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We have a history of love for the standard Subaru Crosstrek here at Cars.com. In fact, it has won our Subcompact SUV Challenge twice over the years. In its plug-in hybrid form, it still puts up a good fight, albeit with a significantly higher price tag. While the 2019 Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid may have a more limited appeal than its gas-powered counterpart, that hasn’t stopped it from sitting comfortably high on this week’s list of top reviews — though still in second place behind the 2020 Kia Telluride SUV.

Related: More Expert Car Reviews

Cars.com reviewer Aaron Bragman notes that the Crosstrek Hybrid is a lot heavier than the standard model, which is most evident when changing directions. However, all that extra weight hasn’t taken any of the pep from its step.

“Driving the Crosstrek Hybrid is a serene experience — at least while electricity powers the car,” Bragman writes. “EVs are usually wonderfully silent and the Crosstrek is no exception: Smooth, calm acceleration is the name of the game, and as long as you don’t push too hard on the pedal, you’ll be rewarded with silent sailing.”

But if you don’t need the calm and quiet, you could floor it to see how well the electric motors work in the Crosstrek’s favor. “Spoiler alert: It makes it quicker,” Bragman writes. “Subaru says the electric motors change the vehicle’s torque profile such that it subtracts a full second off its zero-to-60-mph sprint.”

For more on the Crosstrek Hybrid, check out the full review via the link below.

In videos this week, our First Drive of the 2020 Hyundai Palisade is still on top. Sitting at No. 2 is our drag-strip test of the 2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat, which jumped up two places from last week. Third is the off-road challenge, which pitted the 2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 Bison and the 2020 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon against each other. No. 4 is our latest video, a review of the 2019 Kia Optima. And last but not least is our 2019 Compact SUV Challenge.

Heading out to car shop this weekend or just want to stay up on what’s good? Here are the top five reviews and videos of the week:

Top 5 Reviews

1. 2020 Kia Telluride Review: The New Big SUV Benchmark

2. 2019 Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid Review: More Efficient, Less Useful

3. 2019 Volkswagen Tiguan Review: All Around Greatness

4. 2019 Mazda CX-5 Review: Posh and Poised, But Tech Needs Tuning

5. 2019 Lincoln Nautilus Review: Faces of Lavishness and Disenchantment

Top 5 Videos

1. 2020 Hyundai Palisade: First Drive

2. 2019 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye: Drag-Strip Tested

3. 2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 Bison Vs. 2020 Jeep Gladiator Rubicon: Off-Road Challenge

4. 2019 Kia Optima: Review

5. 2019 Compact SUV Challenge

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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So you’ve decided to make one small step for your family and one giant leap for your future automotive existence by purchasing a new car this weekend. It’s not exactly Apollo 11, but it’s definitely going to make your day-to-day life easier. Great! Now what? Well, we’re here to answer that with a list of links below that’s designed not only to guide you toward the right land rover, but also to help you get the best deal for it. Before you hit the dealerships this weekend, get a crash course in the car-buying process below.

Related: Which Dealerships Do It Right? Car Brands Ranked for Customer Service

What car should I buy? That depends on a lot of factors, and our reviews can help. Check out our recent additions:

Pickup trucks: Ford F-250 Super Duty, Chevrolet Silverado 2500/3500, Chevrolet Silverado 1500, Ford Ranger, Jeep Gladiator
SUVs: BMW X4, Ford Explorer ST, Ford Explorer, Jeep Renegade, Maserati Levante, BMW X7, Nissan Murano
Sedans: Kia Optima, Kia K900, Audi A8 L
Hatchback: Kia Soul
Hybrid: Subaru Crosstrek Hybrid
Electric: Nissan Leaf
Performance:
Ford Mustang Shelby GT350

Which cars have the best deals right now? Check out our top deals for July. As always, your discounts may vary, so see your dealer for specifics.

Should I buy new or used? Read up on the pros and cons of each. If you go used, review our used-car buyers’ checklist and consider whether you want a certified pre-owned car.

How much can I afford? Read our primer. Then use our Price Comparison Tool while you shop to find what’s right for you.

Should I finance, lease or pay cash? That depends, but this might help you decide. How do I get the best lease rate? Bone up on common lease terminology, plus our tips.

How do I get the best financing rate? Our game plan lays out some advice. While you’re at it, here’s what you need to know about auto loans and what you’ll need to get one.

Anything I shouldn’t do when I’m at the dealer? Yep. Avoid these pitfalls.

Should I get an extended warranty? That depends. Here’s what you need to know.

How do I sell or trade in my old car? Learn how to prep your car before you sell it to a dealer, how to trade it in and how to deal with taxes and other considerations. If you still owe money on your old car, read this. Finally, if you want to sell it private party, here’s how to create the picture-perfect ad and how to seal the deal.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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Cars.com News by Patrick Masterson - 2d ago

Vehicles Affected: Approximately 2,500 model-year 2016 Mazda MX-5 Miata sports cars

The Problem: The skid plate and metal bracket may detach from underneath the vehicle, which may become a road hazard, increasing the risk of a crash.

The Fix: Dealers will replace the skid plate for free.

What Owners Should Do: Mazda will begin notifying owners Aug. 26. Owners can call the automaker at 800-222-5500, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s vehicle-safety hotline at 888-327-4236 or visit its website to check their vehicle identification number and learn more.

Need to Find a Dealer for Service? Go to Cars.com Service & Repair to find your local dealer. To check for other recalls, and to schedule a free recall repair at your local dealership, click here: Mazda MX-5 Miata

More From Cars.com:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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Vehicles Affected: Approximately 1,330 model-year 2017-19 Toyota Camry sedans, Corolla sedans and hatchbacks, RAV4 SUVs, Sienna minivans and Yaris iA sedans equipped with factory-installed floormats

The Problem: The load carrying capacity modification label may be incorrect, which may lead to unintentionally overloading the vehicle, increasing the risk of a crash.

The Fix: Southeast Toyota Distributors will provide a corrected label for placement over the inaccurate one for free.

What Owners Should Do: SET will begin notifying owners Aug. 27. Owners can call the distributor at 888-270-9371, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s vehicle-safety hotline at 888-327-4236 or visit its website to check their vehicle identification number and learn more.

Need to Find a Dealer for Service? Go to Cars.com Service & Repair to find your local dealer. Click here to schedule a free recall repair at your local dealership.

More From Cars.com:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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At long last — like, half a century long, if you’ve been following the decades of conjecture, innuendo and speculation — Chevrolet has revealed the mid-engine version of the iconic everyman’s supercar, the 2020 Corvette Stingray. Chevy refers to the new Vette — the first-ever mid-engine configuration for the storied sports car — as “the sum of everything that came before it.”

Related: Chevrolet Celebrates Racing History With 2019 Corvette Drivers Series

“As America’s most iconic performance nameplate, redesigning the Corvette Stingray from the ground up presented the team a historic opportunity, something Chevrolet designers have desired for over 60 years,” said Michael Simcoe, GM’s vice president of Global Design. “It is now the best of America, a new arrival in the mid-engine sports car class. We know [the] Corvette can stand tall with the best the world has to offer.”

We’ll be poring over all the specs and newly available info to bring you our requisite comprehensive coverage of everything we learn as we vet this Vette, but for now, here are a few fast facts about the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray:

1. It’s Fast AF!

In fact, it’s touted as the Fastest. Vette. Ever. (We’ve heard that before, but we’re guessing the boast will bear out. Chevy says that when equipped with the Z51 Performance Package, the new Stingray will hit 60 mph in less than three seconds. All that comes from a 6.2-liter naturally aspirated V-8 that bangs out 495 horsepower and 470 pounds-feet of torque when equipped with the optional performance exhaust.

2. It’s Affordable (for a Car That Hits 60 in Under Three Seconds)

Chevy promises the eighth-generation, or C8, Stingray will start at less than $60,000, and calls it a “no-compromise value proposition” in keeping with the tradition of the attainable supercar.

3. Mid-Engine = Max Performance

With the engine positioned directly behind the two occupants instead of under the hood, a host of performance enhancements become possible, according to Chevrolet, including better weight distribution for improved straight-line track driving, and better responsiveness and control courtesy of the driver’s position closer to the front axle. That’s in addition to an improved view of the road or track, and improved sightlines through the car thanks to a lower hood position, instrument panel and steering wheel.

4. Sorry, Man, No Manual … But!

As feared, you won’t get the visceral joy of rowing your own gears, as the 2020 Stingray will notoffer a manual transmission. (You picked a fine time to tell us this, Chevy … just a few days after National Stick Shift Day? It just feels so insensitive.) However, the automaker promises that the eight-speed dual-clutch automatic the Corvette doeshave offers something a manual can’t: a continuous transmission of torque and power to the wheel, offering “ultra-fast,” precise shifts that happen in less than 100 milliseconds for uninterrupted acceleration, and able to keep 100 percent of the torque applied during the shift. So there’s that.

5. It Looks Like a Vette Fornicated With a Ferrari

The mid-engine design immediately lends the new Stingray the look of an exotic European sports car, but, depending somewhat on the angle, you still won’t mistake it for a Corvette. Chevrolet pointed to some standout design features, including:

  • Low-profile headlamps
  • Completely hidden door, hood and hatch releases
  • Large side air intakes for engine cooling and aerodynamic performance
  • A revised A-pillar shape that improves visibility
  • A large rear hatch that showcases the engine with seven air vents
  • Quad exhaust tips located on the vehicle’s outboard ends
  • Dual-element LED taillamps with animated turn signals
6. Not Only Can This Car Go, But It Can Carry Cargo

Again, to be attainable in some relative sense, a car has to be able to serve as a daily driver for someone willing to make some obvious concessions. Cargo space, fortunately for 2020 Corvette buyers, won’t be one of those concessions: The mid-engine design allows for front and rear storage compartments totaling 12.6 cubic feet, and Chevy claims the rear compartment can accommodate two golf club bags.

7. It Takes a Curb-Clearing Cue From Tesla

Chevrolet wants to spare you some cold sweat when you encounter the low-riding sports-car owner’s equivalent of walking through a minefield. An optional front suspension lift helps you clear curbs, speed bumps and steep driveways, and — like Tesla’s similar feature — is programmable via GPS. A two-position hydraulic lifter allows nearly 2 inches lift to get you over the hump without hearing that stomach-knotting scraaaaaape! Additionally, the optional Z51 Performance Package, which introduces a host of new technology to the 2020 Stingray, adds a performance suspension with manually adjustable threaded spring seats.

8. It’s Coming Soon

It would seem cruel for the Corvette faithful to have to wait this long for the mid-engine version and then have to wait some more for their chance to buy one. The 2020 Corvette is set to go on sale in “late 2019,” so get your financial affairs in order and start making space in the garage.

More From Cars.com:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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Hyundai refreshed the Tucson compact SUV for 2019 with significant safety, powertrain and tech changes, even if it looks much the same as the 2018 from the outside. The changes have helped the Tucson stay in the game as compact SUV sales have boomed and competition heats up with new and redesigned rivals.

Related: What’s the Best Compact SUV of 2019?

The changes were enough for a solid finish in the top three of our 2019 Compact SUV Challenge that compared seven redesigned or refreshed 2019 models. You can read more about that comparison by following the Challenge link above.

Standard on all 2019 Hyundai Tucsons is a front collision system with automatic emergency braking and pedestrian detection. The second-level Value trim adds a standard blind spot warning with rear cross-traffic alert. And newly optional are adaptive cruise control, a driver attention warning and automatic high beams. Tucson also raised its 2019 Insurance Institute for Highway Safety rating to Top Safety Pick Plus with a headlight improvement in March 2019.

Under the hood, the base engine for the two lowest trim levels continues in 2019 to be a 161-horsepower, 2.0-liter four-cylinder mated to a six-speed automatic transmission. But newly standard on all other models is a 181-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder and six-speed automatic.

Tech upgrades include a new multimedia system that sits tablet-style atop a restyled dashboard. And newly optional are wireless phone charging, USB power for the backseat and a 360-degree camera system.

We’ve driven the new Tucson and had complete coverage of the refreshed SUV from its auto show unveiling onward, including pricing, specs and much more. Below is a roundup of our comprehensive coverage that can tell you everything you need to know about the 2019 Hyundai Tucson:

2019 Hyundai Tucson Review: Updates Freshen Journeyman Compact SUV’s Appeal

2019 Hyundai Tucson MPG: Our Real-World Testing Results

2019 Hyundai Tucson: 8 Things We Like (and 4 Not So Much)

2019 Hyundai Tucson Upgrades Light Way to Best Safety Rating

How Do Car Seats Fit in the 2019 Hyundai Tucson?

Photo Gallery: 2019 Hyundai Tucson Is Nipped and Tucked

Refreshed 2019 Hyundai Tucson Adds Safety Tech, Drops Turbo Engine

2019 Compact SUV Challenge Video

2019 Hyundai Tucson Adds Value, Safety to Bottom Line

Hyundai Tucson N Line Stays in Line With Sporty-Styled Siblings

More From Cars.com:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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If you’ve ever seen a Jeep Wrangler SUV or the new Wrangler-based 2020 Gladiator mid-size pickup truck driving around with no doors, you’ve probably asked yourself the simple question: What’s that about?

Well, there are actually two answers, and one of them is more practical than you might think — though it involves the kind of hardcore off-roading illustrated in Pickuptrucks.com’s head-to-head testing between a doorless Gladiator Rubicon and buttoned-up 2019 Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 Bison. I’ll get to that in a moment.

Related: Off-Road Comparison: Can the Gladiator Rubicon Dethrone the Colorado ZR2?

But first, the common reason people drive doorless: It’s fun! All Wranglers and Gladiators are convertibles, though you can’t always tell because some have removable hard tops rather than soft tops. And once you remove those tops, these Jeeps are among the most open-air experiences you can get in a convertible because so much of the surrounding structure is removed — way more than with a Porsche Targa top or Mazda MX-5 Miata retractable fastback, for example. One exception is the doors, of which the window frames rise to roof level. Some owners mitigate this by purchasing half doors from Mopar or aftermarket companies, but others just take off the full-size ones and stop there. Jeep simplifies all of this by making doors owner-removable by means of just two bolts per door. It’s the equivalent of removing the pins from the hinges. (Removing the door from a Colorado, by contrast, would require unbolting the hinges from the doorjambs, which is simply not done.) The new Wrangler JL generation and Gladiator have aluminum doors, so they’re lighter than ever, just 44 pounds apiece for the front and 29 pounds apiece for the rear doors.

Driving with no doors takes the convertible experience to the next level, but it’s not without downsides. For one thing, doors represent side-impact protection, and though it’s enjoyable, we can’t recommend driving doorless on the street. To that end, it’s not necessarily legal. When you remove the front doors, the side mirrors go with it, and some states require that the car have either one or both of those. (Aftermarket companies have workarounds for this as well.)

More About the Jeep Gladiator:

The Doorless Off-Roading Advantage

You know where you’re allowed to drive with no mirrors and where you’re unlikely to be T-boned by a driver distracted by rug rats or a smartphone? On an off-road trail like those where we pitted a Rubicon version of the Gladiator against a Colorado ZR2 Bison in the Pickuptrucks.com Off-Road Comparison.

I admit I had second thoughts as we did the sand testing (there’s a video clip somewhere of me coughing for a solid minute), after which we made a point of putting the Jeep in front of the Chevy to minimize the dust. But when it came to rock crawling, the doorless Gladiator was in a league of its own in one regard: You could lean out where the door would be, look forward past where a side mirror would be and see clearly where the driver-side front wheel was headed. I could even reach up and grab the tubular roof rail and swing out for a better look, front or back, without unbuckling my seat belt. Contrast the ZR2, which has a tall hood and doors. It lacks grab handles overhead, and oftentimes there’s no clearance to open your door anyway.

The Gladiator also had a trail camera that shows a view forward on the touchscreen, but in my opinion the presence of this feature took a distant second to the absence of the doors when sighting an appropriate line.

Taking the Trail Home

As on the street, doors-off Jeepin’ isn’t all positive. It took about a half hour to remove the hard top and doors, and of course the reverse is required later. It isn’t something you’re likely to do for a run to the grocery store, but if you’re going to spend a whole day off-roading, there’s plenty of return on the investment. We did our best with cleaning the Gladiator’s interior before returning it to Jeep, but we suspect people are going to be finding evidence of our adventure for months or even years to come.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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Vehicles Affected: Approximately 91,300 model-year 2017-19 Nissan Titan gasoline pickup trucks

The Problem: The alternator harness may have been damaged during engine installation and could cause an electrical short. An electrical short may cause an engine stall, increasing the risk of a crash or a fire.

The Fix: Dealers will inspect the alternator harness for proper routing and possible damage; the harness will be clipped into the correct position or replaced as necessary. All repairs will be done for free.

What Owners Should Do: Nissan will begin notifying owners Tuesday. Owners can call Nissan at 800-867-7669, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s vehicle-safety hotline at 888-327-4236 or visit its website to check their vehicle identification number and learn more.

Need to Find a Dealer for Service? Go to Cars.com Service & Repair to find your local dealer. To check for other recalls, and to schedule a free recall repair at your local dealership, click here: Nissan Titan

More From Cars.com:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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Vehicles Affected: Approximately 500 model-year 2019 Ram 2500 and 3500 heavy-duty pickup trucks, and 3500, 4500 and 5500 chassis-cab trucks equipped with diesel engines

The Problem: The fuel lines may leak fuel into the engine compartment; a fuel leak in the presence of an ignition source increases the risk of a fire.

The Fix: Dealers will inspect the fuel lines and replace them, if necessary, for free.

What Owners Should Do: Ram parent company Fiat Chrysler Automobiles will begin notifying owners Aug. 16. Owners can call FCA at 800-853-1403, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s vehicle-safety hotline at 888-327-4236 or visit its website to check their vehicle identification number and learn more.

Need to Find a Dealer for Service? Go to Cars.com Service & Repair to find your local dealer. Click here to schedule a free recall repair at your local dealership.

More From Cars.com:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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After a long day hunched over a keyboard, nothing sounds better than driving home in a luxury car. Scratch that; nothing sounds better than driving home in a luxury car with massaging seats.

Related: The 2019 Mercedes-AMG CLS53’s Blind Spot Assist Had Us Seeing Red (in a Good Way)

The stress of the day will melt away as the car’s seat rollers work their magic on all the knots and sore muscles in your back — that is, unless you’re in a Mercedes-Benz. Sadly, Mercedes’ massaging seats are the equivalent of a half-hearted massage begrudgingly given.

I recently spent a weekend in the 2019 Mercedes-AMG CLS53. Our test car started at $79,900, but once it was loaded up with optional equipment, it totaled $106,980. Among those luxurious touches were the active multicontour front seats with massage feature that cost $1,320.

Break out the world’s tiniest violin for my tale of woe. The Mercedes’ massage function comes in seven flavors:

  • Hot Relaxing Back
  • Hot Relaxing Shoulder
  • Activating Massage
  • Classic Massage
  • Wave Massage
  • Active Workout Back
  • Active Workout Cushion

But for me, they’re all rather vanilla.

For $1,320, I could get 26 30-minute deep tissue massages at $50 a pop (I can only handle 30 minutes due to their intensity). Or I could invest in nine shiatsu massage cushion with heat chair pads for $139.95. Or I could go whole hog and buy a massage chair for $1,099.

What I really want is a massaging driver’s seat that beats my muscle tension into submission. Is that too much to ask for?!

More From Cars.com:

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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