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Brisket is beloved, and not just by Jewish grandmas and Texas pitmasters. Almost every meat eater appreciates the savor of a juicy, tender, well-cooked brisket, whether it’s braised or barbecued. And May 28 happens to be National Brisket Day—sure, it’s a little silly, but why not celebrate something so delicious with its own holiday? We rounded up our best brisket recipes, tips, and tricks to pay homage.

Brisket vs Texas Brisket: What’s the Difference?

The first step to making perfect brisket, whether you’re barbecuing or braising it, is knowing which cut is best for the job. There are flats, points, and full packers (aka Texas brisket), and they all have their pros and cons. Find out all you need to know about Different Cuts of Brisket.

Snake River Farms American Wagyu Gold Grade Packer Brisket, $189 and upPractice on something cheaper, perhaps, but when you're pro level, this packer is a fine choice for BBQ.
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How to Make the Best Smoked Brisket Ever

BBQ brisket inspires rhapsodic devotion, and if you’ve had really good smoked brisket, you know why. If you’re interested in trying to make it yourself, you’re in luck: we spoke with a pitmaster (though he would never call himself that) to get all the details on the perfect BBQ brisket.

Aaron Franklin Teaches Texas-Style BBQ, $90 on MasterClassTake a 16-part lesson from a BBQ guru.
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Make Brisket Better Than Bubbe’s

Besides BBQ, the other best way to cook brisket is to braise it, but it’s still a low and slow road to perfection. You can cheat with a slow cooker. See our 7 Brisket Recipes Better Than Bubbe’s.

What to Do with BBQ Brisket Leftovers

If you’re lucky enough to have leftover barbecue brisket, there are a lot of delicious things you can do with it besides simply slapping it between two slices of bread (though that’s fantastic too). See 11 Things to Do with BBQ Brisket Leftovers.

Johnny Miller (Gail Simmons’ Christmas Brisket Fried Rice recipe)

What’s the Difference Between Corned Beef and Pastrami?

Besides barbecue and braises, brisket can be cured for corned beef or pastrami (which, like BBQ brisket, is also smoked). You might not give it much thought until Saint Patrick’s Day, but find out The Difference Between Corned Beef and Pastrami.

All featured products are curated independently by our editors. When you buy something through our retail links, we may receive a commission. For more great hand-picked products, check out the Chowhound Shop.

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Barbecued brisket is not only a beautiful and ridiculously delicious thing to have, but the leftovers are amazing. Here are some ideas from the Chowhound Home Cooking discussion board on what to do with leftover smoked brisket, well worth bringing out of the archives. And we added a few other options for leftover brisket we love.

1. Chop up leftover brisket as a filling for tacos topped with shredded cabbage, crema, and avocado. –thegirlwholovestoeat

2. Barbecued brisket freezes pretty well if you mix it with sauce first—try freezing some in tomato sauce to bake on pizza. –lennyk

3. Smoked brisket is incredible in soup. Make your favorite vegetable soup and add the chopped meat during the last 15 minutes of simmering. –N Mac

4. Think grilled cheese with bacon is good? Try it with smoked brisket and prepare to swoon.

5. Barbecued brisket makes the best smoky ragu for spooning over polenta or mashed potatoes. –goodhealthgourmet

6. Shred your leftover brisket for enchiladas.

7. Breakfast hash takes on a whole new dimension when you make it with barbecued brisket. –ticrta

8. Smoked brisket leftovers make the best pot pie or shepherd’s pie you’ll ever taste. –ipsedixit

9. Give smoked brisket the chile verde treatment. Chop and add onions, garlic, ground cumin, tomatoes, and poblano chiles that you’ve charred, peeled, and seeded. Cook as you would any other chili (start with step 3 in this White Chicken Chili recipe). –ruafoodie

10. Make fried rice studded with brisket. Gail Simmons’ Christmas Brisket Fried Rice doesn’t use barbecued brisket, but there’s no reason you shouldn’t!

Johnny Miller

11. Obvious idea, but perfect: pile that leftover BBQ brisket on nachos. Nothing better.

Read More: How to Smoke Brisket Like a Pitmaster
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Although these two beverages sound like they could pass for fairly legitimate Brooklyn hipster baby names (Shandy Mendes and Radler Gosling, anyone?), these two beer-based drinks are the perfect answer to beating the heat at a summertime happy hour.

Beer-based cocktails are an easy pick for parties and don’t take much effort to make. The shandy and the radler are two of the most well-known, so let’s compare and contrast.

What is a shandy?

The shandy is made by mixing beer (normally a blond lager) with lemonade, or even lemon-lime soda. The ratio should be about 50-50 and you can mix-and-match with your choice of beer and fruity additions.

What is a radler?

A radler—which means cyclist in German—is a similar citrus and beer concoction but can also include other fruit juices, like grapefruit.

How are they different?

Essentially, if you’re in the mood for a shandy and you order a radler, you’ll still be enjoying a beer-and-juice combination with a citrusy and refreshing taste. Shandy is the British name for it whereas radlers are the German name for them.

What are the best canned radlers and shandies?

Both the shandy and the radler come pre-mixed in cans, and there are some fun alternatives on the market that include grapefruit juice and ginger beer. One of the most well-known pre-packaged shandies is the iconic Del’s Shandy by Naragansett—sold seasonally in many regions of the United States and made with a ‘Gansett lager mixed with Del’s Frozen lemonade (both Rhode Island-based brands). New in 2019, you can now also get Del’s Watermelon Shandy, sure to become a smash hit summer fave.

The Del’s Shandy has a steadfast following and many fans stock up when they can find it. (I was once gifted a precious Del’s Shandy while waiting in line to get into a bar by a man who had lovingly driven it all the way from Rhode Island to Chicago in his VW minibus.) But there are other brands available, from major breweries as well as local craft spots.

Leinenkugel's Summer Shandy on Saucey (price and availability varies)This brand is fairly easy to find in most grocery stores.
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As for radlers, the gateway drink is often Stiegl, a German grapefruit radler in those bold orange-and-white striped cans that seem to promise instant refreshment.

Stiegl Grapefruit Radler on Saucey (price and availability varies)Fruity, fizzy, and ulta-refreshing.
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Look around for local craft options for these fruity drinks too. Or, make your own.

Shandy and Radler Recipes

The next time you’re in the mood for a thirst-quenching alcoholic beverage, think about whipping up a batch of radlers (everyone can participate in the fun and mix-and-match with beers and different flavors of juice) or crack open an ice-cold shandy. Check out our seven shandy and radler recipes for inspiration and beat the heat.

Ginger Shandy

Chowhound

Chilled ginger beer adds a kick to this shandy. Pair with a lager (English style is recommended) and use a ginger beer that packs a punch. Get our Ginger Shandy recipe.

Traditional Radler

Chowhound

Give the original a try before creating your favorite pairings—our basic radler recipe calls for lager and some lemon-lime soda (but we won’t tell anyone if you use lemonade instead). Get our Traditional Radler recipe.

Raspberry Shandy

Chowhound

Is this a shandy or a radler? It’s hard to decide (especially if you’re using German beer), but this recipe is a snap with wheat beer and some chilled raspberry lambic instead of lemonade. Get our Raspberry Shandy recipe.

The Hop Over Radler

This recipe from Dutch Kills in Queens combines some unusual ingredients—falernum, genever, and orange flower water—with a hoppy IPA and lemon juice to create an extremely unusual radler. Get the The Hop Over Radler recipe.

Watermelon Shandy

Why let lemons and grapefruit have all the fun when you can mix beer with watermelon juice for a pink shandy? Get the Watermelon Shandy recipe.

Southern Peach Radler

The traditional radler is taken to the next level here and enhanced with peach brandy and fresh peaches as a garnish. You can make a big batch and scale these radlers easily for a party. Get the Southern Peach Radler recipe.

Mezcal Shandy

Shutterstock

Pilsner is paired with mezcal and lemon along with bitters and some sugar to add sweetness in this enhanced summertime shandy. Get the Mezcal Shandy recipe.

Related Reading: The Best Low-Carb Craft Beers for Summer

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With Memorial Day comes the return of backyard grilling season, which means plenty of burgers are on the horizon. Ensuring that warm spring and summer nights bring tender, juicy burgers and not dry, dense hockey pucks has to do with both sourcing and technique. Chowhounds have shared a few simple tricks and tips over the years, starting with buying the right ground beef.

Tip #1: Avoid extra-lean grinds. The higher the fat content, the moister the patty. A burger with beef that’s 80 percent lean (i.e., 20 percent fat) is luxurious and juicy, Brandon Nelson explains on Chowhound.

Chowhound’s Bull Market Burger

Tip #2: Minimal handling is just as important. Form the patties gently, compressing as little as possible. Just as overworking pastry and dough will make it tough, so will over-handling your meat.

Tip #3: Make an indentation in the middle of each patty. Just press your thumb (not too firmly) into the meat and the divot will prevent it from puffing up and will allow it to cook evenly, mike0989 says. This one is also endorsed by Jon Lemon, culinary director of Bareburger; see more BBQ tips and tricks from chefs.

How to Make an Easy Grilled Cheeseburger - The Easiest Way - YouTube

Tip #4: Don’t press the patties with a spatula as they cook—that just forces out the juice. Your spatula is strictly for flipping, and only once.

Tip #5: Keep in mind there’s carryover cooking time, so pull the burgers off the grill just shy of your target doneness. They’ll be just right when they hit the table, cstr says. Conversely, pull them off when they already look perfect, and by the time they hit your bun, they’ll be overdone.

Chowhound

Tip #6: If you just can’t resist buying lean ground beef, try adding a bit of water to it, valerie says. A little extra moisture helps even well-done burgers stay juicy and tender, even if they’re made from 90 percent lean ground beef. Mix in 1/4 to 1/2 cup water per pound of ground beef before forming your patties to reap the tenderizing benefit of H20.

Tip #7: Try stuffing it with cheese and adding fat via toppings. The classic Juicy Lucy is a great option for anyone who wants a really luxurious burger, since it’s full of molten cheese:

Chowhound’s Juicy Lucy Burger

Along those lines, adding fatty, moist condiments like aioli, bacon jam, ripe tomatoes, and sliced avocado will help boost your burger’s juicy factor (and flavor), but can’t totally save a bone-dry patty, so follow the tips above to ensure your burgers stay perfectly moist on the grill, and then go to town with the toppings. Check out 15 Non-Traditional Burger Recipes for Summer BBQs for ideas.

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Read More: The Ultimate Guide to Grilling & BBQ

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Kitchen confidence a little lacking? If you’re not quite sure what to do when it comes to making dinner (or anything beyond ramen noodles), take these 10 cooking rules to heart.

You don’t have to have gone to culinary school to become a successful cook, home or otherwise, but culinary school certainly will teach you a handful of skills. As a former culinary student and food writer, it was tempting for me to simply share a litany of edicts here that I think are invaluable for those who are setting up shop in their first home kitchens, aspiring to a life of successful home cooking.

Tools of the TradeBasic Kitchen Tools Every New Cook NeedsInstead, I set out to collect some friendly cooking advice as a graduation present from those who did study cooking (and a few successful others), to recent college graduates or anyone outfitting a new kitchen, and found that from good kitchen technique comes good life advice.

And why not? Cooking is an apt metaphor for life. Cooking is not necessarily an art, but has artistic elements. It involves science, but also the nebulous element of intuition. It requires participation of all of the senses, including the sixth. It’s the journey and the destination, since the end product is something that hopefully provides enjoyment and nourishes you.

As encouragement from former culinary students, including myself, who have gone on to a number of roles, culinary or otherwise, consider these 10 rules to memorize while starting out in your own kitchen!

1. Clean As You Go

I chose to lead with this one—endorsed by Zev Glesta (Culinary Institute of America, The Modern) and Ben Earthman (Institute of Culinary Education, Blue Smoke), among many others—because it is also near and dear to my heart. The best way to ensure the ongoing energy to approach kitchen projects in your home is to ensure that your kitchen is always cooking ready. The best way to ensure that your kitchen is always cooking ready is to not leave the dishes undone. The best way to not have to tackle a mountain of dishes at once is to clean as you go.

Related Reading: 8 Places in Your Kitchen You Can Clean with Vinegar

2. Learn Techniques, Not Recipes

Chowhound’s Basic Roasted Chicken

Obviously you should feel free to seek recipes for inspiration and to even follow them, but as suggested by Gabriel Smith (The Cooking Hospitality Institute of Chicago, Common Threads, DC), pay attention to recurring themes rather than try to memorize long lists of ingredients and instructions. Gabe’s point here is one that all culinary students must reckon with and that can also serve the home cook well: a proper saute is a saute is a saute whether you are cooking classic French, modern American, or neo-space-age Icelandic. Learn the technique, and the recipe will be easy.

Cuisinart Chef's Classic Nonstick Hard-Anodized Skillet with Lid, $30.75 on AmazonA proper saute pan will help too.
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3. SALT

If there’s one thing that chefs want you to know it is this. So much so that it was iterated and reiterated in so many different ways; Chris Wegan (CIA): “Salt.” Alex Harris (The Restaurant School at Walnut Hill College, Emma’s Torch): “Don’t be afraid of salt.” Kyungmoon Kim (CIA, Master Sommelier): “Salt salt salt!” In short: salt. If you ever wonder why restaurant dishes feel so much more impactful than that which you make at home, it’s the fearlessness with which chefs approach the seasoning process. (PSA: not everyone responds the same way to sodium, so don’t necessarily let the USDA scare you into submission.)

Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt, $8.73 on AmazonThe 3-pound box that sits on almost every chef's shelf.
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Season each component individually. Salt the liquid you’re cooking in. Finish with a little more salt if it isn’t quite popping. And as a close second in terms of encouragement:

4. TASTE

Jason Hopple (Pennsylvania College of Technology, Prestige LeDroit Imports) “Don’t be afraid to season to taste. Most people don’t taste or add enough.” Travis Pranke (CIA, Eleven Madison Park): “Taste taste taste.” This also harkens back to point number two: Recipes are just guidelines. You need to taste, and—write this one down—ADJUST. If you think something needs more salt, add it. If it needs more acid, add it. If it’s too acidic, balance it out with some more richness. If it’s not done, cook it a little more. Don’t simply settle for “but that’s what the recipe said…” Not all ingredients, tools, and equipment are made equal. Learn to trust your senses more than the recipe.

Chowhound’s Classic Tomato Soup

5. Use Your Tools, Correctly

Dmitriy Karpunin (Corporate Sous Chef at Lazard): “Get yourself a good chef’s knife, paring knife, and bread knife. With good knives come good skills.” Chris Wegan (CIA): “Good cutting board.” BJ Evans, (Wellshire Farms): “Buy a thermometer.” This isn’t to say that outfitting yourself with all the latest gadgets will make you an excellent cook, but having a good, basic set of knives and everyday kitchen tools will ensure that you can use your creativity for flavor rather than process.

The verb “whisk” should invariably involve an actual whisk. Certain things require a serrated knife, often called a bread knife, to be sliced appropriately, i.e. bread. (And tomatoes, unless you have a razor sharp chef’s knife.)

Chowhound’s Heirloom Tomato Toast

If a particular cut of meat should be cooked to 140 degrees, there is a magical way (read: thermometer) to determine when that is without guessing. Cooking should utilize some intuition, but absolutely needn’t be haphazard, and having the correct tools at hand, used appropriately, can guide you.

J.A. Henckels International Statement 7-Piece Self-Sharpening Knife Block Set, $99.95 on AmazonEvery knife you need, and they sharpen themselves.
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6. Stay Organized

David Watsky (Chowhound editor extraordinaire): “Prepare as much as you can before you begin a recipe.” Carol Elwood (home cook extraordinaire): “Read through the entire recipe before starting.” Chris Wegan (CIA): “Stay organized.” Time management is one of the hardest things to learn in the process of learning cooking until you have established good habits. Meanwhile, set yourself up for success by being ready to begin the entire process so that you don’t find yourself in a (literal) high heat moment unprepared for the next step.

Related Reading: The Best Cookbooks for Beginners

7. Brown Onions, Not Garlic

This one’s from me. Onions get sweeter as they get brown. Garlic gets bitter. Be suspicious of recipes that call for onions and minced garlic added at the same step. Garlic should go later, and even better, added as whole cloves that will infuse your dishes with the sweet perfume of garlic, but that will get removed before you serve a dish. Trust me on this one. Separate the sweet from the bitter? In the kitchen as in life.

Chowhound’s Caramelized Onions

8. Make Mistakes and Learn From Them

Desiree Tuttle (Le Cordon Bleu, Achilles Heel): “It’s never too late to start over. Have humility.” Alan Wither (Le Cordon Bleu, The Modern): “You would be a fool to think that the highest rated chefs in the world never made a mistake. What’s important is learning from those mistakes and pressing forward.” Daniel Ford (CIA, Peppercorn Events): “Cooking takes practice. It’s more a craft than an art.” If you want to get good at this, even in the privacy of your own home, commit the time. Be willing to take risks. Apply the lessons you learn. Go a little out of your comfort zone. Do your dishes tonight and show up again tomorrow.

Josey Baker’s Skillet Pizza

9. Have Patience

Emily Isaac (French Culinary Institute): “Let it rest.” This is both a literal and a metaphorical tidbit. Cooked meats should rest before slicing. Pastries should cool for a moment in the pan before removal. You should forgive yourself for today’s transgressions and approach tomorrow with a fresh outlook.

10. Have Fun

Daniela Traina (CIA, The Modern): “MORE BUTTER.” I mean, it’s never the wrong answer.

Related Reading: 12 Cooking Tips From Moms We Should’ve Listened to Ages Ago

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Low-alcohol and non-alcoholic cocktails continue to pop up on cocktail menus, but if you’re a host or homebody looking to cut the booze down or completely out of your cocktail routine, you’ll need to build a functional non-alcoholic or low-alcoholic home bar.

I spoke with Davide Segat, Director of Bars for the Edition Hotels about the subject. Segat notes that options for non-drinkers used to just be water, overly-sugary soft drinks, or juice, the latter two of which often contain tons of acidity and just fill you up, and are not ideal for having more than one. All of this made him conscious of people who don’t drink and the “very limited” offerings available to them. The non-alcoholic cocktail was eventually born but relegated to a “simple recipe without much thought.” Thankfully some important people paid attention, and now, according to Segat, “everything has changed.” We can have good non-alcoholic drinks on any given night out and even at home.

There are some amazing and truly innovative new non-alcoholic and low-alcoholic products on the market to help one build a zero-proof or low-alcohol home bar without the booze. From spirits to bitters, bar tools, bar carts, and books, here are some essentials to get started.

Spirits Seedlip Garden 108, $37.50 on Amazon

Amazon

“This brilliant company took away fermentation and made a distilled spirit that works as sort of a gin,” says Segat. Seedlip was crafted specifically for a non-alcohol imbiber. The non-alcoholic line of botanical spirit has three distinct flavor profiles (aromatic, citrus, and herbal) but most versatile is the Garden 108, with delicate notes of peas, hay, spearmint, rosemary, and thyme, which pairs nicely with tonic water, citrus, or perhaps even tea.Buy Now

Keel Premium Light Vodka (price and availability varies)

Keel Vodka

This is a new low-alcohol, gluten-free vodka made in Newport, Rhode Island. At just 50 proof and 58 calories per serving, Keel is a nice smooth option for cutting the booze down on your favorite vodka-based cocktail like a Cosmopolitan or Moscow Mule. Check to see if it’s stocked at a liquor store near you.

Bitters

Bitters are essential for any bar but especially a non-alcoholic or low-alcohol version. You can think of them like seasonings. They generally (technically) have some alcohol so if you’re going full n/a, look for one that bills itself as such. Otherwise, keep a bottle of classic Angostura bitters on hand to build cocktails in addition to some more nuanced flavors.

Woodford Reserve Bitters Bundle: Bourbon, Spiced Cherry, Orange, & Chocolate, $34.85 on Amazon

Amazon

These options from Woodford Reserve bring notes of spices, cherries, chocolate, and orange, and are all aged in bourbon barrels.Buy Now

Aperitifs

Aperitifs add more body and structure to a cocktail than bitters. Segat says to “think of them like secondary ingredients after the base spirit.” They carry all sorts of flavors like rich fruit, dry citrus, smokiness, cherrywood, clove, spice, and nuttiness.

Dolin Vermouth Rouge on Saucey (price and availability varies)

Saucey

For Drew Lazor, author of “Session Cocktails,” vermouth is key. “We’re quick to think of it as nothing more than an adjunct in a martini or Manhattan when it can just as easily be the star of a drink. Look at historic drinks like the Bamboo (dry vermouth, fino sherry, bitters) and Old Hickory (sweet and dry vermouths, bitters). There are some really cool American-made vermouths on the market nowadays, but I still think the best place to start is with a French brand like Dolin, whose dry, sweet, and blanc vermouths deliver excellent quality at a fair price point. Just don’t forget to refrigerate your vermouths and use them as quickly as possible!Buy Now

Session Cocktails: Low-Alcohol Drinks for Any OccasionFor recipe ideas, Drew Lazor wrote the book on low-alcohol cocktails.
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Æcorn Aperitifs, $22 at Æcorn

Æcorn

English brand Æcorn also makes a line of non-alcoholic aperitifs distilled from grapes that Segat swears by and stocks at his bars and restaurants for the Edition brand.Buy Now

Mixers Llanllyr Source Tonic & Soda Waters, 12 bottles for $56.90 on Amazon

Amazon

Once you have a good n/a spirit selection you need some good mixers. Edition Hotels proudly serves the range of Llanllyr SOURCE mixers at their bars including tonics, soda waters, ginger beers, sodas, and more. “With the full range of their products and lots of fresh fruit (namely citrus) you have everything you need to make amazing drinks at home.”Buy Now

Fever Tree Ginger Beer, 4 bottles for $15.34 on Amazon

Amazon

Another robust bar ingredient well-suited for a low- or non-alcoholic cocktail. Mix in some floral Seedlip or low-alcohol vodka for a spicy, refreshing, pseudo-adult beverage.Buy Now

Bloody Revolution Bloody Mary Mix, $11.01 on Amazon

Bloody Revolution/Facebook

Bloody Mary mix is a great choice for the non-boozy adult beverage but is something you shouldn’t cheap out on. The bad ones are bad and if you see a lot of artificial ingredients or cheap sweeteners like corn syrup, put it gently back on the shelf. Bloody Revolution in Austin is a good one to have on hand, if not a bit spicy, and comes in flavors like pickle and habanero. Or make your ownBuy Now

Bar Tools Crafthouse by Fortessa Bar Tool Set, $90 on Sur la Table

Sur la Table

Of course, you’ll need a handsome cocktail shaker but for an advanced garnish game, consider this stunning kit with sturdy walnut bar board, stainless steel knife, and sleek peelers for perfect citrus twists.Buy Now

Read More: Check out our glassware buying guide to stock your bar with the classiest cocktail vessels around.

Bars & Bar Carts Creative Co-Op 2-Tier Bar Cart, $349 on Sur la Table

Sur la Table

Alcohol or not, this bar cart is both a functional and stunning addition to your living or dining room. Vintage-inspired with a burnished gold finish, the rolling, two-tiered cart has enough space for your bottles, mixers, tools, and anything else. It can be easily moved to follow the party but also locked in place for stability.Buy Now

Linon Mid-Century Bar Cart, $98.10 on Amazon

Amazon

This slightly more cost-effective mid-century model also has the space you need to create great cocktails and store all your goods, with glass shelves for easy cleanup.Buy Now

Read More: The Best Amazon Cocktail Sets for Your Home Bar

All featured products are curated independently by our editors. When you buy something through our retail links, we may receive a commission. For more great hand-picked products, check out the Chowhound Shop.

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Augmented reality aims to make buying wine, cider, beer, and other booze easier, more informative, and more fun—but it has to go beyond the gimmick.

Have you ever found yourself in a wine store trying to project an air of knowledgeable confidence that you know just the thing you’re looking for but secretly relying on a sophisticated process of seeking out the second-least expensive selection with the pithiest name or catchiest label design? Have you ever wanted to understand a little more about a wine you are considering buying without having to admit to a live person that you understand very little about the wine you are considering buying? Do you sometimes wish there was just one more X factor that helped you make an educated decision about what to take home?

This purchase anxiety is just one element of the beverage buying experience that Augmented Reality (AR)—the latest trend in beverage marketing specifically aimed at capturing the attention of the Millennial consumer—aims to tackle.

Out the Bottle

Interactive Experiences

“Right now it’s still kind of a gimmick,” says Jason Grossman, founder of the augmented reality app Out The Bottle, “but down the road I believe it will be one of the most important marketing tools anyone can have.”

While it may sound like a hallucinatory experience or a way in which you might actually enter the matrix, augmented reality is really just a lighter version of virtual reality. Think Pokémon Go—virtual technology superimposed over actual reality. Rather than transport you into a scene, the scene is brought to you by way of label recognition technology that prompts an interactive experience once you pass your smartphone (loaded with the app) over the beverage label. This could be a video from the winemaker, scenes from the vineyard or winery, historical context about the name of the wine or beverage, or even food pairing suggestions.

“It’s a way to tell the story to the consumer with very little effort,” adds Grossman, who is based in the heart of California wine country and whose app is primarily at work for small to medium sized wineries without a juggernaut name or marketing division; California brands such as Mazzoco and Haraszthy Family Cellars.

Stories Drive Sales

Evidence that story is indeed important: beverage companies began to sit up straight and take note of augmented reality after the success of Australian wine label 19 Crimes, which saw sales increase by nearly ten-fold after the launch of AR labels that merely told the story of each of the convicts-turned-colonists depicted on the brand’s bottles.

Angry Orchard followed suit with its own app called Angry Orchard Cider and Food, which provides appetizer, entrée, and dessert recommendations for all four of its ciders.

Out The Bottle provides the ability for companies to establish AR opportunities in a centralized app, rather than trying to get the desired Millennial consumer to load a different app for each brand. The model features a 15-second intro after the app connects with the label, which could feature a welcome from the winemaker or an animation—Grossman acknowledges the importance of having this first part be brief—after which the app loads three buttons for additional engagement. These could be prompts for tasting notes, info on how to join the wine club, availability maps, etc. Getting consumers to engage at this level is key, says Grossman: “Now you’ve gone past the gimmick.”

The Future of Food?How Virtual & Augmented Reality Could Change EverythingWineries were potential early adopters for this sort of marketing technology for several reasons, believes Grossman: “Wine is a very crowded segment of any market,” with a tremendous amount of choice among a comparatively wide price point. Plus, “wine people tend to be a little more educated and more interested in the product.” Wineries also have a huge challenge in connecting with consumers, in that they have to go through distributors first, and AR also provides a more personalized opportunity to connect, perhaps even in a creative or whimsical way. And Grossman notes that some of his brands are using their AR platforms even as a way for sales reps to connect with distributors or retailers, with a method that is more interactive and less materials-intensive than passing out catalogues or tasting sheets.

“I’m not a computer geek, just a visionary,” says Grossman, who believes that augmented reality marketing models will become as ubiquitous as bar codes. “If you don’t have it you’ve missed the boat.”

Read More: The Best Wine Clubs & Subscriptions
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Unless you’re imbibing at happy hour or drowning your sorrows at the local dive, finding a cocktail for less than a Hamilton has become a virtual unicorn. Then, of course, there’s the exorbitant moustache wax and suspenders tax that’s levied for the privilege of being jammed into a so-trendy-it-hurts “speakeasy.” A hangover is painful enough; there’s no need to further the suffering by waking up to an empty wallet. Well, here’s a simple remedy: Mix things up at home. Thanks to the help of these trusty cocktail guides, you can learn the skills to prepare high quality libations without having to leave the house.

“Meehan’s Bartender Manual” by Jim Meehan, $22.35 on Amazon

Amazon

Whether you’re a cocktail newbie or experienced mixologist, Jim Meehan’s James Beard Award winning guide to all things booze is a must-own, covering everything from recipes, types of glassware, and assorted tricks of the trade. “Meehan’s Bartender’s Manual” offers a glimpse into the mind of the celebrated Gramercy Tavern and Pegu Club vet along with additional insight into what it takes to be your best behind the bar from over 50 of his colleagues.Buy Now

“The Ultimate Bar Book: The Comprehensive Guide to Over 1,000 Cocktails” by Mittie Hellmich, $12.94 on Amazon

Amazon

A veritable Encyclopedia Bar-tanica, “The Ultimate Bar Book” certainly lives up to its name. Whether you’re in need in of a recipe for a cocktail classic or a deep cut libation, Millie Hellmich’s essential compendium has got you covered. There’s even a section for hangover remedies which are sure to come in handy if you plan to take full advantage of this expansive guide.Buy Now

“Batch Cocktails: Make-Ahead Pitcher Drinks for Every Occasion” by Maggie Hoffman, $13.51 on Amazon

Amazon

If you’re planning on hosting a get-together, be it a boozy brunch, casual shindig, or an Ina Garten-approved Hamptons soiree, this book will be a life saver. “Batch Cocktails” includes 65 recipes for large-format, make-ahead mixed drinks (including non-alcoholic options) that are sure to satisfy your guests and, more importantly, save you plenty of time behind the bar.Buy Now

“Tiki: Modern Tropical Cocktails” by Shannon Mustipher, $19.46 on Amazon

Amazon

Rum expert Shannon Mustipher is helping usher in a new generation of Traders and Beachcombers with his refreshing take on tiki drinks. Moving beyond popular classics like the Zombie and Pain Killer, Mustipher offers an easy-to-follow guide to preparing unfamiliar—though instantly unforgettable—tropical libations with an emphasis on high quality ingredients.Buy Now

“Liquid Intelligence: The Art and Science of the Perfect Cocktail” by Dave Arnold, $23.79 on Amazon

Amazon

Dave Arnold, the maverick mixologist behind New York City bar sensations Existing Conditions and Booker & Dax, breaks down the components of the “perfect cocktail,” examining not just what is used but why. Arnold’s culinary expertise comes in handy as he delves into the complexities of something as seemingly basic as ice along with the science of some of the more advanced techniques utilized in new wave cocktail preparation.Buy Now

“The Waldorf Astoria Bar Book” by Frank Caiafa, $13.74 on Amazon

Amazon

Old-timey cocktails continue to be all the rage and this collection of recipes culled from the archives of New York’s famed Waldorf Astoria hotel hearkens back to those legendary pre-Prohibition days. From swizzles and shrubs, absinthe cocktails to whiskey and tansy (prepared with the leaves of the toxic flower), “The Waldorf Astoria Bar Book” takes readers on a nostalgic trip back a century, shining a light on throwback adult beverages that go beyond the martini and Manhattan.Buy Now

“Imbibe!” by David Wondrich, $19.95 on Amazon

Amazon

Chronicling the utterly fascinating and equally bizarre life of trailblazing 19th century bartender Jerry Thomas, David Wondrich offers the perfect blend of cocktail history and recipes. If you have a thirst for knowledge when it comes to the roots of our modern cocktail culture “Imbibe!” offers a thorough education.Buy Now

All featured products are curated independently by our editors. When you buy something through our retail links, we may receive a commission. For more great hand-picked products, check out the Chowhound Shop.

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Some dads love their coffee almost as much as their children. Whether they’re sipping a morning latte or evening espresso, these guys are never without a cup of joe. In honor of Father’s Day, we pulled together some gifts that appeal to coffee-loving dads everywhere. Whether it’s a high-tech gadget or a pun-filled mug, these items are sure to please the pickiest drinkers of them all.

Bourbon Infused Coffee, $20 at Uncommon Goods

Uncommon Goods

Here’s the perfect gift for the dad who is equally obsessed with booze as they are with coffee. These beans are infused with bourbon so you can have a taste of Kentucky’s best spirit alongside your breakfast.Buy Now

Related Reading: The Best Gifts for Booze-Loving Dads

Zulay Milk Frother, $14.99 on Amazon

Amazon

With this handy milk frother, dad can create the lattes of his dreams. This comes with a lifetime warranty, which your dad is also sure to approve of.Buy Now

Dad Joke Coffee Mug, $15.95 on Amazon

Amazon

If your dad is running low on jokes, this mug is here to supply him with a lifetime of cheesy puns, including this classic: Why did the coffee file a police report? It got mugged! Just pretend to laugh the next time you pour him a cup.Buy Now

Drift Away Coffee Subscription (price and plans vary)

Amazon

There are a lot of coffee subscription services on the market, but what we appreciate about Drift Away is that it provides customized orders based on your taste preferences. It’s the perfect way to ensure dad gets his favorite roast without doing any guesswork.Buy Now

Steampunk Coffee Grinder, $65 at Uncommon Goods

Uncommon Goods

This old-timey coffee grinder is the perfect way for dad to crank up his morning routine; highly recommended for steampunk obsessives everywhere.Buy Now

Coffee Bell, $7.98 on Amazon

Amazon

Depending on your living situation, this could make for a dangerous present. After all, gifting dad a bell that explicitly says “ring for coffee” means he will definitely take advantage of that offer. Better get used to a lot of ding-ding-dinging!Buy Now

French Press Coffee Maker, $25 on Amazon

Amazon

This shiny, stainless steel French press is a great way to make a strong morning brew and a great entry level model if you think dad’s likely to go back to his cheap drip coffee maker at some point.Buy Now

Pop Chart Espresso Poster, $30 on Amazon

Amazon

This poster is not only aesthetically pleasing, but incredibly practical. It features loads of recipes and ratios for all your favorite coffee drinks. Dad will never forget the difference between an Americano and a flat white again when this work of art is hanging in his office.Buy Now

Mug Warmer, $18.99 on Amazon

Amazon

Dad can keep his coffee nice and hot, instead of gross and lukewarm, with this hot plate. Now he can continue to sip at a long and leisurely pace without fear of the temperature dropping at all.Buy Now

Coffee Puzzle, $17.94 on Amazon

Amazon

With 1,000 pieces, this jigsaw puzzle will keep dad busy for days. While he attempts to put it together, he’ll also probably regale you with stories about coffee companies that no longer exist. Those were the good old days.Buy Now

Mini Espresso Maker, $40.49 on Amazon

Amazon

This mini espresso maker is a portable gift from the gods. Now dad can never go without a well-needed shot of caffeine to help him through the day.Buy Now

Thirsty for more? Check out 12 Coffee Products You Never Knew You Needed, and see CNET’s Best Coffee Grinders.

All featured products are curated independently by our editors. When you buy something through our retail links, we may receive a commission. For more great hand-picked products, check out the Chowhound Shop.

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Beans, coleslaw, and potato salad are the champions of the barbecue side dish world. But if you already have your grill a-blazin’, why not use it to turn out some charred, flavorful vegetable sides too? Half the work will be done for you flavor-wise thanks to the magic of the open flame, so you can stick to basic seasonings like a few herbs or a crumble of feta. These recipes are fast, easy, and can hold their own next to any grilled beef, pork, lamb, or chicken dish.

Sur la Table SaleGreat Deals on BBQ ToolsOf course, grilled veggies can also form the satisfying main course for a vegetarian BBQ (or sidle up to veggie burgers as easily as they would to any meaty option). Basically, these are easy recipes that everyone at your next backyard barbecue will love.

So get some general grilling tips if you’re not already a certified pro, check out our grilling recipes for ideas on what to pair with your sides, and take your pick of the grilled vegetables below.

Oh, and don’t forget about grilled dessert.

1. Grilled Corn with Soy Sauce and Mirin

Chowhound

Grilled corn on the cob is classic, but switch it up a bit with soy and mirin instead of plain old butter and salt. These flavors pair really well with ribs, especially if they have an Asian-inspired sauce on them, but even regular old BBQ sauce will be in harmony. Get our Grilled Corn with Soy Sauce and Mirin recipe.

2. Grilled Padrón Peppers

Chowhound

Eating Spanish padrón peppers is a game of chance: while most of the peppers are fairly mild and sweet, some are super spicy—but you won’t know which ones until you bite into them. The smoky layer of flavor they get from the grill is delicious either way. Get our Grilled Padrón Peppers recipe. (And try our Grilled Shishito Peppers recipe too.)

3. Grilled Eggplant and Red Pepper with Israeli Couscous

Chowhound

Pleasantly chewy Israeli couscous plus sweet, tender, charred pieces of pepper and eggplant, and a dressing with tahini and garlic adds up to a delicious side salad you could happily eat on its own for lunch (but pairs wonderfully with Oregano Grilled Chicken or Lamb Kebabs). Get our Grilled Eggplant and Red Pepper with Israeli Couscous recipe.

4. Grilled Summer Squash with Feta and Mint

Chowhound

Blistered summer squash perked up with salty feta and herbal mint is a simple yet stunning combo. A little olive oil, lemon juice, salt, and pepper is all the dressing it needs. Get our Grilled Summer Squash with Feta and Mint recipe. (For a sweeter spin, try our Grilled Watermelon, Feta, and Mint Salad recipe too.)

5. Grilled Greek Salad

Chowhound

You needn’t stick to the usual vegetable suspects when it comes to the grill; try grilling romaine too. It’s great as the base of a smoky salad, like this deconstructed Greek salad on a stick (well, everything but the lettuce is on a stick, including the grilled halloumi cheese). Get our Grilled Greek Salad recipe.

6. Grilled Sweet Potatoes with Sour Cream and Lime

Chowhound

Smoky grilled sweet potato wedges are a fresh alternative to fries, perfect for all your backyard burgers (and good with grilled fish too, especially salmon). The lime and cilantro-spiked sour cream is a fabulous dipping sauce, but try these with curried ketchup, tzatziki, or whatever goes best with your main course flavors. Get our Grilled Sweet Potatoes with Sour Cream and Lime recipe.

7. Grilled Okra

Chowhound

You may think you don’t like okra, but we suggest trying it grilled before passing final judgment. The smoky char lends delicious flavor, naturally, but the quick, high-heat cooking method also means there’s no slimy texture—just crisp-tender green veg, with a lemony basil dipping sauce on the side (but you could also toss the okra in a little Cajun seasoning instead). Get our Grilled Okra recipe.

See our Ultimate Guide to Grilling & BBQ for more recipes, tips, and tricks.
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