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Chances are, you probably want your home to be a safe-and-cozy environment. Ductless systems address both of these needs. By installing one, you’ll drastically improve your indoor air quality (IAQ), as well as keeping your home the perfect temperature.

Brought to you by our team at Comfort Zone, here are some of the reasons millions of Americans are switching to ductless:

• Comfort at Your Fingertips

Ductless systems make temperature control a breeze. With just the touch of a button, you can easily adjust the room temperature to your liking. Ductless units have both an air conditioner and a heat pump built in, so they provide the service of two units in one. Many ductless systems can also conveniently be controlled with your smart phone.

• Breathe Easier

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), many American households have poor air quality: up to five times more polluted than the air outside. Don’t let your home be part of this statistic. Ductless systems cleanse your air in two ways:

1. Air Filtration

Ductless units are known for their exceptional air filtration. Their large filters collect even the tiniest molecules from the air. Regular air conditioners have ductwork, which often collects dust over time. Ductless models eliminate ducts, which eliminates this problem. Some advanced models go the extra mile by removing 99.9 percent of bacteria from the air. Ductless units are a great investment for families, particularly if any members suffer from allergies or asthma.

2. Humidity Control

Besides dust and pollen, mold is a common contributor to compromised air quality. Mold, like any form of life, needs water to survive. Humidity in your home causes water condensation. This condensation is an invitation for mold and mildew to grow. The mold and mildew release spores into your air, which can irritate the lungs. Ductless units can prevent all of this, because they remove humidity from the air and flush it into their condensate tanks.

• Lower Your Bills

Many traditional air conditioners bring you comfort––that is until you see your bill at the end of the month! Ductless systems are much more energy efficient than traditional HVAC models. Because you’re using less electricity, you’ll pay less for utilities. That’s one more reason you’ll breathe a sigh of relief after switching to ductless mini-splits.

At Comfort Zone, we’re excited to bring the latest in HVAC technology to our neighbors here in Weiser, ID. Call us at 208-414-1302 to learn more about the benefits of going ductless.

Need HVAC Service?

Contact the experts!

Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling services Caldwell, Fruitland, Cambridge, Council, Homedale, Middleton, Midvale, Nampa, Weiser, New Plymouth, Parma, & Payette, Idaho, as well as Nyssa, Ontario, & Vale, Oregon, & the surrounding Idaho/Oregon communities with their heating & cooling needs. Visit our service area page for more coverage details, call us at 208-414-1302, or request service online today.

The post Ductless Mini-Splits—for Comfortable and Healthy Living appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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Having the right sized air conditioner is a key component in cooling your space effectively. A unit that is too small has to run constantly, playing catch up all day trying to fill a space that it isn’t designed for. A unit that is too big will turn on, cool the space quickly and then shut off, which sounds good but the heat will come back in and the unit will click back on and then back off. This on, off, on, off uses a lot of energy and more energy equals more money. At Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling we are in the business of keeping you cool and saving you money.

Air conditioners are measured by tons, but this isn’t the weight of your appliance in tons. The tonnage of an AC unit is based on how much the unit can cool. A 1 ton air conditioner = 12,000 BTUs.

A BTU or British Thermal Unit is the unit of energy that equals 1055 jules. One BTU is the amount of energy needed to cool 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. A one ton AC unit can cool 12,000 pounds of water by 1 degree, each hour.

Home units can be anything from a 1-5 ton unit and they increase by .5’s as they go up. Size matters, but bigger is not necessarily better, having an accurately sized unit is the way to go.

The old school equation to finding out the right size unit for you is as follows:

The square footage of your space multiplied by 25, divided by 12,000, then subtract .5.

Climate zones also make a difference in determining the correct unit for you, so you can follow the equation or contact us for help!

We are happy to assist you in finding the right appliance for your home or office.

Contact us today at 208-414-1302 or request service online.

Need HVAC Service?

Contact the experts!

Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling services Caldwell, Fruitland, Cambridge, Council, Homedale, Middleton, Midvale, Nampa, Weiser, New Plymouth, Parma, & Payette, Idaho, as well as Nyssa, Ontario, & Vale, Oregon, & the surrounding Idaho/Oregon communities with their heating & cooling needs. Visit our service area page for more coverage details, call us at 208-414-1302, or request service online today.

The post What Size AC Unit Should I Get for My Home or Office? appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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Does an air conditioner help with allergies? In one word, yes. Actually two words, yes if. If you properly maintain the air conditioner. Air conditioners can help filter your home’s air and control its humidity, which are both helps in the allergy world. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA), it’s estimated there are now 50 million seasonal allergy sufferers in America, so any and all help is welcomed.

But properly maintaining your heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system is the difference between your air conditioner helping with those allergies and it aggravating them.Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling specializes in air conditioners. Contact us with any questions you may have or assistance you may need.

How It Helps

Whether you suffer from ID seasonal allergies or year-long allergens like pet dander or dust, your air conditioner can help you breathe easier. With the correct filter, your indoor air quality (IAQ) can be improved, filtering out allergens like pollen, pet dander, dust mites, and other irritant air particles. These particles get stopped by the filter and are not allowed to continue through the system to make their way to your lungs, improving air quality.

Indoor air quality is also improved because your air conditioner helps control your home’s humidity. Higher levels of humidity breed additional allergens like bacteria, mold, and mildew. Your air conditioner works hard to balance your home’s humidity, thereby reducing the instances of these allergens and irritants.

When It Does Not Help

Your air conditioner can help in these instances, except when it’s not maintained properly. When the maintenance on your HVAC system is neglected, it actually makes your indoor air quality worse, so in turn your allergies may get worse.

If your filter continues to trap the particles flowing through the system and is not changed, those particles build up, now having nowhere to go except to blow through your home. The same applies to the other allergens resulting from higher humidity or dampness.

If the humidity builds or if there are leaks somewhere in the system, say in the ductwork, a damp environment now exists. Mold and bacteria have free rein to flow through your home’s air, adding to the allergens you’re breathing.

What You Can Do

To keep your air conditioner helping, rather than hurting, your allergies, take these steps:

    • Have your air conditioner cleaned and maintained regularly, at least once a year
    • Change or clean your air filters regularly
    • Use a higher MERV-rated (Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value) filter (at least an 8 rating), if changing filters
    • Clean any debris or dust around both your outdoor and indoor air conditioner units to avoid it being pulled into the unit and introduced into your home
    • Dust all indoor registers and returns on a regular basis
    • Inspect your ductwork and HVAC unit (drip pan and drain, evaporator coils, air handler) for signs of leaks, corrosion, or mold
    • Consider upgrading your air conditioner if over ten years old
    • Keep doors and windows closed while your air conditioner is running
    • Consider adding on an air purifier
    Let Us Help You With Your Allergies

    Here in Weiser, allergies are a serious concern for many. Keeping your air conditioner properly maintained throughout the year can definitely help with airborne allergies. Call our experts at Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling at 208-414-1302 or contact us online to speak with one of our professionals today to see how we can help you.

Need HVAC Service?

Contact the experts!

Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling services Caldwell, Fruitland, Cambridge, Council, Homedale, Middleton, Midvale, Nampa, Weiser, New Plymouth, Parma, & Payette, Idaho, as well as Nyssa, Ontario, & Vale, Oregon, & the surrounding Idaho/Oregon communities with their heating & cooling needs. Visit our service area page for more coverage details, call us at 208-414-1302, or request service online today.

The post Does an Air Conditioner Help With Allergies? appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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Air conditioning isn’t exactly a stimulating topic to bring up at parties. It’s not something most people think about too excessively. But at Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling, we’re obsessed with it! We want to share with you some things that you may not have known about your air conditioner (AC). We’ve made this list to help you become an informed consumer and get the best out of your purchase.

Here are four things you might not know about your air conditioner:

1. It doesn’t actually produce cold air.

Believe it or not, your air conditioner doesn’t actually add any coldness to the air. Instead, it extracts heat. It does this with a chemical solution known as refrigerant. The heat that is removed is then transferred outside. This leaves cold air, which is circulated through the ducts.

2. It balances the humidity.

Lower humidity means you’re less likely to feel hot. The dehumidifying process helps you breathe higher quality air and lowers the chance of mold growth. This is one of the reasons that a well-maintained central air conditioning system is the perfect ally for those with allergies.

3. Air filters should be cleaned or replaced regularly.

It’s important to replace your filter routinely. The filter can only hold so much dust and particles before the system becomes clogged. Clogs can cause all sorts of mechanical errors, as well as decrease your air quality while increasing your electric bill. Check the manufacturer’s recommendations to see when you should clean or swap out your filter.

4. Maintenance is a requirement.

You should schedule a maintenance tune-up for your air conditioner at least once a year. Serious problems can go undetected, sometimes till they’re too late to fix. During a service visit, you’ll get an expert pair of eyes to see if there are any problems. Also, your air conditioner will be cleaned to restore the machine’s components and to make sure it runs like new.

We at Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling hope you’ve learned something new from our list. Call us today at 208-414-1302 if you have any questions or would like to schedule maintenance for your air conditioner. We’re proud to share the gift of cold air here in Middleton, ID!

Need HVAC Service?

Contact the experts!

Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling services Caldwell, Fruitland, Cambridge, Council, Homedale, Middleton, Midvale, Nampa, Weiser, New Plymouth, Parma, & Payette, Idaho, as well as Nyssa, Ontario, & Vale, Oregon, & the surrounding Idaho/Oregon communities with their heating & cooling needs. Visit our service area page for more coverage details, call us at 208-414-1302, or request service online today.

The post 4 Things to Know About Your Air Conditioner appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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Aside from the professionals, like ours at Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling, who really thinks about air conditioners and their components? Air conditioners keep your Weiser, ID, home or business cool and comfy when the outside temperatures are high, and that’s all you really need to know, right?

Well, air conditioners do so much more than just cool, like dehumidify your home or business and help keep your inside air cleaner. Understanding a bit of its basic components and how they work can help you identify a problem or malfunction when it occurs.

Air Conditioner Overview

As already mentioned, your air conditioner does more than just cool. It dehumidifies by reducing the volume of humid air, thereby taking a portion of its moisture. That’s the reason for pans and drains with air conditioners. Your air conditioner also aids in cleaning the air by removing allergen and debris particles from the airflow where they attach to the filter. 

But the largest purpose of your air conditioner is to remove the heat from your inside air and cool it, providing the maximum indoor comfort. Looking at this side of your air conditioner, most conventional central air conditioners have a hot side, which is located outside, and a cool side, located inside. Since these air conditioners have both outdoor and indoor components, many times you’ll see your air conditioner referred to as a split-system air conditioner.

In the very basest of explanations, here’s how your air conditioner works:

  1. Air conditioners transfer heat to the outside, extracting it from the inside air.
  2. The compressed gas refrigerant in the system (you probably know DuPont’s Freon® refrigerant) absorbs the excess heat before it’s pumped through the piping in a closed system to an outside coil.
  3. A fan blows air over the hot coil, transferring the absorbed heat in the refrigerant to the outdoor air.
  4. Since the inside heat has been removed, the indoor air is now cool. As a result, the refrigerant is re-cooled and condensed here, then sent back to circulate through the system to begin the process again.

There are many complex and smaller transactions throughout your air conditioning system, but this gives you an overview on how your system works.

Air Conditioner Components

An air conditioner is made up of many components, but the major parts doing the heavy lifting of moving the air indoors and outdoors are the evaporator, condenser, expansion valve, and compressor. Keep in mind they’re each either located outside (the hot side) or inside (the cool side).

  • Evaporator
  • The evaporator is located on the cool side. Its main function is to receive the liquid refrigerant. It’s paired with a fan blowing air over the chilled coils into your home. After it receives the liquid refrigerant, it converts it to gas through a drop in pressure.

  • Condenser

  • The condenser is located on the hot side. Its main function is to facilitate heat transfer. Resembling a car’s radiator in looks, it actually works the opposite of the evaporator by converting the evaporated refrigerant back into a liquid. This process is called a heat transfer, working on the principle that heat will always move from a warmer to a cooler substance.

  • Expansion valve
  • 
The expansion valve is located between the evaporator and condenser coils. Its main function is to regulate the refrigerant flow into the evaporator. It removes pressure from the liquid refrigerant allowing the conversion into gas to occur in the evaporator.

  • Compressor
  • The compressor is located on the hot side. Its main function is to pressurize refrigerant. The compressor is a large electric pump re-pressurizing the refrigerant gas to convert it back into liquid. It assists the condenser, while the expansion valve assists the evaporator.

The post How Does Your Central Air Conditioner Cool Your Home? appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling by Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling - 3M ago

What is a dehumidifier?

A dehumidifier is an appliance that removes moisture from the air.

What are the signs that I need a dehumidifier?

There are a number of things that can indicate you need a dehumidifier:

You may have condensation on your windows or doors. You will see water beading or fog/vapor on the glass of your windows. This moisture will eventually rot the wood and will also allow mold to grow.

You may see mold spots on your ceiling or the corners of your walls. Moisture rises so you will often see evidence of mold or the beginning of mold up around where the walls meet the ceiling.

A musty odor is another indicator that there is too much moisture in your house. Often these smells will come from a basement, crawl space, laundry room, entrances or garages. Musty or moldy smelling towels and bedding will let you know that your laundry room is one place where moisture is too heavy.

A lot of homes have reoccurring spring water run-off. This results in a damp basement where you will see white or grey water level marks.

You can see blistering paint or peeling wallpaper. When there is excess moisture in the air it can penetrate the wall. It then turns to steam and will cause your paint and wallpaper to lose adhesion. This will then result in bubbles or peels.

The last thing you might witness is creaky doors/windows/floors etc. As wood absorbs moisture it expands, this causes joints, screws and the structural frame of your house to loosen.

Any or all of these things can be evidence of too much moisture in your home. New homes and remodeled homes have better insulation than ever before. This cuts your energy costs overall but it also creates less air flow and therefore traps humidity, so while you are saving money on gas/oil/electricity you may be creating another problem for yourself that, when left unchecked, can lead to costly repairs.

If you see any of these signs it is best to check the humidity levels in your home. Comfort Zone Heating and Cooling is here to help. Contact us online or call 208-414-1302 to schedule service.

Need HVAC Service?

Contact the experts!

Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling services Caldwell, Fruitland, Cambridge, Council, Homedale, Middleton, Midvale, Nampa, Weiser, New Plymouth, Parma, & Payette, Idaho, as well as Nyssa, Ontario, & Vale, Oregon, & the surrounding Idaho/Oregon communities with their heating & cooling needs. Visit our service area page for more coverage details, call us at 208-414-1302, or request service online today.

The post Does My Home Need a Dehumidifier? appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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Having the right sized air conditioner is a key component in cooling your space effectively. A unit that is too small has to run constantly, playing catch up all day trying to fill a space that it isn’t designed for. A unit that is too big will turn on, cool the space quickly and then shut off, which sounds good but the heat will come back in and the unit will click back on and then back off. This on, off, on, off uses a lot of energy and more energy equals more money. At Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling, we are in the business of keeping you cool and saving you money.

Air conditioners are measured by tons, but this isn’t the weight of your appliance in tons. The tonnage of an AC unit is based on how much the unit can cool. A 1 ton air conditioner = 12,000 BTUs.

A BTU or British Thermal Unit is the unit of energy that equals 1055 jules. One BTU is the amount of energy needed to cool 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. A one ton AC unit can cool 12,000 pounds of water by 1 degree, each hour.

Home units can be anything from a 1-5 ton unit and they increase by .5’s as they go up. Size matters, but bigger is not necessarily better, having an accurately sized unit is the way to go.

The old school equation to finding out the right size unit for you is as follows:

The square footage of your space multiplied by 25, divided by 12,000, then subtract .5.

Climate zones also make a difference in determining the correct unit for you, so you can follow the equation or contact us for help!

We are happy to assist you in finding the right appliance for your home or office.

Call us today at 208-414-1302 or request service online.

Need HVAC Service?

Contact the experts!

Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling services Caldwell, Fruitland, Cambridge, Council, Homedale, Middleton, Midvale, Nampa, Weiser, New Plymouth, Parma, & Payette, Idaho, as well as Nyssa, Ontario, & Vale, Oregon, & the surrounding Idaho/Oregon communities with their heating & cooling needs. Visit our service area page for more coverage details, call us at 208-414-1302, or request service online today.

The post What Size AC Unit Should I Get for My Home or Office? appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling by Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling - 4M ago

There are few things more annoying than running out of hot water in the middle of a shower. But don’t panic—it’s more than likely something with your hot water heater. Typically it may be something simple that you can take care of yourself. However, some things do need the assistance of a professional technician. If you run into this situation, try troubleshooting or call Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling, and one of our experienced technicians can either give you advice or come out to your home to get your hot water running again.

There are two types of water heaters: electric and gas. For each type, there are different steps to diagnose where the problem lies. However, for either type you may first want to:

  • Check if your tank size is adequate for your home’s water needs. If you’ve got more than two people living in your home, you may need a larger tank than what you currently have. It takes time for your tank to reheat enough water to refill the tank. So if this might be the case in your home, wait about 30 minutes and retry the hot water. If this works, it might be time to consider upgrading. Or maybe a tankless water heater would be best for your home. Call Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling to discuss your options.
  • Increase the thermostat temperature by a couple of degrees. Ideally, you want your water heater temperature set between 120 and 140 degrees Fahrenheit (120 degrees if you have small children in the home to avoid burning that sensitive skin). If you do adjust it, allow about 30 to 40 minutes for the hot water to return.

If these two options do not produce hot water, follow the instructions below, depending on your water heater type, to assist with your troubleshooting.

Electric Water Heaters

If your unit is electric, consider these possibilities:

  • Restarting your water heater.
  • Sometimes a power surge can shut down your heater. Turn off the tank for a few minutes, and then turn it back on. Wait about 30 minutes. If you still have no hot water, this isn’t the problem. Move on to something else. But a word of caution here. Any time you work with electricity, you need to turn off the power to the tank. There is a strong electrical current running through here, and electricity is nothing to underestimate. Call a professional to help if you have any doubts.

  • Checking the fuse/breaker.
  • If the fuse has blown or the breaker’s been tripped, sometimes it’s not obvious that this is the problem. Reset the breaker, even if it doesn’t look tripped. Flip it to off, and wait about 30 seconds. Then flip it on. If it won’t stay on, you will need to call a professional electrician.

  • Calling in one of the professionals from Comfort Zone.
  • Sometimes the technical side of electricity mingled with a water repair makes everyone feel more secure if handled by a professional. He or she can address the issue without causing further damage to other components, like a heating element or thermostat.

  • Installing a new water heater.
  • The average life span of a water heater these days is ten years. If your tank is close to that age, it may be smarter to invest in a new tank rather than replacing a costly part. After replacing that component, the tank itself could fail, and you would have thrown money out the window. Purchasing a new water heater with higher efficiency and energy savings can save you money in the long run. Also check with Ontario, OR’s energy company. You could qualify for an energy tax break or rebate!

Gas Water Heaters

If your unit is gas, consider these possibilities:

  • Checking the pilot light.
  • Sometimes your issue is as simple as this. Maybe a strong wind down the vent pipe blew the flame out. Read the instructions affixed to your tank on how to relight the pilot. Many tanks now just have a button to depress for relighting. If you’re not comfortable with this process, call one of our technicians to do it for you. Sometimes you may try to relight it and it won’t work. In some cases, a new pilot light assembly is required, in which case a plumber will need to replace it for you anyway.

  • Fixing the thermocouple.
  • If once you light the pilot, the flame won’t stay lighted, the thermocouple may be at fault. A thermocouple is a sensor that measures temperature. It will will shut off the gas flow if the pilot goes out, as a safety measure. If this is something you’re capable of replacing yourself, it’s a low-cost fix. If not, it’s best to call a professional in to replace it for you.

  • Checking the gas supply.
  • Sometimes your heater may not be getting gas. If after you check to be sure the gas valve is turned on and you don’t see a flame or smell gas, this could indicate the problem is the gas supply. Check to be sure the valve is open and assess the gas line to be sure there isn’t anything leaning against it or if there’s a twist or kink in it. If nothing seems apparent, call your gas company to see if they are working on the gas line in your area or if your gas has been turned off. If the answer to both of these is no, you need to call a technician.

  • Installing a new water heater.
  • As with the electric water heater, the life span is typically ten years. Unfortunately, it may just be time for that replacement. Call Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling today at 541-889-5539 to discuss what type and size tank would be best for you!

Need HVAC Service?

Contact the experts!

Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling services Caldwell, Fruitland, Cambridge, Council, Homedale, Middleton, Midvale, Nampa, Weiser, New Plymouth, Parma, & Payette, Idaho, as well as Nyssa, Ontario, & Vale, Oregon, & the surrounding Idaho/Oregon communities with their heating & cooling needs. Visit our service area page for more coverage details, call us at 208-414-1302, or request service online today.

The post What To Do If You Have No Hot Water appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling by Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling - 5M ago

Is your furnace blowing air without pause? If so, you’re probably feeling a bit concerned. First, your house most likely feels like an oven. On top of that, your utility bill will be considerably higher with your furnace constantly running. Believe it or not, this is a fairly common problem, so you don’t need to worry.

Before calling a technician, check these three things:

  1. Be sure you have the right thermostat settings.
  2. Be sure your thermostat is set to a reasonable temperature. Energy Star® recommends keeping it at 68 degrees Fahrenheit during the winter to save on utility costs1. If you set your thermostat to ultra-high temperatures, this may cause it to run constantly. Additionally, be sure to set your thermostat to Auto instead of On. The On setting causes it run constantly, instead of incrementally.

  3. Check the filter.
  4. If you haven’t changed your furnace filter in a while, this could be the source of the problem. Over time, dust and debris clog your filter. This constricts airflow, which means the furnace has to work extra hard to maintain the desired temperature. Depending on how clogged the filter is, it may have your unit running nonstop.

  5. Check the pilot light.
  6. If the pilot light underneath the furnace is out, it can’t generate heat. In many cases, this causes your furnace to run continuously, because it can’t reach the desired temperature. If the pilot light goes out again, call one of our expert technicians.

If none of the previous steps worked, schedule a repair with us at Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling. Here are three potential problems requiring our professional help:

  1. Leaky ducts
  2. If any of your ducts are punctured or blocked, this means heat isn’t being circulated properly. You’re losing heat and losing money through your utilities at the end of the month. A technician can run a thermal analysis to determine the location of the leaks and repair your ductwork.

  3. Broken fan motor
  4. When your fan motor is obstructed, broken, or otherwise faulty, it can’t operate at full capacity. That means it has to run continuously to reach the set temperature. Unusual noises from your furnace are a sign you have a broken motor.

  5. Thermostat malfunction
  6. Your thermostat is the brain of the operation. When it sends the wrong information to your furnace, a number of things can go bad. You could have a broken relay switch, or your thermostat could be producing an inaccurate temperature reading.

We want our neighbors here in Ontario, OR, to come home to a happy, healthy furnace every night this season. To restore your unit to optimal condition, call us at Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling at 208-414-1302.

Need HVAC Service?

Contact the experts!

Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling services Caldwell, Fruitland, Cambridge, Council, Homedale, Middleton, Midvale, Nampa, Weiser, New Plymouth, Parma, & Payette, Idaho, as well as Nyssa, Ontario, & Vale, Oregon, & the surrounding Idaho/Oregon communities with their heating & cooling needs. Visit our service area page for more coverage details, call us at 208-414-1302, or request service online today.

The post Why Won’t My Furnace Stop Running? appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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So you’re looking to invest in a heat pump. You’re not alone—many Americans are making the switch. Why? For starters, heat pumps are generally more efficient than a traditional heating or cooling system. What’s more, they offer both heating and cooling, so they’re versatile. At Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling, we like to help our customers make a decision that meets their home’s needs. Why? Because we want you to be satisfied with your heat pump for years to come.

To assist you in your search, here are four questions to ask yourself when picking out a new heat pump:

  1. How much do I want to spend up front?
  2. Heat pumps offer you more efficiency. Geothermal/water-source heat pumps, in particular, are especially efficient, since they use a minimal amount of electricity to transfer heat from Earth’s natural resources. However, many of the more efficient products have a higher up-front cost than a traditional air conditioner or heater. Generally, a good rule of thumb is the more you invest up front, the less you’ll pay in the long run. It’s up to you to decide which heat pump is best for your budget.

  3. What type of heat pump do I want?
  4. Air-source, mini split, water-source, and geothermal are a few main types of heat pumps. Air-source pumps transfer heat from the outdoor air to warm your home in the winter and expel heat from your home during the summer. Mini splits work similarly but without ducts (which is why they are also called “ductless” units). Water-source heat pumps draw heat from a pond, lake, or water deposit, while geothermal heat pumps draw from the earth. Each type has its advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Will I need a dual-fuel system?
  6. Most heat pumps cannot operate efficiently in temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s why if you live in a climate with freezing winters, you should get a dual-fuel system. A dual-fuel system is a heat pump supplemented with a different heating appliance. When temperatures are too low for your heat pump to operate efficiently, your furnace or boiler will kick on.

  7. What type of thermostat should I buy?
  8. In addition to your heat pump, your technician can install new controls for heating and cooling your home. Based on your home needs, you can choose between a standard, programmable, or WiFi thermostat. Standard thermostats have a simple, familiar interface. They provide you with a Heat or Cool option and On or Auto fan control. Programmable thermostats can be set to automatically lower your home temperature during certain hours of the day when you won’t be home. WiFi thermostats can be controlled remotely using your smartphone, even when you’re not home. Depending on the model, your WiFi thermostat may even offer energy-usage analytics, so you can easily monitor your consumption.

    We at Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling wish you, our neighbors in Ontario, OR, happy hunting as you search for a new heat pump. Call us at 208-414-1302 today to learn more about what we have to offer.

Need HVAC Service?

Contact the experts!

Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling services Caldwell, Fruitland, Cambridge, Council, Homedale, Middleton, Midvale, Nampa, Weiser, New Plymouth, Parma, & Payette, Idaho, as well as Nyssa, Ontario, & Vale, Oregon, & the surrounding Idaho/Oregon communities with their heating & cooling needs. Visit our service area page for more coverage details, call us at 208-414-1302, or request service online today.

The post Four Factors to Consider When Buying a Heat Pump appeared first on Comfort Zone Heating & Cooling.

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