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A few weeks ago, I stood in my bathroom, casually contemplating what mascara to wear that day. I have several options in rotation; there’s the eye-opening full volume mascara (which I’m convinced makes me look less tired), the waterproof one (I think it was drizzling outside, so I was tabling that option), my classic brown-black for when I go au natural-ish…

But as I surveyed my stash—and the surrounding mountains of makeup and skincare on the counter—a wave of eco-anxiety washed over me. Perhaps all of this was a little much? Suddenly, all those great products looked more like a massive pile of would-be beauty trash. At first, I felt a bit sick. Then, I was inspired to do something about it. As an experiment, I decided to go zero-waste for an entire month. And yes, it was about as difficult as it sounds.

It’s time to #breakupwithplastic

If you’ve ever seen the image of a seahorse clutching a used cotton swab by wildlife photographer Justin Hofman, you know where I’m going with this. Our oceans are living—or more to the point, dying—proof: Disposable beauty consumption is out of control.

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It’s a photo that I wish didn’t exist but now that it does I want everyone to see it. What started as an opportunity to photograph a cute little sea horse turned into one of frustration and sadness as the incoming tide brought with it countless pieces of trash and sewage. This sea horse drifts long with the trash day in and day out as it rides the currents that flow along the Indonesian archipelago. This photo serves as an allegory for the current and future state of our oceans. What sort of future are we creating? How can your actions shape our planet?
.
thanks to @eyosexpeditions for getting me there and to @nhm_wpy and @sea_legacy for getting this photo in front of as many eyes as possible. Go to @sea_legacy to see how you can make a difference. . #plastic #seahorse #wpy53 #wildlifephotography #conservation @nhm_wpy @noaadebris #switchthestick

A post shared by Justin Hofman (@justinhofman) on Sep 12, 2017 at 8:28am PDT


“By 2050 we’re going to see more plastic in the ocean than fish [by weight],” says Kelsey Scarfone, water programs manager at Environmental Defence Canada, a national non-profit eco advocacy agency. Need a frightening factoid that hits a little closer to home? “Even in the Great Lakes we’re seeing the same level of plastics,” she says.

And we’re not exaggerating when we say that the consequences are dire. According to Scarfone, “when plastics break down the problem becomes even more insidious—we’re now seeing microplastics in our food supply.” Sure, plastics from personal care products account for just part of the problem, but all of those bottles, tubs and tubes do add up.

Recycling isn’t as effective as you think

If you think all that plastic is getting recycled just because you toss it in your blue bin, you’re fooling yourself. All told, only 11 percent of our plastic waste in Canada is successfully making its way through the recycling system. This is due to recycling program inefficiencies, poor consumer compliance—meaning people aren’t rinsing out their containers first, or throwing them in the recycling bin at all—and plastics that simply aren’t recyclable in the first place.

That last one is a huge problem. Yes, the technology may exist to recycle these plastics somewhere, but there’s no guarantee that your municipality’s curbside recycling program can accept them. For example, the City of Toronto can’t accept black takeout containers because they’re the same colour as the conveyer belt at the sorting plant, which makes it difficult for the plant’s technology to “see” them.

And here’s where it gets even more confusing. There are two types of recycling symbols: Resin identification codes have three flat arrows and a number in the middle, while Mobius loops have three twisted arrows and no number. It’s very easy to mistake a resin identification code for the recycling symbol, but these codes only indicate the type of plastic—they don’t necessarily mean it’s recyclable. Environmental Defense is currently lobbying for a national strategy to make the system easier to understand and stop so much plastic from ending up in landfill or the environment. (You can help by signing their petition.)

My new approach: Reduce, refill, and yes, recycle

I begin my mission by Marie Kondo-ing the heck out of my beauty counter. Everything that’s in a plastic or no-good landfill-destined container is shelved for the month. (For the record, I will use them up later. It would be pretty silly to toss a perfectly good, albeit plastic-clad, hair mask in the name of waste reduction.)

Next, I survey the survivors. I’m able to pardon a few of my favourites that have recently become fully recyclable thanks to deals with TerraCycle, a U.S. company that specializes in dealing with hard-to-recycle waste. The plastic packaging for both Eos lip balms and Weleda Skin Food products can now be mailed to TerraCycle for free (you just have to sign up online for a postage-paid envelope). I can return my tube of L’Occitane en Provence hand cream and Province Apothecary toner, including the spray pumps, to their respective stores to be taken care of. And, mercifully, a few of the natural skincare brands I love come in recyclable glass bottles, so my serums are safe.

But recycling is only part of the solution. The next frontier in the sustainable packaging story is bulk beauty. I buy a box of glass bottles with stainless steel pumps on Amazon and take them into eco+amour, a sustainable living boutique in Toronto’s east end. “I’d say that half of our customers come in carrying a kit with Mason jars and a definite plan,” says co-owner Sarah Marcus, who is also co-founder of local natural beauty brand Lines of Elan. Though the shop sells beautiful glass bottles you can fill with bulk shampoo, conditioner, body wash and more, they also keep a stash of sterilized jars behind the counter, which customers can borrow. “A lot of customers leave with a refill even though they didn’t come in with anything,” says Marcus. And as it turns out, buying in bulk isn’t just good for the environment; it’s also cheaper. You save between $2 and $5 on most of the refill products they carry.

Living that sustainable life is not without challenges

There’s definitely some beauty behaviour modification required to make this zero-waste ethos work, and it doesn’t end at refillable jars. It’s going to take some extra effort to mail back my empty face creams and lip balms to TerraCycle, for example. And I miss single-use makeup wipes.

But face, body and hair care were relatively easy changes to make, and this new focus on packaging has lead me to some incredible discoveries: For one, I’ve swapped my old Sunday self-care sheet masking routine for a powder mask (Odacité Synergie Masque) and am loving my new glow. When the bottle is empty I can toss it in the blue bin—or upcycle it into a flower vase, suggests Laura Townsend, marketing director for The Detox Market, which sells this and many more sustainably packaged beauty products. “The Miron glass is so stunning, we use these as flower pots at home,” she says.

The *real* challenge turned out to be makeup. The options aren’t exactly abundant when it comes to even near zero-waste cosmetics, and that’s especially true for people with darker skin or complexion challenges. Elate Cosmetics, for example, has one of the largest sustainably packaged lines—its products come in compostable bamboo compacts and refills are wrapped in seed paper—and they still only have eight shades of foundation (which claim to cover up to 16 skin tones). I can probably do with fewer makeup options, to be honest. (Four weeks ago I counted 18 tubes of lipstick and gloss in my makeup mountain… and I almost always wear some variation of nude, anyway.) But that is certainly not the case for women of colour, as Fenty Beauty has proven.

My favourite zero-waste beauty discoveries

Over the course of the past month I’ve slowly curated what you might call a cosmetics capsule collection. It’s everything I need, and nothing more. My new makeup tray generates less waste, leaves more space on my bathroom counter and probably saves me time every morning—I no longer debate which mascara to wear, because there’s only one. (It’s Kjaer Weis lengthening mascara, BTW. It comes in the sleekest refillable stainless steel tube and wears as well as my old favourites.) And yes MK, this new routine is sparking major joy.

Find five of my fave zero-waste products in the gallery below.

Gallery

Zero-waste Makeup
Hynt Beauty Duet Perfecting Concealer

The post I Went Zero Waste With My Beauty Routine For One Month appeared first on Chatelaine.

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The post Newsletter Signup (Daily + Food AB) appeared first on Chatelaine.

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What are varicose veins? Healthy veins do one job: move blood back to the heart for reoxygenation. But when the one-way valves that carry out this task become faulty (what’s called chronic venous insufficiency), blood can flow backward and pool in veins—rendering them progressively more swollen, or varicosed. Varicose veins tend to develop in people over 50, after pregnancy, in the obese, if you have a genetic disposition or an occupation that requires long periods of standing. Is it possible to prevent them? Short answer: not if you’re predisposed. “If one parent has varicose veins, you have close to a 50 percent chance of getting them. If both parents have them, you have a 98 percent chance,” says Alexander Matz, a general surgeon and founder of Canada Vein Clinics, which has locations in three provinces. “I don’t believe you can completely prevent them—but you can delay them.” Steps you can take include exercising, keeping body weight in check and wearing compression socks. What’s the difference between varicose and spider veins? Varicose veins bulge from the skin, and are visibly enlarged, lumpy and twisted, while spider veins resemble a tangle of thin, flat lines. Despite distinct appearances, the two conditions sometimes share a common cause: chronic venous insufficiency. Superficial spider veins tend not to cause the same discomfort as full-on varicose veins. Liquid sclerotherapy is the most common treatment to make spider veins disappear. What are the health risks of varicose veins? Varicose veins will worsen if untreated—and the complications can be severe. They can rupture and bleed, and lead to skin ulcers and blood clots. Deep vein thrombosis, a clot that can break loose and cause a pulmonary embolism, can be fatal. What are the treatment options for varicose veins? Procedures for varicose veins have similarly high success rates (around 90 percent or greater), but the most suitable treatment will depend on the size of your problem veins and your pattern of blood flow. “There’s no ‘one size fits all,’” says John Chung, an interventional radiologist and medical director at EVA Vein Care in Vancouver. “Mid- to late-stage chronic venous disease may require multiple types of treatment.” Expect to undergo an assessment, typically involving an ultrasound exam and/or other imaging. Here are the five most common treatment options. 1. Vein ligation and stripping This is an old-school treatment and not as popular as new, minimally invasive procedures. A vascular surgeon will make an incision in the leg, find the abnormal veins, tie off any branches and pull the abnormal veins out of the legs. Although very invasive, it’s considered minor surgery and done under anesthesia in hospital; most patients return home the same day.
Risks: bruising, scarring, pain, nerve injury, longer recovery time (usually two weeks). Typical cost: Usually covered by provincial insurance, if patients have two or more symptoms of serious varicose veins. 2. Sclerotherapy Spider veins and small varicose veins can be injected with liquid sclerotherapy. A sclerosant, a detergent-type material, causes the inner lining of the veins to scar shut. For larger veins, sclerotherapy can be done with a foam agent, though many clinics won’t offer this approach because the foam can travel unexpectedly and increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes to patients. Depending on how many veins require treatment, the procedure can take five to 30 minutes. Risks: bruising, scarring, allergic reaction. Skin discolouration, or post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation is the most common side effect and can take up to a year to fade (in rare cases, it may be permanent). Typical cost: $300 per session; more than one may be needed. 3. Radiofrequency ablation Radiofrequency energy, directed into the varicose vein via a thin catheter, is used to heat up and cause damage to the vein walls. This prompts scar tissue that closes off the diseased vein. The procedure usually takes under an hour. Risks: skin burns, nerve damage. Typical cost: $2,500-plus. 4. Endovenous laser treatment This technique is similar to RFA, except that laser energy is used to heat up and prompt scarring in the vein. A tiny laser fiber is inserted directly into the vein through a thin catheter, and the procedure, typically done in clinics, is usually over in under an hour. Risks: skin burns from the laser, skin discolouration, nerve damage. Typical cost: $3,000-plus. 5. VenaSeal A newer treatment option, it was only approved by Health Canada in 2014. After a numbing medicine is applied, a small catheter is inserted and guided along the varicose vein via ultrasound. A medical-grade adhesive is then very slowly injected into the vein while it’s pressed together at the same time, continuing until the length of the vein has been treated. The process, about 40 minutes long, shuts it immediately. Risks: The most common side effect is an allergic reaction to the adhesive, but this is treatable with over-the-counter allergy medications. Phlebitis (vein inflammation). Typical cost: $4,500-plus

The post Everything You Need To Know About Varicose Veins, Spider Veins And Vein Treatments appeared first on Chatelaine.

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It’s summer! Yes, that’s right. We finally made it to the season of patio hopping, beach days and soaking up that vitamin D (with SPF of course) like it’s our day job. After days filled with warm-weather excursions, settle in for summer evenings filled with any of the brand spankin’ new TV shows and movies blessing our Netflix queue this month. Sit back, relax and enjoy our round-up of everything coming (like a new season of Black Mirror and star-studded comedy Murder Mystery with Jennifer Aniston and Adam Sandler) and going (like early aughts classics American Pie and Wedding Crashers) to Netflix Canada this June.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada in June Marvel’s Jessica Jones, Season 3 (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: When Jessica (Krysten Ritter) crosses paths with a highly intelligent psychopath, she and Trish (Rachael Taylor) must repair their fractured relationship and team up to take him down. But a devastating loss reveals their conflicting ideas of heroism, and sets them on a collision course that will forever change them both.

Trinkets (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: When three teenage girls from different corners of the high school cafeteria find themselves in the same mandated Shoplifter’s Anonymous meeting, an unlikely friendship forms. Elodie, the grieving misfit, Moe, the mysterious outsider and Tabitha, the imperfect picture of perfection, will find strength in each other as they negotiate family issues, high school drama and the complicated dilemma of trying to fit in while longing to break out.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 1 Arthdal Chronicles (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: In a mythical land called Arth, the inhabitants of the ancient city of Arthdal and its surrounding regions vie for power as they build a new society.

Oh, Ramona! (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: Awkward 16-year-old Andrei is infatuated with his alluring but aloof schoolmate Ramona—until he meets stunning hotel clerk Anemona while on vacation.

A Dog’s Purpose

Synopsis: A dog looks to discover his purpose in life over the course of several lifetimes and owners.

Marvels’ Jessica Jones, Season 3 (Photo, Netflix Canada) Alien: Covenant

Synopsis: The crew of a colony ship, bound for a remote planet, discover an uncharted paradise with a threat beyond their imagination and must attempt a harrowing escape.

Anohana: The Flower We Saw That Day

Synopsis: Six childhood friends have grown apart over the years following the death of one of them, Menma.

Apocalypse Now

Synopsis: A U.S. Army officer serving in Vietnam is tasked with assassinating a renegade Special Forces Colonel who sees himself as a god.

Homefront

Synopsis: A former DEA agent moves his family to a quiet town, where he soon tangles with a local meth drug lord.

Inception

Synopsis: A thief who steals corporate secrets through the use of dream-sharing technology is given the inverse task of planting an idea into the mind of a CEO.

The Chef Show (Photo, Netflix Canada) Jurassic Park

Synopsis: During a preview tour, a theme park suffers a major power breakdown that allows its cloned dinosaur exhibits to run amok.

Jurassic Park III

Synopsis: A decidedly odd couple with ulterior motives convince Dr. Grant to go to Isla Sorna, resulting in an unexpected landing and startling new inhabitants on the island.

The Lost World: Jurassic Park

Synopsis: A research team is sent to the Jurassic Park Site B island to study the dinosaurs there, while an InGen team approaches with another agenda.

Life in the Doghouse

Synopsis: The documentary follows the inspiring stories of Danny and Ron’s Rescue. The film showcases their unique approach to dog rescue and adoption, which has enabled them to rescue and adopt out 10,000 dogs.

Police Academy

Synopsis: A group of good-hearted, but incompetent misfits enter the police—but the instructors there are not going to put up with their pranks.

Satan & Adam

Synopsis: Satan & Adam chronicles the unlikely pairing of legendary one-man-band Sterling “Mr. Satan” Magee and harmonica master Adam Gussow. Shot over 20 years, the film showcases one of the greatest blues duos you probably never got a chance to see.

Mr. Iglesias (Photo, Netflix Canada) Shoplifters

Synopsis: A family of small-time crooks take in a child they find outside in the cold.

The Net

Synopsis: A computer programmer (Sandra Bullock) stumbles upon a conspiracy, putting her life and the lives of those around her in great danger.

The Quake

Synopsis: In 1904 an earthquake of magnitude 5.4 on the Richter scale shook Oslo, Norway with an epicentre in the “Oslo Graben” which runs under the Norwegian capital. There are now signs that indicate that we can expect a major future earthquake in Oslo.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 3 Malibu Rescue: The Series (Netflix Original family)

Synopsis: On the heels of Junior Rescue training, Team Flounder returns to brave the beach in a series of thrilling saves and lighthearted laughs.

Miranda Sings Live…Your Welcome (Photo, Netflix Canada) What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 4 Baroness Von Sketch Show, Season 3

Synopsis: Carolyn Taylor, Meredith MacNeill, Aurora Browne and Jennifer Whalen star in this six episode series that takes a comedic look at our narcissistic contemporary culture. Fast paced and irreverent, Baroness von Sketch Show is a single-camera comedy that offers a witty take on everyday concerns. From the politics of ordering a coffee to entitled coworkers to open relationships, this satirical Canadian sketch show holds a fun house mirror up to modern life.

The Guilty

Synopsis: A police officer assigned alarm dispatch duty enters a race against time when he answers an emergency call from a kidnapped woman.

Miranda Sings Live…Your Welcome (Netflix Original comedy)

Synopsis: With more than 2 billion views across her YouTube channels, Colleen Ballinger has become an international sensation with her hilarious alter-ego Miranda Sings. Filmed in front of a packed house of “Mirfandas,” Colleen reads snippets of her diary and sings through some of the weird comments she receives, while the next ‘Virgin Mary’ Miranda blesses the audience with her combination of acting, singing, dancing, modeling and magic.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 5 A Silent Voice

Synopsis: A young man is ostracized by his classmates after he bullies a deaf girl to the point where she moves away. Years later, he sets off on a path for redemption.

Babe

Synopsis: Babe, a pig raised by sheepdogs, learns to herd sheep with a little help from Farmer Hoggett.

Black Mirror: Season 5 | Official Trailer | Netflix - YouTube
Black Mirror, Season 5 (Netflix Original series)
  • Smithereens: A cab driver with an agenda becomes the centre of attention on a day that rapidly spirals out of control.
  • Striking Vipers: Two estranged college friends reunite in later life, triggering a series of events that could alter their lives forever.
  • Rachel, Jack and Ashley Too: A lonely teenager yearns to connect with her favourite pop star—whose charmed existence isn’t quite as rosy it appears…
Couples Retreat

Synopsis: A comedy centred around four couples who settle into a tropical-island resort for a vacation. While one of the couples is there to work on the marriage, the others fail to realize that participation in the resort’s therapy sessions is not optional.

Do the Right Thing

Synopsis: On the hottest day of the year on a street in the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn, everyone’s hate and bigotry smoulders and builds until it explodes into violence.

Nanny McPhee

Synopsis: A governess uses magic to rein in the behaviour of seven ne’er-do-well children in her charge.

Nanny McPhee Returns

Synopsis: Nanny McPhee arrives to help a harried young mother who is trying to run the family farm while her husband is away at war, though she uses her magic to teach the woman’s children and their two spoiled cousins five new lessons.

Kakuguri xx (Photo, Netflix Canada) Role Models

Synopsis: Wild behaviour forces a pair of energy drink reps to enrol in a Big Brother program.

The Boy Next Door

Synopsis: A woman (played by Queen JLo), separated from her unfaithful husband, falls for a younger man who has moved in next door, but their torrid affair soon takes a dangerous turn.

The Breakfast Club

Synopsis: Five high school students meet in Saturday detention and discover how they have a lot more in common than they thought.

Vertigo

Synopsis: A former police detective juggles wrestling with his personal demons and becoming obsessed with a hauntingly beautiful woman.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 6 Alles ist gut (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: A woman sexually assaulted by her new boss’s brother-in-law tries to move on as if nothing happened, but the night weighs heavily on her mind and body.

Trinkets (Photo, Netflix Canada) What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 7 3%, Season 3 (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: Michele creates an idyllic Inland sanctuary that’s open to all, but when a crisis hits, she’s forced to design a selection process of her own.

The Black Godfather (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: An expansive look at the exceptional life and legacy of Clarence Avant, one of the most influential dealmakers in music, entertainment and politics over the last 60 years.

The Chef Show (Netflix Original docuseries)

Synopsis: In The Chef Show, actor/director Jon Favreau and award-winning Chef Roy Choi reunite after their critically-acclaimed film Chef to embark on a new adventure. The two friends experiment with their favourite recipes and techniques, baking, cooking, exploring and collaborating with some of the biggest names in the entertainment and culinary world. From sharing a meal with the Avengers cast in Atlanta, to smoking brisket in Texas with world-renowned pit master Aaron Franklin, to honouring the legendary food critic Jonathan Gold in Los Angeles, Favreau and Choi embrace their passion for food, but more importantly their love for bringing people together over a delicious meal.

Designated Survivor, Season 3 (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: The gloves come off as Kirkman launches his election campaign amidst ethical quandaries, international incidents and a new terrorism threat at home.

Elisa & Marcela (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: In 1901 in Galicia, Spain, Elisa Sánchez Loriga adopts a male identity in order to marry another woman, Marcela Gracia Ibeas. Based on true events.

I Am Mother (Photo, Netflix Canada) I Am Mother (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: In the wake of humanity’s extinction, a teenage girl is raised by a robot designed to repopulate the earth. But their unique bond is threatened when an inexplicable stranger arrives with alarming news.

Rock My Heart (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: A thrill-seeking teenage girl with a heart defect bonds with a rowdy black stallion and fights to ride in a race despite her life-threatening illness.

Super Monsters Monster Pets (Netflix Original family)

Synopsis: For big fun, think small! Join the Super Monsters and their adorable new Monster Pets for a series of short and silly animated adventures.

Tales of the City (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: Returning to San Francisco after a long absence, Mary Ann Singleton reunites with the colourful community of LGBTQ characters at 28 Barbary Lane.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 8 The Edge of Seventeen

Synopsis: High-school life gets even more unbearable for Nadine (Hailee Steinfeld) when her best friend, Krista (Haley Lu Richardson), starts dating her older brother.

Rock My Heart (Photo, Netflix Canada) What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 9 Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Synopsis: When their relationship turns sour, a couple undergoes a medical procedure to have each other erased from their memories.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 11 Baby Driver

Synopsis: After being coerced into working for a crime boss, a young getaway driver finds himself taking part in a heist doomed to fail.

Disney’s Ralph Breaks the Internet

Synopsis: Six years after the events of Wreck-It Ralph, Ralph and Vanellope, now friends, discover a Wi-Fi router in their arcade, leading them into a new adventure.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 12 Jo Koy: Comin’ In Hot (Netflix Original comedy)

Synopsis: Witness the Blaisdell Arena explode with laughter when Jo Koy takes the stage. Returning for his second Netflix special, Jo Koy: Comin’ In Hot, be prepared to witness a dazzling display of hula dancing and an arsenal of self-deprecating humour. Koy is fired up to educate the masses on how to raise a millennial, the intricacies of Filipino traditions and more!

Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story by Martin Scorsese (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: In an alchemic mix of fact and fantasy, Martin Scorsese looks back at Bob Dylan’s 1975 Rolling Thunder Revue tour and a country ripe for reinvention.

The 3rd Eye 2 (Photo: Netflix Canada) What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 13 The 3rd Eye 2 (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: Working in an orphanage, Alia meets teen Nadia, who says she hears a strange voice in the walls. When they try to find the source, things go very wrong.

Jinn (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: When a school trip to Petra turns deadly, some students suspect supernatural forces are to blame. Back home, a mysterious boy appears before Mira.

Kakegurui xx (Netflix Original anime)

Synopsis: Kirari dissolves the student board and proposes a school-wide gambling battle royal, ushering in a new era of chaos and competition for her seat.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 14 Aggretsuko, Season 2 (Netflix Original anime)

Synopsis: From her mother meddling in her personal affairs to a nightmarish new coworker, Retsuko’s still got a lot to rage about in her karaoke sessions.

The Alcàsser Murders (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: An analytical examination of the investigation into the 1992 murders of three teens from Alcàsser, Spain, a case that profoundly affected the nation.

Charité at War (Photo, Netflix Canada) Awake: The Million Dollar Game (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: Sleepless for 24 hours, contestants in this comedy game show stumble through challenges both eccentric and mundane for a chance at a $1 million prize.

Barbie Dreamhouse Adventures, Season 3

Synopsis: Get to know Barbie and her BFFs—including next-door neighbour Ken—in this animated vlog of adventures filmed inside her family’s new dreamhouse.

Charité at War (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: During World War II, the patients and staff at Berlin’s Charité hospital grapple with Nazis, eugenics and euthanasia.

Cinderella Pop (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: Distressed by her parents’ divorce, Cíntia Dorella does not believe in love anymore until she meets and falls in love with singer-songwriter Freddy Prince.

iZombie, Season 5

Synopsis: A medical resident finds that being a zombie has its perks, which she uses to assist the police.

Leila (Photo: Netflix Canada) Leila (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: Leila, from writer and executive producer Urmi Juvekar, based on a book by Prayaag Akbar, tells the story of Shalini, a free-thinking woman in search of the daughter she lost upon her arrest 16 years earlier. Set in the near future, this inventive, boundary-breaking story centres around longing, faith and loss.

Life Overtakes Me (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: In the grip of trauma, hundreds of refugee children in Sweden withdraw from life’s uncertainties into a coma-like illness called Resignation Syndrome.

Murder Mystery (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: When a NYC cop finally takes his wife on a long promised European trip, a chance meeting on the flight gets them invited to an intimate family gathering on the super yacht of elderly billionaire Malcolm Quince. When Quince is murdered, they become the prime suspects in a modern day whodunit.

Unité 42 (Netflix Original series)

Synopsis: A widowed cop tapped to lead a special cyber crimes unit teams up with a former hacker to hunt down tech-savvy criminals who are terrorizing Belgium.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 15 Taking Lives

Synopsis: An FBI profiler (Angelina Jolie) is called in by French-Canadian police to catch a serial killer who takes on the identity of each new victim.

Elisa & Marcela (Photo: Netflix Canada) The Mechanic

Synopsis: Follows an elite hitman as he teaches his trade to an apprentice who has a connection to one of his previous victims.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 18 Adam Devine: Best Time of Our Lives (Netflix Original comedy)

Synopsis: Critically acclaimed comedian, Adam Devine, knows that growing up sucks and is here to tell you why. Filmed in front of a packed house at The Orpheum Theater in his hometown of Omaha, Nebraska, Devine’s new Netflix comedy special will give a comedic take on the worst parts of growing up including puberty, parental judgment and almost dying on your 21st birthday.

What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 19 Beats (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: A reclusive teenage musical prodigy forms an unlikely friendship with a down-on-his-luck high school security guard. United by their mutual love of hip hop, they confront the demons of their past and try to break into Chicago’s music scene.

The Edge of Democracy (Netflix Original film)

Synopsis: A cautionary tale for these times of democracy in crisis—the personal and political fuse to explore one of the most dramatic periods in Brazilian history. Combining unprecedented access to leaders past and present, including Presidents Dilma Rousseff and Lula da Silva, with accounts of her own family’s complex political and industrial past, filmmaker Petra Costa (Elena) witnesses their rise and fall and the tragically polarized nation that remains.

Mr. D, Season 8

Synopsis: This Canadian series follows a teacher juggling being a teacher and dealing with his students while trying to maintain his not-so-cool lifestyle.

Beats (Photo: Netflix Canada) What’s coming to Netflix Canada on June 20 Annabelle: Creation

Synopsis: Twelve years after the tragic death of their little girl, a doll-maker and his wife welcome a nun and several girls from a shuttered orphanage into their home, where they become the target of the..

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I first started to see blue and green veins dancing across my legs when I was 15 years old. I felt embarrassment but no physical pain, so I kept calm and reassured myself that one day I would have them fixed and my legs would look perfect again.

Almost 20 years later, in 2015, I was six months pregnant with my second child. The veins in my legs became so swollen and painful that my doctor ordered me to take a medical leave from my Toronto media job and sent me for an ultrasound to check for blood clots. As I sat in the waiting room, sweating in my opaque black compression stockings, all I could think about was getting a pair of the cooler toeless hose worn by the woman sitting beside me. I was relieved when my results came back clear. For the rest of my pregnancy, I was put on a circulation-boosting regimen, which consisted of wearing my incredibly uncomfortable support hose, walking a lot and elevating my legs. I did this faithfully until my son was born that June.

But as the months rolled along with a newborn and a toddler, I started to experience heaviness and aching in my legs, particularly my right one. I began to wonder if I had prematurely thrown away my support hose. After all, I had three key risk factors in developing venous disease—a potentially dangerous condition in which blood pools in the veins and doesn’t efficiently travel back to the heart. The first was genetics: My grandmother suffered from varicose veins and had hers successfully stripped when she was 52. The second factor was the temporary pressure put on my veins from my pregnancies. And third, I spent long periods sitting at a desk, putting yet more pressure on my veins and causing their valves to weaken. My legs didn’t stand a chance.

By the spring of 2016, my right leg looked very angry, with bulging veins splayed across my outer thigh. Wearing a swimsuit or shorts was out of the question. At night, it was painful for me to sleep on that side.


My family doctor referred me to a vascular surgeon. I researched the various vein treatment options she offered and settled on radio-frequency ablation, which seemed like the least invasive and most effective option. During the procedure, the surgeon uses the heat from radio-frequency energy to contract the vein walls, causing them to collapse and close. Blood naturally redirects to nearby healthy veins, and the treated veins are gradually absorbed into the surrounding tissue.

The 90-minute procedure was elective and cost $3,000 per leg. Even though I was given a numbing agent, I could still feel the catheter being inserted and pulled from my knee to my upper thigh. When it was over, my leg looked swollen but vein-free. I was elated and started fantasizing about cute cut-off denim shorts.

This experience has taught me to embrace my imperfections. Like the inevitability of fine lines and grey hair, my varicose veins are part of my unique aging process, and I’m okay with that.

A week later, the surgeon’s office called to tell me they had found something during the post-procedure checkup and encouraged me to get another ultrasound. It turned out I was one of those rare patients who developed blood clots after the surgery. The following day I met with a hematologist, who told me I should have never been discharged from the hospital—one blood clot could have easily turned into life-threatening deep-vein thrombosis. The doctor injected a blood thinner directly into my stomach and prescribed three months of oral blood-thinning medication. To add insult to injury, over the next two months, my varicose veins started to reroute and appear again.

The procedure hadn’t worked, and I was left with bulging veins, permanent bruising and superficial phlebitis (a visible inflammation of the veins just below the surface of the skin). Oh, and the aching was back, too. Although I took great comfort in the fact that I’d cheated death, I saw a life of hiding my veins under Lululemon leggings awaiting me.

A year after the ordeal, my vascular surgeon offered to fix my veins once more—this time, for free. I decided I wasn’t willing to take the risk again. Today, I am proactive about my vein health. I wear non-restrictive clothing (pants have to be super soft and stretchy—I often size up) and apply a cream containing witch hazel, which seems to help relieve some symptoms. I’ve also bought myself new compression stockings; I wear them when I fly. When shorts season rolls around, I get an organic spray tan, which is an easy way to camouflage veins.

More than anything, this experience has taught me to embrace my imperfections. Like the inevitability of fine lines and grey hair, my varicose veins are part of my unique aging process, and I’m okay with that.

The post My Varicose Veins Horror Story appeared first on Chatelaine.

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Even if you can smell what your neighbour is grilling, you still want to maintain that illusion of privacy.

Create a green screen Gold hanging planter, $20, homesense.ca.

The easiest way to create more privacy is adding greenery. “It’s a much softer look and adds dimension to your space,” says Caitlin Black of Aloe, a landscape design business in Vancouver. And because fences can be only so high (i.e. not high enough) in most municipalities, plants can add the height you want. “Creating a second layer through plantings really cozies up the space, and also gives a noise buffer,” says Black.

Dracaena Marginata potted dragon tree, $20, Ikea.

Cedar hedges offer a year-long dense green wall; deciduous trees provide more diffused privacy and light. In smaller yards and on balconies, planters can create tall privacy shields. “If your planter is two feet and you’re planting a four-foot hedge, all of a sudden you have six feet and it’s only taken up about two feet on the ground,” says Black. She recommends yew or privet hedges, clumping bamboo, or camellia. For a more instant solution, try smaller hanging and potted plants.

Block the view Photo, Janis Nicolay/Aloe.

A privacy screen, like this freestanding custom-built one by Aloe Design, shields the view of your neighbours.

In cramped city quarters where neighbours can see your backyard from their windows, a shade sail or umbrella can provide privacy from overhead onlookers, and protection from the sun. Premium quadrilateral shade sail, from $375–$815, Shade Sails Canada.

Much like a privacy screen, a trellis can create a wall where there wasn’t one before. To block the view through it, grow a vine or use S-hooks to hang tiny buckets of potted herbs. Peak Products 72-inch x 20-inch Twilight Trellis, $60, The Home Depot.

Hung around a porch or pergola, drapery can really make an outdoor space feel like another room of your home. Opt for outdoor fabrics, durable polyester and inexpensive styles that can take the elements. Set of two Gråtistel lace curtains, $15, Ikea., $20, Ikea.

The post How To Create A Sense Of Privacy In Your Backyard Or On Your Balcony appeared first on Chatelaine.

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