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Q.

I have a 1972 Lincoln Continental Mark IV 460 V8 7.5L. When I start vehicle each day a cloud of smoke rises from drivers side exhaust manifold and quickly dissipates. However, car idles rough thereafter. If I let vehicle sit for a couple hours and restart the smoke is less.

A.

When you claim, “a cloud of smoke rises from drivers side exhaust manifold“ do you actually mean from the exhaust manifold or out the drivers side exhaust pipe? The exhaust manifold itself should not smoke, although if the valve covers are loose or the valve cover gaskets are bad. This permits oil to seep out onto the exhaust manifold as the car is sitting, but once the car starts the oil is quickly burned off. Later on if the car sits for shorter time it has less oil to burn off so less smoke. If you pull your valve covers also check for the flatness of the gasket surface on the valve cover. If the valve cover has been over torqued down the surface can become warped and permit oil to seep out.

A cloud out the exhaust pipe at start up can be a few things, and it’s best to try and determine what kind of cloud you have.

A white cloud that smalls like car exhaust is often simply condensation in the exhaust system and will dissipate after driving a few miles.

A bluish cloud that has an oily smell is often an indication of worn valve seals; as the car sits oil in the rocker arm area drains down along the valve stems and pools on top of the valves if closed or drains into the cylinder if the valve is open. Once the engine is started the oil is burned off.

A greyish cloud that has a heavy fuel smell can indicate an engine that needed to be turned over several times to be started and is burning off the excess fuel. Or a carburetor that is adjusted too rich or a choke setting that is incorrect.

The post Partly Cloudy Continental appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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The post appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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I purchased my 1937 Buick in 2018 at an estate sale in Graham, Washington.

Since it’s purchase I’ve stripped the trunk of the weathered cardboard panels and rust where it leaked in around the weather seal. I also stripped the interior, seat, carpet, windows, window trim, door panels, knobs, etc.

The engine was froze up when I purchased the Buick and I removed the intake manifold to work on trying to free up the engine. Additionally I have been working on removing the dash and gauges to prepare for fresh paint. The rear seat was missing and will certainly give me something challenging to look for! I’ve reworked the brakes, new wheel cylinders, brake shoes, turned drums, installed new wheel cylinders. Finally the headliner has been removed to evict the mice and their nests.

My future plans are to remove the straight 8 engine and get it running. Hopefully the drivetrain is in operable condition. Looking ideas to change out dash gauges, or whole cluster.

Monte Truesdell
California

The post 1937 Buick Special appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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Here are a couple photos of my art enhanced classic cars.

The first is a 1928 Model A Ford AR Roadster pickup. This is a great little pickup that I enhanced as a historical documentary on comics from 1896 until today. I spent nearly 3,000 hours painting the numerous characters on the truck. It has appeared in the New York Auto Show, Comic-Con NY, the Hilton Head Concours, the Newark Art Museum and the AACA Museum in Hershey.

Actual sand from the beach at Iwo Jima was embedded in the hood next to the painting of the Marine Memorial.

Robert Luczun
Clifton, N.J.

The post 1928 Roadster Pickup & 1986 El Camino appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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The Rolls Royce is one of my special ladies in my collection. I have my first car, a 1978 Camaro, a 1989 IROC-Z, a 1986 Corvette, and my Rolls Royce as Show Cars. All have been award winners but the Rolls and Camaro have special stories.

The Rolls Royce is a 1973 model Silver Shadow I. I had the Rolls Royce Enthusiasts Club (RREC) in England run a Heritage Certificate on her this year. This details all production documents on the car when she was produced at the Crewe Production facility in England. As it turns out, her first owner was Vogue Magazine of Hanover Square, London. I hope to find that she was in a photo shoot for Vogue back in the 1970’s but am still researching Vogue issues for that period.

She arrived in Oklahoma in 1984 to a banker. His estate sold it to a gentlemen who deals in exotic automobiles in Kansas City. I acquire her from him in 2014 and brought her back home to Oklahoma. She has 67,000 original miles and has won numerous car shows, including a best of show. She has also been featured in Rolls Royce and Bentley Driver Magazine in England.

She is Caribbean Blue with Tan interior and has a very rare leather sunroof. Fortunately, she came with a two-foot thick series of repair manuals that are valued at over $1000. This has assisted me endlessly when I have performed repairs. These have included rebuilding the electric fuel pump, alternator, and voltage regulator. I have also carried out routine maintenance with fluids, filters, and air intake hoses and have kept her all original.

I went to Los Angeles last year to learn some things under Ronnie Shafer for repair information and to obtain certification as a Rolls Royce Judge for Rolls Royce Car Shows with the Rolls Royce Owners Club (RROC) here in the U.S. Ronnie is fabulous….a genius when it comes to Rolls Royce.

She is a complicated lady, as the brake and suspension system are all on the same hydraulic system which is quite complicated for repairs and maintenance, requiring a special RR363 fluid that Castrol only makes every couple of years. Nevertheless, there is nothing like a Rolls Royce….driving her is like riding on a cloud. The leather seats emit an aroma unlike any car I have ever experienced as well as feeling like you are in your favorite lounge chair in your living room.

The Rolls Royce is beyond description and I cannot express enough about this marvelous creation and the engineering innovations one finds in her from that period. She attracts quite the attention in small Mustang, Oklahoma to say the least. I have named her Queen Elizabeth II.

Jeff Kelley
Mustang, OK

The post 1973 Rolls Royce Silver Shadow I appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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Here is my 1951 Ford Custom with a Fordomatic transmission. I purchased the car in July of 2018.

It has a ’53 Mercury rebuilt engine, It has been converted to a 12 volt electrical system and now has a Pertronix electronic ignition, it also is equipped with electric fuel pump, dual exhaust and Vintage Air.

I get a lot of compliments and it drives pretty well for being over sixty years old.

Ralph Merrow
Georgia

The post 1951 Ford Custom appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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I purchased my 1949 Mercury about 2 years ago from Mike White of Climax Mi. who built the car in the 1990’s. I have made some minor changes adding wide whites, 1951 Mercury skirts, and Oldsmobile spinners, a ‘51 Crestline steering wheel, and miscellaneous 50s style items to it.

The car has a 1974 Nova front clip with disc brakes and power steering, 350 Small Block Chevrolet engine and GM 700R4 automatic overdrive transmission and a ’96 S10 rear axle assembly.

The color is a 1994 Buick burgundy. The body has been nosed, decked, shaved, and frenched. Any future work will be to keep the car a looking like a pre 1959 custom.

Tom Calvey
Kalamazoo, Michigan

The post 1949 Mercury Custom appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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This 1968 Lincoln Continental belonged to my parents. They purchased it in 1970 when I was eleven years old. It is the coolest! I love the suicide doors. My Dad dove her until 1982. He parked her in the garage with 127,386 miles until 2002, occasionally driving her. He had the 462 engine rebuilt along with the transmission. Slowly restoring what he could. Before he passed away in 2009, he gave the car to me.

I’ve put in: shocks, tires, crankshaft driven power steering pump, seat upholstery, window and door rubber, and fairly high-end paint in the original color (Diamond green). And had the bumpers re-chromed. I drive her weekly and so many compliments and comments. I love it!

Devin Wright
Carrollton, Texas

The post 1968 Lincoln Continental appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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I have wanted a 1938 for over 25 years, Finally I have one . I brought it in Korunbarra, Melbourne and drove it home to brisbane over 3 days. It went like a dream.

I flew down to Melbourne , picked up by the seller and driven back to his place 2 hours east of Melbourne.
I looked over the car, brought it and started driving home, I left about 12:30 am stopped for the night 6pm.- 312 klms
Next day started driving at 7am drove all day stopped for the night at 4:15pm 637 klms.
Next day started 6:45am drove all day until I got home in Brisbane at 7pm- 857 klms.
Total driving 28 hours.
The car went really well for a 81 year, no problems at all, cruised on 55 mph.

Dean Gordon
Brisbane, Australia

The post 1938 Chevrolet appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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I purchased my 1938 Rolls Royce Phantom III at an estate auction in Sydney, Australia. I don’t think I’ll ever sell it. It’s part of the family. Phoebe the Phantom, as I’ve come to call it, comes with quite a history.

The chassis was built in Crewe and H.J. Mulliner in London built the Sedanca de Ville town car coach. It was a demo model for seven months before being bought by a French woman and shipped to Quebec.

She passed away in 1952 and the car was taken to a New York car yard until 1967 when a London undertaker who returned it to Great Brittan bought it for about $1200. The body was modified to add another row of seats so it could be used as a mourning car.

Just two years later a Sydney solicitor bought it and drove it around London for a couple of years before shipping it out the colonies. In 1975, a Sydney Volvo dealer swapped a new Volvo for the relic, which was, then in need of substantial restoration.

The dealer restored the engine, but little else until I bought it. The Rolls Royce is powered by a 7340cc twin-spark V12 engine and it runs as smooth as the day it was built. It’s true what they say about it being so quiet inside the only thing you can hear is the clock. Sometimes you can hold the starter on for too long because you can’t hear or feel when the engine has started. The Rolls can sit in the garage for three months without running and it starts first time. The big 5,800lb beast has 160 horsepower that will roll it up to 65mph in 16.5 seconds and out to a top speed of 95mph while guzzling fuel at 12mpg.

Mechanical highlights are a Bijur auto lubricating system with “miles” of copper tubing; hydraulic auto jacks, three-speed auto and four drum brakes. Only 727 of these were made and lords, ladies, princes, maharajahs, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Field Marshal Montgomery, have owned them.

But as each model is purpose built to owner specifications, no two models are the same. Phoebe features the extra seats, a cocktail cabinet, a rear picnic table, pullout tool kit, one-way intercom from passenger to chauffeur and, an electrically controlled silk privacy screen. There’s plenty of room to do whatever you like in the back.

Martin Glynn
Queensland, Australia

The post 1938 Rolls-Royce Phantom III appeared first on Classic Car Restoration Club.

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