Loading...

Follow Chase Blackwood on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Let me begin with a hook. Here it is: this article could change your life.
I’ve had the fortune of traveling since I was young. I was born in Africa, to parents from two separate continents. From sub-Saharan Africa, I moved to a Caribbean Island. From the Caribbean I moved to the United States. Since that time, I’ve lived in nine U.S. States, as well as Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. I’ve also had the fortune to have traveled to nearly 60 countries thus far.
My reasons for travel have been as varied as the travel itself. I’ve moved with family as a child. I’ve moved for college as a young man. I’ve lived overseas to study martial arts. I’ve traveled for adventure, for the military, for the federal government, for fun, for the beauty of a place, to combat terrorism, for love, and simply to see what’s out there.
I have opened my eyes to the subtleties of human nature, to the lies we tell and the truths sandwiched in between. I’ve learned to read people. I’ve learned to read areas.
DISCLAIMER: Before you read any further, I want to remind you, as the reader, that you may not agree with everything I’ve written. In fact, I hope you don’t. I hope you question it, research it, and think about it, then buy one of my books.
What I am writing below are broad trends that apply to large groups of people. There are always anomalies. There are always outliers. Try not to read the list and think: but my friend John isn’t like this, or I don’t feel this way. Treat this blog as a thought exercise. An observation. An attempt to simplify the complex.
And, without further ado, here are a few things I’ve learned over the past few decades.
1) PEOPLE ARE THE SAME DESPITE THEIR DIFFERENCES
From the mountains of Tibet to the plains of Africa to the deserts of the Middle East, everyone struggles with the same challenges of being human. For those in poverty: food, water, and shelter are primary struggles that shape their lives. For everyone: the challenges of emotion and perspective (see #7), of belonging, and being loved (see #2); influence our thoughts, behaviors, and consequently our actions.
2) PEOPLE ARE TRIBAL
We humans are social creatures and as such often strive to belong to a group. Our identities are woven inextricably into these group dynamics. On a small scale, we have family and friends. These define our small social circles. Ideologically, we are defined by our region, our religion, our politics…...the number of ways of separating humanity is endless (gender, race, sexual orientation, job occupation, similar hobbies, sports team, etc.)
This need to belong, is a driving factor in our decisions and identity, to such a strong degree, that conflict often arises. Tribalism can lead to an US vs THEM mentality, when fear manifests and takes hold.
3) PEOPLE WANT LOVE AND RESPECT
The desire for respect stems from a need for love, for attention, and a need to belong. As we become adults it often manifests itself differently than when we are young. A child may reach up for a hug. A child may smile and hope for reciprocation. An adult may do the same. If well-adjusted, with a loving upbringing, it is manifested in strong, healthy relationships. If not, the behaviors can range from a social guffaw, an awkward joke, on one end of the spectrum to the extreme.
A subtle insult can be a cry for attention. A suicide bombing or a gang shooting, is a non-subtle cry for attention (Please note: I am in no way endorsing extreme behavior, simply denoting their common underlying theme). The outcomes are very different. The outward reasons are very different. The underlying, hidden motivations are similar.
(I realize this may seem like a stretch without further explanation. Suicide bombers are not born with bombs strapped to their chests, just like gang members aren’t born with guns in their hands. If one seeks trends: many are born, into greater poverty, areas of conflict, areas of greater corruption, and often taught or influenced by family, friends, and by figures of authority to accept, condone, or conduct violence. When enough factors line up, combined with certain genetic predispositions, and the manipulation of our underlying human nature, people are capable of heinous acts of violence.)
What’s the common thread here? A need to belong. A need to be loved. A need for respect. The hope that we will gain these through our actions in the here and now, and/or in the afterlife.
4) OFTEN THE LOUDEST PEOPLE ARE THE MOST IGNORANT
There is an interesting phenomenon that has become exasperated by technology (namely, social media), that has become more pervasive. Simply put: the loudest, most confident people are often the most ignorant. It is known as the Dunning-Kruger Effect. In other words, the less you know, the less you realize you know and the greater your confidence in that subject. Those with moderate knowledge often remain silent. The experts, often underestimate their knowledge, not to mention are few and far between. Therefore, based on numbers, we’re far more likely to hear from a confident ignorant than an expert.
5) STRUGGLE IS NECESSARY FOR PERSONAL GROWTH AND RESILIENCE
Not all people are the same, some are more resilient than others. One person’s challenge, is another person’s traumatic event. That being said, small challenges that force someone to grow, to overcome, to push past their perceived boundaries, are necessary for personal growth. Without these challenges during childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood; people become unable to cope with basic difficulties. Without learning how to deal with stressors, any stress can become overwhelming and debilitating.
6) WITHOUT INTROSPECTION WE LOSE EMPATHY
It is important to take time to reflect, to think on our actions, to visualize the effects of our words and behavior on others. Without a quiet time of introspection, we humans, begin to lose our ability to empathize with others. I write this last one as an observation on the younger generation, worldwide, and the effects of technology. Increasingly, everyone, even in third-world countries, has a cellphone. Being glued to that screen, constantly distracted, doesn’t allow us to face the world, face challenges, or to pause and reflect. Consequently, true acts of kindness and empathy, appear to be less common.
7) EMOTION AND CULTURE SHAPES OUR PERSPECTIVE
We all know that as human beings we have emotions. These emotions often dictate our actions. I’m sad and I frown, or cry. I’m happy and I smile and laugh. Emotions also shape how we see the world. Someone who is chronically depressed will see the same events very differently than someone who is always upbeat and happy.
Culture is another shaping factor. The environment we group up in and the people we align and associate with shape our thoughts and thereby our actions (e.g. a Christian may view one event differently than a Hindi, a Muslim, a Zoroastrian, or a Jew). If one has never left their small corner of the world, one may never realize how much culture has shaped their perspective. Culture shapes many aspects of our lives. If I grow up in one country, I may be of a particular religion, whether I want to or not. I may wear certain clothing. I may have certain beliefs on nudity, homosexuality, governance, comedy, sarcasm, lending, charity, education, etc.
8) FEAR IS A TOOL OF CONTROL
Throughout history leaders, governments, religions, have used fear as a tool to control the masses. For example, if you don’t do X, Y, and Z you will go to hell. If you don’t obey the law you are punished (pillory, hanging, torture, jail).
(Note: Fear is a valuable learning/teaching tool in certain cases, for example: avoid rattle snakes, because they’re poisonous. The stove is hot, don’t touch it.)
Ultimately, the combined effects of emotion, culture, tribalism, education, and our need for love, drive our actions.
The next time someone’s insecurity bleeds through, and you hear something you don’t like, pause, think, and see what this person is really saying: “I want/need your approval.”
The next time you take offense, pause and think: “What was their intent?” “Is this person normally mean-spirited?” “What mood was I in when I heard this.” “Why am I offended?”
The next time we judge someone different from ourselves, think: “Would I actually be different if I grew up in their household, their neighborhood, under the same conditions?” “Does different really mean that other groups are bad?” “Do I dislike what I don’t understand?” “Do I fear what I do not know?”
The world is smaller than we realize. We have more in common than we know. We share the same struggles, hopes, and desires. A little understanding may help alleviate the fear of the unknown, and reduce tension, and thereby reduce some of the struggle and violence that continues to define so many lives.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
This is a very short post. One of excitement and humility and a contradictory sense of pride. Excitement for having my work appreciated and seen. Humility for knowing how many amazing works of fiction are out there. Pride, in having accomplished a small measure of success.
Last, an update for any fans who are interested. Book 2: Into the Fold, is about 80% complete. If all goes well, I hope to publish this summer, after completing the final chapters, final edits, and having received my beta-reader feedback.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Let me begin with a hook. Here it is: this article could change your life.
I’ve had the fortune of traveling since I was young. I was born in Africa, to parents from two separate continents. From sub-Saharan Africa, I moved to a Caribbean Island. From the Caribbean I moved to the United States. Since that time, I’ve lived in nine U.S. States, as well as Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. I’ve also had the fortune to have traveled to nearly 60 countries thus far.
My reasons for travel have been as varied as the travel itself. I’ve moved with family as a child. I’ve moved for college as a young man. I’ve lived overseas to study martial arts. I’ve traveled for adventure, for the military, for the federal government, for fun, for the beauty of a place, to combat terrorism, for love, and simply to see what’s out there.
I have opened my eyes to the subtleties of human nature, to the lies we tell and the truths sandwiched in between. I’ve learned to read people. I’ve learned to read areas.
DISCLAIMER: Before you read any further, I want to remind you, as the reader, that you may not agree with everything I’ve written. In fact, I hope you don’t. I hope you question it, research it, and think about it, then buy one of my books.
What I am writing below are broad trends that apply to large groups of people. There are always anomalies. There are always outliers. Try not to read the list and think: but my friend John isn’t like this, or I don’t feel this way. Treat this blog as a thought exercise. An observation. An attempt to simplify the complex.
And, without further ado, here are a few things I’ve learned over the past few decades.
1) PEOPLE ARE THE SAME DESPITE THEIR DIFFERENCES
From the mountains of Tibet to the plains of Africa to the deserts of the Middle East, everyone struggles with the same challenges of being human. For those in poverty: food, water, and shelter are primary struggles that shape their lives. For everyone: the challenges of emotion and perspective (see #7), of belonging, and being loved (see #2); influence our thoughts, behaviors, and consequently our actions.
2) PEOPLE ARE TRIBAL
We humans are social creatures and as such often strive to belong to a group. Our identities are woven inextricably into these group dynamics. On a small scale, we have family and friends. These define our small social circles. Ideologically, we are defined by our region, our religion, our politics…...the number of ways of separating humanity is endless (gender, race, sexual orientation, job occupation, similar hobbies, sports team, etc.)
This need to belong, is a driving factor in our decisions and identity, to such a strong degree, that conflict often arises. Tribalism can lead to an US vs THEM mentality, when fear manifests and takes hold.
3) PEOPLE WANT LOVE AND RESPECT
The desire for respect stems from a need for love, for attention, and a need to belong. As we become adults it often manifests itself differently than when we are young. A child may reach up for a hug. A child may smile and hope for reciprocation. An adult may do the same. If well-adjusted, with a loving upbringing, it is manifested in strong, healthy relationships. If not, the behaviors can range from a social guffaw, an awkward joke, on one end of the spectrum to the extreme.
A subtle insult can be a cry for attention. A suicide bombing or a gang shooting, is a non-subtle cry for attention (Please note: I am in no way endorsing extreme behavior, simply denoting their common underlying theme). The outcomes are very different. The outward reasons are very different. The underlying, hidden motivations are similar.
(I realize this may seem like a stretch without further explanation. Suicide bombers are not born with bombs strapped to their chests, just like gang members aren’t born with guns in their hands. If one seeks trends: many are born, into greater poverty, areas of conflict, areas of greater corruption, and often taught or influenced by family, friends, and by figures of authority to accept, condone, or conduct violence. When enough factors line up, combined with certain genetic predispositions, and the manipulation of our underlying human nature, people are capable of heinous acts of violence.)
What’s the common thread here? A need to belong. A need to be loved. A need for respect. The hope that we will gain these through our actions in the here and now, and/or in the afterlife.
4) OFTEN THE LOUDEST PEOPLE ARE THE MOST IGNORANT
There is an interesting phenomenon that has become exasperated by technology (namely, social media), that has become more pervasive. Simply put: the loudest, most confident people are often the most ignorant. It is known as the Dunning-Kruger Effect. In other words, the less you know, the less you realize you know and the greater your confidence in that subject. Those with moderate knowledge often remain silent. The experts, often underestimate their knowledge, not to mention are few and far between. Therefore, based on numbers, we’re far more likely to hear from a confident ignorant than an expert.
5) STRUGGLE IS NECESSARY FOR PERSONAL GROWTH AND RESILIENCE
Not all people are the same, some are more resilient than others. One person’s challenge, is another person’s traumatic event. That being said, small challenges that force someone to grow, to overcome, to push past their perceived boundaries, are necessary for personal growth. Without these challenges during childhood, adolescence, and into adulthood; people become unable to cope with basic difficulties. Without learning how to deal with stressors, any stress can become overwhelming and debilitating.
6) WITHOUT INTROSPECTION WE LOSE EMPATHY
It is important to take time to reflect, to think on our actions, to visualize the effects of our words and behavior on others. Without a quiet time of introspection, we humans, begin to lose our ability to empathize with others. I write this last one as an observation on the younger generation, worldwide, and the effects of technology. Increasingly, everyone, even in third-world countries, has a cellphone. Being glued to that screen, constantly distracted, doesn’t allow us to face the world, face challenges, or to pause and reflect. Consequently, true acts of kindness and empathy, appear to be less common.
7) EMOTION AND CULTURE SHAPES OUR PERSPECTIVE
We all know that as human beings we have emotions. These emotions often dictate our actions. I’m sad and I frown, or cry. I’m happy and I smile and laugh. Emotions also shape how we see the world. Someone who is chronically depressed will see the same events very differently than someone who is always upbeat and happy.
Culture is another shaping factor. The environment we group up in and the people we align and associate with shape our thoughts and thereby our actions (e.g. a Christian may view one event differently than a Hindi, a Muslim, a Zoroastrian, or a Jew). If one has never left their small corner of the world, one may never realize how much culture has shaped their perspective. Culture shapes many aspects of our lives. If I grow up in one country, I may be of a particular religion, whether I want to or not. I may wear certain clothing. I may have certain beliefs on nudity, homosexuality, governance, comedy, sarcasm, lending, charity, education, etc.
8) FEAR IS A TOOL OF CONTROL
Throughout history leaders, governments, religions, have used fear as a tool to control the masses. For example, if you don’t do X, Y, and Z you will go to hell. If you don’t obey the law you are punished (pillory, hanging, torture, jail).
(Note: Fear is a valuable learning/teaching tool in certain cases, for example: avoid rattle snakes, because they’re poisonous. The stove is hot, don’t touch it.)
Ultimately, the combined effects of emotion, culture, tribalism, education, and our need for love, drive our actions.
The next time someone’s insecurity bleeds through, and you hear something you don’t like, pause, think, and see what this person is really saying: “I want/need your approval.”
The next time you take offense, pause and think: “What was their intent?” “Is this person normally mean-spirited?” “What mood was I in when I heard this.” “Why am I offended?”
The next time we judge someone different from ourselves, think: “Would I actually be different if I grew up in their household, their neighborhood, under the same conditions?” “Does different really mean that other groups are bad?” “Do I dislike what I don’t understand?” “Do I fear what I do not know?”
The world is smaller than we realize. We have more in common than we know. We share the same struggles, hopes, and desires. A little understanding may help alleviate the fear of the unknown, and reduce tension, and thereby reduce some of the struggle and violence that continues to define so many lives.
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Tears of a Heart, Chase Blackwood
September 12, 2018 by Aimee Ann
Coming of Age, Fantasy, Literature & Fiction, Magic & Sword and Sorcery
He’s been called the Scourge of Bodig, the Bane of Verold, but most know him as the Kan Savasci. He’s one of the most feared men alive. Chaos and war have followed him like an angry shadow.
The one problem, as the world faces the wrath of forgotten gods, Kan Savasci is nowhere to be found.
The annalist, a man trained in the ancient arts of the arkein, has been tasked to uncover the whereabouts of the Kan Savasci at any cost. In order to find the man, one must unmask the depths of his reclusive history.
The clock is ticking as Verold descends into darkness.
Tears of a Heart is book 0 in the Kan Savasci Cycle written by the talented Chase Blackwood and wow, what a great start to the series! Tears of a Heart is a novel I was desperate to read ever since discovering it and caught my attention right away thanks to its description which alludes to a troubling war and a mysterious character which intrigued me. Now and then a reader will come across that one book that blows them away, it is a somewhat generic term, but that is what Tears of a Heart did to me… it blew me away and ever since completing it I have been thinking of its intricate and detailed story and how I need to re-read it! That is when you know book lovers that you have come across an incredible book when you are thinking of it when you have a million things to do. That is why I am already going to recommend Tears of a Heart to you lovely readers, and yes, it may be early on in my review but Tears of a Heart is a novel not to be missed.
Tears of a Heart for me was thrilling, captivating and addictive right from the start and I felt this from beginning to end. Tears of a Heart was captivating to me from the start thanks to the unique premise of the story and the bewitching literature courtesy of the author, Chase Blackwood who from the start hooked me with his unique story that was unlike anything I have read before. It is rare to find a fantasy novel that is refreshing and it is even more challenging to discover a fantasy story that does not rely on gimmicks and ridiculous action sequences! Tears of a Heart does have action-packed moments however they are tasteful and in no way gimmicky which is always fantastic in a book!
Tears of a Heart is a phenomenal book that will take the reader to a fantasy realm in which chaos is raging. The reader will be introduced to the land but also to Kan Savasci, a man who is known by many names such as ‘The Bane of Verold.’ Kan is a man where war and chaos seem to follow him everywhere he goes but when he is needed when the land faces the wrath of the forgotten Gods. At this point, the reader will be introduced to another character known as the annalist who has been tasked with finding Kan Savasci before it is too late and this book lovers is the premise of the sensational novel Tears of a Heart.
The premise of Tears of a Heart is exceptional, original and unlike anything I have read before. I loved the many themes and elements explored throughout the book, and all themes are explored by Blackwood wonderfully, and he does this by lacing these interesting themes throughout the text flawlessly and weaving them with the story. The result of this makes Tears of a Heart a highly addictive and fascinating read that is never once lackluster or predictable. Blackwood really has accomplished the near impossible, Blackwood has managed to write an entertaining, bewitching and flawless story that will perfectly unfold in readers minds like a movie and now that I think about it, why is this book not a movie already!
Chase Blackwood is a phenomenal writer who knows how to grasp his reader’s attention from the first page. Blackwood instead of writing long, drawn-out builds up which are commonly found in fantasy novels, decides to ditch this approach and thrust his reader into the heart of the story straight away so that the reader is instantly captivated and immersed. I personally love this approach, what is the point of having a long build-up with little excitement? This is only necessary if the author in question can’t develop the characters in the story quickly but with Tears of a Heart, the reader will not encounter this issue because Blackwood instantly develops his character and makes the reader invest in not only them but also their journey.
Blackwood is not only a brilliant writer for his ability to captivate the reader’s attention straight away, but he is also an excellent author for his ability to lace exceptional twists and turns throughout his story that genuinely had me shocked at points! The combination of Blackwood’s shocking twists and his explanatory powers will immerse the reader in the story and make them be able to visualize every detail, no matter how small. This writing approach is one of my favorites because it makes the reader feel included in the story and make the reader feel as if they are in the same situation as the protagonists of the novel.
Overall Tears of a Heart is a thrilling, compelling and action-packed novel that will easily entertain readers for many days and nights and so I, of course, have to award this stellar gem of a book five stars! If you are a reader who loves fantasy or even dystopia then I implore you to read Tears of a Heart; it is a fast-paced, action adventure that should not be missed so have a read of the preview below and get reading! Be sure to keep an eye out for my review for the next book in the series which will be live soon!
Thank you so much for reading book lovers! I appreciate it so much, I love discussing wonderful books with all of you so please comment below and let me know your thoughts on Tears of a Heart. Do you see yourself reading this book? Do you love the genre? Please let me know your brilliant thoughts below and I will be sure to comment back. Thank you so much again for reading!
Goodbye for now book lovers,
P.S. Here is a preview of the book for all of you lovely readers to enjoy! Please have a read of the preview and if you find that you have loved what you have read then all you need to do is click the Buy on Amazon button and it will take you straight to the book on Amazon U.S.! If you are in the U.K. then below I have attached a link to the book for Amazon U.K..
Below I have attached some links about the author and this wonderful book so if you would like to learn more about the author and the book then please have a browse. Thank you so much again for reading book lovers, I can’t wait to read your thoughts on this book!
Amazon U.S. – Amazon U.K. – Goodreads – Smashwords – Barnes & Noble – Audible
Chase Blackwood: Website – Facebook – Instagram – YouTube
Link to original review: https://redheadedbooklover.com/tears-of-a-heart-chase-blackwood/
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview