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Many of my executive-level clients have aspirations to serve on a corporate board, either in conjunction with their current role or as part of their career transition into an active retirement. Board seats are exceptionally competitive, and the process for sourcing these roles differs in some ways from the strategies the executive may have used in a previous search. Below are several suggestions for optimizing your board search campaign.

Understand that a board resume is different than other resumes.

Your current C-level resume may reflect how you grew revenues, reduced costs, improved margins, launched new products, or optimized business operations, but to land a board role you will have to show more. In order to be relevant to a board, you need to be able to show what activities you participated in that are most similar to the work you would do on a board. Board member responsibilities are more aligned with strategic planning, M&A activity, financial oversight, governance and compliance, executive compensation, and succession planning. In recent years, board have also become more involved in cyber-security initiatives.

Showcase your current interactions with boards.

If you don’t have any corporate board experience, focus on interactions you have had with the board. Did you present at board meetings or prepare notes or reports for others that did? Did you help set the agenda or take the board notes? Think about how you have interacted with boards to prove that you are aware of the temperament necessary to be a board member and the culture that surrounds the post.

Highlight your non-profit board experience.

If you have served as a volunteer board member, you have most likely developed skills that are transferrable to a corporate board role. Develop stories of success around some of your responsibilities such as setting the five-year plan for the organization, overseeing the budget process, or managing a brand transformation,

Activate your network.

Most board seats are filled through networking. Be sure to stay top-of-mind with your network and let them know about your board aspirations. Develop a pitch outlining your top three skills as they relate to potential board roles.

Seek out board education partners and affiliations.

The National Association of Corporate Directors (NACD) offers board education, credentialing, and networking events to individuals serving on boards of public, private, and non-profit organizations. This is a great way to meet others in the corporate board space and become on insider regarding potential opportunities.

Be Patient.

It typically takes about two years to land a corporate board seat, and if you are currently in a full-time executive role, the trajectory could be longer. Create a plan for pacing yourself and committing to professional development and networking opportunities that keep you on track.

The post How to Land Your First Corporate Board Role appeared first on Career Solvers.

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This might be one of the questions I am most frequently asked. My answer is always the same…it depends. While it’s not unusual for a senior-level executive to spend six to 12 months in an active search, there are numerous factors that contribute to the length of a search. Here are the biggest ones to consider.

The amount of time you spend on job boards.
It seems so sensible. There is a list of open jobs. Your skills match the job requirements. Of course the hiring manager will deem you to be the perfect candidate. But while you are thinking this, so are 100+ other people. And simultaneously, there are one or two other candidates that were referred in. They are the people who will generally get the interview, because someone who knows and trusts them recommended them. The other 100+ candidates will most likely hear nothing.

Instead of spending hours applying to the jobs online posted by employers who aren’t likely to respond to you, identify companies where you think there may be a good fit based on your skills and try to make contacts at those companies despite there being no indication if there is a current opportunity there. Start conversations that showcase your value before there is a live opening and become a company insider. That way you may be able to become one of the two candidates referred in when there is an open job and not one of the 100+ who most likely will hear nothing.

Your reliance on recruiters to find you the next job.
Most recruiters will tell you that you are more likely to land your next job through a relationship than through a recruiter. . Recruiters are inundated with candidates, and it’s unrealistic to assume they will remember you based on the fact that you once sent them your resume.

Recruiters are only exposed to a certain portion of the market; the jobs at companies willing to pay a steep recruiter fee. Companies hire recruiters to find the exact match; the needle in the haystack. It’s not unusual for them to request a slate of candidates strictly from particular companies, schools, or degree programs.

Instead of thinking about how a recruiter can help you, think about how you can help them. Network with them and pitch your value, but also be gracious and offer to make introductions to others that may be suitable for their current openings. This will make you more memorable and improve the chances that you will be top-of-mind with them should a role that matches your background become available.

The quality and quantity of your network.
In order to network effectively, you need both. You need to reach some level of “critical mass” in order to more easily leverage the strength of your second and third degree connections. I recommend trying to build your network to at least 300 connections and using LinkedIn as the tool for tracking those connections. But having a large network where you barely know the majority of your first degree connections will not have much value because your relationship with these connections may not be strong enough to have them become advocates for you. Building a quality network will generally yield better results, because people who know you are more likely to recommend you or be willing to make other introductions.

How you frame the “ask.”
Most job seekers reach out to their network and say something like, “I’m in a job search, and if you hear of anything that matches my skills, let me know.” The problem with this ask is that the likelihood that your contact knows of an open opportunity right now that is an exact match is quite remote. Additionally, with this type of ask, your contact is likely to assist with some well-intentioned, but limited help. They will probably say, “Send me your resume, and I will see what I can do.” They will probably send it to their HR department, where it will go unnoticed unless miraculously there is a job that you are a direct fit for.

While it may sound counterintuitive, creating a broader ask will generally lead to better results. Instead try, “I am currently in a job transition, and while I understand you don’t necessarily know of a role right now that matches my skills, I am reaching out to learn more about (your role, your company, your industry views-pick the most appropriate ask) to help inform my job search. People are more likely to share information when it is not linked to an expectation of a job. They may even feel flattered that you asked for their insights and opinions. As part of your conversation, ask if there is anyone else they suggest you speak to, reiterating that you make no assumption that their contacts know of an open job. By gaining these introductions, you increase the likelihood that someone you meet actually knows of an open role that may be suitable for you.

The amount of time you put into your networking.
If you are not currently employed, view your job search as your fulltime job and dedicate at least 35 hours per week to your search. There is a lot to do. You will need to create an entire suite of self-marketing tools including a resume, cover letter, executive bio, and LinkedIn profile. You will need to identify and activate your network, ask for meetings, take those meetings, send follow up letters,
research companies of interest, prep for interviews, and more. If you only spend half the allotted hours working on your search, it will take you twice as long to land your next job.

How helpful you have been to others in the past.
What goes around comes around. Do you have a reputation as a connector or a mentor? Have you made any meaningful introductions to colleagues or friends that led them one step closer to their next job? People remember people who have helped them. Do you fall into this category? If not, it’s never too late to start. As a job seeker, you probably have some new-found empathy for people in a similar situation. Try to help others in search, and become a connector for contacts who may need recommendations for referrals for other roles outside your professional level, industry, or area of expertise.

How realistic your salary requirements are.
Most job seekers use their past salary as the main benchmark for determining their salary requirements. They hope to make more, but will settle for the same or a bit less. But all a salary represents is the amount of money an employer was willing to pay you to do a particular job at a certain point in time. It may have no bearing on what the current market value for that role is or it may not represent the responsibilities of the new role you are seeking. If your salary requirements are higher than what the market will bear, you may end up extending your search, holding out for a salary that is no longer realistic. Be sure to research the competitive value of the jobs/level you are applying for. Consult colleagues, recruiters, industry surveys, and online resources like Glassdoor, Payscale, and LinkedIn for salary survey data.

Your willingness to relocate.
Particularly at the senior executive levels, there will be fewer roles to compete for. Candidates who are willing to relocate will have a competitive edge over those who are not. If relocation is not an option, consider ways you could still be considered a candidate. Perhaps you would be willing to travel or can outline a path to success through virtual work. Pitch the value you bring to the table that a local candidate might not have, and prove that an alternative to relocation could work.

Luck.
There is a certain element of luck in a job search, and I wish every job seeker a good dose of it. While we can’t control this factor, we can try to influence it somewhat to increase the likelihood of being in the right place at the right time more frequently. This occurs when you are open-minded about helping others, create a strong professional brand and industry presence for yourself, and remain diligent to the task at hand.

The post How Long Does the Average Job Search Take? appeared first on Career Solvers.

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This might be one of the questions I am most frequently asked. My answer is always the same…it depends. While it’s not unusual for a senior-level executive to spend six to 12 months in an active search, there are numerous factors that contribute to the length of a search. Here are the biggest ones to consider.

The amount of time you spend on job boards.
It seems so sensible. There is a list of open jobs. Your skills match the job requirements. Of course the hiring manager will deem you to be the perfect candidate. But while you are thinking this, so are 100+ other people. And simultaneously, there are one or two other candidates that were referred in. They are the people who will generally get the interview, because someone who knows and trusts them recommended them. The other 100+ candidates will most likely hear nothing.

Instead of spending hours applying to the jobs online posted by employers who aren’t likely to respond to you, identify companies where you think there may be a good fit based on your skills and try to make contacts at those companies despite there being no indication if there is a current opportunity there. Start conversations that showcase your value before there is a live opening and become a company insider. That way you may be able to become one of the two candidates referred in when there is an open job and not one of the 100+ who most likely will hear nothing.

Your reliance on recruiters to find you the next job.
Most recruiters will tell you that you are more likely to land your next job through a relationship than through a recruiter. . Recruiters are inundated with candidates, and it’s unrealistic to assume they will remember you based on the fact that you once sent them your resume.

Recruiters are only exposed to a certain portion of the market; the jobs at companies willing to pay a steep recruiter fee. Companies hire recruiters to find the exact match; the needle in the haystack. It’s not unusual for them to request a slate of candidates strictly from particular companies, schools, or degree programs.

Instead of thinking about how a recruiter can help you, think about how you can help them. Network with them and pitch your value, but also be gracious and offer to make introductions to others that may be suitable for their current openings. This will make you more memorable and improve the chances that you will be top-of-mind with them should a role that matches your background become available.

The quality and quantity of your network.
In order to network effectively, you need both. You need to reach some level of “critical mass” in order to more easily leverage the strength of your second and third degree connections. I recommend trying to build your network to at least 300 connections and using LinkedIn as the tool for tracking those connections. But having a large network where you barely know the majority of your first degree connections will not have much value because your relationship with these connections may not be strong enough to have them become advocates for you. Building a quality network will generally yield better results, because people who know you are more likely to recommend you or be willing to make other introductions.

How you frame the “ask.”
Most job seekers reach out to their network and say something like, “I’m in a job search, and if you hear of anything that matches my skills, let me know.” The problem with this ask is that the likelihood that your contact knows of an open opportunity right now that is an exact match is quite remote. Additionally, with this type of ask, your contact is likely to assist with some well-intentioned, but limited help. They will probably say, “Send me your resume, and I will see what I can do.” They will probably send it to their HR department, where it will go unnoticed unless miraculously there is a job that you are a direct fit for.

While it may sound counterintuitive, creating a broader ask will generally lead to better results. Instead try, “I am currently in a job transition, and while I understand you don’t necessarily know of a role right now that matches my skills, I am reaching out to learn more about (your role, your company, your industry views-pick the most appropriate ask) to help inform my job search. People are more likely to share information when it is not linked to an expectation of a job. They may even feel flattered that you asked for their insights and opinions. As part of your conversation, ask if there is anyone else they suggest you speak to, reiterating that you make no assumption that their contacts know of an open job. By gaining these introductions, you increase the likelihood that someone you meet actually knows of an open role that may be suitable for you.

The amount of time you put into your networking.
If you are not currently employed, view your job search as your fulltime job and dedicate at least 35 hours per week to your search. There is a lot to do. You will need to create an entire suite of self-marketing tools including a resume, cover letter, executive bio, and LinkedIn profile. You will need to identify and activate your network, ask for meetings, take those meetings, send follow up letters,
research companies of interest, prep for interviews, and more. If you only spend half the allotted hours working on your search, it will take you twice as long to land your next job.

How helpful you have been to others in the past.
What goes around comes around. Do you have a reputation as a connector or a mentor? Have you made any meaningful introductions to colleagues or friends that led them one step closer to their next job? People remember people who have helped them. Do you fall into this category? If not, it’s never too late to start. As a job seeker, you probably have some new-found empathy for people in a similar situation. Try to help others in search, and become a connector for contacts who may need recommendations for referrals for other roles outside your professional level, industry, or area of expertise.

How realistic your salary requirements are.
Most job seekers use their past salary as the main benchmark for determining their salary requirements. They hope to make more, but will settle for the same or a bit less. But all a salary represents is the amount of money an employer was willing to pay you to do a particular job at a certain point in time. It may have no bearing on what the current market value for that role is or it may not represent the responsibilities of the new role you are seeking. If your salary requirements are higher than what the market will bear, you may end up extending your search, holding out for a salary that is no longer realistic. Be sure to research the competitive value of the jobs/level you are applying for. Consult colleagues, recruiters, industry surveys, and online resources like Glassdoor, Payscale, and LinkedIn for salary survey data.

Your willingness to relocate.
Particularly at the senior executive levels, there will be fewer roles to compete for. Candidates who are willing to relocate will have a competitive edge over those who are not. If relocation is not an option, consider ways you could still be considered a candidate. Perhaps you would be willing to travel or can outline a path to success through virtual work. Pitch the value you bring to the table that a local candidate might not have, and prove that an alternative to relocation could work.

Luck.
There is a certain element of luck in a job search, and I wish every job seeker a good dose of it. While we can’t control this factor, we can try to influence it somewhat to increase the likelihood of being in the right place at the right time more frequently. This occurs when you are open-minded about helping others, create a strong professional brand and industry presence for yourself, and remain diligent to the task at hand.

The post How Long Does the Average Job Search Take? appeared first on Career Solvers.

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When I diagnose problems clients have with their interview strategy, I often notice they answer interview questions too generally. They attempt to convey their fit for the job by describing the personal attributes they think make them relevant for the position. They explain they are team players, flexible, and good communicators; they claim they are passionate about their work. But rarely do they go much deeper, failing to reveal just how they have leveraged these attributes and skills.

In my free ebook, How to Tell a Great Interview Story, I discuss common interview questions and explain how to craft a response that demonstrates your fit and value to an employer. Questions explored include:

  • How do you overcome obstacles to get the job done?
  • Describe your leadership style.
  • Have you ever had a disagreement with a colleague?
  • How do you deal with change?
  • How do you handle projects that lack clear goals?
  • Give me an example of a project where someone dropped the ball.
  • What traits do you look for when hiring staff?

Download your free ebook at the bottom of our homepage here.

The post How Good Is Your Interview Story? appeared first on Career Solvers.

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The end of the year is a natural time to take stock of the past year and plan for the year ahead. Career Solvers is pleased to introduce our 2019 Career
Planner, designed to help you take a look back at 2018 and look ahead to
2019.

You have very likely accomplished a lot in the past 12 months, even if some days it doesn’t feel like it. The exercises in the Career Planner will help you assess your accomplishments — both professionally and personally.

Download the book and set aside time — either each day for a couple of days in a row, or a block of time in one day — to spend on this. It’s important. If you don’t stop and think about these things, life will just happen … but it may not be the life you want. Go to our home page, scroll to the bottom, and download your Career Solvers 2019 Career Planner.

The post Download Your Free 2019 Career Planner appeared first on Career Solvers.

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Mobilizing your network during a job search is a lot of work with many ups and downs. People don’t always react to your requests for guidance and information as you’d like them to, and many report learning who their friends really are during a search.

After coaching hundreds of job search clients, I’ve seen pretty much every networking interaction possible. Sometimes the people you most expect to help you don’t, and total strangers are incredibly open and giving. The earlier you identify the “tag lines” of people you come into contact with while networking, the faster you will be able to reframe how they can help you, and course correct in order to get the most mileage out of your contacts.
Here are the most common things people who you try to network with will say.

1. I need to reschedule our meeting. This contact commits to a meeting, but then reschedules several times because he’s overwhelmed by other responsibilities. When dealing with this type, suggest meeting at an event you know he will be attending; perhaps grabbing a few minutes at a conference you will both be attending, or offering to stop by his office 15 minutes before his first appointment.

2. I’m unhappy in my own job. Your efforts to network are usually thwarted by her complaints about her own situation. Unfortunately, this can happen when you network with colleagues at a company where you were recently downsized, or when you are talking to someone in an industry experiencing contraction. Try to be empathic and offer some sort of advice to help. Then steer the conversation toward how your contact can help you.

3. I’m not comfortable sharing my contacts with you. Maybe the person doesn’t say this outright, but it’s obvious she is reluctant to give up any names of contacts because she is protective of her network and very concerned with their opinion of her. Or perhaps she doesn’t know you well enough to feel she can share this information or vouch for your skills. Remind her that you recognize her contacts don’t necessarily know of any open jobs. Stress that you are just trying to meet people who can share valuable information about an industry, job function, or company to help validate your search targets. By lowering the expectation, you may be able to convince her that an introduction carries no risk.

4. I don’t know how I can help you. She often says something like, “I don’t know how I can help you; all my contacts are in industry X and you are looking for people in industry Y.” Remind her that you are not only interested in what her contacts do, but who they know in other industries and can introduce you to.

5. Just tell me who you want to meet. This contact only wants to help if you can tell him specifically who you want an introduction to. Try to reframe the “ask” by saying something like, “I’m not limiting myself to a specific contact; I’m interested in meeting anyone in the healthcare industry with a VP title or above in marketing.”

6. Let me get back to you. He claims he knows several people and is willing to make introductions. But when you follow up with him you hear nothing. Try one or two additional outreaches. If that doesn’t work, seek out others with similar profiles who may be more receptive to your request.

7. Feel free to post your resume to our company website. This contact immediately refers you to the company’s online job posting portal. They genuinely think they are helping you. Educate them by saying, “Thank you, but in my experience HR departments are inundated with candidates; I’m trying to get in front of the hiring manager so I can have a meaningful conversation about the value I can add.”

8. Give me your resume, and I will see what I can do. He’s the guy who says, “Give me your resume and I will send it to our HR department.” He thinks he is helping and following company protocol. But unless HR is hiring for someone with your exact skill set right now, the chances of them responding are low. Tell your contact that in your experience HR is generally a gatekeeper and you are trying to get in front of a decision maker.

9. No response at all. You call, you email, you send a message via LinkedIn, but hear nothing. When you encounter this situation, reach out to others who know the contact to see if you can find out why she hasn’t been responsive or to ask if they would be willing to reach out to her on your behalf. If you still hear nothing, move on. It may be that this person isn’t willing to help.

Part of your networking strategy will be to educate your contacts on how they can help you. But you will also meet people who get it right on the first try and provide invaluable leads. And ultimately, you will meet that person who actually has an open job and wants to fill it with you. He exists, but you often have to meet many of the others who put up roadblocks before you get to him.

Remember, a job search is a marathon, not a sprint. You will go down many paths that lead to nothing and meet many people who won’t be able to help you land that next job. But only by exploring all paths can you find the gems in your network who can help you get to the finish line faster.

The post How to Avoid Networking That Goes Nowhere appeared first on Career Solvers.

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I am pleased to announce that Career Solvers recently won three of the industry’s most prestigious resume writing awards. As the winner of the Modernize Your Resume Award, sponsored by Emerald Career Publishing, my work was recognized for its tight writing, compelling strategy for messaging the client’s value, and unique design aesthetic. I achieved an Honorable Mention in the  Recognizing Outstanding Achievement in Resumes (ROAR) competition sponsored by The National Resume Writers Association, my second time being honored with a win.

My win in the TORI (Toast of the Resume Industry) competition, sponsored by Career Directors International, marks my 12th TORI award since 2006. The competition draws hundreds of entries from resume writers from all over the world, and it is an honor to be a winner this year in the category of Best Healthcare Resume. I’ve been honored in the past in the categories of Best Executive Resume, Best Technology Resume,  Best Sales & Marketing Resume, Best International Resume, Best Creative Resume, and Best Cover Letter.

Special thanks to the organizations who make these contests possible and to the judges who dedicated their time to reviewing all the entries. I am thankful for your contribution to the industry.

The post Career Solvers Honored With Three Industry Distinctions appeared first on Career Solvers.

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Despite popular belief, the holiday season is a great time to continue your job search efforts to accelerate potential activity in December and the New Year. Here are 12 networking tips for the holiday season.

Attend holiday parties. Many professional associations host holiday parties. This is a great way to meet others in your field that may be able to make meaningful introductions for you.

Throw your own party. Have an intimate dinner party or a bigger bash at your home or nearby restaurant. This is a great way to practice your pitch, and reconnect with people who may be able to assist you in your search.

Ask for informational interviews. The last two weeks of December are traditionally slow for most businesses. You may find that some of the decision makers you need to get in front of are in the office during those last two weeks and it may be a lot easier to get in front of them during this time of year.

Keep looking. Many job seekers take a break during the holiday season, assuming no one is hiring. But many companies do hire in December to make good use of their current hiring budgets or shore up talent in the new year. When other job seekers lay low during December, you may have a better chance to be found.

Volunteer. Tis the season…volunteer to do something meaningful in your personal or professional communities during December. Doing so can increase your visibility and jump start some conversations with people who may be able to help you in the New Year.

Do a favor for someone. Maybe you can watch your friend’s children while she does her Christmas shopping, or assist a friend who needs help with a computer problem or home improvement project. Your goodwill will not be forgotten and is likely to be reciprocated with help for your in the future.

Take a vacation. What better way to meet new decision makers? It doesn’t need to be extravagant…just find new people to have conversations with. Let them know what you do and ask for their suggestions for expanding your brand’s reach in a very informational, non-threatening way. You may just pick up a lead or two.

Reconnect with friends of “Christmas Past.” Check out LinkedIn and Facebook and search for old friends. What better time to reconnect than the holiday season? Get over the fact that it’s been awhile since you last spoke and take the first step. You may be pleasantly surprised by the response you get.

Endorse or recommend colleagues you respect who do good work. If you have just reconnected with someone, the next step might be to endorse or recommend them on LinkedIn or like their Facebook status. These simple displays of acknowledgement go a long way towards building solid relationships.

Send holiday cards. Holiday cards provide a natural “touch point” or opportunity to reconnect with friends, family, and colleagues. Reach out to your network now with some “best wishes” and holiday cheer and you will have a natural entrée into a job-related conversation in the New Year.

Schedule a lunch or coffee with a colleague or friend. Your contacts may have more time to give during this season and schedules may be more flexible. Take advantage of the lull and get back in touch with people who can serve as advocates in the new year.

Join a professional association. Professional associations offer excellent opportunities for beefing up your skills and building your network of contacts. Plus, many offer end-of-year membership discounts as an incentive for joining.

The post On the First Day of Christmas, My Network Gave to Me… appeared first on Career Solvers.

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When you start a job search, reaching out to people you know for introductions and leads is critical. But it can be challenging to get a handle on and mobilize your network, particularly if it is large or if you have been out of touch with key contacts for a while.

A great place to begin assessing the quality and quantity of your network is LinkedIn. Linked in allows you to export your contacts into a spreadsheet, which makes it much easier to understand who is in your network from a high-level view.

Once you have exported your contacts, create categories to differentiate the quality of each relationship on LinkedIn. Use some kind of sorting or color coding system to make it easy to examine the quantity of contacts in each category. Here’s an example of a sorting system.

Strong contacts; those you know well and could probably set up a meeting with fairly easily. Even though these people know you well, they may not be able to articulate your professional value proposition to others, so it makes sense to meet with them and share your positioning with them so they can make the right types of introductions. Highlight their names in yellow.

People you know well, but haven’t talked to in over a year. You need to figure out a strategy for reengaging with this group before launching into requests for information or introductions. Try reviewing their activity on LinkedIn first. Perhaps you can comment on something they wrote or liked. This type of activity often provides the ice-breaker you need to expand the dialogue. Highlight their names in blue.

People who are acquaintances, and who you would like to know better. This might be someone that you met at a professional event or had one business meeting with. You may have agreed to connect on LinkedIn, but then never did anything to nurture the relationship. For these contacts, try sharing or commenting on content they post to get on their radar and make it easier to initiate a conversation. Highlight them in green.

People who you are connected to on LinkedIn, but have no idea who they are. It’s not unusual to have several contacts who fall into this category. Take some time to evaluate each person and decide if it’s worth it to initiate a relationship. Follow their feeds to gain a better understanding of who they are professionally and who they are connected to. Highlight them in purple.

Consider doing a similar exercise for other databases you may have for storing contacts. This may be as sophisticated as a formal CRM system or as simple as an old address book or Roledex. The important thing is to capture all your contacts in one place so you can implement a strategic plan for your outreach.

Next, you will need to create a plan for how many people you will reach out to at a time. This will vary depending on your job status (someone in a full-time job and also in a job search will generally have less time to dedicate to their search activities). You need to create a situation where no one in your network has to wait to get on your calendar. You must be exceptionally accessible and flexible based on their availability. You may want to start reaching out to just a few contacts each week to determine the cadence of your efforts and then you can decide if and when to increase your weekly outreach.

Below are some screenshots to show you how to export your LinkedIn contacts.

 

The post How Strong is Your Network? appeared first on Career Solvers.

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More and more employers are conducting first and even second round phone interviews for executive candidates rather than in-person interviews. These meetings should be taken just as seriously as in-person interviews. Will you be prepared? Here are five tips.

  1. Practice for phone interviews. Don’t just practice answering questions — also practice how you will sound on the phone. Conduct a mock interview with a friend and record it. (You can use a free service like Freeconferencing.com.) You may be surprised at how you come across on the phone. Identify opportunities for improvement.
  2. Be aware that not all phone interviews are scheduled in advance. If you get a call from a hiring manager or human resources staffer and it’s not a good time to talk (i.e., you’re in a noisy place), either don’t answer the call and let it go to voicemail, or ask if you can get to a quiet place and call them back in a few minutes.
  3. When scheduling a phone interview, make sure you know the exact time of the call (including any time zone clarification), who the call is with, who is calling whom (and on what phone number), and how long to expect the call to last.
  4. If you are preparing for a scheduled phone interview, create a cheat sheet of notes you can reference — for example, specific metrics related to your accomplishments, questions you want to ask, etc.
  5. Prepare for a phone interview like you would prepare for an in-person interview: Research the company and practice answering the questions you expect to be asked.

The post Five Tips for Preparing for Phone Interviews appeared first on Career Solvers.

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