of old wooden boards and panes, a good deal of swearing at my 'plans' and a big dose of poetic licence, my 'glasshouse' was born.

Gorgeous.

Granted, it is more of a glass cupboard than a glasshouse, but none the less, to me it is beautiful. And made by my Dad, which makes it all the more special.  

Around 80cm square (I use the term 'square' loosely, as not one of the panes is the same size as another. Hence the swearing...) My gorgeous new mini glasshouse is the perfect hotspot for sun loving crops. Growing away are chillies and peppers, which have been under sown with coriander and basil. 

I decided not to create shelves, but instead fill the whole of the bottom part with a heady mix of well rotted horsey poo and compost. First I lined the bottom of the glasshouse, repeating the same trick I used when making my 'mini meadows' last Spring. I added drainage holes and lots of old pots and crocks at the bottom. Then, quite a few wheelbarrows full of farmyard manure and compost. 

While the glasshouse is currently home to my tender crops, I'm intending on using it as a winter home for patio plants that won't want to stay outside during the colder months. 

The glasshouse has been up and running for around six weeks now. And in that time, I've learned a lot...

Five things to know about growing under glass - the story so far...

1. Things happen fast. I mean, seriously fast. Compared to normal outdoor gardening, this is extreme 'mood swing' gardening. One minute it's 40 degrees in there, next it is down to 20. In the first week or so I was up and down that garden path like a rat up a pump. Opening doors one minute. Closing windows the next.

Honestly.

But on the flip side, it has made me pay attention to the weather; the times of day that the glasshouse is in full sun versus full shade and what is actually happening in the real world outside my window, instead of finding out what the weather is likely to do from an app. In many ways, I feel more in touch with the garden. Hooray! 

2. Glass gets grubby. Even in this short time, glass gets grubby. I'm going to investigate this further, so I can perhaps grow crops that 'clean up' after a different variety has been and gone. Just a personal view, but I'm not keen on using any substance to clean the windows that close to my crops. Good old fashioned hot water to wash down the windows is my route forward. 

3. If you broadcast seeds you need a mixer. Not so much to do with the glasshouse, but more to do with my carelessness. I thought I had spread the seeds quite evenly when I sowed the basil and coriander under the pepper and chillies. What was I thinking?! It would have been much better to have mixed the seed first with sand or something to get a more even spread instead of the clumps of seedlings I have now. Because of my clumsiness, I'll end up having to thin out and lose a lot of the seed, whereas I could have sown regularly throughout the season to create a constant supply of delicious crops. Shucks. 

4. Hunt down that rose for the watering can: Watering is essential if you are growing under glass. It is much better if you can use rain water and a rose for the watering can. To me, everything in the glasshouse seems so tender, more delicate compared to their hardier compadres outside of the glass walls. They don't want some big old deluge of water, but rather, a more gentle approach to 'bathing'.  

5. Position carefully: You'll notice from the pictures that my glasshouse is against a fence which if you read lots of guides, is a bit of a no no when it comes to siting a greenhouse. But I'm happy with it. It is in the sunniest part of the garden. It faces West and has window panes throughout to enjoy maximum sunlight. Plus, it helps to draw the eye away from a pretty ugly fence. That'll do for me. However, we've had some really cold nights recently and the temperature in the greenhouse has plummeted, so it is wrong to assume greenhouses are hot. Once the sun goes down, the temperature drop dramatically. If you are keen on growing tropical plants, you might want to think about having a greenhouse near your house or not too far from civilisation. That way, you can hook up to the electric supply to keep everything warm and toasty.

 

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Around about now, an assortment of colourful trailing flowers and plants start to appear in local nurseries and garden centres. I love them. For me, there is no better way to display these than a macrame plant hanger. Whether you are DIYing it, or planning on making a purchase, macrame plant hangers make a beautiful, colourful alternative to traditional hanging baskets.

Choosing your macrame rope or cord is perhaps determined by where you intend to position your plant hanger. Warm, sheltered porches are perhaps the most ideal environment, as the flowers and hanging display can create a big, welcoming impact, while the dry, cosy environment means you can pretty much choose whatever type of plant hanger you like, as muck and dirt is at a minimum. If you place plants and flower pots into a pot without a hole, you'll also ensure that muddy water doesn't run through onto your hanger once you've finished watering. 

Simple, rustic garden plant hangers made from garden twine are a great alternative if the position of your plant hanger means you need something a little less decorative and a little more resilient. If you are making the hanger yourself, it may be worth doubling up the twine. I've got all sorts of birds flitting around at the moment, busy nest building. Their beaks are full leaves, twigs and twine - they seem to love it! So, rather than have them peck away and dislodge your planters, take a belt and braces approach to homemade plant hangers. Be neat with your knots, and ensure any ends are tucked away, so they can't pull at the twine and unravel your knots! Yikes! 

Using a macrame plant hanger as a temporary, decoration for garden parties and dinners with friends is also a really lovely touch. Position a plant hanger above a table and fill with plants, create a flower ball, or add a couple of twinkly, battery operated lights, for a beautiful, fun centrepiece. 

If you do opt for a macrame plant hanger to display trailing flowers and plants, you can choose from all kinds of containers to place inside. I've opted for an old tin for here. Really, I needn't have made the basket section of the macrame hanger so big, but I want to keep my options open - I may swap things around later in the summer and put a bigger pot inside. Choose your variety and you could enjoy watching your flowers start to weave around the cord and rope - how lovely would that be?! 

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A couple of years ago, I thought 'I know, I'm going to grow a little rhubarb'. I love a shot of rhubarb in a crumble and also enjoy how handsome rhubarb looks in the veggie patch. Fast forward a year or two, and I have created a BEAST! A hedge of rhubarb has formed. The mere utterance of 'anyone fancy rhubarb for tea..?' creates screams and howls that can be heard for miles. 

Thankfully, Sarah Giles has come to the rescue and helped to extend my rhubarb repertoire with this fab, tasty recipe. Sarah is a freelance journalist specialising in food and gardening – both of which are great passions of hers away from work too. Her blog, A Cook’s Plot, is where you’ll find lots of lovely quick and easy recipes using homegrown fruit, veg and herbs. Here’s just a taster…

This is an exciting time of year because, for me, the gardening season really feels as though it’s begun in earnest once the first stalks of rhubarb are ready for picking. And it’s a great crop to kick off with because it’s so versatile, lending itself to hot and cold puds and cakes, as well as savoury sauces. This is a useful recipe to have up your sleeve as it can be dressed up or down depending on the occasion. I’ve decorated the pudding in the photo using a curly strip of raw rhubarb – it’s completely edible and its fresh, concentrated taste works really well if you nibble it with the creamy rice. Just peel off a thin strip from an extra rhubarb stalk (where you’ve trimmed the ends you’ll notice that some thin strips will have started to peel back a little of their own accord, so pull on one of these right down the length of the stalk. As it detaches, it will automatically start curling up as shown. Clever, eh?) 

Ingredients: 

  • 50g short grain rice (also called pudding rice)
  • 25g caster sugar
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract (or, better still, vanilla paste)
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 600ml whole milk
  • 5 stems rhubarb (plus an extra one for the decoration, optional)
  • 5 pieces of stem ginger (from a jar)
  • 50-100g caster sugar, to taste

Serves 4

Method: 

Lightly butter a shallow ovenproof dish and preheat the oven to 140C (fan oven). Stir the rice, sugar, vanilla, bay leaf and milk together in a jug, pour into the dish and bake for one and a half hours (giving it a good stir after the first 30 mins). Meanwhile, chop 5 of the rhubarb stalks into 2.5cm lengths then put in a pan with the stem ginger and about 50g sugar. Cover and cook over a medium heat until the juices start to run from the rhubarb, then remove the lid, turn down the heat and simmer gently for about 15 mins until the rhubarb is tender. Taste and add more sugar as necessary – you want it to be quite sweet as a contrast to the creamy rice. Leave to cool to room temperature then divide among 4 glass dishes. When the rice is cooked, let it stand for a few minutes to thicken up, then add to the dishes and top with the rhubarb curls, if using (see above).

COOKS' PLOT TIP: To make the rice super-creamy, stir in 2 tbsp of mascarpone along with the milk. And for a special occasion, adding three tablespoons of amaretto liqueur to the rhubarb as it cooks takes the dessert to a whole new level!

For more rhubarb recipes over the coming weeks, (I know where I am heading!) visit Sarah's blog at  https://a-cooks-plot.blogspot.co.uk

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Fancy making your own macrame plant hanger? Not sure how to go about it? Or simply fancy doing something a little different? We've got just the thing! 

On Thursday 10th May, we're running our first macrame plant hanger workshop with House of Fraser, Maidstone. All profits from the event will go to support House of Fraser's chosen charity - Action for Children and a v. important, special project that supports children in our home town of Maidstone. 

At the workshop, you'll learn four different types of knot, which will not only help you create your own plant hanger to take home, but set you up to make all kinds of things in the future - bags, wall hangings, decorations. You name it, these handy little knots are great for using time and time again for all kinds of creative projects! 

We're planning a fab, fun evening with a glass of prosecco or two for good measure! We'd love to see you. To book, simply head over to our workshop page. Please remember to add your preferred contact details when you book, so that we can prep your cord in advance in your preferred colour. 

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It is not easy. You may have gleefully booked a few days off work to cover the school holidays, or, if like me, you are self employed and have resigned yourself to the fact that nothing of note will get done in the next few days. Or, you could be a long suffering relative or relative that have had someone else's little darlings foisted on you. How is it going? I personally can't bring myself to go to another soft play / park / place of interest for small children hotspot. When it comes to the last day or two, I just wanna stay at home. 

But it's raining. Again. It's been raining for weeks. And, let's face it, we are all beginning to go a little bonkers. 

Thankfully, the garden can help. There are a host of gardening jobs to do now that both yourself and your little ones can enjoy, together.

Yes, really.

Take a dip into these sanity saving, fun time activities to end the Easter holidays on a high...

1. Potato Chitting: Potato chitting is so easy, it is literally child's play. There is a debate about the effectiveness of chitting potatoes. The purpose of chitting your potatoes is to increase your crop and speed up harvest time. The idea is to place your potato tubers into a seed tray or egg box. However, if you're like me, anything useful has already been used up with 'art' projects, so my potatoes are in an old casserole dish ontop of the freezer. Dead posh. Anyway, importantly, the knobbly bits have to point up. (always worth noting, I feel). A good result in a week or two is that your knobbly bits have developed into stout, strong shoots, purple or dark green in colour up to an inch long to appear. If you are after some big baking potatoes, pick off a couple of the shoots to leave one or two remaining strong sprouts per potato, and plant out. If you are not worried, and planting into good soil, just put the potatoes straight into the ground. Don't be in a rush to plant out your potatoes. End of the month, beginning of May when frosts are hopefully a thing of the past, is perfect. Potatoes need a lot of water, so, once all this rain is over and we've got a hose pipe ban in place, look forward to more fun gardening activities for the children this summer - watering. 

2. Plant out strawberries. As delicious and delicate as the flavour can be, strawberries are tough cookies. They won't be deterred by any late frosts that might head our way in the next few weeks. Around about now, you'll find trays of little strawberry plants at your local nursery. These can easily go straight into the ground. My favourite variety is Elsanta - Hardy, easy to grow and taste divine. What is not to love?! They can be planted in well draining soil, or into pots and baskets, so ideal for the smallest of spaces. Because they are so tough, they are very reliable, so are great for introducing kids to the wonders and joys of growing your own. 

3. Make your own polytunnel. So easy, such a great little addition to the veg patch and gains points on the 'rustic' style scale for your burgeoning potager. Again, it's a great activity to do with kids because it is easy and naturally leads to a storytelling opportunity. It is my personal belief that there are so many great garden writers out there because gardens provide the ultimate storyboard. There is always a start, middle and end. And nine times out of ten, the weather provides an unexpected twist to the plot. Not to mention all the wonderful plant names that provoke squeals of laughter (stinking iris, anyone?!) To make our polytunnel, we used four plant supports that normally come when you buy roses or sweet peas or something that 'climbs'. Try and ease them out so the legs are as wide as poss without breaking and push them into the ground. Then, grab some bubble wrap or horticultural fleece and string and get creative! 

4. Sow some seeds. With your polytunnel in place, it's a great opportunity to transfer any seedlings that are ready to go outside, but just want a little more protection should the worst happen, and it actually gets COLDER!! Alternatively, a polytunnel is a great 'safe bet' for sowing directly into the ground for anything that ordinarily would be happy to be sown out in April, whether you fancy growing fruit, flowers or veg. 

5. Deadhead daffs: The circle of life (cue song), is ideally explained with the deadheading of daffs. With much of the garden just stirring back into life, many daffodils are going over now. Or at least they are here in Kent. Removing the heads needs just a sharp finger nail. No tools required. However, it does help to put all of the goodness back into the bulb under the ground, ready for a fab show next Spring. One you've removed the head, let the foliage die back naturally. Then, once it's all brown in a few week's time, you can gently pull out and place onto the compost head.  

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At last. Some sunshine has appeared. It's as if the garden has flung open the doors, and shouted 'PARTY TIME!'. From the bright, brassy yellows of the daffs, celandine and forsythia, through to the the flowering ribes in bloom, the bees, butterflies and other party goers are making the most of the veritable happy hour that is taking place. And why not?! It's been a long winter for all of us, furry or otherwise. 

While it is great to be out in the garden again, it does come with a sense of 'ooh, here we go', as the list of jobs starts to creep up.

It is at these moments that I think a good diversion is in order. When your own garden is less than salubrious, a well timed trip to someone else's is in order. In my case, this weekend included a trip to Down House, which was once the family home of Charles Darwin.

Not too big, not too grand, Down House is a beautiful place to visit. The gardens and grounds are lovely, and play a critical role in the legacy left by Darwin. It was here, and within the glasshouse, that many of Darwin's experiments took place. 

A mooch around the gardens of this extraordinary man got me feeling back on track about my own little patch. Back home, the potatoes are chitting nicely, ready to go into the veg patch in a few week's time. Blossom from the pear and cherry cordons is starting to appear. And, while much of the garden is still a boggy mess, things are definitely on the up. 

So, like a gym bunny, back to working out after a good few months of R&R, I'm easing myself into the garden gently with three easy tasks this week. Come and join me: 

  • Deadhead any daffodils that have already gone over to produce a bumper crop next year.
  • Pots of hyacinth bulbs that have stopped flowering can be popped into the garden. Dig a decent sized hole, water your plant in the pot first to try and keep all the roots intact, and add a little compost to give them a decent welcome to their new surroundings. Water well and voila. Job done. 
  • Mulch cane fruits, such as raspberries and blackberries. Because cane fruits carry extensive fibrous roots just under the surface of the soil, they appreciate a good feed at this time of year. You can use horsie poo, composted garden waste, shredded bark, mushroom compost, spent hops, whatever you have. Water the area first if you’ve had a dry spell, (seriously, who in the UK has had a dry spell!?!) so that all the goodness you are adding can start to work straight away. 
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British Summertime begins on Sunday - HOORAY! What a grey, long old winter it has been. If you are desperate to get outside, or considering how to create your own tropical garden paradise this year, but not sure where to start, here is our run down of the best bits about gardening to get you motivated and ready to tackle the great outdoors.

1. Getting outside = freedom and sanity during times of duress

I love my children but when my first son arrived, he screamed like a banshee. I literally couldn’t stand the constant noise. Locked in a sleep deprived, slightly manic world of my own, the last thing I needed was a howler in the house. However, in my (albeit limited) experience, a child’s scream is significantly more bearable outside. The walls don’t close in for starters. A walk around in the pram sent my one off straight away, meaning I could park him up under some shade and either sit in the deckchair and gently pull out a few weeds either side in a vain attempt to do something that felt vaguely related to the outside world, or nod off, dreaming of how wonderful my garden was going to look once I had some energy to really get cracking... Whether it is a child, an annoying boss, or some other factor causing you grief, a couple of hours in the garden on a bright day translate into the best tonic that doesn’t cost you money. 

2. Boredom doesn’t exist for gardeners.

For some, gardening has become synonymous a sedentary, sleepy way of life -  slightly safe and dull. Au contraire! New varieties of flowers and veggies emerge every year, bred to meet the demands of tricky weather conditions, dodgy soil types or just to create additional, hardiness, colour or vibrancy to an existing family of plants. It is a wonderfully frivolous, fun and addictive past time. If you are clever with your pots and planting, a garden can change with the seasons, and with your tastes. Over time, what suited you once can be swapped with friends and family or unceremoniously booted out in favour of a new addition. Add to the compost bin and you’ll be creating new resources and new food for your beds and borders, once it all breaks down. 

3. ‘Free’ cut flowers and veg.  

Yes, you pay for seeds, bulbs and plants. But it is often a one purchase requirement. Collect seeds, replant bulbs, keep your garden stocked with perennials, and the costs do decrease. Gardening creates results. You can fill your house full of flowers and have a well supplied kitchen with herbs as well as veg. Personally, I get great pride seeing my leeks upright and regimental in their rows, ready for me to dig up as and when I fancy a drop of soup, or need some extra veg for dinner. I always feel slightly sad when I pull them up. I also can’t bring myself to cut home grown, ‘cut’ flowers.  I love seeing them on their tall stems dotted around the garden. Despite my overly sensitive ways, the intention is good, which in gardening, seems to be all that really matters. 

4. The Garden at Night

No, not some weird, slightly trippy kids programme. Or an astronomy thing. For a lot of us, enjoying the great outdoors is predominantly an evening event. Work, commuting or just life gets in the way of really spending much time outdoors in true daylight hours. The garden at night can be a wonderful retreat from your busy world. Add outdoor lighting, comfy seating, a few strongly scented flowers to your space, and the garden transforms into a living, breathing room which is really magical. It’s an obvious option in summer, but wrapped up, in front of a fire pit with a glass of wine is a great way to spend time with friends and loved ones on a clear night in the days and months surrounding our few weeks of ‘summer’. Outdoor space = headspace. 

5. The art of Pottering. 

Pottering is lovely. The joy of doing something worthwhile without any stress or time pressure is something we don’t experience enough of. You can lose yourself in pulling out a few weeds, having a good inspection of buds and seedlings emerging, or just enjoy a beer while poking about a bonfire on a bright, still autumn afternoon. Pottering is sanctity. 

6. A little is always enough.

To put it bluntly, ‘all or nothing' is an approach to gardening, but it’s not a very pleasurable one. Getting a sweat on to ‘clear’ a garden is therapeutic, but you may find you are getting irritated two weeks later when the weeds start reappearing.  No matter how little you do, it’s still an improvement. Little and often is easy to fit in, and the rewards are plenty. 

7. Tanning time. 

A natural tan. I know all the stuff about skin cancer etc... but there is no better feeling than being warmed by the sun. This week, on a brief break from the Beast of the East, I’ve wrapped myself up, plonked myself in a chair in front of the shed, and basked in the reflected heat coming off of the wood, brazenly ignoring the fact that the shed, is in fact, rotting, and in desperate need of a treatment. I like my wood to look rustic. And giving my commitment to tanning time, I imagine I’ll soon have a complexion to complement it. 

8. Ultimate ‘recycling’

When you garden, it’s not just your fingers that turn green. Gardening is the ultimate definition of recycling. With one or two exceptions, most of your garden rubbish, and some of your household waste can be composted. Fast forward a year and you have the perfect ingredient for rejuvenating your soil and producing even better crops. Buy an established plant from your local garden nursery, and if not straight away, in time, you’ll be able to take cuttings and establish a whole new bed of plants for free. Simple, easy and satisfying. 

9. Express yourself

Gardening is creative. It has the texture, colour and vibrancy of the fashion world.  Combining tones and shades, adding structure into a bed, border or even window box can be as enjoyable as creating the perfect indoor room. You can create minimalist, contemporary space, using plants to make an architectural statement, go mad with perennials to design a romantic, traditional cottage garden, or any combination in between. Whether you have a big space in which to create a series of moods and ‘rooms’ or a small, intimate area in which to sit and relax, gardening provides both a dedicated time, and a means, to express yourself. 

10. A small reminder of a bigger world

Sometimes, we all take life and ourselves, a bit too seriously. Despite harsh winters, seemingly illogical hose ban curfews, and wanton neglect, my old, faithful wisteria, produces strikingly beautiful blue racemes of flowers every year, and in doing so, sticks her fingers up and says “Get a grip.”  She’s right of course. As is the decadently scented daphne, which has managed to claw its roots through the pot it was once in, into the ground, and now finds itself in the most uncomfortable, restrictive position, yet still does what it does best, bringing gorgeous early flowers and fragrance to the garden. The world is bigger, infinitely more interesting and durable than most problems I encounter. It also brilliant at providing a well timed kick up the derriere. 

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This year marks the 50th Anniversary of the Gardening for Disabled Trust. Celebrating in style, this fantastic charity has headed back it's swinging sixties roots to create an exciting fundraising challenge for this summer. 

Alan Titchmarsh, President of the Trust, will share his ten top gardening tips for flower power success to everyone who makes a £10.00 donation. Between you and I, I'm also hoping to see Alan give us a twirl as 'Austen Powers' this summer! Now come on, that's got to be worth an extra fiver?! 

Each year, the Gardening for Disabled Trust, a small, Kent based charity, works nationwide, helping thousands of people to enjoy gardening, defying physical disabilities and mental health issues. 

The healing effects of gardening are becoming increasingly researched and well known. By supporting the Gardening for Disabled Trust, and helping them to reach their target of £5000, you will directly help to improve access to the garden for those that need it most. Every single penny the charity receives goes towards items such as raised beds; making gardens/level accessible with ramps/adaptations; adding handrails, as well as shrubs/seeds/bulbs tools or all kinds of other garden requirements. £5000 equates to 100 raised planter beds or 50 garden access ramps. 

To find out more and to keep in touch with the campaign this summer, visit www.gardeningfordisabledtrust.org.uk and look out for the #gdtflowerpower across Facebook, Twitter and other social channels. 

 

Images kindly provided by Gardening for Disabled Trust. Copyright owned by Alan Titchmarsh.  

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