Loading...

Follow The Cleveland Foundation Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Our third annual Common Ground day of community conversation returns June 30, 2019. Common Ground is a single-day initiative where people gather at locations across our region to share a meal and a conversation about the places we call home. Individuals and organizations across Cuyahoga, Lake, and Geauga counties will bring family, friends, and neighbors to the Common Ground table to discuss this year’s prompt:

My Environment was…

My Environment is…

My Environment will be…

Common Ground conversation events are planned throughout the day on June 30. All events are free to attend, but online registration is required. Explore conversations listed below by topic to find the events that fit your interests, or CLICK HERE to browse conversations by time of day to find the events that fit your schedule. Interested in more than one Common Ground conversation? Register to attend multiple events! 

Environment

Neighborhoods

Education

Arts & Culture

Families and Youth

Health

Technology

Cleveland Stories and Beyond

Cleveland Rising
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Western Reserve Land Conservancy is returning for a third year to host a Common Ground conversation! Common Ground is an exciting region-wide initiative to explore our community’s power to build a stronger, safer and more dynamic home. In addition to connecting with your community over an engaging discussion about the environment, the Land Conservancy will also be leading a hike touring Cleveland’s new 25-acre urban greenspace.

In 2015, the Land Conservancy secured funding to acquire the former Henninger Landfill, a construction and demolition debris landfill that sat idle for decades. Remediation of the landfill was completed in 2017 and now plans are underway to develop a trail system that will allow for full public access and enjoyment.

The park will create a large public green space in Old Brooklyn with access for hiking, biking, walking, birding and other outdoor recreation activities. The opportunity to create a new park serving Cleveland’s largest and most densely populated neighborhood is tremendous. Additionally, approximately one mile of new trails will support an enhanced regional trail network, including a connector between the Ohio & Erie Canalway Towpath Trail, Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, and Brookside Reservation.

Join the Western Reserve Land Conservancy and Old Brooklyn Community Development Corporation for this Common Ground event on June 30 from 10:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Share a meal, connect, and discuss our 2019 theme: My environment was… My environment is… My environment will be…

This is free to attend and all are welcome! CLICK HERE to register. 

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
The Cleveland Foundation Blog by Cleveland Foundation - 1w ago

We’re excited to share a few highlights from our recent grants to organizations serving residents of Cuyahoga, Lake and Geauga counties. These May grants focus support on services for senior citizens, community engagement efforts, as well as criminal justice advocacy and services for citizens returning from incarceration.

Services for Senior Citizens

  • $40,000 to Community Partnership on Aging to support Communities Assisting Residential Elderly (CARE), a collaborative program serving Cleveland Heights, Highland Heights, Lyndhurst, Maple Heights, Mayfield Heights, Mayfield Village, Solon and South Euclid that focuses on helping older adults stay safe, avoid injury and maintain their independence.
  • $30,000 to The Cutting Board Academy to pilot a 16-week food and nutrition education program for low-income senior adults with chronic medical conditions that can be successfully managed through healthy nutrition and learned behaviors.
  • $150,000 to Rebuilding Together Northeast Ohio for its Safe at Home Modification Program, a national model that improves home safety, addresses minor home repair concerns and aims to prevent injuries within the homes of older adults. Our grant will focus on direct engagement and services for seniors in the Clark-Fulton and Buckeye-Woodhill neighborhoods.

Community Engagement Efforts

  • $200,000 to Lake County YMCA to build a new intergenerational West End campus called Union Village. By co-locating with the Willoughby-Eastlake School District as well as the local senior center, the YMCA will enhance its efforts to improve health and wellness among all residents.
  • $20,000 to the Cleveland Museum of Natural History to provide free public transit access on Saturday June 22, 2019 – the 50th anniversary of the last Cuyahoga River fire. Free RTA access will not only reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but also encourage community members to attend Cuyahoga50 events and other community engagement opportunities on June 22.

Criminal Justice Advocacy and Services for Citizens Returning from Incarceration

  • $100,000 to the Center for Community Solutions to continue supporting the Ohio Transformation Fund, a collaborative of local and national partners seeking to address mass incarceration and racial disparities in Ohio’s criminal justice system through community organizing, public policy advocacy and civic engagement.
  • $65,000 to EDWINS Leadership & Restaurant Institute to implement a new leadership development program to prepare previously incarcerated individuals for management positions in the culinary and hospitality industry. This program will engage EDWINS management students in structured training to develop leadership skills in areas such as workplace communication and safety, financial statements, equipment, cash flow, cost-and-profit management, as well as dining room and kitchen management.

These are just a few of our May grants. Want to learn more about our grantmaking? Click here.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Our third annual Common Ground day of community conversation returns June 30, 2019. Common Ground gatherings are planned at homes, businesses and community locations across Northeast Ohio throughout the day on June 30; we hope you’ll make plans to attend one – or a few! In the weeks leading up to #CG2019, we’re highlighting these Common Ground events on our blog. Find one that fits your schedule and interests, and sign up today! All events are free to attend.

What is Common Ground and Why Should I Participate?

Common Ground is a day of community conversation. United by a common question, all Common Ground conversations have the same goal: to create spaces where meaningful connections are made and purposeful actions begin. For more information, check out our FAQ.

Check out these Common Ground events scheduled for June 30:


Common Ground: Downtown Cleveland Residents

11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Hosted by Old Stone Church and Downtown Cleveland Residents

At Old Stone Church (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground 2019: Inner Harmony and the Environment

11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Hosted by Heartfulness Meditation Center

At Heartfulness Meditation Center (Valley View, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


COMMON GROUND: Toby’s Plaza / Museum of Contemporary Art (moCa) Cleveland

12 – 2 p.m.

Hosted by moCa Cleveland with University Circle Inc. and Case Western Reserve University

At Toby’s Plaza/moCa Cleveland (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Creating Equitable Teaching Environments

12 – 2 p.m.

Hosted by Cuyahoga Community College

At Cuyahoga Community College Metropolitan Campus (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground at Spirit Corner

12 – 2 p.m.

Hosted by Bob Brown

At Spirit Corner (Cleveland Heights, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground at Cleveland Foundry

12 – 2 p.m.

Hosted by The Foundry Community Rowing and Sailing Center

At The Foundry Community Rowing and Sailing Center (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Nurturing Talent for an Inclusive Cleveland

12 – 2 p.m.

Hosted by Cleveland State University

At CSU Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Boys Hope Girls Hope of Northeastern Ohio Common Ground

12 – 2 p.m.

Hosted by Boys Hope Girls Hope of Northeastern Ohio

At Rajan Center (Garfield Heights, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground – Abundant Community – New Avenues to Independence

12:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Hosted by New Avenues to Independence

At New Avenues to Independence (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Cleveland: Then and Now

1 – 4 p.m.

Hosted by the Cleveland History Center

At the Cleveland History Center (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Painting the Possible: Art as Community Builder

1 – 3 p.m.

Hosted by Cleveland Public Library, FRONT International and Transformer Station

At Cleveland Public Library – Martin Luther King Jr. Branch (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground in Ohio City

1 – 3:30 p.m.

At 3704 Clinton Ave., Cleveland, OH

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Supporting Change in Stockyards

1 – 3 p.m.

Hosted by Building Hope in the City

At 48th St. Park (Cleveland, OH)

This event is specifically for residents of the Stockyards community. 

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Leading the Way in La Villa

1 – 3 p.m.

Hosted by Building Hope in the City & Hispanic Alliance

At Roberto Clemente Park

This event is specifically for residents of La Villa Hispana (Clark-Fulton) community.

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


A Loving Home for Life’s Last Journey: A Conversation about Malachi House

1 – 3 p.m.

Hosted by Malachi House

At Malachi House (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground- Bridging the Rt. 44 Divide

1 – 3 p.m.

Hosted by Leadership Geauga and the Geauga County Library

At Geauga County Public Library Administration Building (Chardon, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


The Educational Environment for the African American Community…. Past, Present and Future……Where Do We Go From Here?

1 – 3 p.m.

At Coventry Building (Cleveland Heights, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground at Cuyahoga Valley National Park

1 – 3 p.m.

Hosted by Cuyahoga Valley National Park

At Cuyahoga Valley National Park (Valley View, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground Conversation Tri – Cities Past / Present / Future

1 – 3:30 p.m.

At Cuyahoga County Public Library – Parma Branch (Parma, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


You can explore the full listing of Common Ground events here, and stay tuned as we highlight more in the coming weeks. Want to host your own Common Ground gathering? The deadline to register as a host is June 17. Get the details here. 

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The 33,000 acres of protected land between Cleveland and Akron that we know as Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CVNP) was established in 1974 as a part of President Nixon’s “Parks to the People” policy, an initiative created to make national parks relevant to nearby urban populations. Now, CVNP, the only national park in Ohio, is explored by more than 2.5 million visitors each year.*

However, the Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park (CCVNP) – a nonprofit organization and friends group that exists to inspire use, appreciation and support of CVNP – has found that just because the park is located near diverse communities, doesn’t mean the park’s visitors represent that diversity. Deb Yandala, CEO of CCVNP, explains, “When we’ve done our research, statistics say our visitation by persons of color is quite low. We felt it was time to ask ourselves, ‘How can we do our work better?’ Especially given our location near two urban areas, our park needs to be welcoming to all people and a place where all people can find a sense that this is their national park.”

The Conservancy is addressing barriers to access across all aspects of the organization, from revamping internal culture to creating new community engagement efforts. We asked Yolanda Hamilton, Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) at CCVNP, and Deb Yandala how their organization is implementing DEI strategies that provide underrepresented populations with opportunities to enjoy greenspace, learn about preservation and build careers in environmental stewardship:

Stories of Impact: Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park - YouTube

Can you explain the mission of the Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park?

Deb Yandala: Originally, our group was made of volunteers who fought to protect this land that lies between Cleveland and Akron, people who wanted it preserved as a park for public access. Now at the Conservancy, we work to connect the community with this national park and with environmental issues. We do that via education, volunteerism, overseeing retail stores and leasing buildings from the park services to put into public use. We’re here to support the mission of the National Park Service.

In the past few years, your organization has made diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) a priority. How do you implement this in your programming?

Yolanda Hamilton: Our diversity, equity and inclusion initiative consists of health equity, environmental justice and education. We wanted to focus on these three areas so we can have more engagement with the communities we serve. As it relates to health equity, we know that the use of green space is very important in terms of improving overall health outcomes related to physical and mental health. Cuyahoga Valley National Park is such a great resource because of the amount of green space we have.

As it relates to environmental justice, it’s so important for the community to recognize the Conservancy as a leading resource. When it comes to health care disparities and food insecurities, we have a wide variety of resources, educational opportunities especially, to reduce barriers in terms of improving health outcomes for the communities we serve. We’re not just located in the park; we are extending our reach to the Cleveland and Akron areas.

As it relates to education, we offer a variety of programs working with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District as well as the Akron Public Schools to expose those students to the park and provide activities in green space, so they can become environmental stewards for the future.

Why is it important to provide programming specific to youth?

Yandala: I am most proud of the work we do with youth. We realize for many children in Northeast Ohio, this might be their only national park experience. We believe learning about the environment and protecting natural resources is a right of all children. It’s going to be important for them as voters and decision makers as adults. That means we do a lot of programming in the park, but also in the city so the kids learn about environmental justice issues right in their neighborhoods.

In 2018, the Cleveland Foundation supported the Conservancy with a $170,000 grant to advance diversity, equity and inclusion in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. What progress has been made with this funding?

Hamilton: With the support we received from the Cleveland Foundation, we have been able to go full force in driving our DEI goals. One prominent program we have launched because of funding from the Cleveland Foundation is our pipeline program, which creates access to opportunities in environmental careers to students from underserved populations. We recognized that we needed to do better in diversifying our recruitment and retention efforts, so as a result, the pipeline program gives opportunities to students from different backgrounds, particularly from historically black colleges and universities, to provide them with a first-hand opportunity for meaningful employment.

During our 2019 Annual Meeting, we asked our Program team to define what makes an “Environment for Success.” How do you define an “Environment for Success” and how does the CCVNP support that vision?

Yandala: I think a successful environment is where all feel that they are welcome and that they have a voice. Our natural environment works best when we recognize the importance of biodiversity. It’s why every species is important and why protecting habitats in the park is important. Biodiversity is an important ecological concept that is true for human beings as well. That means in our organization, everybody is equally important and everybody’s voice is important. It means constantly asking ourselves how we can be better at reaching people and protecting this park.

Hamilton: An environment for success consists of having leadership that is courageous to take on this mantle we have in the community to become an organization focused on DEI. Leadership that stands up to challenge systemic racism and the barriers to access and opportunities that are faced by underrepresented groups. The CCVNP has an executive leadership team that brings these values into our internal culture.

Can you speak about the history of the National Park’s relationship with the Cleveland Foundation?

Yandala: The Cleveland Foundation has long been a funder of Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Earlier leaders of the Cleveland Foundation recognized the economic potential of having a national park in the backyard of Cleveland. They funded projects here, including the establishment of the Towpath Trail, Cuyahoga Valley Education Center, the scenic railroad and the Countryside Initiative program. And those early leaders at the Cleveland Foundation were right; this park attracts a lot of tourists and it’s one of the amenities people in Cleveland talk about as a resource for them. I really appreciate that the present-day leaders of the Cleveland Foundation help us to be better at what we do, push us to be more accessible to more people and help us to think creatively about the work we do. The program officers we work with are really thought leaders and they help us to be better as a nonprofit organization.

Support the Conservancy for Cuyahoga Valley National Park here

Stay tuned for more “Stories of Impact” in our community throughout 2019 featuring Cleveland Foundation partners and grant-funded nonprofit organizations. Looking to donate to a specific field of interest or begin your own fund to support causes you care about? Visit: www.ClevelandFoundation.org/give.

*nps.gov

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Our Common Ground day of community conversation returns for its third year on June 30, 2019! In this blog series, we’re featuring the stories of people who have participated in Common Ground conversations in years past. In this guest blog, Amir Saleem talks about the project he helped to launch after attending a 2018 Common Ground conversation. 

Name: Amir Saleem

Profession/Title: Community Leader/Fatherhood Practitioner

City you live in: Euclid      

City in which you are leading project: Cleveland

Common Ground 2018 conversation attended: Northeast Ohio Neighborhood Health Services, Inc.

What motivated you to start a project after participating in a Common Ground 2018 conversation?

I co-facilitated last year’s Common Ground event with Northeast Ohio Neighborhood Health Services, Inc. (NEON), so I knew I wanted to be more involved from the outset of Common Ground 2019. 

Tell us a little bit about your project:

Last year, the theme of our conversation was “What Is Your Second Most Important Home? Your Medical Home,” which assisted us in bringing additional light and hopefully a renewed focus on the importance of one’s health and wellness. The Male Health and Wellness Initiative, the project that was inspired by NEON’s 2018 Common Ground conversation, is a series of ongoing social events that aim to engage Black men around the topic of healthcare. The goal is to have participating men work closely with their physicians to improve their health and ultimately enhance their quality of life. 

What did you hope to accomplish by starting your project?

We wanted individuals and communities to take their respective health and wellness “reins,” if you will, to work with their physicians to increase their quality of life. We then added a specific focus on male health and wellness by engaging men during football season (speaking with them during commercials and halftime) to drive home the importance of scheduled and regular trips to their physician.

What steps did you take to start and implement your project?

We first sought out a partner who we thought shared our vision. Then, we worked intensely – on a short timeline – to have a successful Common Ground conversation that we were able to leverage into our Male Health & Wellness Initiative.

Is there anything else that you would like to share about your project?

Yes: the work is not complete. We are consulting other leaders in a number of neighborhoods on how we can expand what was done and add depth and sustainable context.

Want to participate in a 2019 Common Ground conversation? Explore this year’s Common Ground events here. Want to host your own Common Ground event? The deadline to register as a host is June 17. Learn more about hosting here

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Our third annual Common Ground day of community conversation returns June 30, 2019. Common Ground gatherings are planned at homes, businesses and community locations across Northeast Ohio throughout the day on June 30; we hope you’ll make plans to attend one – or a few! In the weeks leading up to #CG2019, we’re highlighting these Common Ground events on our blog. Find one that fits your schedule and interests, and sign up today! All events are free to attend.

What is Common Ground and Why Should I Participate?

Common Ground is a day of community conversation. United by a common question, all Common Ground conversations have the same goal: to create spaces where meaningful connections are made and purposeful actions begin. For more information, check out our FAQ.

Check out these Common Ground events scheduled for June 30:


Common Ground @ One University Circle with Julie Rehm & Bruce Szabo

9 – 11 a.m.

Hosted by Julie Rehm & Bruce Szabo

At One University Circle Apartments (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION HERE


Common Ground at the Westerly Wastewater Treatment Plant

9:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Hosted by Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District

At Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District Westerly Wastewater Treatment Plant (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION HERE


Data, Information + You

10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Hosted by Data Days CLE

At The MidTown Tech Hive (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION HERE  


Common Ground: Conservation Conversations

10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Hosted by the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes

At Nature Center at Shaker Lakes (Shaker Heights, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION HERE


Plastic Surgery: Cutting Plastic Out of Your Life (Flats/Downtown)

10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Hosted by Sustainable Cleveland Plastic Reduction Working Group

At Greater Cleveland Aquarium (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION HERE


Bialosky Cleveland: Our Environment

10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Hosted by Bialosky Cleveland

At Bialosky Cleveland Offices (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Vibrant Places: Old Brooklyn Connector Hike + Common Ground

10:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.  

Hosted by the Western Reserve Land Conservancy and Old Brooklyn Community Development Corporation

At 3967 Pearl Rd. (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Does My Past Financial Environment Affect My Future?

10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

Hosted by HFLA of Northeast Ohio

At Horseshoe Lake Park – Pavilion (Shaker Heights, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


The Kids of 216 – What Do YOU Think Kids Can Do?

10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Hosted by The Kids of 216

At “Kiddie City” School Building (Euclid, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground @ Bay Branch Farm

11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Hosted by Bay Branch Farm

At Bay Branch Farm (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Common Ground @ LGBT Community Center of Greater Cleveland

11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Hosted by LGBT Center of Greater Cleveland

At LGBT Center Greater Cleveland (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Cultural Competency in the CCIS Community: Past, Present and Future

11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Hosted by the Cleveland Council of Independent Schools

At Laurel School (Shaker Heights, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


CH-UH City Schools & the Heights Schools Foundation

11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Hosted by CH-UH City Schools and the Heights Schools Foundation

At Cain Park (Cleveland Heights, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


Brunch at the Ballpark with the Baseball Heritage Museum: A Common Ground Event

11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Hosted by The Baseball Heritage Museum

At League Park (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION  


Reframing Philanthropy in Our Environment

1 p.m. – 4 p.m. 

Hosted by The Soul of Philanthropy Cleveland (TSOPCLE)

At NewBridge Center for Arts & Technology (Cleveland, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION 


We’re All In This Race Together!

1 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Hosted by Faith in the City Group and the City of Euclid

At Tizzano’s Party Center (Euclid, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION

 

Building Beloved Community

5 – 7 p.m.

Hosted by Heights Christian Church

At Heights Christian Church (Shaker Heights, OH)

DETAILS & REGISTRATION


You can explore the full listing of Common Ground events here, and stay tuned as we highlight more in the coming weeks. Want to host your own Common Ground gathering? The deadline to register as a host is June 17. Get the details here. 

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We call it a “Summer of Purpose.” Since 1999, the Cleveland Foundation Summer Internship Program has provided undergraduates, graduate students and recent graduates an opportunity to work in Cleveland-area nonprofit organizations and governmental agencies during an 11-week paid internship. The program aligns with the foundation’s commitment to supporting Greater Cleveland’s nonprofit and public sectors, and fostering the next generation of community leaders. Learn what this year’s interns are doing during their Summer of Purpose:

Agnes Bisselle, a senior at Hobart and William Smith Colleges majoring in Media and Society, is placed at New Directions. Agnes will maintain New Directions’ social media presence across platforms, and will support marketing and communications strategy, content development, data and story collection, as well as prospect research.

Maria Cristina Burris Proano, a junior at Cleveland State University majoring in Early Childhood Education, is placed at MAGNET. Maria will support the scaling of the Early College, Early Career (ECEC) program throughout Cleveland and Northeast Ohio. Maria will also develop and create an employer guide, school guide, revised ECEC website, and marketing materials.

Brittany Chapman, a senior at Bowling Green State University majoring in Psychology, is placed at Leadership Lake County. Brittany will research and connect to junior program alumni from the first 23 years of the program. Brittany will connect junior alumni to signature alumni events via personal meetings, digital communications and social media. Brittany will also plan and prepare for the annual meeting of the board and CEO.

Tameka Coleman, a senior at Baldwin Wallace majoring in Public Health, is placed at The Ohio State University Extension. Tameka will provide support to OSUE programs that focus on food security, healthy food access and urban agriculture through data collection, data management and promotion.

Naomi Gaston, a senior at Miami University of Ohio majoring in Social Work and Black World Studies, is placed at Lake Erie Ink. Naomi will design, implement and evaluate teen programming for both new and ongoing programs.

Calvin Gibson, a senior at Case Western Reserve University majoring in Sociology, is placed at FutureHeights. Calvin will facilitate and implement short-term projects in placemaking, public art, economic development and community outreach.

Samantha Greenfield, a senior at Baldwin Wallace University majoring in Arts Management and Entrepreneurship, is placed at Cleveland Public Theatre. Samantha will work with the CFO and General Manager to prepare documents in alignment with external auditor’s request, gaining intimate experience with standard accounting procedures and how non-profit organizations maintain financial records that comply with an annual audit.

Jason Guo, a junior at Case Western Reserve University majoring in Economics and International Studies, is placed at the Nonprofit and Public Service Center at Lakeland Community College. Jason will update, edit and fine-tune databases and create a social media communications plan for the center. Jason will also connect with the HIVE, an on-campus makerspace, and conduct design thinking research

Eva Holtkamp, a senior at Ohio University majoring in Journalism and Political Science, is placed at Montefiore Foundation. Eva will lead social media and promotional efforts for the Shining Star CLE event, and will serve as a school outreach liaison.

Meg Hopkins, a junior at The Ohio State University majoring in Public Management, Leadership and Policy, is placed at the City of Broadview Heights. Meg will organize and streamline event planning, particularly within the new Community Amphitheater that is opening in 2019; this includes creating a centralized community calendar, compiling details of each event, and developing a marketing and outreach plan. 

Diona James, a senior at Case Western Reserve University majoring in Medical Anthropology, Pre-Law and International Studies, is placed at United Way Services of Geauga County. Diona will assist with building a planned giving program for donors and the community, analyzing current donor lists adn developing a target list. She will help coordinate volunteers and supplies in partnership with Geauga County Public Library and United Way’s Women United.

Audra Mahon, a senior at Baldwin Wallace University majoring in Creative Writing, is placed at Eliza Bryant Village. Audra will plan for the launch of the Elder Justice Center, helping to create white papers, messaging, collateral materials and PR/event coverage.

Hakmat Manaa, a junior at Cleveland State University majoring in Political Science, is placed at The May Dugan Center. Hakmat will plan, implement and coordinate the 50th anniversary cook-out for MDC clients. Hakmat will also design and distribute newsletters, social media, and giving collateral as well as provide programmatic support.

Julia Mayer, a junior at The Ohio State University Honors College majoring in English, is placed at Upside of Downs of Northeast Ohio. Julia will analyze the DonorPerfect database to help create, improve and implement strategies of engagement with a variety of constituents (families, self-advocates, volunteers, donors and other supports). She will also assist with special events and attend programming presented to families.

Arielis Rodriguez, a junior at Kent State University majoring in Human Development and Family Studies, is placed at Shoes and Clothes for kids. Arielis will help manage volunteers and paid temporary staff as they help receive, sort, stock and pack clothing. Arielis will also administer and help implement a new online ordering system with 28 partners.

Lindsey Schneider, a senior at George Washington University majoring in Geography, is placed at Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District. Lindsey will assist in developing a “Greenprint for Public Involvement in Soil & Water Conservation,” and will analyze school, conservation easement, and public property features in Map Viewer for Cuyahoga County.

Daijha Thompson, a junior at Syracuse University majoring in Public Relations and Political Philosophy, is placed at Cleveland Museum of Art. Daijha will assist with social media and engagement of millennial audiences, as well as researching, developing and implementing new program formats. She will also assist with public programs, marketing and the campaign for CMA’s Museum of the Future.

AmakhutMaati Tyehimba, a junior at Virginia Commonwealth University majoring in Regional Planning, is placed at Manufacturing Works. AmakhutMaati will assist with marketing initiatives, program outreach, event planning, data entry, fundraising, volunteer recruitment and training, and other general nonprofit operations. This includes all aspects of three big summer events: MFG Summer Camp, the Membership Appreciation Picnic, and a golf outing.

Lauren Vitas, a senior at Cleveland State University majoring in Spanish and English, is placed at PRE4CLE. Lauren will help plan events and support social media content for the 5th annual report release, while assisting with recruitment efforts and supporting communication and advocacy efforts.

Brendan Zak, a senior at Cleveland State University majoring in Urban Studies, is placed at the City of Brooklyn. Brendan will collect data and information, and review and report all aspects of the 2019 Exterior Maintenance Grant Program.

In addition, four Porter Cleveland Fellows from Wheaton College have been placed at internship host sites for the summer. The Porter Cleveland Fellows Program began in 2005 in honor of Nancy Lyon Porter, a 1943 graduate of Wheaton College in Massachusetts. The program provides opportunities for students of Wheaton College to intern with community-based organizations in Cleveland.  We are excited to invite this year’s Porter Fellows to participate in the Cleveland Foundation Summer Internship Program:

Zainab Ayinde is interning with Circle Health Services

Jaylene Coss is interning with Legal Aid Society of Cleveland

Maggie Lawler is interning with Reaching Heights

Meshal Muzaffar is interning with Legal Aid Society of Cleveland

Stay tuned! We’ll be sharing guest blogs from each of the interns throughout the summer. Follow #SummerOfPurpose on social media for updates!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Katie Brennan, Program Officer, Education, Cleveland Foundation

“The world around us is changing, and we are the change agents.”

These words, from Hon. Judge Sherrie Miday, kicked off the Inaugural Sister Cities Conference hosted by Cleveland Foundation nonprofit partner Global Cleveland on May 1-3, 2019. She was right—the world around us is changing. We live in an ever-globalizing society in which we can call overseas as easily as calling home; journeys that used to take months now take only a matter of hours. Given this context, our international relationships matter more now than ever before.

Cleveland already has a fertile landscape on which to grow these bonds. Thanks to the work of the City of Cleveland, Cleveland has sister city relationships with 23 cities* around the globe, spanning 13 time zones, 5 continents, 19 languages, and dozens of dialects. We continued expanding this network as, on May 2, we named our 23rd sister city: Beit She’an, Israel.  

*Cleveland’s Sister Cities include:

  • Alexandria, Egypt
  • Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
  • Bangalore, India
  • Beit She’an, Israel
  • Brasov, Romania
  • Bratislava, Slovakia
  • Cleveland, United Kingdom
  • Conakry, Guinea
  • Fier, Albania
  • Gdansk, Poland
  • Heidenheim, Germany
  • Holon, Israel
  • Ibadan, Nigeria
  • Klaipeda, Lithuania
  • Lima, Peru
  • Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • Miskolc, Hungary
  • Rouen, France
  • Segundo Montes, El Salvador
  • Taipei City, Taiwan
  • Vicenza, Italy
  • Volgograd, Russia
  • West Mayo, Ireland

Recognizing the need to build and strengthen partnerships between local ethnic communities and with our brothers and sisters overseas in order to help push Cleveland further onto the international stage, Global Cleveland convened a conference planning committee consisting of Global Cleveland staff, Colleen Corrigan Day (Mayo Society of Greater Cleveland), Mark Owens (Cleveland Irish Network), and myself. Colleen, Mark, and I represented the Irish community, as Cleveland’s connection to our sister city/county in West Mayo, Ireland—as well as throughout the rest of the island—has been very strong since its inception.

We aimed to host a conference that was free and open to the public, touching on issues that are prominent in Cleveland as well as in our sister cities around the world. On Day 1, conference attendees convened at Cleveland Public Library for the opening reception, with remarks from Joe Cimperman (Global Cleveland), Felton Thomas (Cleveland Public Library), Chief Valarie McCall (City of Cleveland), Dr. Hiroyuki Fujita (Honorary Consul of Japan in Cleveland; Cleveland Foundation and Global Cleveland board member), and Judge Sherrie Miday (Cuyahoga County Court of Common Pleas).  

Day two of the conference opened with a celebration of the naming of Beit She’an, Israel, as our 23rd sister city. Mayor Frank G. Jackson, the Jewish Federation of Cleveland, and hundreds of community members were in attendance for this exciting moment. Throughout the rest of the day, we held panels covering important community topics such as education, economic development, interfaith relations, immigration, and youth issues.

While all the conversations were impactful, I would like to highlight two in particular. The first relates to our sister city in Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. Mr. Kibret Abebe Tuffa opened the first private ambulance service in Ethiopia after witnessing the unnecessary loss of life due to the lack of such a service. He visited Cleveland for this conference to speak to our Emergency Medical Service (EMS) personnel to learn how to better expand and improve his own services with the goal of saving many more lives. Here, we see a change agent at work.

The world around us continues to change, and moving forward, youth will be at the forefront of such change. Karson Baldwin (University School sophomore), Israel Kambomba (Thomas Jefferson International Newcomers Academy sophomore) and Chloe Friedland (Shaker Heights High School junior) organized an international video conference with high school students from our sister cities in Albania, France, Nigeria, and Romania to discuss issues facing youth around the world today. It was truly inspiring to see the energy and passion from young people—our future leaders—sharing their experiences and broadening their cities’ horizons.

We wrapped up the second day with a Sister Cities International Soccer Tournament at Saint Ignatius High School. Teams representing Albania, Ireland, Lithuania, Nigeria, and Peru partook in a friendly competition, ending in a shootout between Ireland and Nigeria. Ultimately, Ireland won the title of first Sister Cities International Soccer Tournament champions.

The conference wrapped up on the morning of May 3 with a naturalization ceremony, where we welcomed about 30 new Americans to our community. The world—and city—around us are changing, and we as the Cleveland community are acting as the change agents. Stay tuned as we announce the dates for next year’s Sister Cities Conference! 

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“Changing Minds, Changing Lives,” is the motto behind the Mental Health & Addiction Advocacy Coalition’s (MHAC) overarching goal to improve access to mental health and addiction services. As a nonprofit coalition currently consisting of 118 member organizations, the MHAC provides a platform where diverse organizations come together and speak with a common voice to advocate for financial and legislative support at the state and local levels for individuals with mental illness and addiction disorders. We asked Karen Kearney, Northeast Ohio Hub Director, to explain how the MHAC succeeds in its mission-driven advocacy, from research to education to collaboration. 

Why is it important to have both local- and state-level representation?

Kearney: A lot of overarching policy is made at the state level through the administration and the General Assembly. Their decisions directly impact the availability of services in different counties throughout the state. But, it’s also important to have attention on local communities because we have very different counties in Ohio, some more rural and some more urban. Different counties have different problems and needs. A one-size-fits-all approach is not appropriate, and the people who know the needs of each community best are the people who work and live there.

Need an advocate? Are you an individual who needs help finding an advocate or access to services? If you are looking for someone to support you as an advocate for treatment or other resources, contact your local ADAMHS Board or your local chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and ask how to get connected with an advocate or ombudsman.

To find the contact information for your local Board, use the following link: https://www.oacbha.org/mappage.php.

To connect with your local NAMI chapter, use the following link: http://namiohio.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/NAMI-Ohio-Affiliates-Master-Spreadsheet.pdf.

Support the Mental Health & Addiction Advocacy Coalition:

Donate now to help individuals with mental health and addiction disorders.

Learn about current bills related to mental health and addiction disorders in the Ohio General Assembly in the process of becoming law.

Follow the MHAC on Twitter @MHAC_Ohio and on Facebook @MHAC.Ohio.

How do you build unity between MHAC’s members, and why is it important to have a cohesive voice as a coalition?

It’s important to have a cohesive voice because when we’re able to say, ‘We have an 118-member organization,’ it means more to a legislator than a single organization saying, ‘We have a very specific problem we want you to address.’ There’s more power in collaborating.

Creating a unified voice is difficult, especially among the diverse range of member organizations we work with. They don’t always agree on issues. We try to find commonalities and lay everything out ahead of time, so there won’t be unforeseen conflicts.

We use what’s called an advocacy agenda at the local and state level as a roadmap that lays out what we’re going to work on. We define focus areas and specific action steps that we can use to measure our success. We invite all our members to participate in local and state Policy & Advocacy Committees, so everyone has an opportunity to weigh in on the agenda. This allows us to hash out those differences before we advocate.

Can you tell us about the four-part series of research reports titled “By the Numbers” that the MHAC completed in collaboration with The Center for Community Solutions?

Our “By the Numbers” reports are all on different topics. The most recent one addresses the extraordinarily high volume of behavioral health problems in the criminal justice system, and where Ohio’s strengths and gaps exist relating to that. The over-representation of behavioral health problems in the criminal justice system is often caused because there isn’t a good crisis response in the community. For example, someone could be having a mental health crisis and, to a bystander, it appears to be a violent person looking to hurt others. Really, they’re experiencing a crisis and if they could access treatment right away, it could be resolved. Often what happens is the police get called, and if they’re not educated on how to respond to a crisis, the person having a mental health crisis could end up in jail instead of getting the treatment he or she needs outside of the criminal justice system. On the addiction side, people often get arrested for something as small as possession or intoxication and they end up in jail instead of receiving detox or treatment.

Excerpt from Cuyahoga County Sequential Intercept Mapping Final Report (August 2017) by Northeast Ohio Medical University.

After conducting this research, what’s the next step?

Our research highlights a lot of interesting work that’s happening around the state related to behavioral health and criminal justice. One example is a process called sequential intercept mapping. Northeast Ohio Medical University is working with counties throughout the state to map out the different points at which a person in need of mental health services has the opportunity to be intercepted and treated for a mental illness. This includes preventing people from entering the criminal justice system by getting them treatment before an incident occurs or after they’ve been arrested, making sure they receive treatment while in jail or awaiting sentencing. Post release is also an opportunity to help. The report includes specific recommendations for how policymakers and other stakeholders can take action to improve outcomes for people with behavioral health disorders who are involved in the criminal justice system.

Can you speak about your relationship with the Cleveland Foundation?

The MHAC is supported around 80% by foundations and 20% by member dues and other revenue, so for the past 16 years we’ve relied heavily on philanthropic support. We’re honored that the Cleveland Foundation has been by our side for a long time and has been very supportive of our work. As a local foundation, they are very knowledgeable about local issues. It helps to have a funder that’s so rooted in Cleveland and willing to connect us to other organizations too, because we’re always trying to expand our membership.

Stay tuned for more “Stories of Impact” in our community throughout 2019 featuring Cleveland Foundation partners and grant-funded nonprofit organizations. Looking to donate to a specific field of interest or begin your own fund to support causes you care about? Visit: www.ClevelandFoundation.org/give.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview