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Farmers don’t get off the farm that much, but when they do, they relish the connections they make with Cabot fans on travels all over the U.S. — even the world!

From right nearby to the world over, Cabot farmers are making connections through delicious dairy.
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We collected just a few of those stories prompted by Blake Gendebien of Twin Mill Farms in Ogdensburg, NY. “I can’t help but notice how many stories from my friends and family are wrapped around lasting friendships and conversations that start by talking about Cabot cheese,” Blake said.

Peter and Blake Gendebien

Such connections are special wherever they happen, but the joy is amplified when they are a little unexpected and happen “west of the Mississippi or on vacation anywhere,” he continued. “My sister who lives in Las Vegas is often asked about where to find Cabot cheese!”

Two members of the Duffy family of Great Brook Farm in Carlisle, MA shared tales of cheese-lovers encountered both near and far. Mark Duffy recalls being in the airport in Hong Kong when fellow travelers noticed his Cabot plaid bag and volunteered that they were big fans. “Once they heard we were farmer-owners, they said they would have to start buying even more,” he said happily.

Tamma & Mark Duffy

Closer to home, his daughter Marlow was sampling cheese in Boston when an Amish family caught her attention. “Since they had their hands full with children,” she recalled, Marlow headed over to them to hand-deliver some Cabot single-serve snack packs. “While chatting, they told me they have cousins who farm in New York State and supply milk to Cabot,” she said.

Marlow Duffy

Amanda Freund of Freund’s Farm in East Canaan, CT has a bad habit (or good, we think) of rearranging the Cabot cheeses in the dairy section of every grocery store she visits. Not that long ago, she was in a store about 45 minutes away from the farm and reached in to pull a two-pound block of pepper jack to the front of the shelf. When she saw the packaging, “I shrieked,” she recalled, “causing the couple next to me to jump back. They hesitantly approached me, thinking something was very wrong.”

Wordlessly, Amanda pointed to the label, which, to her own pleased surprise, bore her face and that of her sister. It turned out one member of the couple volunteered with a local community health organization that connects inner-city residents with local food, including growing their own. “She was excited to meet a local farmer,” Amanda said, and they exchanged contact information to arrange an educational farm tour for her organization. (Amanda noted that she bought a full case of pepper jack as gifts for friends and family and when her mom, Theresa, returned a month later to buy another case, a store employee said, “Oh, I heard about you, you’re the farmers on the label!”)

Amanda Freund with a case of Pepper Jack cheese!

Amanda also shared another small cheese-world experience. At a conference she attended several years ago, she met, Danielle, a PhD student from North Carolina State who was admirably earning her degree in pharmacology and her veterinary medicine simultaneously. The two stayed in loose touch via social media but had not chatted directly until a few weeks ago when she texted Amanda to say she had spied a Cabot van in a store parking lot in North Carolina. “She was not expecting me to know exactly who was driving that van,” Amanda said, but, of course, the co-op farmer community is small, and Amanda knew it was Allison Akins of Five Mile Farm in Lisbon, NY in her traveling cheese ambassador role. “We exchanged numbers by text and Allison connected with Danielle for some #farmlove and cheese sharing,” Amanda said with satisfaction.

Our next story comes from Denise Barstow of Barstow’s Longview Farm in Hadley, MA. Every year, Denise recounted, the farm takes part in the local Memorial Day parade, tossing Cabot single-serve samples off a float. “The parade, not big, not flashy, but as townie as it gets,” she said. “If you’re not in it, you’re watching! The streets are lined with locals in lawn chairs, everyone waving at the passing floats and kids collecting candy thrown from the floats.”

The Barstow’s Parade Float!

The first year the Barstow crew threw cheese into the mix was to celebrate their farm’s bicentennial birthday in 2006. The first few tosses went to some adults without kids, and assuming it was candy, they didn’t budge. “‘It’s cheese!’ we hollered from the float. ‘Cheese!?’ they yelled back tripping over themselves to get down to the road’s edge. The whole route was like that, the farmers yelling ‘Cheese!’ and the spectators yelling back, ‘Cheese!?’ to confirm.” It’s become a parade tradition at this point, Denise said with a laugh. “We have the town trained. They see the Barstow’s float coming and get to their feet hollering, ‘Cheese!’ And we get stopped all year: on our way to vote, in the grocery store, at the bank or the post office with thanks for the cheese at the parade.”

And last, but by no means least, a trio of connections shared by Jenni Tilton-Flood of Flood Brothers Farm in Clinton, ME who has traveled to New York City several times with a group of Cabot farmers. There, she has taken full advantage of getting to know the locals which, as is often the case in big cities, includes folks who hail originally from all over the world.

During one visit, Jenni struck up a conversation with a sharply dressed student of political science working as a cab driver to support his studies and his family. Born in the midst of conflict in their home of Ghana, the young man’s mother had heard of the passing of Nobel Peace Prize winner, Anwar Sadat, and named her son after him thinking that “it would be a good thing for the world to have another.” As Anwar drove Jenni, the two shared cheese and stories of their lives. He confided that what he misses most is the community that Ghana offers; he has found that city life is often too busy to stop and be part of a greater family. Jenni, in turn, explained what it means to be part of the Cabot farm family, which Anwar appreciated very much.

Cabot Farmers Lucas and Angela Young with Anwar

Another cab connection came when Cabot farmers spreading the cheese love in the Big Apple were standing in front of Metropolitan Museum of Art. Rachel, a cab driver, pulled over and jumped out of her cab to say thanks for her favorite cheese, which she has been eating for 20 years. “We gave her cheese and coupons and finally convinced her that we very much appreciated her thanks and, in fact, we had traveled all the way from our farms to the city to say thank you to people like her!” Jenni explained.

A cab driver in NYC, Rachel that farmer Jenni met on a visit.

It was on another such trip to NYC that Jenni met Thiam from Senegal while taking a stroll in Bryant Park. “Thiam actually spends his days working in Bryant Park as a horticulturist,” Jenni explained, but he was a dairy farmer back home. Over his 20 years in New York, he has returned a few times to Senegal, and he told Jenni he misses his cows and the open landscape. “I’m just a Cabot farmer so I can’t magic someone to where they want to be,” Jenni reflected, “but I can sit down next to someone, give them some cheese and share pictures on my phone of my cows and the green grass of my home: a Cabot farmer from Maine and a dairy farmer from Senegal sitting on a bench in Bryant Park, eating cheese, homesick for their cows.”

Thiam from Senegal

Each of these connections—whether fostering ties within a farmer’s own community or expanding the Cabot community around the country and even the globe—is precious. As Jenni put it so well, “Cabot knows that being the World’s Best is about getting to know the world.”

Have you had a chance encounter with a Cabot farmer or employee out there in the world that added a personal story to your favorite dairy products? Tell us about it!

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The Cabot Blog by Cabot Creamery - 4d ago

Hosting a brunch is a great way to gather friends or family over a meal full of crowd-pleasing dishes. However, if you or your guests are following a low carb diet, it can be a bit of a challenge to find enough dishes to make a full meal. The usual fare of baked goods, high carb casseroles and fruit salads simply won’t fit your current eating plan.

we're brunching - low carb style! Get our favorite recipes #cabotcheese
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Fortunately, many of our favorite brunch recipes here at Cabot actually DO fit a low carb way of life. In fact, cheese — naturally made of simply milk fats and proteins — is an ideal inclusion to any low carb way of life. Paired with cured meats, olives and nuts, cheese can start in a cheese board that offers the perfect start to any get together, low carb or otherwise.

But the best brunches obviously need to offer more than just a low carb appetizer. From start to finish, here are our favorite choices to help you host the best low carb brunch:

Cauliflower Breakfast Casserole

Some of the most amazing brunch menus begin with a crowd-pleasing casserole. But often they’re loaded with high carb potatoes or bread cubes. By using naturally low carb cauliflower as the base, this low carb breakfast casserole is veggie-rich and lower in carbohydrate, while still being loaded with lots of flavor.

Roasted Asparagus Salad

If there’s a right way and wrong way to do low carb, the wrong way involves a total avoidance of veggies. Vegetables are naturally low carb, extremely nutritious and high in fiber. A salad at brunch helps fill out the plate and provide a nice balance to all the other rich dishes on the menu.

Spicy Cheddar Muffins

One of the most common complaints of a low carb diet is the lack of variety when it comes to baked goods. Very few options fit into a low carb eating plan because of the high carbohydrate content of the grains they’re baked with. You can think of these muffins as “mock” muffins because they’re actually not baked with grains at all. Instead, the recipe uses high-fat, high-fiber coconut flour and fits perfectly into a low carb way of life.

Low Carb Raspberry Scones 

Who says scones aren’t invited to a low carb brunch? They are when they’re made with the right mix of nutrient-dense almond flour and coconut flour. By combining these high-fat, low carb flours with just enough of a natural sugar substitute like erythritol, you get the perfect low carb brunch treat that will make you forget higher carb choices ever existed.

Low Carb Parfaits

These parfaits may look off limits for a low carb diet, but don’t be fooled. By using a combo of Cabot Greek Yogurt and whipping cream topped with just the right amount of naturally lower in carbohydrate, high-fiber fruits this sweet treat ends brunch with a taste everyone will enjoy.

Get more low carb recipes here.
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The Cabot Blog by Cabot Creamery - 4d ago

Cabot farms are more than just home to the cows who produce the fresh, creamy milk that makes our award-winning dairy products. They’re also home to cutting edge technology that’s revolutionizing cow comfort, improving farm efficiency, and moving farming forward.

On robotic milking farms, cows set their own schedule and milking is more efficient, which means cows have more time to rest, and our farmers have more time to care for their herds. #cabotcheese
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Robotic Milking may sound like something out of a science-fiction movie, but in truth, it’s already been around for several years, and represents the bold spirit of innovation that our farmers have embraced for over a century. Robotic milking is great for farms because it gives cows full control over when and how often they get milked, which gives farmers more time to focus on caring for their herd. Additionally, it ensures that chores & schedules are more flexible – allowing farmers more time to plant, harvest crops, or attend their kids sports games!

Here’s how it works: Step 1:

When they’re ready, cows voluntarily enter the milking stall. A sensor reads a chip usually located on a collar around each cow’s neck and either begins prepping the cow for milking—or releases her if she’s been milked too recently and needs to wait until later.

Cows at Foster Brother’s Farm eagerly awaiting their turn

Step 2:

Grain is dispensed for the cow to nibble on, based on her specific nutritional needs. A cow producing more milk will be provided with more grain to match her individual caloric needs. Simultaneously, a robotic arm brushes and disinfects the cow’s teats and attaches the inflations. The robotic milker collects 3-5 gallons per visit, stopping and detaching automatically when milking is finished.

The cow’s teat is getting cleaned prior to milking

After the teat is cleaned with cleaning solution, a robotic arm attaches the milking machine

Step 3:

After all 4 quarters are finished milking, her teats are sprayed with an iodine solution to help seal the teat ends and the cow is released to roam the barn, visit the feed bunk, get her back scratched or socialize with her friends while the next cow enters.

The ladies love getting a nice scratch in the barn

From start to finish, the whole process takes around 7 minutes. When you consider that cows usually get milked 2-3 times per day, this means that they spend no more than 21 minutes in an entire day being milked. This incredible efficiency allows cows to rest and socialize more with other cows, and lets farmers focus even more on improving the lives of their herd and their family.

Cows at Foster Brother’s Farm relaxing in the free stall barnThe robotic system also keeps detailed records on each cow’s milk production including total milk yield, time spent in robot, milk temperature, butterfat and protein levels, number of visits to the robotic milker and much more. The farmers can use all of this information to tend to the cows whose production may be low or inconsistent.

Rachel Freund from Freund’s Farm looking over some data

Robotic Milking is already thriving on a number of Cabot farms, many of whom were the first in their states to adopt this exciting technology. Let’s meet some of them!

The Duffy Family, owners of Great Brook Farm in Carlisle, Massachusetts, installed their robotic system in 2011, becoming the first in their state to do so. Great Brook Farm is also located on a state park and welcomes over 100,000 visitors every year.

Tamma & Mark Duffy

Mark giving tours to local students.

In March, 2016, Freund’s Farm in East Canaan, CT, was the first in the state to install a robotic milking system, and is also home to over 1,200 solar panels that generate enough electricity to power the farm, and even send surplus energy to the local grid.

The Freund Family

Amanda Freund watching over the Robotic Milking

Foster Brothers Farm in Middlebury, Vermont, installed their robotic milking system in 2018, and was named 2019 Innovative Dairy Farmer of the Year. As home to one of the first “cow power” anaerobic digesters in the state, it’s easy to see why the Fosters’ efforts to create renewable energy and be more sustainable are celebrated.

The Foster Family

Technology on the Foster Brothers Farm

Other Cabot farms who have invested in robotic milking include Kenyon Hill Farm from Cambridge, NY, Barstow’s Longview Farm in Hadley, Massachusetts, UConn Department of Animal Science, Hastings Farm in Suffield CT, Sweet Pea Farm in North Ganby CT, and Echo Farm Puddings in Hinsdale NH.

With so many exciting benefits, it’s easy to see why farmers and cows alike are excited about robotic milking. After all, the more rich milk Cabot farms produce, the more rich Cabot cheddar we can put on your table. And perhaps we’re a little biased, but we think you can never go wrong with more cheddar.

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The Cabot Blog by Cabot Creamery - 2w ago

From blazingly hot to sweetly savory, Cabot’s collection of flavored cheeses brings bold, award-winning flavor to luscious meals, gooey appetizers, or show-stopping cheese boards. Pepper JackTomato BasilHorseradish, and Hot Habanero. Who’s hungry? Our classic cheddars may be the world’s best, but don’t sleep on our flavored cheese offerings, whose flavors more than hold their own with their more famous sharp cheddar cousins.  

From blazingly hot to sweetly savory, our flavored cheeses bring bold flavor to luscious meals, gooey appetizers, or show-stopping cheese boards. Step into a whole new world of flavor #cabotcheese
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Let’s meet the stars of our Flavored Cheese Collection.    Pepper Jack

This supremely smooth favorite smolders in a fiery fusion of green and red jalapeños, the perfect balance of spicy and creamy. 

Tomato Basil

This mild Vermont cheddar is rich and savory with the sweet taste of tomatoes and an earthy hint of fresh basil. 

Hot Habanero

Layered with mouthwatering fiery habaneros, this lusciously hot cheddar is the pinnacle of cheddar heat.   

Horseradish

A luscious blend of mouth-tingling horseradish bite and creamy cheddar smoothness. Bursts with flavor for an unforgettable ride. 

Like our classic cheddars, our flavored cheeses are all stars in the kitchen and add big flavor to whatever you’re cooking up. In fact, some of our very favorite Cabot recipes ever feature our flavored cheeses, including these classics, which we think you’re going to love: 

Pepper Jack and Ham Popovers—A light, fluffy texture filled with spicy, creamy Pepper Jack and savory ham, these popovers make an ideal breakfast, lunch, or casual dinner.  

 

Chicken & Broccoli Penne—This easy weeknight meal, layered with the sweet, savory taste of our Tomato Basil Cheddar, makes greatness out of leftover broccoli and chicken.  

 

Five Mile Farm’s Spinach Artichoke Dip—This mouthwatering version of the classic uses the bold kick of our Horseradish Cheddar for hot and gooey appetizer perfection.  

Grace Potter’s Macaroni and Cheddar Cupcakes—Featuring truffle oil, grated parmesan, and both Seriously Sharp and Hot Habanero Cheddar, these cheesy, crunchy delights are real rock stars. But what else would you expect from Vermont’s first lady of rock and roll?  

 

Pepper Jack Cheese Sauce – This dreamy sauce is velvety smooth and is the perfect thing to take your nachos to the next level. Topped with fresh veggies, this simple dinner is perfect for busy weeknights.

With new packaging to celebrate Cabot’s Centennial and our farmers’ unwavering commitment to quality, our flavored cheeses look as good as they taste. Have a peek at the new look and explore our entire flavored cheese collection.  

Welcome to a bold new world of flavor. Enjoy!  
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Sometimes peer pressure can be a positive thing. Back when Andy Birch was in college studying agriculture, he tagged along with friends who were donating blood and decided he might as well give it a try himself. “It was peer pressure in a good way,” he says. “I think it’s important to give back and when I was a college student, it was an easy way I could do that since I didn’t have money to donate, or a lot of time. We’ve all got blood inside of us!”

“Giving what we can is what makes our community whole,” says Jenni Tilton-Flood, Cabot farmer and member of co-op’s American Red Cross team. In honor of our Centennial Anniversary, 100 Cabot farmer-owners and employees will give blood…
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After college and some years working on other farms, Andy and his wife, Sarah, came back home to Derby, Vermont. His parents had stopped milking at the family’s Maple Grove Farm, but Andy and Sarah slowly saved and invested in a new, small dairy herd. The couple also welcomed two daughters into their family; Hannah and Ida are now 3 years old and 8 months.

Andy & Sarah’s daughter Hannah

A busy life of farming and parenting does not leave much room for other commitments, but Andy kept donating blood regularly and made time to deliver Cabot cheese samples to his local blood drive site as post-donation energy boosters. Whenever things got too busy, he’d think back on a friend who’d had a serious accident and needed massive blood transfusions. “That really brought it home,” Andy says.

Andy helping a new calf with a lift to the barn

For Andy, it’s also part of giving back to the community where he was raised and to which he feels very attached. “Sarah and I both wanted to come back to be closer to family. This is the place I grew up and it means something to me,” he says.

Sarah and Andy showing cows

As a regular blood donor, Andy had loaded the American Red Cross blood donor app on his phone to track his donation history and vital health information. He noted that there was a team function, which allows donors to set up a group with fellow members and establish collective goals. “A couple years ago, I started a team for Cabot and we began putting out the word for other farmers and employees to join,” Andy explains.

One of those who signed up was Jenni Tilton-Flood of Flood Brothers Farm in Maine. Jenni was not new to donating blood, she says, “but over the past years, I just seemed to not be a regular donor anymore because life…because everything else just seemed to get in the way.” When Andy started the team, she continues, “it was just the push I needed to remember why I donated blood in the first place: because giving what we can is what makes our community whole.”

This Centennial year for the co-op, in addition to encouraging a team of 100 farmers and employees to donate, Cabot will be sending cheese and coupons to donor sites throughout the Northeast for the month of May. Supporting the Red Cross goes along with the co-op’s mission to encourage people to volunteer within their communities via the Reward Volunteers program.

“I’ve always been in awe of the spirit that moves people to give blood and the volunteers and staff that make it all possible,” says Jenni. “And that I can share Cabot Cheese with them as a wee thanks? That just makes it all even more wonderful.”

Andy is proud of the role he’s been able to play in putting peer pressure to work in a positive way to get the Cabot American Red Cross donation team up and running.

If blood donation is not your thing, Andy encourages everyone to find a way to give back that works for them. For him, having the regularly scheduled donations keeps him on track. “Just do what you can,” Andy suggests. “Find little ways you can contribute. There are lots of organizations that need help in some way whether it’s financial donations or a helping hand.”

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When Hollywood came knocking at the barn door of Bohanan Farm in New Hampshire, the Robertson family thought hard before they took the leap into the world of reality TV. It might sound glamorous, but daily life with a film crew following you around for eight months is not for everyone. And it’s probably obvious by now that not every reality series star comes up smelling like roses.

The Robertson brothers of Bohanan Farm are among the farmers starring in the @History Channel’s new series, “The American Farm.” Tune in to follow their challenges, triumphs and fun antics Thursday nights!
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But of course, when you milk 200 cows every day of the year, you don’t expect to smell like roses. As Si, the oldest of the three Robertson boys now back on the farm, demonstrates in the first episode of The History Channel’s new docuseries, “The American Farm,” you are more likely to smell of something a little more…shall we say, earthy?

After the New Hampshire Farm Bureau reached out to the Robertson family to see if they might be interested in applying to become one of five diverse American farms in the inaugural season, Jamie Robertson sent out texts to everyone in the family. He did it that way, Jamie recalled with a chuckle, “so I’d have everyone’s response in writing.”

Everyone was game, but also definitely a little nervous, Jamie recounted. “We kept coming back to the fact that dairy should be represented,” he said, “and as scary as it might be, as imperfect as our farm might be, we believed the way we care about our animals and the environment would come through to the public.”

Jamie’s wife, Heather, grew up on the farm where their sons are the fifth generation since the Bohanans settled there well over a century ago. Ranging in age now from 21 to 26, Bram, Nate and Si all decided to return after college to work with their parents and cousin, Meagan Wilson.

Jamie practically grew up on the farm, too. “My dad worked for Heather’s grandfather and I started working here after high school,” Jamie explained. “I’ve known her my whole life.” The Robertsons are deeply devoted to farming and family – but as they’ve already proven to their growing number of TV fans, they also believe in having fun while working hard.

“The American Farm” follows five very different family farms around the country – from Alaska to Virginia. It pulls viewers in with the inherent drama of multi-generation dynamics; the stresses of dealing with weather, animals and unpredictable markets; and the sheer beauty of those fabled waves of amber grain.

It will also make you smile with touching moments and silly antics, especially from the Robertson brothers, who wrestle like puppies and sport matching shaggy auburn beards (think Duck Dynasty meets ZZ Top).

All joking aside, the Robertsons have a couple goals that are pretty serious. Jamie and Heather consider themselves lucky to have all three boys back on the farm, but it’s not easy in today’s milk economy to support four families on the income from a 200-cow dairy. Rather than grow their herd, they launched their farm-based Contoocook Creamery several years ago to market some of their milk direct in glass bottles and as cheese. During filming of the series, they invested in an expansion of their onsite processing plant and are burning the candle at both ends to make it all work. Anything that can help spread the word is worth a try.

Their second aim goes far beyond their own farm and family. The Robertsons hope that they and their fellow farmer co-stars can help remind Americans what it takes to get fresh, wholesome food on the table. “We kind of want to be your country cousin that’s still home farming . That connection has been lost, that trust,” lamented Jamie. “We take what we do very seriously. It’s a huge weight on our shoulders to represent dairy farmers well and make the co-op proud.”

The Robertsons can’t share a lot about what goes on behind-the-scenes, but Jamie will say that the whole experience was a good one filled with mutual respect — and some killer Taco Tuesdays thanks to a senior cameraman who was an awesome Mexican food cook. “We put a lot of trust in them and they put a lot of trust in us,” he said.

It’s fair to say each side of the production partnership has learned things through the process. The Robertsons were surprised to learn how similar farming is to TV docuseries production. In both, Jamie explained, “budgets are tight, equipment breaks, and you’re always at the mercy of Mother Nature.” For their part, the TV production team had hoped to get all the farm families together to meet, until they realized how difficult it is for farmers to leave their animals and crops.

About halfway into the inaugural eight episodes, the response has been very positive so far and the crew will return soon to Bohanan Farm to start filming for a second set of shows. The History Channel committed to the first season and everyone is hoping that viewership will warrant a second. “Just like farming you produce the product and hope you have a future market,” Jamie said.

Even though they don’t get to see the final shows until they air, the Robertsons feel good about what they’ve done so far and are looking forward to what’s next. As Jamie said in the first episode, “All farmers thrive on challenges. We like living on that edge.”

Check out our farmers on TV! Tune into The History Channel Thursday nights 10/9 Central.
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The Cabot Blog by Cabot Creamery - 1M ago

Over the century since the Cabot co-op was founded in 1919, food tastes in America have changed pretty dramatically. Who would have thought so many of us would fall in love with sushi, or that kale would transform itself from buffet decoration to vegetable rock star? 

At the same time, what is old is new again and many people once again appreciate the value of whole, natural, minimally processed foods cooked simply.

Tastes have changed a bit since 1919 but some things are timeless, like Red Flannel Hash sprinkled with a generous handful of sharp #Cabotcheese.
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Cabot’s award-winning cheeses and other dairy products have been making uncomplicated recipes more delicious for decades. To celebrate our 100th birthday, we refreshed two retro classics to stay true to their historical roots and also deliver modern-day appeal.

Red flannel hash was a natural. Our barns, our farmers and our calves all wear their red plaid flannel proudly; why not our food? 

New England Boiled Dinner

Hash is a time-tested tradition: essentially a creative and practical way to make the most of the New England classic, boiled dinner, traditionally containing corned beef, cabbage, and root vegetables like potatoes and carrots. Click here to get the full recipe.

Red Flannel Hash 

The next day after making the New England Boiled Dinner, the savvy housewife chops up the leftover meat and veg and fries it up with a generous knob of butter before topping it with farm-fresh eggs. The red flannel part comes courtesy of beets. Of course, you have to gild the lily with a generous handful of Cabot Seriously Sharp Cheddar Cheese to pull it all together into a gooey, delectable whole. Click here to get the full recipe.

Cheese Toasts

The 1909 edition of The Good Housekeeping Woman’s Home Cook Book provided inspiration for our second celebratory but super-simple recipe from the Sandwiches and Canapes section of the cookbook. Along with anchovy cheese sandwiches, dessert sandwiches made with slices of sponge cake, and mock crab sandwiches, the authors include a cheese sandwich and a toasted sandwich, so we combined the two to bring you Cheese Toasts!  Click here to get the full recipe.

This melty, savory, tangy treat is so simple, yet so special, we’d love for you to put a candle in it and sing us happy birthday before digging in. (Plus that will give it a moment out of the broiler or toaster oven to cool off so you don’t burn your mouth.)

Get a variety of cheesy and delicious recipes here. 
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Cabot farmers do more than produce the fresh milk for our award-winning dairy products. They’re industry-leading innovators who are pioneering next-century farm practices that improve care for cows, increase farm efficiency, and create renewable energy that supports their communities and makes farming more sustainable.  

 

Meet some of the amazing farms—and inspiring farmers—using Real Farm Power to move farming forward. #cabotcheese #cabotfarmers
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Let’s meet some of the amazing farms—and inspiring farmers—using Real Farm Power to move farming forward.  

The Barstow Family

At Barstow’s Longview Farm, now run by the sixth and seventh generations of this farm family, sustainability is a family passion and a successful business model. The farm is home to robotic milking machines that improve cow care by making milking more comfortable, more efficient—and since the cows themselves choose when to be milked—more independent. The system also tracks each cow’s individual yield so that farmers can care even better for the health of their herd.  

For the Barstows, farming is all about community, and they love sharing their practices and chatting with neighbors in their dairy store or at their famous sweet corn stand during the summer. “I like working toward something that’s helping my family sustain this land and our community,” says Kelly Barstow.  

The Audet Family

At Blue Spruce Farm in Bridport, Vermont, owners Marie and Eugene Audet believe that growth and innovation are part of what it means to be a farmer. “We don’t farm the way we did ten years ago, or even five years ago,” Marie says. “We’re changing year by year.” 

That means planting cover crops that help reduce soil erosion during winter, and high-tech barns where the fan speeds are set on thermostats and the barn walls work like curtains to rise or fall based on the temperature, keeping cows comfortable and conserving energy.  

It also means renewable energy solutions that benefit the cows, the farm, and the land.  

 

Renewable energy is all about making the most of what’s around, and for a dairy farm—that means cow manure. Lots and lots of cow manure. Blue Spruce Farm was the first farm in Vermont to install an anaerobic digester to extract reusable biogas from manure1. The digester looks a little bit like an in-ground swimming pool with a concrete cover. Instead of water, though, the digester is filled with 14 feet of manure. Gases collected at the top power generators that create enough energy to power over 300 homes, keeping tons of greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere. Manure liquids help fertilize fields, while odorless solids supplement cow bedding, saving money and preserving natural resources.  

 

According to Marie, “we can’t even imagine a farm today that doesn’t have renewable energy.” Farmers are “not only feeding our communities, we’re providing ecosystem benefits.” 

The Hill Family

Like Blue Spruce Farm, Four Hills Farm in Bristol, VT, uses a bio-digester to convert manure into electricity, which helps manage manure and provides extra income.   

To minimize their environmental impact and protect soil health, they use a “dragline” method that applies manure more evenly and consistently to reduce the risk of runoff, which is not only good for soil, but good for water systems as well. For their efforts, the farm won the Conservation Farmer of the Year award in 2015.   

For Four Hills Farm—named for the four Hill siblings who purchased the original farm from their parents—farming is a way to ensure a bright future for their family. Brian Hill’s wife Chanin says “we want to make sure our kids want to come back—and that they have something promising to come back to.” 

Here at Cabot, we’re proud to work for such amazing farmers, who are helping protect the future of farming, the future of our environment, and of course, the future of delicious, world-class cheddar for generations to come.  

 

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Is there anything better than brunch? That wonderful late morning/early afternoon meal that was made for memorable get–togethers with friends and family. A place where just about any dish can find a home—so long as it’s delicious.  

Whether it’s the creamy yogurt swirled into a smoothie or the sharp cheddar sprinkled atop a frittata, our farmers’ best makes brunch better. Enjoy our Top Ten most loved brunch recipes ever.
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And whether it’s the creamy Greek yogurt swirled into a fruit smoothie, or the sharp cheddar sprinkled onto a golden–brown frittata, our farmers’ award-winning dairy products have been making brunch better for over a hundred years now.  

So, cancel that reservation, and plan an unforgettable menu with a little help from our top ten most loved and talked-about brunch recipes ever. Make a handful of your favorites, or make it a pot luck so you can try them all. Just make sure you come hungry! 

Let’s start with some hearty dishes packed with healthy handfuls of Cabot cheese. It’s fair to say we’re pretty egg-static about these 

This Breakfast Sausage Casserole is one of Cabot lovers’ all-time favorites, and when you put it on the table, you’ll see why. It’s easy to make, and ideal for feeding even your hungriest guests.  

Breakfast Sausage Casserole - YouTube

Our Baked Cheddar Frittata is a hearty and delicious canvas for vegetables, diced potatoes, or even pasta. Just don’t forget the farm fresh eggs and the sharp cheddar

Our Vegetable, Egg, and Cheddar Strata features a base of baked bread layered with eggs, fresh vegetables, and Cabot Cheddar. Leftover dinner rolls or challah both work great, and though our Seriously Sharp Cheddar is a perfect fit, this brunch casserole is also delicious with Tomato Basil Cheddar or our Swiss-inspired Alpine Cheddar. 

Try these Cheesy Eggs in a Basket for something simple and delightful. Choose good multi-grain bread and any of our aged cheddars, from Alpine, to White Oak, to Farmhouse Reserve. With gooey, molten cheese and a perfect sunny yolk, this dish looks as good as it tastes.  

Let’s sweeten things up bit with a quartet of our most popular brunch smoothie recipes, all featuring creamy, protein-rich scoops of our farmers award-winning Greek yogurt 

Our Pineapple Banana Smoothie blends lovely tropical fruits with yogurt for a sweet, smooth concoction that everyone will love. Add a dash of brown sugar if you’re feeling extra sweet.   

Perhaps it’s no surprise, but we love real maple syrup, and that magic elixir, plus fresh bananas and pears, are the secret behind our amazing Maple Moo Smoothie.   

Our Blueberry Lemon Smoothie makes for a tangy brunch treat. It’s full of antioxidant-rich blueberries, creamy Greek yogurt, lemon juice, and a dash of lemon zest.    

For a kid-friendly crowd pleaser, try our Nutty Monkey Protein Smoothie packed with creamy peanut butter, ripe bananas, yogurt, and a dollop of honey.   

Rounding out the top ten are two of our favorite casseroles, layered with shredded potatoes and gobs of Cabot cheddar—the sort of dishes brunch was made for  

Our Easy Breakfast Potato Casserole is a blend of our farmers’ best cheddar, sour cream, and butter mixed with hash browns, onions, and cream of celery soup. A crunchy topping from dried cereal or potato chips makes this one a brunch keeper.  

Speaking of hash browns, they’re the star of our Healthy Hash Brown Casserole, which cuts some of the calories, but none of the flavor, using Cabot Sharp Lite Cheddar.  

 These ten classics are our most popular for a reason, and we know they’ll help you plan a brunch for the ages. If you’re still hungry for more, have fun browsing our full selection of brunch recipes, as well as our how-to on making popovers – also a great addition to brunch.  

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To celebrate Cabot’s Centennial, we sought to find dietitians who share in Cabot’s principles of cooperation, commitment to community, and other core values and honor them with the Cabot Community Celebrity Award.   

And the winners are: 
    • Pat Terry (Alabama) 
    • Toni Bowman (DC) 
    • David Trinkle (Florida) 
    • Serena Ball (Illinois) 
    • Amanda Hege (Kentucky) 
    • Theresa Stahl (Maryland) 
    • Cary Skelton (Missouri) 
    • Jamie Pepper (New Jersey) 
    • Sarah Fine (New Jersey) 
    • Manju Karkare (North Carolina) 
    • Heidi Hetzler (Rhode Island) 
    • Wanda Koszewski (South Carolina) 

The amazing group of dietitians selected for the Award truly demonstrate a commitment to the profession.   They each give selflessly of their time by volunteering and/or supporting their community through other efforts, programs, and initiatives.  These attributes, together with their actions to promote ‘community spirit’, encourage eating local foods, and supporting agriculture within the state, exemplify the values of Cabot’s farm families. 

And one standout has been selected for Cabot’s Community Celebrity Cruise, in September 2019. Congratulations, Manju Karkare!   

 

“Volunteering provides a strong connection to my community and gives me a great deal of personal gratitude. My passion for nutrition drives me to give in the areas of hunger and nutrition education… This award exemplifies the role of RDNs beyond the clinics, schools, kitchens, and labs and into the fields, farms, and sources of food.” – Manju Karkare, MS, RDN, CLT, FAND   
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