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If you’ve worked hard getting your body into shape this year this is not the time to undo all your efforts with a Christmas blow out. But it doesn’t mean missing out on traditional favourites. Here’s how to avoid that holiday weight gain by making savvy choices.

The festive season can be a difficult time to keep to your healthy regime.  With all those family gatherings, parties and meals out, eating fatty, sugary food becomes the norm.  We consume, on average, a whopping 6-7,000 calories over the course of Christmas Day around 3-4 times a woman’s daily recommended intake.  It’s no wonder that on average people gain about 5lbs over the festive season.  It takes just 3,500 extra calories to put on 1lb in weight and with all those little treats it’s easily done.  The main course alone can add up to 1000 calories.

The good news is that many festive foods can be healthy.  There are plenty of Santa’s superfoods – you just need to make savvy choices and watch those little ‘extras’.  If you’re looking for healthy recipes then grab my festive paleo and gluten free recipe ebook

CHRISTMAS DINNER

The Superfoods

Turkey:  A great source of lean protein, iron, zinc, selenium and B vitamins.  Contains tryptophan, an amino acid which the body converts to serotonin a brain chemical known for its mood-boosting properties (useful if the family’s already stressing you out).

Make it healthier: 100g serving of roast turkey without skin (104 calories, 2g fat).  Removing the skin saves you 40 calories and over half the fat.  Light meat has fewer calories but darker meat contains more iron.

Sweet Potatoes: Instead of roast potatoes why not opt for roasted sweet potatoes? With their lovely orange colour they are an excellent source of beta-carotene; the plant form of vitamin A and an essential nutrient for healthy skin and a healthy immune system.  The vitamin C content of sweet potatoes provides further defence-boosting and anti-inflammatory properties.  If you cut them into wedges and bake them in the oven they make a healthier carb option

Make it Healthier: Don’t drench your potatoes in inflammatory vegetable oil – this can result in your consuming 149kcal and 4.5g fat. Boil or bake. Alternatively par boil then coat in a little coconut oil before roasting. Coconut oil is a heat stable fat and preferentially used by the body as a fuel source plus it contains lauric acid to support immune health.

Brussels sprouts and other veggies: Love them or hate them it’s worth piling the sprouts on your plate – bursting with cancer fighting sulforaphane, folate, vitamin C and fibre they have been shown to reduce DNA damage.  Cover your plate with a rainbow selection of steamed veggies and boost your antioxidant intake.

Make it Healthier:  Forget drenching them in creamy sauces or sugary dressings – just lightly steam for maximum flavour and health benefits. You can always then toss in a pan with herbs and spices for additional flavour  Calorie wise and carb wise you’re on to a winner. 1 cup (150g) Brussels sprouts only contains 65 calories

Cranberry Sauce: Rich in flavonoids these red gems will help immune health and keep urinary tract infections at bay.

Make it healthier: Shop bought versions can be sugar ladened so make your own by simmering fresh cranberries with orange juice and red wine.

WATCH OUT!!

Stuffing and ‘extras’

Sausages, meat stuffing and bacon are processed, high in salt and often additives. Just one rasher of bacon contains up to 6g fat and 90 calories.  Add a serving of stuffing with gravy and you’re eating over 320 calories.

Make it healthier: Swap the sausage meat for a nut and fruit based stuffing for more antioxidants, healthier fats and more fibre. This will fill you up and provide valuable nutrients to keep you energised.

CHRISTMAS DESSERTS & TREATS

Mince pies: just because they contain dried fruit does not make these healthy! One mince pie contains 203 calories and ladened with sugar – about 4tsp per mince pie.

Make it healthier: Make your own so you know what they contain – try making mini versions too. Sweeten homemade mincemeat if needed with xylitol to keep the sugar content down as much as possible. See our ebook for some healthy paleo mince pies

Christmas Pudding: Again a serving will set you back over 320 calories, 49g sugar (over 12tsp) and 8g fat.  Add a dollop of brandy butter and you are talking serious calories and sugar. Make your own to reduce the sugar content.

Make it healthier:  Watch your portion size and top it with Greek yogurt or Coconut yogurt instead of cream and you’ll also give your body some healthy beneficial bacteria.

Christmas Cake: A slice of cake with marzipan and icing will set you back 200 calories and 30g sugar (7tsp).

Box of Chocs: Half a selection box 125g box adds up to 680 calories and 15tsp sugar

HEALTHIER OPTIONS

Satsumas: A low calorie treat bursting with vitamin C, antioxidants and plenty of soluble fibre.   2 satsumas contain 36 calories

Dark chocolate: Choose at least 70% cocoa solids. Prevent overdoing it and pick mini bars, I love making my own raw chocolates too

Handful of mixed nuts:  Rich in heart-healthy monounsaturated and essential fats plus vits and minerals (the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study found just 2-4g a day cuts cardiovascular disease risk by 12%).  1oz contains 174 calories

Red wine / mulled wine.  Rich in heart protective antioxidants particularly resveratrol but watch how much you consume.   1 glass contains 122 calories and is high in sugar.  Highest content of antioxidants are found in Pinot Noir varieties. For children why not try warm apple or cherry concentrate with star anise and cinnamon. This cherry juice is actually a source of melatonin so may help your children sleep better on Christmas Eve

PARTY PLEASERS

At a party and not sure what to choose?  Firstly try and have a light snack prior to going to the party. Don’t be tempted to starve yourself all day as you are likely to overeat sampling everything on the buffet table.  Avoid standing near the buffet table – you will nibble and pick at food eating far more calories than you intend to. Drink plenty of water through the even as well to keep you feeling fuller.

Healthy options

  • Vegetable sticks & salsa, hummus and tzatziki
  • Olives
  • Unsalted nuts and seeds
  • Salad & vegetables
  • Lean turkey & ham slices
  • Smoked mackerel or smoked salmon
  • Fresh Fruit

Not so healthy..

  • Crisps & fried snacks
  • Sausage rolls & pasties
  • Shop bought coleslaw / potato salads
  • Pasta salads
  • Quiches, vol au vents, spring rolls
  • Battered prawns, crispy fried foods
  • Sweets and chocolates
  • Cocktails, Beer and Cider

WHAT IF I OVERDO IT?

Don’t beat yourself up – and don’t make it an excuse to carry on eating too much or too much of the wrong types of foods. If you feel you need to clean up your diet why not follow one of our detox programmes

The post Healthy Christmas Survival Guide appeared first on Christine Bailey.

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Feeling run down, depressed and fatigued? Gaining weight for no apparent reason? Your Thyroid and / or Adrenal health may be compromised.

During this seminar we will discuss the function and regulation of the adrenal and thyroid glands and the systemic implications of dysfunction.

This Seminar will include:

  • The importance of proper testing and interpretation of results
  • The importance of nutrients and certain foods for optimising hormone levels
  • Dietary and Lifestyle Strategies that make a difference.
  • Advice on the best supplements to use

The seminar will finish with a delicious 2-course lunch and there will be plenty of time to ask questions.

*** 3 HOURS BANT CPD APPROVED, CERTIFICATE SUPPLIED AFTER THE EVENT ***

Location:

Hosted by Irrefutable Health at The Willow

16 The Triangle

Kingston upon Thames

KT1 3RT

Date: 

Tue, April 2, 2019

Time:

9:30 AM – 2:30 PM

Booking: Book your ticket via event brite

The post Eating well for Thyroid and Adrenal Health appeared first on Christine Bailey.

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Both Cancer Research UK and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) acknowledge the role diet has on cancer incidence, survival and recovery. What you choose to eat can make all the different on outcomes whether you are looking at cancer risk, progression or recurrence.

This seminar will provide practical and evidence-based nutritional support in relation to dietary and lifestyle factors for different cancers.

This Seminar will include:

  • Risk reduction – dietary and lifestyle strategies to reduce your risk of cancer
  • Role of laboratory testing for personalised approach
  • Tackling side effects during and post treatment
  • Role of specific nutrients and foods
  • A review of the evidence around common dietary strategies employed in cancer care
  • Moving forward – longer term approaches

The seminar will finish with a delicious 2-course lunch and there will be plenty of time to ask questions.

Open to Practitioners and the Public

3 HOURS BANT CPD APPROVED, CERTIFICATE SUPPLIED AFTER THE EVENT

Location:

Hosted by Irrefutable Health at The Willow

16 The Triangle

Kingston upon Thames

KT1 3RT

Date – February 12th 2019

Time – 9:30 AM – 2:30 PM

Book via event brite

The post Eating Well For Cancer – Nutrition Support appeared first on Christine Bailey.

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We all want to keep our immune system in top shape particularly over the winter months. If you’re looking to protect yourself and your family from colds and any type of flu this year then here’s a summary of some key foods and nutrients to focus on.

Firstly it’s worth mentioning that both colds and various influenzas are caused by a range of viruses (not bacteria). This is why typically antibiotics are often not appropriate – however remember that sinus, ear, and lung infections (bronchitis and pneumonia) are examples of bacterial infections where antibiotics may be needed.

Common symptoms of a cold include runny nose, congestion, cough, and sore throat. The symptoms of the flu tend to be far more severe, as the influenza viruses are capable of causing severe lung infection, pneumonia, and even respiratory failure. They also tend to affect your joints—hence general achy feeling over your body.  The most common way these viruses are spread is via hand-to-hand contact – so washing your hands and basic hygiene is important if other family members are affected. Often the reason we suffer with the flu is that the immune system is compromised.  This can be due to low levels of key nutrients but also lifestyle factors such as stress and lack of sleep.

To support your immune system focus on these nutrients

Vitamin D. There are many studies to show that people with higher vitamin D levels contract substantially fewer cold, flu, and other viral infections Vitamin D also down regulates inflammatory compounds and optimal levels may help reduce the risk of autoimmune diseases. Studies also suggest that higher vitamin D levels are associated with a decreased risk of contracting a seasonal viral infection. There are only a few food sources of vitamin D as our main source is sunlight. Oily fish, mushrooms, full fat milk will contain a little but most people may benefit from a supplement. It is recommended you take a blood test to check your levels before supplementing. Home test kits are available

Antioxidants. Immune cells like other cells need protection from damage by free radicals. Free radicals stop our immune system from functioning optimally. This is one of the reasons why antioxidants are important immune-system aids. Studies have shown that supplementing with antioxidants like vitamins C, E, and A stimulate immune function. Vitamin C is a key component of the immune system and also helps lower inflammation in the body. Vitamin C enhances the production and action of white blood cells; for example it increases the ability of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) to attack and engulf viruses. Vitamin C has been shown to reduce the chances of catching a cold, and may speed up recovery from a cold. As it is water soluble take a supplement in doses through the day – 500mg every 2-3 hours up to 3g daily. Excess can have a laxative effect.

Vitamin E is a powerful fat-soluble antioxidant. It protects the cell membranes of the immune system and other cells and enhances the effectiveness of lymphocytes. Avocados are a great source of vitamin E. Snack on nuts and seeds too for a healthy dose.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), synthesized from the amino acid tyrosine, is important for the production of energy for all the body’s cells and low levels may be linked to low energy levels and fatigue. It also has an important role in the stimulation of the immune system. Unfortunately as we age levels of CoQ10 decline not only making our energy production systems less efficient but also may adversely affect our immune health too. While you can get some through the diet e.g oily fish a supplement may also be helpful.

Other immune supporting antioxidants are phytonutrients including proanthocyanidins found in berries, grapes and grapeseed extract. In laboratory studies, proanthocyanidins increased the power of natural killer cells, and decreased inflammatory chemicals. Elderberry supplements have been shown to be effective in the prevention and treatment of influenza, which may be due to its high flavonoid content.

Whey Protein. Sufficient protein is important for a healthy functioning immune system. Whey protein in particular has many benefits. Whey protein is easily absorbed by the body and contains glutamate and cysteine, precursors to glutathione. Whey protein can activate natural killer cells and contains several substances that enhance the immune system, including beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-lactalbumin, lactoperoxidase and lactoferrin. Lactoferrin, a major component of whey protein, also acts as an antioxidant. It can inhibit the absorption of bacteria through the intestinal wall.

Colostrum. Soon after giving birth, female mammals produce colostrum, which is a milk-like substance that jump-starts a newborn’s immune system. Researchers have also found it beneficial for boosting overall immune health. Colostrum has two groups of components: immune system factors and growth factors. These show anti-microbial and antiviral properties. Colostrum powder can be a useful way to get these natural immune supporting components.

Zinc and Selenium. Among children, deficiencies of zinc, copper, and selenium have been linked to immune deficiency and infection. One of the roles of selenium is in helping to recycle glutathione in the body.

Zinc helps support the function of lymphocytes and can decrease inflammation in the body. Zinc deficiency can lead to reduced immune function increasing your risk of an infection. If you want to increase your intake of zinc naturally include plenty of pumpkin and sesame seeds, lamb, beef, oats, yogurts and prawns. When you are suffering with a cold or flu try sucking zinc lozenges every 2 to 3 hours for first day or two.

Beta Glucans. Beta glucans are polysaccharides that can activate the immune system, enhance macrophages and natural killer cell function and inhibit tumour growth. Beta glucans can naturally boost the immune system by optimizing its response to diseases and infections. Because the body does not produce beta glucans naturally, the only way to get them is through foods or supplements. Food sources of beta glucans include oats, barley and mushrooms. You could include medicinal mushroom powders for a further boost which are delicious added to smoothies especially combined with raw cacao.

Probiotics. Over 70% of our immune system resides in your gut. The gastrointestinal tract relies on friendly bacteria to help support a robust immune response. These probiotic bacteria help prevent foreign bacteria and allergens from passing through the intestinal wall and are important to the overall health of the intestinal immune system. You can boost your levels of probiotics by eating fermented foods such as yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut and miso.

When flu strikes you may wish to try elderberry syrup. Elderberry extracts have been shown to have anti viral properties and may help fight colds by activating white blood cells. Echinacea is another popular choice for colds and upper respiratory tract infections.

Garlic is a traditional remedy for colds and infections. When raw garlic is chopped or chewed, it releases an active compound called allicin, which has demonstrated antiviral activity.

Don’t forget foods like mushrooms. Medicinal mushrooms are potent immune modulators rich in polysaccharides as well as providing key vitamins, minerals and amino acids. Medicinal mushrooms such as shittake, cordyceps, reishi, chaga have been widely researched and known for their anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties.

To keep our immune system healthy it is important that we address not just our diet but our lifestyle too. Watch your sugar intake – this can suppress your immune system. In addition feeling stressed, not sleeping properly, smoking, drinking too much alcohol can all play havoc on our immune response.

The post Supercharge Your Immune System appeared first on Christine Bailey.

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Want a delicious drink without the booze?  It’s easy to create your own healthy alcohol-free mocktail, perfect for celebrations and alfresco eating.

Mocktails seem to be all the craze at the moment. These non-alcoholic drinks are often designed to be similar to traditional cocktails but without the alcohol. While you may have sipped on a virgin blood Mary there are plenty more options to choose.

Mocktails are a great option if you want to avoid alcohol but still enjoy a delicious drink. Cocktails are renowned for being high in calories and alcohol of course and being so sweet the trouble is you often end up consuming more alcohol than you realise or intended. They are also incredibly expensive. Making a non alcoholic version is much healthier and typically lower in calories but watch out for shop bought mocktails or those in bars and restaurants – these can be loaded with sugar and calories. So when you are making your own choose ingredients carefully.

Here’s a few tips when creating your own

Ingredients to avoid – in addition to added syrups and sugars don’t overload your drink with fruit juices or juice drinks. Skip the lemonades or sodas, tonic waters and energy drinks – these have no nutritional value and simply add sugar.

Ingredients to include.  Good options include sparkling water, coconut water, coconut milk, unsweetened fruit and vegetable juices, citrus peels and slices of fruit and vegetables for added flavour. I like to add fresh herbs and spices for additional flavour. Other options include kombucha and water kefir for a probiotic boost or if you like a creamy mocktail try milk or coconut kefir. If you need a little sweetener then try xylitol or stevia.

Creating Your Own Mocktail – use these steps to create your own healthy option

Choose healthy liquids – Don’t overload with fruit juice – mix with sparkling water or coconut water and always choose unsweetened fruit juice or vegetable juice. Ideally freshly made for extra nutrition. For a creamy taste use some coconut milk, kefir or yogurt

Flavour with herbs and citrus peels – a great way to add flavour and extra nutrition – chopped herbs or leaves, citrus peel or wedges of lime are delicious additions. For savoury mocktails why not add some pickled cucumber or celery – these would be perfect for a virgin bloody Mary for example

Add in some spices – pinch of turmeric, ginger are great anti-inflammatories and again make a great addition for some Mocktails particularly savoury options

Finish with ice – a great way to add a more indulgent feel to your mocktail – crushed ice or ice cubes

Try my Lime and Mint Mocktail for a refreshing, hydrating treat

The post Creating a Healthy Mocktail appeared first on Christine Bailey.

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Whether you’re seasoned runner, gym goer or like to exercise regularly, to reap the benefits make sure you consume sufficient protein. Here’s what you need to know.

Understanding the Basics

Protein is an essential nutrient. It is crucial to the health of every cell in your body, involved in hormone production, immune health, bone health, recovery and repair.  Proteins are used to make muscles, tendons, organs and skin as well as being used to make enzymes and neurotransmitters that affect how we think and feel.

 

If you are involved in regular exercise, particularly if you are an endurance athlete you may need more protein that you think. Endurance athletes tend to oxidise amino acids as an energy source over long distances so getting optimal amount is important for overall performance and maintaining muscle tissue. Adequate protein intake also supports muscle growth, recovery and healing making it essential for any one exercising regularly. If you are not getting enough you may be at a greater risk of injury. Protein is also crucial for a healthy immune system. After an intense training, your immune system is depressed for several hours. Consuming adequate protein particularly post exercise can help reduce the risk of infections particularly respiratory problems which can be common in endurance athletes.

But protein is not just about quantity. It’s also about qualityAnimal protein (meat, fish, eggs, dairy) tends to provide all the essential amino acids in the right ratio for us to make full use of them. So if you regularly eat animal proteins you may be doing pretty well in terms of your daily intake.  It can be more difficult if you are a vegan however as many plant based foods do not provide all the essential amino acids that your body needs. Have a look at my book GO LEAN VEGAN for more information on getting sufficient protein on a vegan diet.

That does not mean everyone should be taking protein supplements, but they can be useful for athletes, bodybuilders or anyone exercising regularly who is not getting the results they want from their workouts.

How Much is Enough?

The recommended daily amount (RDA) for the general population is 0.8g/kg/day but that is not enough for athletes according to latest sports research. The optimal intake for endurance athletes is considered to be around 1.2-1.6 gram per kilogram of body weight a day. A recent research study in 2015 on women endurance runners suggested 1.6 g/kg/day would be more appropriate for optimal health and performance. This translates to around 90g protein for a 9 stone runner or 110g protein for a 11 stone runner.

If you’re looking to support weight loss studies suggest that a protein intake of around 30% may be optimal. This is because a higher protein intake boosts metabolic rate as well as helping you feel fuller meaning overall you are likely to reduce your overall calorie intake.

If you’re serious about gaining muscle then you may need to check how much you are eating. While studies differ in recommendations. Generally speaking around 0.8-1g of protein per pound of body weight seems to be most effective. This is actually more than you may think – this is around 1.6- 2.2g of protein per kg which is much higher than the RDA.

In practical terms this means you are looking to consume 20-30g protein at each meal and include protein in a couple of snacks daily too.

It’s not just the athletes that may need more protein. Elderly people also benefit as it can help prevent sarcopenia (reduction in muscle mass) and osteoporosis. For example this study suggest the RDA for Elderly people should be 1.0 to 1.2 g/kg per day

In addition if you are recovering from an injury you may need more protein too

Exercise and Nutrient Timing

There are lots written about the best time to eat around exercise. It is often suggested that there is a tight anabolic window after exercise where you need to consume more protein to stimulate muscle protein synthesis and aid growth and recovery.

While it may be useful to consume some food after a workout, studies suggest that you don’t necessarily need to do this immediately after a workout. Exercise has the effect of increasing muscle protein synthesis for several hours after training.

It is more important to ensure that your overall daily protein intake and the nutrients you consume is appropriate for your activity levels.   Consuming sufficient protein at each meal appears to be more effective at enhancing muscle growth and supporting recovery than concentrating your intake in one meal per day.

The main time you may need to prioritise a post workout snack is if you are exercising more than once a day or you are an elite or endurance athlete and need to replenish your body’s fuel more quickly or looking to gain that competitive advantage.

Your Pre workout meal or snack may be actually more important if you are looking to boost performance. Eating an easy to digest meal or snack at least 1 hour before a workout may improve performance particularly if you have not eaten for a while or you are working out first thing in the morning.

However if you are looking to shift fat and improve insulin sensitivity then training on an empty stomach may help you burn fat so it does depend on your goals.

The key focus should be on getting sufficient quality protein spread throughout your day based on your activity levels as mentioned above.

What to Eat: Best Sources

Lean meats and other animal products, like eggs and dairy, pack a lot of protein and contain all the essential amino acids (the building blocks of protein) the body needs. A 100g chicken breast for example contains 28g protein while two eggs contain around 15g.

Many plant proteins are low in one of the essential amino acids. For instance, grains tend to be short of lysine while pulses are low in methionine. The exceptions are foods like soy (e.g. tofu), spirulina and quinoa (an ancient grain) which do contain all the essential amino acids. However, this does not mean that vegans will be short on protein. Eating a variety of plant proteins through the day will help ensure you get all the essential amino acids your body needs. Read my GO LEAN VEGAN book for more information.

What Does 20g protein look like?

400g can baked beans

1 small lamb chop

70g beef fillet

80g can tuna

3 eggs

5 egg whites

150g pot cottage cheese

90g chicken breast

80g turkey

100g salmon fillet

100g cod fillet

5tbsp peanut butter

75g prawns

110g / 1 cup nuts

170g tofu

140g Quorn

200g fat free Greek yogurt

400g fromage frais

33g spirulina

130g ham

Protein Powders

Protein powders can be a convenient way to ensure sufficient protein intake, particularly post training. Most contain around 20-30g per serving of protein.

Whey powder is recognised by many sports nutritionists as the premier powder of choice for athletes. If you are prone to injuries or need some bone support whey protein has also been shown to help bone metabolism, both in building bone and preventing resorption of bone.  Whey is particularly useful to help with recovery because of rapid transit into the small intestine & high levels of Branch-Chain Amino Acids (BCAA’s) (which is also useful for prevention of muscle breakdown during exercise) & Glutamine (important fuel for muscle synthesis). When choosing a product look at the added ingredients and how it is processed. Many prefer to choose powders which have been cold-processed as it is thought that heat treatments can degrade the protein as well as damaging immune supportive micronutrients.

I often use collagen powder and while this is not a complete protein it is very valuable for gut health as well as connective tissue and bone support. Another great option especially if you struggle with poor digestive health or runner’s trots is colostrum powder which has been widely studied into its benefits as a post workout recovery food particularly for its ability to heal leaky gut.

Hemp protein, Egg, Soya, Pea and Rice proteins are also readily available and can be useful options if you are unable to tolerate or wish to avoid milk proteins. Hemp protein contains all the essential amino acids plus essential omega 3 fats making it useful for lowering inflammation. Others like pea and rice tend to be low in certain amino acids. Brown rice protein powder contains the complete combination of amino acids but is a bit low in lysine for example in comparison to whey protein.  Pea protein is easily digestible and contains particular amino acids relevant to runners including lysine (for bone health), BCAA (to maintain muscle tissue during exercise), glutamine (muscle recovery) and arginine (muscle metabolism and energy). Ideally use a mixture of different protein powders or choose a blended protein powder to get maximum benefits.

Whatever your choice remember that protein powders are still a supplement which means you should use them in addition to including a variety of protein rich foods throughout the day in your diet.

The post Protein & Exercise – What You Need to Know appeared first on Christine Bailey.

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Join our FREE 3 day Juice & Smoothie Programme starting Friday 20th July – Sunday 23rd July

Want to give your body a makeover from the inside out?  Our 3 Day, Juice & Smoothie programme is designed to help you kick start a healthier diet and lifestyle by providing you with a range of delicious juice and smoothie recipes to energise and cleanse your body.

Once you start fueling your body with delicious juices and smoothies packed with fresh veggies and fruit, you’ll see results in how you look and feel. Following a juice programme can help you lose a few pounds, improve the appearance of your skin and boost energy. By giving the digestive system a rest many people also find ongoing digestive issues improve.

This July we are running a FREE 3 day Juice & Smoothie Programme. All you need to do is sign up below and then you will be sent the programme which includes recipes, shopping list and programme to follow.

If you take part in the programme and post pictures of your juices with #christinembailey you will also be entered into our competition to win a copy of my Supercharged Juice & Smoothie Book plus a box of sunchlorella tablets.

Our programme is completely FREE – ARE YOU IN?

Join our FREE 3 Day Juice & Smoothie Programme
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The post JOIN OUR 3 DAY DETOX JUICE & SMOOTHIE PROGRAMME – FREE!! appeared first on Christine Bailey.

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We all know children can be tricky to feed at times but when your child has a food allergy or intolerance and you have to avoid certain foods or food groups there can be additional concerns making sure their diet is healthy and balanced. With three boys myself all with food reactions and being coeliac myself I know the pain of having to constantly read labels, check ingredients and create allergy free versions of family favourites.

Through my own experiences and working alongside families with allergies I have learnt how it is possible to make dietary and lifestyle adjustments yet at the same time create delicious real food that the whole family love and enjoy.  I have also spent years helping families develop the skills and information they need to cook nutritious meals that the whole family can eat.

More importantly it is important to support your child’s health long term and to really tackle their symptoms naturally you need to address the route causes of food reactions. Food reactions are often a sign of imbalances in the immune response. By tackling underlying imbalances you can help bring about longer term relief and ensure future allergies and associated conditions are less likely to manifest.

After years of working with children and allergies I am delighted to announce that I have a new book coming out:  My Kids Can’t Eat That: Rules and Recipes to Cope with Children’s Food Allergies, Intolerances and Sensitivities .

This is very much a functional nutrition approach to allergies and it looks at how imbalances in the body including the immune system and the gut are linked to the risk and severity of allergies.  The book is divided into three parts. The first part ‘What Does This All Mean?’ helps you understand the different types of food reactions that may be affecting your child and what it means for them. It then explains what is happening to your child’s immune system, risk factors and why the gut plays a crucial role in the development of allergies. This section also includes my route to resolution – how you can identify the underlying imbalances involved in your child’s food reactions and symptoms and how to eliminate these causes and thereby reduce your child’s allergic potential, and ongoing symptoms. In some cases, you can desensitise their reactions to certain foods enabling them to tolerate them again. Some types of allergies of course are for life. If your child has certain types of reactions you can still reduce the severity of their allergic symptoms using natural approaches, rebalance the immune system, nourish the gut and improve their health long term.

The Second part of the book is ‘Getting Down to Business’ – this looks at how to support your child in dealing with allergies – this may be practically and emotionally. It includes guidance on how to talk to your child about their allergies as well as practical support in coping with food allergies in daily life. This includes how to avoid cross contamination, preparing for travelling and eating away from home. There is plenty of advice around working with the nursery or school and how to ensure your child enjoys birthday parties and other celebrations without feeling excluded or different. This section also covers nutrition aspects of creating a nourishing diet and ensuring your child is not missing out on key nutrients.

Part Three ‘Mealtimes in Practice’ includes a range of meal plans that not only cover gluten free, dairy free, egg free, soy free dishes but those that help lower inflammation, nourish the gut and rebalance the immune system. By including nutrient rich meals that help tackle the route causes you can reduce their allergic potential long term and address any ongoing symptoms at the same time.   The recipes included address some of the most common food allergens with notes on adapting the recipes to suit your child’s needs. In all the recipes I have aimed for simplicity using ingredients regularly found in supermarkets and health shops and focusing on everyday family friendly recipes. Whether you cook regularly or feel less competent in the kitchen you will find these recipes easy to follow and make. They are also focused on nourishing your child with dishes that are low in sugar and rich in an array of nutrients, vitamins and minerals to keep them healthy and happy.

If you’re looking for a nutrition focused book that will provide you with clear steps to take and practical tips together with delicious family friendly recipes then pre order your book now. This is the book I wish I had when my children were young!!

Remember too that you can sign up to our FREE cook alongs where we share fabulous easy to make allergy free recipes.

The post Kids & Food Allergies – My Brand New Book appeared first on Christine Bailey.

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