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Right to Work Checks: Guidance for Employers 

As a UK employer, you have a legal obligation to comply with prevention of illegal working legislation.

Specifically, this requires you to conduct basic documentation checks on every UK-based employee. Right to Work checks are required to verify that any individual you employ has the requisite permissions to work in the UK. Performing Right to Work checks correctly provides defence in the event of an issue with the immigration or working status of any of your employees.

Importantly, the checks must be carried out indiscriminately and without assumption on all prospective employees and employees, regardless of nationality, race or ethnicity – including British, EEA. Singling out certain classes of individual could equate to discrimination.

It is illegal to breach your duty to prevent illegal working.

Failure to perform Right to Work checks correctly could result in unwanted Home Office scrutiny and serious ramifications, including:

  • Civil penalty for illegal working – fine for up to £20,000 per breach
  • Criminal prosecution
  • Enforced debt action
  • County Court judgment
  • Tier 2 Sponsor Licence revocation
  • Adverse impact on the ability to obtain future credit
  • Disqualification of company directors
  • Inclusion on the Home Office’s civil penalty offender list
  • Bad press, reputational harm and a resulting hit on profits
  • Business forced to cease trading

Summary of Right to Work checks

It is good risk management practice to ensure any processes you have in place remain compliant and implemented consistently and correctly.

Right to Work checks ordinarily form part of the onboarding process, requiring HR and line managers to be trained to perform the checks adequately.

All provisions are under Sections 15 – 25 of the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006 which came into force on 29 February 2008. The Home Office has published guidance for employers.

  • Step 1 – Obtain: We advise that a copy of a future employee’s right to work is taken before they starts working for you. This is also a preventive measure in case at interview stage a candidate you really wish to hire requires a permit to work here. You will ensure that you put the wheels in motion in good time in case you require to secure a CoS and Tier 2 for your future hire. Look at your recruitment process and find where right to work naturally fits in for you / your organisation, however keep in mind that leaving it for induction day could be too late.
  • Step 2 – Check: Check the documents in the employees’ presence. Ensure that the photo in the bio page is the same as the person in front of you. You also want to feel the documents, so make sure you do so. Look carefully and ensure that all pages of the passport are there. Tilt the document and check the lighting on the holograms and MRZ.
  • Step 3 – Retain copies and record the date of the check. Depending on the individual’s immigration status at the time of the check, there will be different demands on the type of documents to tbe checked and retained.

What do you need to retain for List A, List B Group 1 and Group 2?

List A – British Citizens

  • For employees who are UK passport holders, you must copy and retain the details page of their passport as prove of lawful right to work in the UK. Copy of the passport cover is no longer required.
  • If a passport is not available, you must request, copy and retain their National Insurance number and name (e.g P45, P60, NI card or letter from a government agency or previous employers) and either full birth certificate or adoption certificate, or certificate or registration or naturalisation as a British citizen

What if the UK passport has expired and no replacement is available ? You can still accept it as a valid right to work provided that the photo on the passport is not too dates and you are satisfied it resembles the person in front of you.

List A – European Nationals

  • Valid national passport or identity card; or
  • Registration certificate of document indicating permanent residence issued to an EEA national; or
  • Permanent residence card issued to a family member of an EEA national

European passports, ID cards and permits are varied and sometimes it is difficult to determine what constitutes a genuine one, particularly as their look, shape and feel changes over the years. If in doubt, make use of Prado, the Council of Europe’s public register with examples of past and present European passports and other identification documents and residence permits.

List A – Others

  • Document showing NI Number and name

List B employees present additional risk for employers given the time-limited nature of their work permission, and the implications of hiring an employee whose permission to work has expired. You must stay on top this. Diarising regular checks for List B employees for example

List B – Group 1

  • Are those employees (limited time to live and work in the UK) where repeat checks must take place on expiry of their leave. In order to constitute a valid Right to Work check and ensure a statutory defence for your organisation, you must hold on file a copy of their immigration status document with photo to show that the employee has the correct leave and can do the work in question. You must also hold a copy of a document showing NI number and name.

List B – Group 2

  • Are those visa holder employees (limited time to live and work in the UK) where repeat checks must take place every six months.
  • Alongside the usual documents, employers must also retain for this group: Positive Verification Note issued by UKVI alone or with: Certificate of Application to a non-EEA family member or EEA national / Switzerland that is less than 6 months old or; Application Registration Card permitting employment in question.
Right to Work 

DavidsonMorris are specialist business immigration legal advisers, working with UK employers to ensure compliance with their duties to prevent illegal working.

If you have a question about any aspect of Right to Work checks and avoiding Home Office penalties, contact us.

The post Right to Work Checks Guidance appeared first on DavidsonMorris - Immigration Solicitors.

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NHS: Overseas Doctors Refused Tier 2 Visa Applications

International recruitment offers a rapid and immediate response to the demand for qualified, experienced healthcare professionals in the NHS. So why is the health service being hindered in its efforts to access overseas talent and ease staffing shortfalls?

Rising shortages of trained medical professionals across the NHS have been well-documented and well-publicised.

NHS staffing issues – or some would say, crisis – are being attributed to a number of factors:

  • Low supply of qualified medical practitioners in the resident labour market.
  • Failure of student nursing commissions to match demand.
  • Current focus on safe staffing levels and care standards.
  • Exodus of EU medical professionals.
  • Fall in number of EU national workers coming to UK.

A worrying state of affairs, in clear need of resolution. Which makes recent reports of overseas doctors being refused their Tier 2 visa applications to come and work in the health service somewhat baffling.

Tier 2 for highly skilled workers

The Tier 2 visa route is designed to allow non-EEA medium and highly skilled individuals to work in the UK on a temporary basis to alleviate shortages in resident labour for certain roles.

So given current healthcare staffing issues, foreign healthcare professionals would seem to be ideally suited for the Tier 2 visa.

But, as has been reported recently, a number of Tier 2 visa applications from overseas doctors have for the past two months been rejected by the Home Office.

The issue also affects individuals switching to the Tier 2 visa, who may already be in the UK, but are now unable to secure the necessary permission to work under a new visa.

Why?

Initial speculation was that the refusals were due to immigration criteria being tightened, presumably by some under-the-radar change in Home Office policy.

But there’s no clear evidence that this is the case. The salary thresholds for the Tier 2 visa have not changed. Likewise, the Tier 2 annual quota set in 2011 by the Coalition government (at a level driven largely by a broader aim to lower net migration) has also remained the same.

So what has changed?

The Tier 2 route is limited each year to a quota of 20,700 Certificates of Sponsorship (CoS), divided into monthly allocations.

When total CoS applications for the month come in below the monthly allocation, they are carried over to the next month’s allocation, to be drawn against by new applications. At the year-end in April, the reset button is pressed.

When applications exceed the month’s allocation of Tier 2 visas, priority is given to higher-scoring applicants, such as those filling a shortage or PhD-level occupation, those with a higher salary.

Looking at the most recent Home Office figures for allocations of Certificates of Sponsorship, an unprecedented number of ‘exceptional grants’ were allocated outside of the usual allocation process in December (388), resulting in CoS applications exceeding the allocated quota, and crucially meaning the available CoS were granted as priority to applications with higher points scores.

The result – doctors on lower salaries who would otherwise and ordinarily be eligible under Tier 2, have seen their applications rejected.

Who these exceptional CoS were granted to isn’t clear at this point, but they have in effect been given precedence over NHS doctors.

This causes issues on a number of levels.

First, how is the NHS to resolve the very real staffing shortages if they are being prevented from filling vacancies by what’s essentially a numbers game?

The NHS has to operate business as usual, with high standards in patient care.

In the absence of alternative solutions, international recruitment offers a rapid and immediate response to labour demand. This recent issue impacts the ability to plan for recruitment and front-line staffing.

Second, it is curious to note that Tier 2 visa priority is given on the Shortage Occupation List to applicants in certain areas of medical practice such as emergency and paediatrics.

I’d guess the logic behind giving precedence to some practitioners is based on a politically-motivated target to reduce migration and limit allowances. But surely, given the continued staffing issues, this policy needs to change to encompass all, if not a substantially broader, range of healthcare specialisms.

Third, attracting highly skilled workers is a challenge in the best of circumstances. The global market is competitive, countries offer their own special visas and allowances to attract much sought-after medical professionals (among other skilled professions). The current system is in effect turning away willing and able talent.

Applicants are required as part of the Tier 2 application process to pass an extensive recruitment and selection process including General Medical Council tests and the language tests. Any degree of uncertainty around the likely prospect of a visa rejection is likely to put candidates off applying in the first place.

Around one third of Tier 2 applications are for NHS applicants, but the debate following these recent refusals has raised the ongoing plight of already-stretched doctors, and it’s clear this allocation is still not enough.

Conclusion

There has been suggestion the Home Office recognises salary thresholds for example, are not adequate, which is putting off overseas candidates. But clearly the issue goes beyond individual criterion – it is the underlying immigration rules and policy that are hindering a health service in need of support.

The short answer to this recent issue is that immigration policy has not kept pace with the real world.

It remains to be seen whether this was a short-term ‘blip’ and figures return to usual levels, or whether the message to foreign medical professionals has been off-putting.

The current treatment of medical professionals under UK immigration rules is clearly unfit for purpose and needs to be looked at again, particularly since the Brexit vote and EU employee exodus will only put more pressure on staffing levels.

The arbitrary quota is preventing the healthy operation of the public health service.

DavidsonMorris works with organisations and individuals from across the UK health and social care sector, specialising in all aspects of the Tier 2 visa and sponsorship licences, including applications and renewals. We are also involved in lobbying for change in the pre-registration process for non-EEA nurses, to help alleviate the shortage of qualified, experienced nurses across health and social care.

If you have any questions about this article, or any UK immigration-related queries, please contact us.

The post NHS: Overseas Doctors Refused Tier 2 Visa Applications appeared first on DavidsonMorris - Immigration Solicitors.

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What is the Home Office process for issuing a civil penalty notice for illegal working?

Through the civil penalty regime, UKVI ensure employers are compliant with immigration rules by conducting effective Right to Work checks and that all personnel have the relevant permissions to work in the UK.

Where businesses are found to be in breach of their immigration duties, a civil penalty for illegal employment may be issued, comprising a fine of up to £20,000 per breach.

In addition to the significant financial penalty, businesses found to be in breach of their duties could also face criminal prosecution, among many other negative ramifications.

Civil penalties are highly lucrative for the Home Office, with tens of thousands of pounds of fines issued to hundreds of businesses on a quarterly basis.

Taking preventative measures is the most effective way to avoid falling foul of immigration breaches, but if you are facing UKVI action and a possible civil penalty notice for illegal working, it can be helpful to understand what the Home Office process is before you decide your next steps.

Stage 1: Information Gathering

Where the Home Office becomes aware or suspicious of potential immigration breaches, such as from an anonymous tip-off (think disgruntled former employee or unhappy customer), they have the power to act on the information by contacting you to request a visit to your business premises.

During the site visit, the Home Office will examine all HR and onboarding processes and documentation relating to Right to Work checks.

The Home Office does not need to have concrete evidence of any non-compliance or illegal working to conduct a site inspection.

Where evidence of illegal working is found, a referral will be made to the Civil Penalty Compliance Team.

The Civil Penalty Compliance Team will assess the information and evidence gathered to date, and issue an Information Request to the business for the following:

  • Confirmation as to whether you are the employer of the workers identified. If this is not the case, details are requested of the business who is employing the identified workers.
  • Confirmation as to whether Right to Work document checks have been carried out, and when they were carried out.
  • Confirmation as to whether reports were made of suspected illegal workers.
  • Confirmation as to whether you employed the identified workers and when.

You will be given 10 days to return the completed Information Request Response Form and supporting documents.

Your response to the Information Request will play a decisive role in the level of civil penalty issued. Instructing expert legal representation to prepare a detailed response is crucial at this stage.

For example, the Civil Penalty Compliance Team will expect you to complete only the required information in the Response Form, which does not give you the opportunity to argue against the allegations. However – we advise that representations be made, providing a detailed defence against each allegation, to be submitted alongside the Response Form.

Stage 2: Civil Penalty Notice Issued for Illegal Working

The Civil Penalty Compliance Team will then consider your response to the Information Request.

It may be decided at this stage that a Formal Warning Notice – with no penalty – will be issued, or a reduced civil penalty if they are satisfied that successful mitigation has taken place as a result of the information provided in the response.

If a Civil Penalty Notice is however to be issued – around 220 are served every month – you will have 28 days to make full payment, set up an instalment plan, or object to the penalty.

If you have not been found to be employing illegal workers within the last 3 years, you may be provided with the Fast Payment Option in your Civil Penalty Notice which entitles you to a 30% reduction in the penalty if payment is made in full within 21 days of the Civil Penalty Notice issue date.

As the owner of a business, you will need to decide whether it is worth outlaying the costs on instructing legal representation to object against the Civil Penalty or whether you should pay the penalty.

This decision will depend on whether there are strong grounds to object against the allegations in the Civil Penalty Notice, which will result in the penalty being reduced.

Appealing a Civil Penalty Notice Illegal Working 

Employers who are served a civil penalty notice for employing illegal workers are permitted to pursue an appeal.

This can be to either lower the level of the original penalty, or to remove the penalty altogether.

The appeals process is, however, complex, and you have a limited amount of time to weigh up the pros and cons and make a decision based on the options open to you.

Challenges have to be made on specific grounds, within specific timeframes, and be supported by relevant documentary evidence. The approach you take should be dependent on your organisation’s circumstances and the level of the civil penalty notice you have received.

Note however that the Home Office has the power to increase the level of the original penalty at the appeal stage – so it is important to proceed with this only where you are confident in the merit of your challenge following professional advice.

It is crucial at this stage to obtain specialised legal advice as it is within the Home Office’s rights to issue an increased civil penalty in response to receiving an objection.

DavidsonMorris provides a fixed fee assessment at Stage 1 and Stage 2 of the Civil Penalty process, enabling you to determine which option will result in minimal financial loss for your business.

If you have any questions about this article, or any immigration-related queries, please contact us for further details.

The post Civil Penalty Notice Illegal Working: Home Office Process appeared first on DavidsonMorris - Immigration Solicitors.

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HR & Global Mobility: What’s ahead for Business Immigration in 2018?

UK business immigration is expected to undergo considerable change in the coming 12 months. For HR teams and global mobility professionals, it will be critical to ensure their organisations are sufficiently prepared for future changes in UK immigration rules, to ensure compliance with these new rules while also maximising opportunity to build competitive advantage and efficiencies through mobility programmes.

What should HR and global mobility teams be preparing for in 2018?

Business Immigration 2018: Compliance with Tier 2

There are many ways that the Home Office can become aware of an immigration compliance breach – unannounced and planned Home Office visits, whistleblowing, cross-referencing with HMRC records. The message from UKVI is clear – sponsor licence holders have to keep their licence in order, to avoid any scrutiny or penalty being directed at your business.

UK sponsor licence holders need to be mindful however of more than just the Home Office where compliance with your sponsor licence duties are concerned.

We have been instructed by an employer who is facing an Employment Tribunal claim by a former employee for breach of contract and unfair dismissal. The basis of the claim is that the HR function failed to maintain the company sponsor licence correctly, which led to the Home Office curtailing the visa of the employee, who then brought the claim.

It’s a stressful, time-consuming and costly experience for all parties, and best avoided through careful and proactive management of the sponsor licence.

Going into the new year is a good time to take stock of your company’s compliance position. Do your company processes, policies and personnel meet the requirements? An effective starting point for assessing HR compliance is an immigration audit – understanding where any weak points or areas of potential breach are, and how to rectify them.

Business Immigration 2018: Brexit

Following the Government’s proposals for ‘settled status‘ of qualifying EU citizens, and with the MAC due to publish its immigration report in the Autumn, we eagerly anticipate the detail in 2018 of the UK’s post-Brexit immigration policy, and expect the Home Office to continue to release white papers and committee meeting notes.

It makes practical sense for employers to be looking now at what this means for their companies and their HR strategies – cascading relevant information to your employee, supporting your workforce, and ensuring immigration compliance while minimising disruption to your operations. We have been involved for example with hosting surgeries and webinars to assist with applications to register EEA employees.

Business Immigration 2018: Building a Talent Pipeline

With the OECD predicting growth across all member countries, the outlook for global business seems positive. Companies will be looking to their talent pools – existing and new – to realise growth ambitions.

Expect more investment in global mobility programmes, and with it the expectation of greater returns through personnel development, improved knowledge-sharing and enhanced, data-driven efficiencies.

For example, we are seeing a focus on internal training programmes with enhanced mobility elements, designed to strengthen management capability, and retain and develop talent and future leaders. Graduates and younger professionals are seeking opportunities for international experience.

The UK entities of global organisations are looking outward – career development of the overseas graduates – transferring to the UK under the Tier 2 ICT Graduate trainee route and then returning them to home entities. This is particularly prevalent in sectors such as energy, oil and gas.

Business Immigration 2018: Plugging Skills Gaps

The UK economy continues to experience skill shortages in a number of sectors – think care home nurses, tech & digital, academia, engineering.

For smaller companies, there is an opportunity to gain competitive advantage and to get ahead by using UK immigration rules to attract skilled workers and retain them within the business.

Where companies are unable to meet their talent needs in the domestic (and EU) labour market, hiring non-EEA skilled nationals will require an application for a sponsorship licence.

Applying for a UK sponsorship licence can enable companies to meet their people needs, but it’s important for employers to understand the obligations this will bring in terms of ongoing licence management.

Business Immigration: Safety First

With terrorist attacks no longer confined to certain parts of the world, the risk of attack has become pervasive meaning any business must ensure its mobility programme adequately caters for the worst, for the protection of its employees. The global mobility programme should be considered within the organisation’s wider risk management strategy, and reviewed on a regular basis to ensure it remains fit for purpose.

We have looked previously at how to approach global mobility in a crisis. Advances in technology, such as the use of assignee tracking (and of their dependants), is becoming commonplace, offering benefits in addition to employee safety – wider data use such as tax purposes.

From an employee perspective, heightened levels of ‘monitoring’ and collection of data by employers may be brought into question, as wider concerns about personal privacy are raised. This will be an interesting area for employees to navigate.

UKVI service

Brexit has placed a spotlight on the Home Office and its ability to cope with the expected surges in applications and enquiries under the new UK rules.

In response, as well as recruiting more caseworkers, the Government has pledged that the application process for the new settled status will be less intensive and involved for applicants than other immigration applications. In addition, Home Office caseworkers are said to be afforded more discretion to support applicants with any issues or queries relating to their applications.

Business Immigration 2018: Tier 2 surge 

We’re also anticipating a surge in Tier 2 visas from Tier 2 visa holders coming out of the 12 -month ‘cooling off’ period restriction which would have been placed upon them in 2016/2017.

For more information about allocations, or applications for the Tier 2 visa route, please get in touch.

HR Essentials: Changes in Immigration Rules 

DavidsonMorris will continue to report on developments in immigration and HR compliance affecting UK employers and HR teams via email updates and Twitter. We also offer a programme of free webinars, which take a practical look at key immigration issues for employers, HR and mobility teams.

If you have any questions about this article, or any immigration-related queries, please contact us for further details.

The post Business Immigration in 2018 – What’s Ahead? appeared first on DavidsonMorris - Immigration Solicitors.

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Sponsor licence holders & Home Office compliance 

You’ve successfully navigated the Home Office sponsorship licence application process, and have been granted a sponsor licence – time to put your feet up? No chance!

This is where the hard work really starts.

Meeting your duties as a sponsor licence holder will require resource, effort and commitment. Depending on the size of your organisation and how you use your sponsor licence, it’s likely that it won’t require daily attention, but similarly your licence can’t be left to run itself.

With more than 27,000 sponsor licence holders in the UK, the Home Office places duties on these organisations to inform of certain organisational and employee changes to ensure their records are kept up to date, and that immigration enforcement is upheld.

If you fail to keep your licence up-to-date, the Home Office can downgrade, suspend or even revoke it – with potentially catastrophic impact on your sponsored migrants, as well as on your ability to recruit and employ sponsored migrants in future.

If your licence is downgraded you will be required to pay UKVI for the privilege of being given an action plan that specifies the issues that you must remedy in order to be upgraded back to A-status. If your licence is revoked you may be barred from applying for a new licence for a six month ‘cooling off period’.

So what do you need to do to ensure your licence remains compliant? Here are some common scenarios where sponsor licence holders are required to take positive action to notify the Home Office of changes in circumstances.

If you change company address

If your company has moved address, the Home Office needs to know. They don’t like turning up for an unannounced audit visit to find a completely different company in situ (yes, we have heard of that happening.) It tends to make them nervous about what else you might have failed to tell them.

If you change your Authorising Officer

It’s essential that you have an Authorising Officer in place at all times. That means if the current incumbent leaves the company, or relocates overseas, or goes on sabbatical or maternity leave, you need to appoint someone else to fill the role – even if it’s just a temporary move. UKVI see the Authorising Officer as their key point of contact with your company, even if they aren’t involved in the day-to-day work of immigration. They will be e-mailing your Authorising Office from time to time, and if they get an automatic reply telling them ‘Mr Smith left the company in 2014, please contact…’ they won’t be happy. In their eyes if you don’t have an Authorising Officer in place then no one is taking responsibility for immigration matters.

If you open or close a UK branch

UKVI want to have up-to-date information on your UK sites – because that’s where your migrant workers will be based. Unfortunately it can be easy to lose track of what you’ve told the Home Office, because details of your branches aren’t published on the Sponsorship Management System. That means the only way you’ll know which addresses are in your licence is by keeping clear records and making sure they’re amended every time you open or close a branch.

If you establish or close an overseas branch, a subsidiary company or a linked entity

It can be even easier to lose track of which overseas companies are covered by your licence – yet again none of this information is viewable on your Sponsorship Management System. And if you’re part of a Group with a complex global structure, we appreciate that sometimes UK HR may be informed rather late down the line when a new subsidiary in Azerbaijan is established. Usually just at the point that one of your Managers wants to bring over an employee from there to the UK. Ideally you should be updating UKVI every time a linked entity overseas is established (or shut down), and certainly you must have done this before you can consider transferring an employee from that overseas company to the UK, but if your Group is constantly opening new overseas branches or companies then we would suggest programming in the submission of an update to UKVI every quarter, or yearly – it will depend on how frequent those kind of changes are.

Other significant changes to the company

Takeovers, acquisitions, mergers, TUPE transfers. All of these will have ramifications for your sponsor licence. This is a much more complex matter, so there isn’t room to talk through all of the implications here, but in most cases these changes have to be reported to UKVI, usually within a very tight timescale of 28 days after a change occurs. And you may need to submit a new licence application in this timeframe too. We would strongly suggest that you take expert advice on what is needed, at an early a date as possible.

DavidsonMorris can advise on Home Office compliance 

Our advice for maintaining compliance and keeping the Home Office happy? Don’t fall into the trap of ‘out of sight out of mind’.

Give your licence a little bit of attention and TLC on a regular basis. Schedule in regular check-ups and you’ll avoid problems coming to bite you later.

Avoid isssues, scrutiny and penalty by keeping on top of your duties. A neglected licence may cause issues at renewal stage. An immigration audit can also be extremely helpful in identifying potential issues before the Home Office comes calling.

Keep all aspects of your HR compliance in check; HR processes, policies, and importantly record keeping. 

If you are unsure about any aspect of your duties as a sponsor licence holder, or are preparing to apply to renew your licence and are concerned about your HR house-keeping, contact our business immigration experts for a no-obligation discussion.

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A number of changes have been announced to the UK Immigration Rules that will take effect from 11 January 2018.

We provide a brief summary of some of the updates. For more detailed advice or specific questions, please contact us to speak with one of our immigration law specialists.

Tier 1 Entrepreneur 

The requirements for a Tier 1 Entrepreneur visa have not in themselves been changed, however the new guidance clarifies and expands the previous wording.

For example, the new wording seeks to prevent ‘recycling’ of funds i.e. applicants cannot base their application on funds already ‘used’ by another applicant, or family members.

Further detail is also provided on documentary evidence, and the rules concerning creation of jobs for domestic workers have been clarified.

If you are applying for a new Tier 1 Entrepreneur visa, or to extend an existing, seek advice to ensure your application meets the newly-published requirements.

Read more about the Tier 1 Entrepreneur visa.

Tier 1 (Exceptional Talent)

In support of the changes announced in the Autumn Budget 2017, the number of Tier 1 Exceptional Talent visas allocated annually is being doubled to 2,000.

The additional 1,000 visas will be held separately, in an unallocated pool draw on a first-come, first served basis.

Exceptional talent visa holders (but not exceptional promise visa holders) are also now permitted to qualify for ILR after three years,

Resident Labour Market Test new exemptions 

In a move welcomed by the higher education sector, new exemptions to the Resident Labour Market test have been introduced in respect of researcher and reader posts.

Posts that will be held by sponsored research team members or researchers in receipt of supernumerary research Awards and Fellowships are no longer subject to the RLMT.

Indefinite leave to remain for Tier 2 visa holders

Prior to the rule change, a 60 day ‘gap’ between roles prevented Tier 2 holders from meeting the five-year requirement, and thus being able to qualify for Indefinite Leave to Remain.

Under the new rules, Tier 2 visa holders who have more than 60 days between Tier 2 employments are no longer precluded from applying for ILR when they reach the qualifying mark of five-continuous years employment in the UK.

Tier 4 switching to Tier 2

Tier 4 visa holders on non-PhD courses can now apply to switch to Tier 2 when they finish their course, and will no longer have to wait until they have received their final results.

PBS Visa Dependants 

PBS migrants applying for ILR are not permitted to be out of the country for more than 180 days in any 12 months during the qualifying period. Dependants of PBS migrants however had not been subject to this rule.

The new changes now bring dependents under the 180 day requirement, and will apply to all ILR applications made after 11 January 2018.

This may affect Tier 1 Entrepreneur and Investor visa holders, where the business person had been in the UK on a dependant visa to enable them to benefit from the more relaxed travel restrictions in the lead up to ILR qualification. We can advise if you have any questions on the impact of the 180 day rule on Tier 1 dependants.

Visitors 

From 11 January 2018, visitors who hold a standard or marriage/civil partnership visit visa will be allowed to transit the UK without the need to obtain a separate transit visa.

There is also clarification that visitors are not permitted to study at an academy or a school maintained by a Local Authority.

Electronic entry clearance 

A new electronic entry clearance system is being rolled out from 2018. Individuals with electronic clearance will only have to present their passport or identity documents at the UK border for the Immigration Officer to check electronically for entry clearance. Electronic entry clearance will be trialled initially with a pilot group, ahead of wider implementation.

UK immigration rule changes December 2017- do you have a question?

If you have a question about how the changes affect you or your organisation, please contact us. Our team of UK immigration law experts are on hand to answer your queries.

The full statement of changes in Immigration Rules can be found at HC309

The post UK Immigration Rules Changes January 2018 appeared first on DavidsonMorris - Immigration Solicitors.

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