Loading...

Follow Brookings | International Affairs on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

By Kemal Kirişci, Gokce Uysal Kolasin

Eight years after Syrians began to flee en masse from the growing violence in their country, Turkey now hosts 3.6 million Syrian refugees. For the fourth year running, this makes Turkey the largest host, globally, of refugees.

Neither return nor resettlement are real options for the refugees. They will likely stay in Turkey for the foreseeable future, and it’s time to get serious about creating opportunities for how to formally and sustainably employ them. However, this will not be an easy exercise, and progress will depend on deepening the cooperation between Turkey and the international community, especially the European Union. The 2018 Global Compact on Refugees offers a useful guide for concrete policy options.

The current situation

Most of the Syrians currently residing in Turkey enjoy protection from forced return to Syria as well as access to basic public services including health care and, more recently, public schools. Following the EU-Turkey statement from March 2016, they have also been receiving modest cash support through the Emergency Social Safety Net (ESSN) and the Conditional Cash Transfer for Education (CCTE) programs.

Given that the support they receive from the state is far from meeting their needs, Syrians have been participating informally in the Turkish labor market for some time, as many Syrians living in Turkey do not have work permits. In this context, their participation has been fraught with problems and challenges.

By the numbers: Syrians in Turkey

There are 2.1 million working-age (15-65) registered Syrians in Turkey, but the number of Syrians actively participating in the labor market is unknown, as the informal nature of their employment makes it difficult to know exactly. In the absence of comprehensive data on the labor-market status of Syrians in Turkey, it is estimated that between 500,000 and one million Syrians actually work. Most sources indicate that Syrians are working predominantly in the textile and apparel sectors, as well as in education, construction, services, and especially agriculture. A survey conducted by the Turkish Red Crescent in 2018 showed that 20.7% of the Syrian workers in education are employed in irregular jobs, while this rate increased to 92% for those Syrians employed in the agricultural sector. Informal and irregular employment inevitably come with low wages—well below legally prescribed minimum pay—as well as poor working conditions and exploitation, especially among children and women.

In January 2016, the government began allowing registered Syrian refugees to access formal employment opportunities by making it easier to obtain work permits. However, this has not significantly improved the picture, as only around 65,000 work permits had been issued by the end of 2018, according to the Interior Minister of Turkey.

The obstacles

Beyond the issue of work permits, there are various obstacles to formal employment, some specific to Syrians and others more general.

As Turkish regulations stipulate, work permits cost time and money, and need to be renewed annually. Moreover, there is a six-month residency requirement for application. There is a 10% quota for Syrian workers in a given firm, and this quota applies even if the ownership structure of the firm includes a Syrian. Moreover, the design of the ESSN cash-support program dissuades formal employment, as households are immediately excluded from the program even when just a single member is formally employed.

The structural problems of the labor market in Turkey present further challenges. According to TurkStat, one in every three Turkish workers is employed informally. In other words, high labor costs, relatively high minimum wages, and low skill levels—coupled with slack enforcement—create a dual labor market in Turkey, where informal workers are working under precarious conditions, regardless of their nationality.

Furthermore, lack of language skills and the non-transferability of certain labor market skills exacerbates the problem for most Syrians. Particularly, low levels of education play a role: According to the above-mentioned Red Crescent survey, more than 50% of Syrians surveyed had either no education or only primary-level schooling, which limits employment prospects. For those who do have higher education levels, establishing degree equivalence often stands in the way of formal employment. As a result, many Syrians have to accept job offers for lower wages: For instance, one study found that young Syrians in Istanbul earn 27% less than their Turkish counterparts on average.

Ironically, this also creates lost opportunities for the Turkish economy: 20% of Syrians in Istanbul between 18-29 years of age have a university degree, yet these degrees do not translate into higher wages. A U.N. research team identified at least 125 university-trained Syrian agronomists in Şanlıurfa, for instance, but reported that most of them are unemployed or work in unskilled jobs.

In an effort to promote labor market access, the government has exempted Syrians employed as seasonal workers in agriculture from work permits. However, the agricultural sector offers its own challenges. Most of the current employment is itself informal. Working conditions are notoriously difficult even for local laborers, especially for women and children, not to mention migrants in general. According to the Household Labor Force Statistics by TurkStat, more than 70% of local agricultural wage earners report working in seasonal jobs, and a mere 21% of all wage-earners in agriculture are formally employed. In short, workers in agriculture face low wages, work long hours, and commonly work informally, regardless of their migrant status. Thus, many try to transition into jobs in urban areas and in other sectors.

One final challenge result from the worsening state of the Turkish economy. In 2018, the economy grew by only 2.6%. With more than 700,000 people entering the labor market annually, the unemployment rate soared to 13.7% in March 2019, according to seasonally-adjusted data, following an increase of almost 4 percentage points in a single year. Unfortunately, the Turkish economy is not expected to recover soon. The current growth estimates for Turkey in 2019 calculated by the OECD and the IMF is in the negative. Needless to say, such a grim outlook is bound to aggravate public resentment towards Syrians in Turkey and undermine social peace. In the informal sector, the employment of 10 Syrian men is estimated to eliminate the jobs of four native men (when including part-time work) and forces wages into a downward spiral.

Prospects for a better path

Yet all is not lost. In line with the U.N.’s Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan (3RP Turkey), international agencies such as the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), International Labor Organization (ILO), Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), and International Organization for Migration (IOM) are invested in projects to improve the skill set of refugees and enhance their employability, especially in the private sector. There are also national efforts involving the Directorate General of International Labor, as well as the Turkish Employment Agency (ISKUR) to facilitate access to livelihoods, with a growing emphasis on vocational training, programs fostering entrepreneurship, and tax subsidies to create sustainable employment. Turkish NGOs such as SGDD-ASAM, as well as international ones such as United Works and Spark, also work on placing refugees into formal jobs.

Furthermore, agriculture may emerge as a promising sector for employment opportunities. According to the Household Labor Force Statistics by TurkStat, Turkish agricultural production is dominated by family-owned businesses. Close to 5 million people work on family farms, together with wage-earners amounting to more than half a million, excluding migrants. Yet, as Turkish farmers age and wage-earners move on to non-farm jobs, firms in agriculture encounter growing pockets of labor shortages. Given the difficulty of accessing livelihoods on one side, and the need to find workers on the other, many Syrians find themselves employed seasonally in agriculture. In such a setting, large, export-oriented Turkish companies with a sense of corporate responsibility are expressing interest to train and employ Syrian refugees, offering them a path to sustainable employment.

What the EU can do

An important proportion of livelihood-focused projects to enhance refugees’ self-reliance is already internationally funded, especially by European Union’s Facility for Refugees in Turkey (FRIT). However, FRIT is slated to end in two years, and there are no indications that it will be renewed. Hence, it will be important for Turkey and international stakeholders to develop a long-term strategy to enhance the prospects of integrating Syrian refugees into Turkey’s formal economy. This is particularly urgent since the Syrian refugee population in Turkey is very young and growing by 350 each day (since 2011, by more than 350,000 overall), while the local labor market is challenged to create jobs for almost 4.5 million unemployed Turkish nationals.

The Global Compact on Refugees offers constructive ideas. It calls on the signatories to “promote economic opportunities, decent work, job creation and entrepreneurship programs for host community members and refugees” to support sustainable livelihood opportunities and resilience of host communities by ensuring “inclusive economic growth for host communities and refugees.” It is with this in mind that the EU and Turkey should start formulating a strategy.

Such a strategy could start by exploring the establishment of a Qualified Industrial Zone near the Syrian border, where close to a million refugees live. The region (the provinces of Gaziantep, Kilis, and Sanliurfa) is recognized for its diverse industrial as well as agricultural production. The EU could permit products from this zone as certified, to give firms employing Syrians preferential access to its markets.

Additionally, to incentivize Turkish businesses to employ Syrians formally, the EU could increase quotas on fresh agricultural products that are exempted from import duties, as well as consider lowering such duties for products beyond these quotas. The EU could also unilaterally lift custom duties on the agricultural component of processed agricultural goods covered by the customs union between the EU and Turkey.

Lastly, the EU could encourage large European companies to consider involving fledgling social cooperatives founded by Syrians and locals in their value chains. The benefit of these policy ideas is that they would not require direct funding from the EU, an issue that usually tends to generate resistance from member states, but would be in line both with the letter and spirit of the Global Compact on Refugees. They would encourage economic growth in a manner that benefits both refugees and locals, and could generate a win-win outcome.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Welcome to the fourth edition of the Trans-Atlantic Scorecard, a quarterly evaluation of U.S.-European relations produced by Brookings’s Center on the United States and Europe (CUSE), as part of the Brookings – Robert Bosch Foundation Transatlantic Initiative. To produce the Scorecard, we poll Brookings scholars and other experts on the present state of U.S. relations with Europe—overall and in the political, security, and economic dimensions—as well as on the state of U.S. relations with five key countries and the European Union itself. We also ask about several major issues in the news. The poll for this edition of the survey was conducted July 8-11, 2019. The experts’ analysis is complemented by a Snapshot of the relationship over the previous three calendar months, including a timeline of significant moments, a tracker of President Trump’s telephone conversations with European leaders, figures presenting data relevant to the relationship, and CUSE Director Thomas Wright’s take on what to watch in the coming months.

Snapshot Timeline

April 1 The U.K. Parliament held a second round of indicative votes to assess support for alternative approaches to Brexit, with no option earning a majority. A customs union was defeated most narrowly (273 in favor to 276 against) while a second referendum received the most votes in favor (280-292). April 2 In New York, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas and French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian announced they will launch an Alliance for Multilateralism at the United Nations General Assembly in September. April 3 NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg addressed a joint session of Congress on the occasion of NATO’s 70th anniversary. “NATO lasts because it is in the national interest of each and every one of our nations,” he told Congress. “Together, we represent almost one billion people. We are half of the world’s economic might. And half of the world’s military might. When we stand together, we are stronger than any potential challenger—economically, politically and militarily… Since we cannot foresee the future, we have to be prepared for the unforeseen. We need a strategy to deal with uncertainty. We have one. That strategy is NATO.” April 4 NATO foreign ministers met in Washington, stating “we remain committed to all three aspects of our 2014 Wales Defence Investment Pledge, including the spending guidelines for 2024, planned capabilities, and contributions to missions and operations. We have made considerable progress but we can, must, and will do more.” April 8 Matteo Salvini, Italy’s deputy prime minister and interior minister and leader of right-wing League, announced a new far-right alliance for European Parliament elections, the European Alliance of Peoples and Nations, with the Alternative for Germany’s lead candidate Jörg Meuthen and others. In June, following the elections, the group was renamed Identity and Democracy. April 8 Romania charged its former president Ion Iliescu with crimes against humanity in the country’s December 1989 revolution. 862 people were killed after Iliescu and the National Salvation Front took control after communist dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu fled Bucharest. Iliescu served as president until 1996 and then again from 2000 to 2004, a period in which Romania joined NATO. April 10 At an extraordinary summit, in response to Prime Minister May’s April 5 request for a second Brexit extension to June 30, the European Council offered the United Kingdom a delay of Brexit to as late as October 31. May accepted, averting a no-deal exit from the EU on April 12. April 11 WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange was expelled from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London, where he has lived since 2012, when Quito granted him asylum. He was arrested by Scotland Yard, and a 2018 indictment against him was unsealed, revealing he is charged with conspiracy with Chelsea Manning to crack a Defense Department computer password to download classified documents. April 17 U.S. Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, leading a bipartisan delegation to the United Kingdom and Ireland, addressed the Irish parliament, stating, “Let me be clear. If the Brexit deal undermines the Good Friday accords, there would be no chance of a U.S.-U.K. trade agreement.” April 18 The redacted text of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election was published. The report detailed the “sweeping and systematic fashion” of Russian interference and “identified numerous links between the Russian government and the Trump Campaign.” The investigation “established that the Russian government perceived it would benefit from a Trump presidency and worked to secure that outcome, and that the Campaign expected it would benefit electorally from information stolen and released through Russian efforts,” but “did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities.” Mueller also investigated President Trump’s actions towards the FBI and Special Counsel investigations into the interference and related matters. Mueller determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgment about whether the president had committed obstruction of justice and the report “does not conclude that the President committed a crime,” nor does it “exonerate him.” On March 31, Attorney General William Barr had told Congress that the special counsel’s evidence was “not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense.” April 18 Northern Irish journalist Lyra McKee was shot dead by New IRA militants while covering rioting in Derry. McKee’s funeral on April 24 was attended by Northern Irish, U.K., and Irish political leaders. On April 26, Prime Minister May and Irish Taoiseach Leo Varadkar announced new talks to quickly “re-establish to full operation the democratic institutions of the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement.” April 21 Volodymyr Zelensky won the Ukrainian presidential election with 73 percent of the vote over incumbent Petro Poroshenko in the second round. April 24 Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon announced she would aim to hold a second independence referendum by the end of the Scottish parliament’s term in May 2021 if the United Kingdom leaves the EU. May 1 Prime Minister May fired U.K. Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson after an investigation into the leaking of the substance of a National Security Council meeting on allowing Huawei a role in building the country’s 5G network. Williamson and several other ministers reportedly opposed the government’s ultimate decision to allow Huawei to supply “non-core” parts. Penny Mourdant was named the United Kingdom’s first female defence secretary. May 2 The U.S. government ended waivers on secondary sanctions imposed in November 2018 for key importers of Iranian oil. While Greece, Italy, and Taiwan had stopped imports since then, China, India, Japan, South Korea, and Turkey had sought a further extension. May 3 President Trump and President Putin spoke on the phone, reportedly discussing Venezuela, North Korea, Ukraine, arms control potentially involving China, and the Mueller report. May 3 President Trump met with Slovak Prime Minister Peter Pellegrini at the White House. May 3 In U.K. local elections, the governing Conservative Party lost 1,333 councilors, and the Labour Party lost 82, while the Liberal Democrats and Greens made notable gains. May 5 In North Macedonia, Stevo Pendarovski, the joint candidate of the governing parties, won the presidential runoff against Siljanovska Dalkova. Pendarovski defended the Prespa Agreement, which was heavily criticized by Dalkova and her conservative opposition party. May 6 Turkey’s High Election Council upheld the AK Party’s challenge to the Istanbul mayoral election outcome and ordered a new election. May 6 U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo delivered a speech in Rovaniemi, Finland at an Arctic Council summit, describing the Arctic as “an arena for power and for competition,” warning Arctic nations of Chinese and Russian behavior, and defending U.S. environmental policy. May 8 U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo delivered a speech in London on the “special relationship,” between the United States and the United Kingdom, which he described as “the beating heart of the entire free world.” May 8 Ireland and the United Kingdom signed a deal to preserve the Common Travel Area (CTA) in case of a no-deal Brexit. The CTA allows British and Irish citizens to work, study, vote, and access social benefits in each other’s jurisdictions. May 13 President Trump met with Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán at the White House. While the Senate Foreign Relations Committee had issued a bipartisan letter calling on Trump to raise “concern about Hungary’s downward democratic trajectory and the implications for U.S. interests in Central Europe,” Trump praised Orbán as having “done a tremendous job.” May 14 U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with President Putin and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov in Sochi. On the previous day, Pompeo stopped in Brussels for meetings focused on Iran. May 15 Eighteen nations and 8 technology companies signed the Christchurch Call, which establishes guidelines to combat online extremism. The Trump administration refused to sign the non-binding agreement spearheaded by New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and President Macron, citing free speech concerns. May 16 President Trump met with Swiss President Ueli Maurer at the White House. May 17 The U.K. Labour Party pulled out of talks with the Conservative Party on Brexit, leaving the deadlocked state of negotiations unchanged. The collapse of six weeks of discussions resulted in backlash against both parties and exacerbated calls for Prime Minister May’s resignation. May 19 Austrian President Alexander Van der Bellen called for elections in September in response to the resignation of Vice Chancellor and Freedom Party leader Heinz-Christian Strache and the collapse of the coalition government, which were triggered by a video showing Strache offering government contracts to someone posing as a Russian oligarch’s niece in exchange for campaign support. May 20 New Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky dissolved parliament and called snap elections with hopes of consolidating his power. May 20 U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, a career diplomat, left her post two months early, reportedly recalled following political attacks by conservative media and one of President Trump’s sons. On June 18, William B. Taylor, who previously served as ambassador in Kyiv from 2006 to 2009, took over as U.S. Chargé d’Affaires. May 21 President Putin, Chancellor Merkel, and President Macron discussed Ukraine in a phone call. The French and German leaders stressed that Russia should create conditions that are favorable for dialogue and be open to ending the conflict in eastern Ukraine. May 23 The U.S. Justice Department announced that Julian Assange has been indicted on 17 counts under the Espionage Act. May 24 Prime Minister May announced that she would resign as the leader of the Conservative Party on June 7. She will stay in power as prime minister until a new leader is selected. May 26 The four-day European Parliament elections concluded. Voter turnout increased for the first time. Pro-EU parties won two-thirds of the seats, though the center-right (European People’s Party) and center-left (Progressive Alliances of Socialists and Democrats) party blocs lost seats to the liberals and the greens. However, right-wing nationalist parties won the most seats in four of the six largest countries—France, Italy, Poland, and the United Kingdom. May 27 Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz lost a no-confidence vote in parliament. Days later, President Alexander Van der Bellen appointed constitutional court president Brigitte Bierlein to lead a caretaker government until elections in September. May 27 Liviu Dragnea, the head of Romania’s ruling Social Democratic Party, was sentenced to three and a half years in prison for procuring fake jobs for two party employees. May 30 Chancellor Merkel spoke at Harvard University’s commencement. She encouraged the graduating class to reject nationalism and instead, embrace truth, multilateralism, openness, and empathy. May 31 U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met Chancellor Merkel and German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas in Berlin, several weeks after canceling a Germany stop on a previous trip to Europe. Pompeo continued to Switzerland and the Netherlands before joining President Trump in London. June 2 German Social Democratic Party leader Andrea Nahles announced her resignation following a third-place finish in the European Parliament election, raising fears about the stability of the country’s governing coalition. June 2 Walter Lübcke, a regional politician from Chancellor Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union and a prominent supporter of her refugee policy, was found dead in his home in Kassel, killed by a gunshot to the head. A far-right extremist confessed to the murder before later retracting the confession. June 3 President Trump began a state visit to the United Kingdom, where he met with Queen Elizabeth II, Prime Minister May, and Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage. Ahead of the visit, Trump praised the putative frontrunner for the Conservative leadership contest, former London mayor and foreign secretary Boris Johnson. He spoke with Johnson on the phone on June 4, but Johnson declined an in-person meeting during the visit citing a previous commitment. June 5 President Trump visited Ireland, meeting with Taoiseach Leo Varadkar at Shannon Airport before staying at his own golf resort at Doonbeg. June 5 In Denmark’s elections, the Social Democrats returned to power after four years in opposition while the populist Danish People’s Party lost more than half of its seats in parliament, likely because other parties co-opted its tough stance on immigration. Other major campaign issues included climate change and expanding welfare. June 6 President Trump met with President Macron following a D-Day commemoration ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery. They discussed topics including Iran and trade. June 6 Russia telecoms company MTS signed a deal with Huawei to develop a 5G network during President Putin’s meeting with President Xi in Moscow. June 7 Prime Minister May resigned as leader of the Conservative Party, triggering the official contest to replace her. June 10 Russian journalist Ivan Golunov was released from jail after charges against him were dropped. The Internal Affairs Ministry announced that there were mistakes made in the leadup to his arrest. Golunov’s imprisonment was widely protested by citizens and the media. June 12 President Trump met with Polish President Andrzej Duda at the White House, where they signed a joint declaration on defense cooperation detailing plans to increase the U.S. military presence in Poland. An F-35 stealth fighter flew over the White House to mark the declaration. June 13 In the first round of voting among Conservative members of Parliament for the party’s leadership contest, Boris Johnson emerged with a strong lead, winning 114 out of 313 votes, with Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt finishing second with 43 votes. Seven contenders advanced to the next round of MP voting while three were eliminated. June 14 Spain’s supreme court ruled that former Catalan Vice President Oriol Junqueras will not be allowed to take his seat as a Member of European Parliament until a verdict is issued in the trial about Catalonia’s independence referendum. June 14 Moldovan President Pavel Filip resigned, allowing the country to overcome a political impasse that began after national parliamentary elections did not award a clear majority of seats to any party and resulted in two rival governments. The country now has a single government led by Prime Minister Maia Sandu. June 17 Iran announced that it would exceed the limits on uranium enrichment established by the JCPOA by the end of the month. Meanwhile, U.S. Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan announced that the U.S. would send 1,000 additional troops to the Middle East. June 17 Italian Deputy Prime Minister and Interior Minister Matteo Salvini met with U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Vice President Mike Pence in Washington. Salvini stated that the United States and Italy had a “common vision” regarding migration, China, Venezuela, Libya, and the Middle East. June 18 President Trump withdrew the nomination of Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan to be permanent defense secretary and named Mark Esper, previously secretary of the Army, as acting secretary. Trump nominated Esper for the permanent defense secretary position three days later. June 18 Following comments by European Central Bank President Mario Draghi opening the door to monetary stimulus, the euro weakened against the dollar; President Trump complained this made it “unfairly easier” for Europe to compete against the United States. “They have been getting away with this for years, along with China and others,” Trump tweeted. June 20 In the U.K. Conservative Party leadership contest, Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt edged Environment Secretary Michael Gove for second-place in the final round of MP voting. The party’s membership of about 160,000 will choose whether Hunt or frontrunner Boris Johnson will replace Theresa May as party leader and prime minister of the United Kingdom. The ballot will close on July 22, the result will be announced on July 23, and the winner will replace May on July 24. June 20 President Trump reportedly approved and subsequently canceled military strikes on Iran after the Iranians shot down a $130 million U.S. surveillance drone near the boundary of Iran’s territorial waters in the Gulf of Oman. June 20 Thousands of Georgians gathered in front of the parliament in Tbilisi to protest Russian MP Sergey Gavrilov’s visit. Gavrilov chaired a meeting of Orthodox Christian lawmakers while sitting in the speaker’s chair. Georgian President Salome Zourabichvili called Russia an “enemy and occupier” and accused Moscow of meddling in Georgia’s domestic affairs. June 21 President Putin temporarily banned direct flights between Russia and Georgia starting July 8. June 23 An estimated 250,000 people gathered in Prague’s Letna Plain to demand the resignation of Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babiš and Justice Minister Marie Benešová, accusing them of corruption and fraud, in the largest of a running series of protests. June 23 In the re-run of the Istanbul mayoral election, opposition candidate Ekrem İmamoğlu defeated the AK Party’s Binali Yıldırım again, expanding his margin of victory from less than 20,000 votes in March to more than 800,000 votes. The result was a huge defeat for President Erdoğan, who served as mayor of Istanbul before the founding of the AK Party and his rise to national power. June 24 President Trump signed an executive order imposing sanctions on Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and his office. June 24 The Court of Justice of the European Union ruled that Poland’s law lowering the retirement age for judges violated EU law and compromised the judiciary’s independence. June 25 Israel hosted a trilateral meeting of the U.S., Russian, and Israeli national security advisors, focusing on Syria. June 25 The parliamentary assembly of the Council of Europe voted to restore Russia’s voting rights, which were removed after the annexation of Crimea. Germany and France had argued for engagement and cited concern that Russian citizens would lose their right to bring cases before the European Court of Human Rights if Russia followed through on its threat to leave the Council. Opponents criticized the decision as sending the wrong message to Moscow. June 26 U.S. Acting Secretary of Defense Mark Esper participated in a NATO defense ministers meeting in Brussels. June 28 At the G20 summit in Osaka, President Trump held bilateral meetings with Chancellor Merkel and President Putin. The agenda for the Trump-Merkel meeting included trade, Iran, West Africa, and counterterrorism. Trump and Putin discussed arms control, Iran, Syria, Venezuela, and Ukraine. Asked by a reporter if he will tell Putin not to meddle in the 2020 election, Trump told Putin “Don’t meddle in the election, President,” and Putin laughed. The two presidents also joked about journalists. June 28 The EU reached a comprehensive..
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Galip Dalay

في 6 يونيو أرسل وزير الدفاع الأمريكي بالوكالة آنذاك باتريك شاناهان رسالة شديدة اللهجة لنظيره التركي بخصوص نيّة تركيا شراء نظام أس-400 للدفاع الجوي من روسيا. وطرحت الرسالة جدولاً زمنياً لإخراج تركيا من برنامج المقاتلة أف-35، في حال أقدمت على عملية الشراء، وحجّة واشنطن في ذلك أنّه في حال تمّ تركيب نظام الصواريخ أس-400 في تركيا، فسيعرّض ذلك تكنولوجيا أف-35 للخطر.

وعبّر الرئيس التركي رجب طيب أردوغان عن انزعاجه من التهويل بالعقوبات، وقال إنّ عملية شراء نظام أس-400 اتفاقية مبرمة. وبالفعل، بدأت روسيا الأسبوع الماضي بتسليم تركيا هذا النظام.

ومع توجّه العلاقات الأمريكية التركية إلى المزيد من التدهور، يبدو أنّ أردوغان علّق أمله على الرئيس ترامب بغية تفادي العقوبات الأمريكية. في الواقع، خرج أردوغان راضياً من اجتماعه مع ترامب على هامش قمة دول مجموعة العشرين في اليابان في نهاية يونيو، إذ وضع ترامب اللوم لأزمة نظام أس-400 على إدارة أوباما وأعطى الانطباع بأنّه لا يحبّذ وضع عقوبات قاسية على تركيا بسبب هذه المسألة، على عكس الرسائل الصادرة من مواقع أخرى من الحكومة الأمريكية.

مع ذلك، لهو من المربك مشاهدة الطريقة التي تُعيد فيها روسيا رسم معالم العلاقات الأمريكية التركية.

فصل جديد

كان التهديد السوفياتي هو ما أدّى إلى نشوء التحالف التركي الأمريكي. فمن خلال المساعدات الاقتصادية والعسكرية، حاول الرئيس الأمريكي هاري ترومان الحؤول دون وقوع تركيا واليونان في فلك النفوذ السوفياتي في العام 1947. وفي لعبة قدر ساخرة، ربّما روسيا الآن هي الدولة التي قد تفضّ هذا التحالف.

فكما يبيّن شراء نظام أس-400 الصاروخي، لقد برز تحوّل مهمّ في العلاقات الأمريكية التركية والعلاقات التركية الروسية على حدّ سواء.

فعلى عكس التوقّعات، عمّقت روسيا وتركيا علاقاتهما بسرعة على عدّة جبهات في السنوات الأخيرة. وكانت سوريا عاملَ جذب استعملته روسيا لاستمالة تركيا. وما بدأ كانخراط براغماتي بين الجهتَين ضمن سياق الأزمة السورية بات يتخطّى المسألة السورية. ولم يتوقّع الكثيرون أنّ الغزل التركي الروسي سيستمرّ لما بعد الأزمة السورية الشديدة التعقيد. لكن حتى الآن صمدت العلاقة لا بل تحسّنت.

ولم تكن التوقّعات السلبية التي أطلِقت حيال مستقبل العلاقات الروسية التركية بلا أساس. فجيوسياسياً، تقع الدولتان على طرفَين متناقضين حيال كل المسائل تقريباً في جوارهما المُتشاطَر. كذلك، مازالت بنية التحالفات المحلّية والإقليمية التي تعتمدها الدولتان كلتاهما متناقضة الغايات، إذ كان الإقرار بطموحات روسيا الجيوسياسية، ولا سيما حيال شرقي المتوسط، واحداً من العوامل الأساسية التي دفعت تركيا إلى العمل على الانخراط في نوادٍ غربية مختلفة.

علاقات ودية أكثر فأكثر بين موسكو وأنقرة

إذاً لماذا تنشد تركيا الآن تأسيس شراكة مع روسيا؟

كان الانخراط العسكري الروسي في الأزمة السورية وإسقاط تركيا لمقاتلة روسية بعد ذلك في خريف العام 2015 نقطتَي التحوّل الحاسمتَين. فمع التدخّل العسكري الروسي، تلاشت فكرة تغيير النظام في دمشق أكثر فأكثر، ومع إسقاط المقاتلة الروسية، أُخرِجت تركيا من المشهد السوري. وبحلول ذلك الوقت، كان الغرب قد تخلّى عن فكرة تغيير النظام في سوريا، وكانت وحدات حماية الشعب الكردية السورية التابعة لحزب العمال الكردستاني تسيطر بسرعة على الأراضي وتكسب النفوذ السياسي في سوريا. ردّاً على ذلك، طرحت تركيا جانباً هدفها بتغيير النظام أيضاً وسَوّت علاقاتها مع روسيا وركّزت عوضاً عن ذلك على لجم المكاسب الكردية في سوريا. وقد أتى هذا الرهان ثماره. فبموافقة روسية، أجرت تركيا عمليات عسكرية في شمال غرب سوريا ودحرت وحدات حماية الشعب إلى شرق نهر الفرات.

لكنّ هذا النوع من البراغماتية لم يكن العامل الوحيد الذي رسم معالم الارتباط الروسي التركي منذ تلك الفترة، بل شكّلت الولايات المتحدة الفريق الثالث الخفي الذي وجّه مسار الارتباط.

فقد شكّل الانفصال والافتراق القوّتَين الطاغيتين في العلاقات الأمريكية التركية في السنوات الأخيرة. إذ طرح المسؤولون من كلتا الجهتين اللياقة الدبلوماسية جانباً وتراشقوا الاتهامات والتهديدات. فتركيا توبّخ الولايات المتحدة لدعهما قوات سوريا الديمقراطية ويعلو صوت الولايات المتحدة أكثر فأكثر في انتقادها علاقات تركيا مع روسيا وإيران، فضلاً عن سياسة أنقرة تجاه سوريا. ويشكّل اسم العقوبة الأمريكية التي تواجها تركيا نتيجة لشراء نظام أس-400، أي قانون مكافحة أعداء أمريكا من خلال العقوبات، خير دليل على ذلك. وبات مستوى الثقة بين البلدَين في أدنى مستوياته على الإطلاق. وتشهد العلاقات المؤسساتية وَهْناً، ولا سيما بين الجيشين. ويرى الشعب والنُخب السياسة وصانعو السياسات الأتراك بشكل متزايد القيادةَ المركزية الأمريكية (سنتكوم) على أنها قوّة تهديدية.

وفي أبريل، طلب نائب الرئيس الأمريكي مايك بنس من تركيا أن تختار بين حلف شمال الأطلسي وروسيا. ولم ترغب تركيا في اتّخاذ خيار كهذا، مفضّلة الاستقلالية الاستراتيجية في السياستَين الخارجية والأمنية على حدّ سواء. فحاولَتْ البحث عن سبل للجمع بين عضويّتها في حلف شمال الأطلسي وعلاقاتها التاريخية مع الغرب من جهة وعلاقاتها المُتحسّنة مع دول مثل روسيا والصين وإيران من جهة أخرى.

ولا يقتصر الأمر على أنّ تركيا تعتقد أنّ الولايات المتحدة ليست منفتحة جيداً لمصالحها، بل تظن تركيا أيضاً أنّ سياسة الولايات المتحدة حيال شرقي المتوسط تقوّض بشكل مباشر دورَ أنقرة الإقليمي. ويفاقم اعتماد مجلس الشيوخ الأمريكي “قانون الأمن والشراكة في شرق المتوسط” المخاوف التركية بأنّ السياسة الأمريكية في المنطقة، سواء أصدفة أم عمداً، ستنتهي باحتواء قاسٍ لإيران واحتواء ناعم لتركيا. وكانت تركياً تقليدياً أحد أبرز محاور السياسة الأمريكية حيال شرقي المتوسط. لكنّ هذا القانون يدعو إلى رفع الحظر على بيع السلاح إلى قبرص (فُرض الحظر للمرة الأولى في العام 1987) ويعتبر اليونان وقبرص وإسرائيل المحاور الجديدة في السياسة الأمريكية حيال المنطقة. في هذا الخصوص، حضور وزير الخارجية الأمريكي مايك بومبيو اللقاءَ الثلاثي الإسرائيلي القبرصي اليوناني حول الطاقة والأمن في شرقي المتوسط الذي أقيم في إسرائيل في مارس يساهم في زيادة المخاوف التركية. وستقنع هذه المبادرة وغيرها من المبادرات صانعي القرارات الأتراك أكثر فأكثر أنّ الولايات المتحدة تنتهج استراتيجية احتواء مزدوجة لإيران وتركيا. ولن يجعل هذا الأمر تركيا أقلّ تعاوناً إزاء أي سياسة أمريكية حول إيران فحسب، بل أيضاً سيحثّ تركيا أكثر على العمل عن كثب مع روسيا وإيران.

هل يمكن إعادة إحياء الصداقة الأمريكية التركية؟

ما زالت الشراكة المُنشأة حديثاً مع روسيا هشّة وفي طور التغيّر. ويبيّن الهجوم الأخير الذي شنّه النظام السوري المدعوم من روسيا على محافظة إدلب بوضوح جليّ حدودَ التعاون الروسي التركي في الشرق الأوسط وما بعد الشرق الأوسط.

ولا ترقى علاقتهما إلى مستوى روابط تركيا التاريخية والمؤسساتية مع الغرب. بيد أنّ هذه الروابط تذوي. وقد يؤدّي فرض مجموعة قاسية من العقوبات الأمريكية على تركيا ردّاً على شراء أنقرة نظام صواريخ أس-400 بشكل غير مقصود إلى جعل تركيا تعتمد أكثر على روسيا. في هذا السيناريو، ستتحوّل هذه الصفقة أكثر فأكثر إلى خيار إعادة اصطفاف جيوسياسية لتركيا، وهو اصطفاف بعيد عن الغرب وأقرب إلى روسيا. وإبعاد تركيا أكثر عن الغرب وتقويض حلف شمال الأطلسي هما بالضبط ما تبتغيه روسيا. وستجعل إعادة الاصطفاف هذه تركيا أكثر انطوائية ومتردّية أكثر من ناحية الديمقراطية، ولن تخدم المصالح التركية ولا الغربية. وهذه هي الاحتمالية التي على المسؤولين الأتراك والأمريكيين الحؤول دون حصولها مهما كان الثمن.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Ali Fathollah-Nejad

لو أجرت إيران استفتاءً حول الجمهورية الإسلامية اليوم، لعارضها أكثر من 70 في المئة. وتشمل هذه النسبة الأثرياءَ والأكاديميين ورجال الدين والمقيمين في الريف والمدينة. ولم تصدر هذه الفرضية الملفتة عن أحد المنشقّين المنفيين الإيرانيين، بل أتت على لسان البروفسور المعروف في العلوم السياسية في طهران صادق زيباكلام في مقابلة أُجريت في خلال الاضطرابات التي شهدتها إيران في أواخر العام 2017 وأوائل العام 2018.

لكن ما السبب الذي يجعل داعماً شديداً سابقاً للثورة الإسلامية يتفوّه بهذا الحُكم المروّع؟ بهدف فهم هذا التحوّل الجذري والإحباط الكامن خلفه، لا بدّ من العودة إلى الوعود التي أطلقتها الثورة الإسلامية منذ أربعة عقود. وقد تمحورت وعود الثورة التي جرت في العام 1979 حول تحقيق ثلاثة أهداف: العدالة الاجتماعية والحرية والديمقراطية والاستقلال عن وصاية القوى العظمى.

سعي إيران المتناقض إلى تحقيق العدالة الاجتماعية

أُطلقت الثورة التي جرت ضمن إطار فكر ماركسي إسلامي بالنيابة عن المستضعفين الذين تخلّى عنهم نموذجُ التنمية غير المتساوي الذي انتهجه النظام الملكي. وفي العقود الأربعة اللاحقة، برز جدالٌ حادّ إزاء أداء الجمهورية الإسلامية الاجتماعي الاقتصادي. ففيما ادّعى بعضهم أنّه تمّ إحراز تقدّم ملحوظ في ظلّ النظام الإسلاموي، وصف بعضهم الآخر البلاد بأنها غارقة في البؤس. لذا تبرز الحاجة إلى المزيد من التفاصيل والسياقات.

لا شكّ في أنّ إيران قد أحرزت تقدّماً على مدى السنوات الأربعين التي خلت. غير أنّ الجدال لا يزال محتدماً في ما إذا كان مردّ هذه النجاحات السياسات ما بعد الثورة أم الضغوط الاجتماعية أم الأسُس التي وضعها الشاه.

وشمل التحوّلُ من سياسات الشاه التي تميل نحو المُدن والتي تتمحور حول نخبة البلاد إلى مقاربة (شعبوية) مؤيدة للريف والفقراء في عهد الجمهورية الإسلامية توسيعَ البنية التحتية والخدمات الأساسية، مثل الكهرباء والمياه النظيفة، من المدن إلى الريف. باختصار، سعت الثورة إلى القضاء على الفجوة بين المناطق الريفية والحضرية. فأدّى توسيع نطاق الصحّة والتعليم في المناطق الريفية الإيرانية إلى تدنٍّ ملحوظ في مستوى الفقر: إذ انخفض معدّل الفقر البالغ 25 في المئة في السبعينيات إلى أقلّ من 10 في المئة في العام 2014. بالتالي، تساعد هذه السياسات الاجتماعية، المنحازة لصالح الفقراء، على تفسير سبب تسجيل إيران مؤشّرَ تنمية بشرية إيجابياً نسبياً.

وعلى عكس الفترة قبل الثورة، يحظى معظم الإيرانيون اليوم بالخدمات الأساسية والبينة التحتية، في الوقت الذي تضاعف فيه عددُ السكان مرتَين تقريباً وبات الطابع الحضري يطال معظم البلاد. على النحو ذاته، تحسّنت مقاييس أخرى معنية بالتنمية الاجتماعية، فازداد عددُ الملمّين بالقراءة والكتابة أكثر من الضعف، ولا سيّما بين النساء، وبات يشمل الآن جميع السكان تقريباً. في غضون ذلك، فاق عددُ الطالبات الملتحقات بالجامعات عددَ نظرائهنّ الذكور لأكثر من عقد.

لكن فيما تشير الإحصاءات إلى أنّ الفقر المطلق قد انحسر إلى حدّ كبير، لا تزال أغلبية الإيرانيين تعاني هشاشةً اجتماعية اقتصادية. فتقول المصادر الرسمية إنّ 12 مليون شخص يعيش دون خطّ الفقر المطلق و25 إلى 30 مليون شخص يعيشون تحت خطّ الفقر. لكنّ التقديرات تشير إلى أنّ ثلث الإيرانيين، و50 إلى 70 في المئة من العمّال، في خطر التراجع إلى ما دون خطّ الفقر. فيشير مركز الإحصاء الإيراني إلى أنّ 14 في المئة من الإيرانيين يقطنون في خيمٍ وثلثَ سكان المدن يعيشون في الأحياء الفقيرة. وظروف المعيشة التي يعيش فيها ما سمّاهم عالم الأنثروبولوجيا شهرام خسروى بـ”نصف إيران الآخر” أو فقراء الطبقة العاملة ملفتة للغاية: فقد تزايد عدد الإيرانيين المقيمين في الأحياء الفقيرة 17 ضعفاً، ولا يحظى 50 في المئة من القوى العاملة إلّا بعمل متقطّع، ويعاني حوالي 10 إلى 13 مليون إيراني “إقصاءً كاملاً من برامج التأمين المعنية بالصحة أو العمل أو البطالة”.

ولا يمكن فصل تحدّيات إيران الاجتماعية الاقتصادية عن اقتصادها السياسي الذي يعطي الأفضلية للموالين للنظام والذي تشوبه سوء الإدارة والمحسوبية والمحاباة والفساد وغياب الإصلاحات الهيكلية الضرورية للغاية. وعلى الرغم من أنّ العقوبات الأمريكية المفروضة قد أدّت بلا شكّ إلى تداعيات سلبية، غالباً ما تتمّ المبالغة بأثرها الإجمالي في الوضع الاقتصادي الإيراني. ففي صيف العام 2018 مثلاً، أشار حسين رغفار، الخبير الاقتصادي في جامعة العلّامة الطباطبائي في طهران، إلى أنّ ما لا يزيد عن 15 في المئة من مشاكل إيران الاقتصادية يُمكن عزوها إلى العقوبات. فقد ساهمت “الليبرالية الجديدة غير الليبرالية” في سياسات اقتصادية إيرانية مختلفة منذ التسعينيات، وقد اتّسمت بالخصخصات الزبائنية وسوق العمل المُحرَّرة من الضوابط، على تشكيل طبقة من الأثرياء الجدد من جهة وطبقة اجتماعية هشّة من جهة أخرى.

ومن الأسباب الأساسية لفشل الجمهورية الإسلامية النقصُ في توليد فرص العمل، مع ازدياد معدّل البطالة حتّى في خلال الطفرات النفطية. وتبقى معدّلات البطالة عالية، ولا سيّما بين الشباب وخرّيجي الجامعات والنساء. وبحسب الأرقام الرسمية، ثُمُن الإيرانيين عاطلٌ عن العمل. وبحسب مركز الأبحاث التابع للبرلمان الإيراني، سيصل معدّل البطالة إلى 16 في المئة بحلول العام 2021 في السيناريوهات المتفائلة أو إلى 26 في المئة في حال كانت الظروف أقلّ تيسيراً. وبين الشباب، تُظهر التوقعات أنّ شابّاً من أصل أربعة عاطلٌ عن العمل (لكنّ بعض التقديرات تصل إلى 40 في المئة). وتضع هذه الأرقام معدّلَ البطالة في إيران بين المعدّلات الأعلى عالمياً.

وبقي مؤشر جيني لتفاوت المداخيل في إيران عالياً باستمرار وهو يتخطّى 0,40، في ما يشير إلى النقص في النموّ الاقتصادي الشامل. وفي دراسةٍ لمستويات التفاوت في فترتَي قبل الثورة وبعدها في إيران، وجد جواد صالح أصفهاني أنّ التفاوت في العام 2002 بلغ المستوى عينه في العام 1972، وأردف قائلاً:

تطرح النتائجُ المتعلقة بالتفاوت أسئلةً مهمة حول طبيعة الثورة الإسلامية. فهل أثّرت الثورة إلى حدّ كبير في هيكلية السلطة كما كان يجدر أن تفعل ثورةٌ اجتماعية بضخامتها؟ وهذا موضوع ذو صلة كبيرة في حالة إيران لأنّه بالإضافة إلى التغيرات في توزيع الإنتاجية يؤثّر توزيع الحصول على الريوع النفطية في التفاوت. وبما أنّ الحصول على هذه الريوع مرتبطٌ مباشرة بالسلطة السياسية، قد يعكس التفاوتُ توزّعَ القوى. بالتالي، يطرح الاستنتاج بأن التفاوت المُسجَّل في العام 2002 بلغ المستوى عينه في العام 1972 أسئلةً حول أهمّية الثورة الإسلامية كثورة اجتماعية وسياسية.

بمعنى آخر، بقي الطابع الطبقي في المجتمع الإيراني على حاله، مع حلول طبقة حاكمة مكانَ أخرى لكن بتكوين اجتماعي مختلف. وفي الرسوم الكاريكاتورية السياسية، انعكس ذلك في صورٍ تُظهر استبدال تاج الشاه بعمامة الملّا لا أكثر. ودفعت هذه الاستمرارية ببعض الباحثين إلى تفسير ثورة العام 1979 على أنّها مجرد “ثورة خاملة، ثورة من دون تغيير” في العلاقات الطبقية. واليوم، يظهر التفاوت بين المداخيل بوضوح بين الناس، نظراً إلى الاستعراض الباذخ للثروة والمحسوبية الذي يتبجّح به أنجالُ التابعين للنظام، الذين يلقبون بالأولاد المدلّلين والذين يراهم الإيرانيون في شوارع طهران أو على هواتفهم الذكية عبر حسابات انستقرام مثل حساب “Rich Kids of Tehran” (أي “أولاد طهران الأغنياء”).

وقد أفضت الإنجازات النسبية التي حقّقتها الجمهورية الإسلامية في مجالات البنية التحتية الريفية والتعليم ومحو الأمية، إلى جانب فشلها في توليد الوظائف، إلى إحداث تناقض اجتماعي اقتصادي متفجّر سياسياً. فسوق الوظائف في إيران ببساطة لا يمكنها استيعاب خرّيجي الجامعات الذين يصل عددهم إلى مئات الآلاف. وتمخّض عن هذا التناقض “فقراء الطبقة الوسطى”، كما وصفهم عالم الاجتماع آصف بيات. ويُعرّف هؤلاء على أنهم يتمتّعون بمؤهلات الطبقة الوسطى وتطلّعاتها لكنهم يعانون هشاشة اجتماعية واقتصادية. واعتُبرت هذه المجموعة القاعدةَ الاجتماعية لثورة العام 2017-2018 ومن المتوقع أن تستمرّ بالتعبير عن غضبها وإحباطها.

وفسّر بيات في مقابلة في العام 2016 عن وضع الشباب في إيران في ظلّ الجمهورية الإسلامية قائلاً:

لا يريد الشباب مستقبلاً آمناً فحسب، أي الحصول على وظائف معقولة وعلى مسكن والزواج وتأسيس عائلة في المستقبل، بل يريدون استعادة “شبابهم” أيضاً، أي تلك الرغبة في عيش حياة الشباب والسعي وراء اهتماماتهم وشخصيتهم الفردية، بعيداً عن مراقبة مَن يكبرهم سنّاً وعن السلطة الأخلاقية والسياسة. ويفاقم هذا البُعد من حياة الشباب الضغوط الاجتماعية القائمة في إيران.

وكما تمّ التلميح إليه سابقاً، تقف عقبةٌ هيكلية أخرى في وجه فرص الإيرانيين الاجتماعية والاقتصادية. إذ يتمتّع الفريقُ المنتمي للنظام (“خوذي” أي “واحد منّا”) أو أولئك ذوو القدرة على الوصول إلى موارد الدولة وامتيازاتها بامتياز الوصول إلى على الوظائف أيضاً. فأدّت هذه الإحباطات بالكثير من الإيرانيين الشباب إلى اللجوء إلى مغادرة البلاد. وحتّى في عهد إدارة روحاني، بقيت إيران تسجّل مستويات قياسيةً عالمياً في هجرة الأدمغة، وتخسر على أثره ما يُقدَّر بمئة وخمسين مليار دولار أمريكي سنوياً.

الحرية السياسية والديمقراطية

بالإضافة إلى العدالة الاجتماعية، زعم مهندسو ثورة العام 1979 أنّ الإطاحة بالملكية ستؤدّي إلى حرّية أكبر. غير أنّ الحماس والشعور بالتحرّر الوجيزَين بعد الثورة سرعان ما تلاشيا وحلّت محلّهما الأسلمة النظامية للدولة والمجتمع التي اعتمدها الحكّام الجدد. فبدا واضحاً في العقد الأوّل من الجمهورية الإسلامية أنّ تلك الديكتاتورية قد استُبدلت بديكتاتورية أخرى، أكثر وحشية حتّى. فبين العامَين 1981 و1985، أُعدم حوالي 8 آلاف شخص، وقُتلت الأعداد نفسها في خلال ما سُمّي بـ”المجزرة الكبرى” التي وقعت في العام الأخير من الحرب الممتدّة بين العامَين 1980 و1988 ضدّ العراق. في المقابل، أُعدم أقلّ من مئة سجين سياسي في السنوات الثمانية السابقة للثورة (بين العامَين 1971 و1979). فباتت الجمهورية الإسلامية أحدَ الأنظمة الأكثر قمعاً في العالم، مع تسجيلها في الآونة الأخيرة معدّلَ الإعدام الأعلى عالمياً.

وفي خضمّ هذه العملية، خضعت التشكيلات الثلاثة السياسية الإيديولوجية المهيمنة أو الثقافات السياسية في إيران المعاصرة، أي القومية والاشتراكية والإسلاموية، للتضييق ليتمّ التركيز على الثقافة الأخيرة التي نجحت في دمج عناصر من التشكيلتَين الأخريَين. وعلى الرغم من ورود بعض التنوّع، تنحصر النخبة السياسية الجديدة بشكل عام ضمن شرائح مختلفة من الإسلاموية. فقد قمعت التعدديةَ السياسية التي نادت بها الحركة الثورية من دون أن تسمح الدولة بإنشاء حزب معارض فعلي.

بالمثل، واجهت الحركات التأسيسية في المجتمع المدني الإيراني، أي النساء والطلاب والعمّال، قمعاً نظامياً، ممّا قوّض قدراتها التنظيمية وجعلت المجتمع المدني الدينامي في إيران ضعيفاً مقارنة بالدولة. واستهدف قمع الدولة أيضاً المنشقّين من مذاهب إيديولوجية متنوعة والأقليات غير الفارسية والصحافيين. فباتت إيران اليوم من أوّل الدول في العالم لناحية سجن الصحافيين، وقد صنّفتها منظمة “مراسلون بلا حدود” في المرتبة 170 من أصل 180. وفيما تُظهر صحافة الجمهورية الإسلامية درجة ملفتة من الحيوية والانفتاح ضمن خطوط النظام الحمراء، لطالما حظّرت السلطة القضائية الخاضعة للمتشدّدين إصدار المنشورات وزجّت الصحافيين في السجن.

ومع الإطاحة بالنظام الملكي القائم، وضعت الجمهورية الإسلامية نظاماً سياسياً غريباً اعتُبر تقليدياً أنّه قائم على ركنَين: الثيوقراطية (مع ترؤّس المرشد الأعلى الدولةَ) والجمهورية (مع مجلس نيابي ورئيس منتخبَين). غير أنّ الركن الثاني في هذا النظام هو في أفضل حالاته شبه جمهوري، إذ لا يسمح مجلس الأوصياء بالترشّح إلّا للمرشحين المُعتبَرين مؤيّدين للجمهورية الإسلامية. بالتالي، يقف هذا التشكيل الفريد عقبة أساسية أمام إحلال الديمقراطية. فلا تزال المؤسّسات غير المنتخَبة مهيمِنة، فيما تبقى تلك المنتخَبة وفية للنظام. والأهم أنّ السلطوية الهجينة التي تعتمدها الجمهورية الإسلامية قد صمدت بشكل ملفت ضدّ التغيير السياسي الفعلي، ممّا أدّى إلى تفشّي إحباط شعبي واسع النطاق اليوم إزاء فرعَي النظام كليهما، أي إزاء مَن يُعرفون بالمعتدلين بالإضافة إلى المتشدّدين أيضاً.

الاستقلال غير قابل للفصل عن الحرية

انعكست معارضةُ الثورة المحتدمة للقوتين العظميين كلتيهما في الحرب الباردة، الولايات المتحدة والاتحاد السوفياتي، في الشعار الثوري “لا شرقية ولا غربية، الجمهورية الإسلامية”. غير أنّ عداء الثورة لواشنطن هو الذي سيطر على علاقات إيران الدولية. وفيما وجدت إيران نفسها في مواجهة جيوسياسية مع الغرب، لم تكن يوماً مندمجة جيوسياسياً في الشرق. بدلاً من ذلك، وكما أظهرت سياسات روسيا والصين والهند في خلال العقوبات الأمريكية المفروضة المتزايدة، وجدت إيران نفسها مجبرة على تقديم تنازلات للقوى الآسيوية العظمى التي فضّلت دائماً علاقاتها مع واشنطن على علاقاتها مع طهران. نتيجة ذلك، شهدت إيران أنماطاً جديدة من التبعية للقوى العظمى الشرقية، بما أنّ مواجهتها ليست بخيارٍ طالما أنّ طهران على خلاف مع الدولة الأقوى في النظام الدولي.

وعلى ضوء هذه الخلفية، كيف بإمكان الإيرانيين أن يحفظوا رغبتهم القديمة في نيل الاستقلال في عالم مترابط في القرن الحادي والعشرين؟ لقد أصاب عميد دراسات سياسة إيران الخارجية الراحل روح الله رمضاني عندما ركّز على أنّه في عالم مترابط، ما من استقلال مطلق بل درجات من الاستقلال. بعبارة أخرى، ستواجه التنمية الوطنية في إيران صعوبة في حال حاولت اليوم على المحافظة على تعلّقها الإيديولوجي القوي بمفهوم مجرّدٍ عنوانه الاستقلال المطلق.

ويشكّل السياق السلطوي المحلّي في إيران تحدياً كبيراً آخر لصون الاستقلال، فهو يفضّل العلاقات الوثيقة مع الدولة السلطوية بدلاً من تلك الديمقراطية. فبهذه الطريقة لن يقلق الأمناء على الجمهورية الإسلامية المتشدّدون من احتمال أن تطرح أنظمة سلطوية شبيهة بنظامهم، مثل الصين وروسيا، مسائلَ مثل حقوق الإنسان والديمقراطية في العلاقات الثنائية. بالتالي، تكون النتيجة تفضيلاً جيوسياسياً لسياسة “النظر نحو الشرق” تميل إليه بالإجمال القوى المستفيدة سياسياً واقتصادياً من هذا التوجّه. وقد أطالت عداوة إيران مع الولايات المتحدة علاقة النزاع التي تربطها بالعالم الغربي. فهي لم تمنعها من تطوير كامل قدراتها عبر إنشاء علاقات وطيدة مع الغرب والشرق على حدّ سواء فحسب، بل دفعت بها إلى أحضان قوى الشرق التي استغلّت انعزال إيران عن الغرب وحاجتها إلى الشرق أيضاً. لهذا السبب، أصاب رمضاني في ملاحظته أنّ إقامة مؤسّسة سياسية ديمقراطية شرطٌ مسبق أساسي لتفادي التبعية، مشيراً إلى أنّ “انهيار سياسة القانون والسلطة القضائية المسيّسة سيُضعفان في نهاية المطاف قدرة إيران على الاحتفاظ باستقلالها في خضم السياسات العالمية.” وشدّد أيضاً على أنّ الحرية والاستقلال غير قابلَين للفصل.

وقد يتيح مناخٌ سياسي أكثر انفتاحاً، كما في الهند مثلاً، إقامة حوارات داخلية حول خيارات السياسة الخارجية وما يقف على المحكّ بالنسبة إلى السكان. بذلك، ستُحسّن الدمقرطة إلى حدّ كبير صورةَ إيران الدولية وربّما تعزّز قدرتَها التفاوضية مع القوى العظمى، ولا سيّما نظراً إلى ميل القوى الغربية نحو استعمال حقوق الإنسان أداةً لتوليد ضغط سياسي.

الخاتمة

إذاً، هل وفت الثورة الإيرانية بوعودها في نهاية المطاف؟ على الرغم من بعض الإنجازات، تبدو الصورة الإجمالية كئيبة، ولا سيّما عندما يتعلّق الأمر بوعود تحقيق الديمقراطية. أمّا إذا من الممكن عكس هذه الأعمال، فهذه مسألة أخرى. فالأزمة الثلاثية الحادّة – الاجتماعية الاقتصادية والسياسية والبيئية – التي تواجهها الجمهورية الإسلامية في عامها الأربعين والشعورُ المتنامي بالخيبة والإحباط الشعبيَّين الذي برز بقوّة في خلال الاضطرابات في العام 2017-2018 والمواجهةُ المستمرة مع الدولة الأقوى في العالم لا تترك أملاً يُذكر بأنّ هذا النظام عينه الذي عجز عن الإيفاء بوعوده لعقود سينجح في المستقبل.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Galip Dalay

في 6 يونيو أرسل وزير الدفاع الأمريكي بالوكالة آنذاك باتريك شاناهان رسالة شديدة اللهجة لنظيره التركي بخصوص نيّة تركيا شراء نظام أس-400 للدفاع الجوي من روسيا. وطرحت الرسالة جدولاً زمنياً لإخراج تركيا من برنامج المقاتلة أف-35، في حال أقدمت على عملية الشراء، وحجّة واشنطن في ذلك أنّه في حال تمّ تركيب نظام الصواريخ أس-400 في تركيا، فسيعرّض ذلك تكنولوجيا أف-35 للخطر.

وعبّر الرئيس التركي رجب طيب أردوغان عن انزعاجه من التهويل بالعقوبات، وقال إنّ عملية شراء نظام أس-400 اتفاقية مبرمة. وبالفعل، بدأت روسيا الأسبوع الماضي بتسليم تركيا هذا النظام.

ومع توجّه العلاقات الأمريكية التركية إلى المزيد من التدهور، يبدو أنّ أردوغان علّق أمله على الرئيس ترامب بغية تفادي العقوبات الأمريكية. في الواقع، خرج أردوغان راضياً من اجتماعه مع ترامب على هامش قمة دول مجموعة العشرين في اليابان في نهاية يونيو، إذ وضع ترامب اللوم لأزمة نظام أس-400 على إدارة أوباما وأعطى الانطباع بأنّه لا يحبّذ وضع عقوبات قاسية على تركيا بسبب هذه المسألة، على عكس الرسائل الصادرة من مواقع أخرى من الحكومة الأمريكية.

مع ذلك، لهو من المربك مشاهدة الطريقة التي تُعيد فيها روسيا رسم معالم العلاقات الأمريكية التركية.

فصل جديد

كان التهديد السوفياتي هو ما أدّى إلى نشوء التحالف التركي الأمريكي. فمن خلال المساعدات الاقتصادية والعسكرية، حاول الرئيس الأمريكي هاري ترومان الحؤول دون وقوع تركيا واليونان في فلك النفوذ السوفياتي في العام 1947. وفي لعبة قدر ساخرة، ربّما روسيا الآن هي الدولة التي قد تفضّ هذا التحالف.

فكما يبيّن شراء نظام أس-400 الصاروخي، لقد برز تحوّل مهمّ في العلاقات الأمريكية التركية والعلاقات التركية الروسية على حدّ سواء.

فعلى عكس التوقّعات، عمّقت روسيا وتركيا علاقاتهما بسرعة على عدّة جبهات في السنوات الأخيرة. وكانت سوريا عاملَ جذب استعملته روسيا لاستمالة تركيا. وما بدأ كانخراط براغماتي بين الجهتَين ضمن سياق الأزمة السورية بات يتخطّى المسألة السورية. ولم يتوقّع الكثيرون أنّ الغزل التركي الروسي سيستمرّ لما بعد الأزمة السورية الشديدة التعقيد. لكن حتى الآن صمدت العلاقة لا بل تحسّنت.

ولم تكن التوقّعات السلبية التي أطلِقت حيال مستقبل العلاقات الروسية التركية بلا أساس. فجيوسياسياً، تقع الدولتان على طرفَين متناقضين حيال كل المسائل تقريباً في جوارهما المُتشاطَر. كذلك، مازالت بنية التحالفات المحلّية والإقليمية التي تعتمدها الدولتان كلتاهما متناقضة الغايات، إذ كان الإقرار بطموحات روسيا الجيوسياسية، ولا سيما حيال شرقي المتوسط، واحداً من العوامل الأساسية التي دفعت تركيا إلى العمل على الانخراط في نوادٍ غربية مختلفة.

علاقات ودية أكثر فأكثر بين موسكو وأنقرة

إذاً لماذا تنشد تركيا الآن تأسيس شراكة مع روسيا؟

كان الانخراط العسكري الروسي في الأزمة السورية وإسقاط تركيا لمقاتلة روسية بعد ذلك في خريف العام 2015 نقطتَي التحوّل الحاسمتَين. فمع التدخّل العسكري الروسي، تلاشت فكرة تغيير النظام في دمشق أكثر فأكثر، ومع إسقاط المقاتلة الروسية، أُخرِجت تركيا من المشهد السوري. وبحلول ذلك الوقت، كان الغرب قد تخلّى عن فكرة تغيير النظام في سوريا، وكانت وحدات حماية الشعب الكردية السورية التابعة لحزب العمال الكردستاني تسيطر بسرعة على الأراضي وتكسب النفوذ السياسي في سوريا. ردّاً على ذلك، طرحت تركيا جانباً هدفها بتغيير النظام أيضاً وسَوّت علاقاتها مع روسيا وركّزت عوضاً عن ذلك على لجم المكاسب الكردية في سوريا. وقد أتى هذا الرهان ثماره. فبموافقة روسية، أجرت تركيا عمليات عسكرية في شمال غرب سوريا ودحرت وحدات حماية الشعب إلى شرق نهر الفرات.

لكنّ هذا النوع من البراغماتية لم يكن العامل الوحيد الذي رسم معالم الارتباط الروسي التركي منذ تلك الفترة، بل شكّلت الولايات المتحدة الفريق الثالث الخفي الذي وجّه مسار الارتباط.

فقد شكّل الانفصال والافتراق القوّتَين الطاغيتين في العلاقات الأمريكية التركية في السنوات الأخيرة. إذ طرح المسؤولون من كلتا الجهتين اللياقة الدبلوماسية جانباً وتراشقوا الاتهامات والتهديدات. فتركيا توبّخ الولايات المتحدة لدعهما قوات سوريا الديمقراطية ويعلو صوت الولايات المتحدة أكثر فأكثر في انتقادها علاقات تركيا مع روسيا وإيران، فضلاً عن سياسة أنقرة تجاه سوريا. ويشكّل اسم العقوبة الأمريكية التي تواجها تركيا نتيجة لشراء نظام أس-400، أي قانون مكافحة أعداء أمريكا من خلال العقوبات، خير دليل على ذلك. وبات مستوى الثقة بين البلدَين في أدنى مستوياته على الإطلاق. وتشهد العلاقات المؤسساتية وَهْناً، ولا سيما بين الجيشين. ويرى الشعب والنُخب السياسة وصانعو السياسات الأتراك بشكل متزايد القيادةَ المركزية الأمريكية (سنتكوم) على أنها قوّة تهديدية.

وفي أبريل، طلب نائب الرئيس الأمريكي مايك بنس من تركيا أن تختار بين حلف شمال الأطلسي وروسيا. ولم ترغب تركيا في اتّخاذ خيار كهذا، مفضّلة الاستقلالية الاستراتيجية في السياستَين الخارجية والأمنية على حدّ سواء. فحاولَتْ البحث عن سبل للجمع بين عضويّتها في حلف شمال الأطلسي وعلاقاتها التاريخية مع الغرب من جهة وعلاقاتها المُتحسّنة مع دول مثل روسيا والصين وإيران من جهة أخرى.

ولا يقتصر الأمر على أنّ تركيا تعتقد أنّ الولايات المتحدة ليست منفتحة جيداً لمصالحها، بل تظن تركيا أيضاً أنّ سياسة الولايات المتحدة حيال شرقي المتوسط تقوّض بشكل مباشر دورَ أنقرة الإقليمي. ويفاقم اعتماد مجلس الشيوخ الأمريكي “قانون الأمن والشراكة في شرق المتوسط” المخاوف التركية بأنّ السياسة الأمريكية في المنطقة، سواء أصدفة أم عمداً، ستنتهي باحتواء قاسٍ لإيران واحتواء ناعم لتركيا. وكانت تركياً تقليدياً أحد أبرز محاور السياسة الأمريكية حيال شرقي المتوسط. لكنّ هذا القانون يدعو إلى رفع الحظر على بيع السلاح إلى قبرص (فُرض الحظر للمرة الأولى في العام 1987) ويعتبر اليونان وقبرص وإسرائيل المحاور الجديدة في السياسة الأمريكية حيال المنطقة. في هذا الخصوص، حضور وزير الخارجية الأمريكي مايك بومبيو اللقاءَ الثلاثي الإسرائيلي القبرصي اليوناني حول الطاقة والأمن في شرقي المتوسط الذي أقيم في إسرائيل في مارس يساهم في زيادة المخاوف التركية. وستقنع هذه المبادرة وغيرها من المبادرات صانعي القرارات الأتراك أكثر فأكثر أنّ الولايات المتحدة تنتهج استراتيجية احتواء مزدوجة لإيران وتركيا. ولن يجعل هذا الأمر تركيا أقلّ تعاوناً إزاء أي سياسة أمريكية حول إيران فحسب، بل أيضاً سيحثّ تركيا أكثر على العمل عن كثب مع روسيا وإيران.

هل يمكن إعادة إحياء الصداقة الأمريكية التركية؟

ما زالت الشراكة المُنشأة حديثاً مع روسيا هشّة وفي طور التغيّر. ويبيّن الهجوم الأخير الذي شنّه النظام السوري المدعوم من روسيا على محافظة إدلب بوضوح جليّ حدودَ التعاون الروسي التركي في الشرق الأوسط وما بعد الشرق الأوسط.

ولا ترقى علاقتهما إلى مستوى روابط تركيا التاريخية والمؤسساتية مع الغرب. بيد أنّ هذه الروابط تذوي. وقد يؤدّي فرض مجموعة قاسية من العقوبات الأمريكية على تركيا ردّاً على شراء أنقرة نظام صواريخ أس-400 بشكل غير مقصود إلى جعل تركيا تعتمد أكثر على روسيا. في هذا السيناريو، ستتحوّل هذه الصفقة أكثر فأكثر إلى خيار إعادة اصطفاف جيوسياسية لتركيا، وهو اصطفاف بعيد عن الغرب وأقرب إلى روسيا. وإبعاد تركيا أكثر عن الغرب وتقويض حلف شمال الأطلسي هما بالضبط ما تبتغيه روسيا. وستجعل إعادة الاصطفاف هذه تركيا أكثر انطوائية ومتردّية أكثر من ناحية الديمقراطية، ولن تخدم المصالح التركية ولا الغربية. وهذه هي الاحتمالية التي على المسؤولين الأتراك والأمريكيين الحؤول دون حصولها مهما كان الثمن.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Ali Fathollah-Nejad

لو أجرت إيران استفتاءً حول الجمهورية الإسلامية اليوم، لعارضها أكثر من 70 في المئة. وتشمل هذه النسبة الأثرياءَ والأكاديميين ورجال الدين والمقيمين في الريف والمدينة. ولم تصدر هذه الفرضية الملفتة عن أحد المنشقّين المنفيين الإيرانيين، بل أتت على لسان البروفسور المعروف في العلوم السياسية في طهران صادق زيباكلام في مقابلة أُجريت في خلال الاضطرابات التي شهدتها إيران في أواخر العام 2017 وأوائل العام 2018.

لكن ما السبب الذي يجعل داعماً شديداً سابقاً للثورة الإسلامية يتفوّه بهذا الحُكم المروّع؟ بهدف فهم هذا التحوّل الجذري والإحباط الكامن خلفه، لا بدّ من العودة إلى الوعود التي أطلقتها الثورة الإسلامية منذ أربعة عقود. وقد تمحورت وعود الثورة التي جرت في العام 1979 حول تحقيق ثلاثة أهداف: العدالة الاجتماعية والحرية والديمقراطية والاستقلال عن وصاية القوى العظمى.

سعي إيران المتناقض إلى تحقيق العدالة الاجتماعية

أُطلقت الثورة التي جرت ضمن إطار فكر ماركسي إسلامي بالنيابة عن المستضعفين الذين تخلّى عنهم نموذجُ التنمية غير المتساوي الذي انتهجه النظام الملكي. وفي العقود الأربعة اللاحقة، برز جدالٌ حادّ إزاء أداء الجمهورية الإسلامية الاجتماعي الاقتصادي. ففيما ادّعى بعضهم أنّه تمّ إحراز تقدّم ملحوظ في ظلّ النظام الإسلاموي، وصف بعضهم الآخر البلاد بأنها غارقة في البؤس. لذا تبرز الحاجة إلى المزيد من التفاصيل والسياقات.

لا شكّ في أنّ إيران قد أحرزت تقدّماً على مدى السنوات الأربعين التي خلت. غير أنّ الجدال لا يزال محتدماً في ما إذا كان مردّ هذه النجاحات السياسات ما بعد الثورة أم الضغوط الاجتماعية أم الأسُس التي وضعها الشاه.

وشمل التحوّلُ من سياسات الشاه التي تميل نحو المُدن والتي تتمحور حول نخبة البلاد إلى مقاربة (شعبوية) مؤيدة للريف والفقراء في عهد الجمهورية الإسلامية توسيعَ البنية التحتية والخدمات الأساسية، مثل الكهرباء والمياه النظيفة، من المدن إلى الريف. باختصار، سعت الثورة إلى القضاء على الفجوة بين المناطق الريفية والحضرية. فأدّى توسيع نطاق الصحّة والتعليم في المناطق الريفية الإيرانية إلى تدنٍّ ملحوظ في مستوى الفقر: إذ انخفض معدّل الفقر البالغ 25 في المئة في السبعينيات إلى أقلّ من 10 في المئة في العام 2014. بالتالي، تساعد هذه السياسات الاجتماعية، المنحازة لصالح الفقراء، على تفسير سبب تسجيل إيران مؤشّرَ تنمية بشرية إيجابياً نسبياً.

وعلى عكس الفترة قبل الثورة، يحظى معظم الإيرانيون اليوم بالخدمات الأساسية والبينة التحتية، في الوقت الذي تضاعف فيه عددُ السكان مرتَين تقريباً وبات الطابع الحضري يطال معظم البلاد. على النحو ذاته، تحسّنت مقاييس أخرى معنية بالتنمية الاجتماعية، فازداد عددُ الملمّين بالقراءة والكتابة أكثر من الضعف، ولا سيّما بين النساء، وبات يشمل الآن جميع السكان تقريباً. في غضون ذلك، فاق عددُ الطالبات الملتحقات بالجامعات عددَ نظرائهنّ الذكور لأكثر من عقد.

لكن فيما تشير الإحصاءات إلى أنّ الفقر المطلق قد انحسر إلى حدّ كبير، لا تزال أغلبية الإيرانيين تعاني هشاشةً اجتماعية اقتصادية. فتقول المصادر الرسمية إنّ 12 مليون شخص يعيش دون خطّ الفقر المطلق و25 إلى 30 مليون شخص يعيشون تحت خطّ الفقر. لكنّ التقديرات تشير إلى أنّ ثلث الإيرانيين، و50 إلى 70 في المئة من العمّال، في خطر التراجع إلى ما دون خطّ الفقر. فيشير مركز الإحصاء الإيراني إلى أنّ 14 في المئة من الإيرانيين يقطنون في خيمٍ وثلثَ سكان المدن يعيشون في الأحياء الفقيرة. وظروف المعيشة التي يعيش فيها ما سمّاهم عالم الأنثروبولوجيا شهرام خسروى بـ”نصف إيران الآخر” أو فقراء الطبقة العاملة ملفتة للغاية: فقد تزايد عدد الإيرانيين المقيمين في الأحياء الفقيرة 17 ضعفاً، ولا يحظى 50 في المئة من القوى العاملة إلّا بعمل متقطّع، ويعاني حوالي 10 إلى 13 مليون إيراني “إقصاءً كاملاً من برامج التأمين المعنية بالصحة أو العمل أو البطالة”.

ولا يمكن فصل تحدّيات إيران الاجتماعية الاقتصادية عن اقتصادها السياسي الذي يعطي الأفضلية للموالين للنظام والذي تشوبه سوء الإدارة والمحسوبية والمحاباة والفساد وغياب الإصلاحات الهيكلية الضرورية للغاية. وعلى الرغم من أنّ العقوبات الأمريكية المفروضة قد أدّت بلا شكّ إلى تداعيات سلبية، غالباً ما تتمّ المبالغة بأثرها الإجمالي في الوضع الاقتصادي الإيراني. ففي صيف العام 2018 مثلاً، أشار حسين رغفار، الخبير الاقتصادي في جامعة العلّامة الطباطبائي في طهران، إلى أنّ ما لا يزيد عن 15 في المئة من مشاكل إيران الاقتصادية يُمكن عزوها إلى العقوبات. فقد ساهمت “الليبرالية الجديدة غير الليبرالية” في سياسات اقتصادية إيرانية مختلفة منذ التسعينيات، وقد اتّسمت بالخصخصات الزبائنية وسوق العمل المُحرَّرة من الضوابط، على تشكيل طبقة من الأثرياء الجدد من جهة وطبقة اجتماعية هشّة من جهة أخرى.

ومن الأسباب الأساسية لفشل الجمهورية الإسلامية النقصُ في توليد فرص العمل، مع ازدياد معدّل البطالة حتّى في خلال الطفرات النفطية. وتبقى معدّلات البطالة عالية، ولا سيّما بين الشباب وخرّيجي الجامعات والنساء. وبحسب الأرقام الرسمية، ثُمُن الإيرانيين عاطلٌ عن العمل. وبحسب مركز الأبحاث التابع للبرلمان الإيراني، سيصل معدّل البطالة إلى 16 في المئة بحلول العام 2021 في السيناريوهات المتفائلة أو إلى 26 في المئة في حال كانت الظروف أقلّ تيسيراً. وبين الشباب، تُظهر التوقعات أنّ شابّاً من أصل أربعة عاطلٌ عن العمل (لكنّ بعض التقديرات تصل إلى 40 في المئة). وتضع هذه الأرقام معدّلَ البطالة في إيران بين المعدّلات الأعلى عالمياً.

وبقي مؤشر جيني لتفاوت المداخيل في إيران عالياً باستمرار وهو يتخطّى 0,40، في ما يشير إلى النقص في النموّ الاقتصادي الشامل. وفي دراسةٍ لمستويات التفاوت في فترتَي قبل الثورة وبعدها في إيران، وجد جواد صالح أصفهاني أنّ التفاوت في العام 2002 بلغ المستوى عينه في العام 1972، وأردف قائلاً:

تطرح النتائجُ المتعلقة بالتفاوت أسئلةً مهمة حول طبيعة الثورة الإسلامية. فهل أثّرت الثورة إلى حدّ كبير في هيكلية السلطة كما كان يجدر أن تفعل ثورةٌ اجتماعية بضخامتها؟ وهذا موضوع ذو صلة كبيرة في حالة إيران لأنّه بالإضافة إلى التغيرات في توزيع الإنتاجية يؤثّر توزيع الحصول على الريوع النفطية في التفاوت. وبما أنّ الحصول على هذه الريوع مرتبطٌ مباشرة بالسلطة السياسية، قد يعكس التفاوتُ توزّعَ القوى. بالتالي، يطرح الاستنتاج بأن التفاوت المُسجَّل في العام 2002 بلغ المستوى عينه في العام 1972 أسئلةً حول أهمّية الثورة الإسلامية كثورة اجتماعية وسياسية.

بمعنى آخر، بقي الطابع الطبقي في المجتمع الإيراني على حاله، مع حلول طبقة حاكمة مكانَ أخرى لكن بتكوين اجتماعي مختلف. وفي الرسوم الكاريكاتورية السياسية، انعكس ذلك في صورٍ تُظهر استبدال تاج الشاه بعمامة الملّا لا أكثر. ودفعت هذه الاستمرارية ببعض الباحثين إلى تفسير ثورة العام 1979 على أنّها مجرد “ثورة خاملة، ثورة من دون تغيير” في العلاقات الطبقية. واليوم، يظهر التفاوت بين المداخيل بوضوح بين الناس، نظراً إلى الاستعراض الباذخ للثروة والمحسوبية الذي يتبجّح به أنجالُ التابعين للنظام، الذين يلقبون بالأولاد المدلّلين والذين يراهم الإيرانيون في شوارع طهران أو على هواتفهم الذكية عبر حسابات انستقرام مثل حساب “Rich Kids of Tehran” (أي “أولاد طهران الأغنياء”).

وقد أفضت الإنجازات النسبية التي حقّقتها الجمهورية الإسلامية في مجالات البنية التحتية الريفية والتعليم ومحو الأمية، إلى جانب فشلها في توليد الوظائف، إلى إحداث تناقض اجتماعي اقتصادي متفجّر سياسياً. فسوق الوظائف في إيران ببساطة لا يمكنها استيعاب خرّيجي الجامعات الذين يصل عددهم إلى مئات الآلاف. وتمخّض عن هذا التناقض “فقراء الطبقة الوسطى”، كما وصفهم عالم الاجتماع آصف بيات. ويُعرّف هؤلاء على أنهم يتمتّعون بمؤهلات الطبقة الوسطى وتطلّعاتها لكنهم يعانون هشاشة اجتماعية واقتصادية. واعتُبرت هذه المجموعة القاعدةَ الاجتماعية لثورة العام 2017-2018 ومن المتوقع أن تستمرّ بالتعبير عن غضبها وإحباطها.

وفسّر بيات في مقابلة في العام 2016 عن وضع الشباب في إيران في ظلّ الجمهورية الإسلامية قائلاً:

لا يريد الشباب مستقبلاً آمناً فحسب، أي الحصول على وظائف معقولة وعلى مسكن والزواج وتأسيس عائلة في المستقبل، بل يريدون استعادة “شبابهم” أيضاً، أي تلك الرغبة في عيش حياة الشباب والسعي وراء اهتماماتهم وشخصيتهم الفردية، بعيداً عن مراقبة مَن يكبرهم سنّاً وعن السلطة الأخلاقية والسياسة. ويفاقم هذا البُعد من حياة الشباب الضغوط الاجتماعية القائمة في إيران.

وكما تمّ التلميح إليه سابقاً، تقف عقبةٌ هيكلية أخرى في وجه فرص الإيرانيين الاجتماعية والاقتصادية. إذ يتمتّع الفريقُ المنتمي للنظام (“خوذي” أي “واحد منّا”) أو أولئك ذوو القدرة على الوصول إلى موارد الدولة وامتيازاتها بامتياز الوصول إلى على الوظائف أيضاً. فأدّت هذه الإحباطات بالكثير من الإيرانيين الشباب إلى اللجوء إلى مغادرة البلاد. وحتّى في عهد إدارة روحاني، بقيت إيران تسجّل مستويات قياسيةً عالمياً في هجرة الأدمغة، وتخسر على أثره ما يُقدَّر بمئة وخمسين مليار دولار أمريكي سنوياً.

الحرية السياسية والديمقراطية

بالإضافة إلى العدالة الاجتماعية، زعم مهندسو ثورة العام 1979 أنّ الإطاحة بالملكية ستؤدّي إلى حرّية أكبر. غير أنّ الحماس والشعور بالتحرّر الوجيزَين بعد الثورة سرعان ما تلاشيا وحلّت محلّهما الأسلمة النظامية للدولة والمجتمع التي اعتمدها الحكّام الجدد. فبدا واضحاً في العقد الأوّل من الجمهورية الإسلامية أنّ تلك الديكتاتورية قد استُبدلت بديكتاتورية أخرى، أكثر وحشية حتّى. فبين العامَين 1981 و1985، أُعدم حوالي 8 آلاف شخص، وقُتلت الأعداد نفسها في خلال ما سُمّي بـ”المجزرة الكبرى” التي وقعت في العام الأخير من الحرب الممتدّة بين العامَين 1980 و1988 ضدّ العراق. في المقابل، أُعدم أقلّ من مئة سجين سياسي في السنوات الثمانية السابقة للثورة (بين العامَين 1971 و1979). فباتت الجمهورية الإسلامية أحدَ الأنظمة الأكثر قمعاً في العالم، مع تسجيلها في الآونة الأخيرة معدّلَ الإعدام الأعلى عالمياً.

وفي خضمّ هذه العملية، خضعت التشكيلات الثلاثة السياسية الإيديولوجية المهيمنة أو الثقافات السياسية في إيران المعاصرة، أي القومية والاشتراكية والإسلاموية، للتضييق ليتمّ التركيز على الثقافة الأخيرة التي نجحت في دمج عناصر من التشكيلتَين الأخريَين. وعلى الرغم من ورود بعض التنوّع، تنحصر النخبة السياسية الجديدة بشكل عام ضمن شرائح مختلفة من الإسلاموية. فقد قمعت التعدديةَ السياسية التي نادت بها الحركة الثورية من دون أن تسمح الدولة بإنشاء حزب معارض فعلي.

بالمثل، واجهت الحركات التأسيسية في المجتمع المدني الإيراني، أي النساء والطلاب والعمّال، قمعاً نظامياً، ممّا قوّض قدراتها التنظيمية وجعلت المجتمع المدني الدينامي في إيران ضعيفاً مقارنة بالدولة. واستهدف قمع الدولة أيضاً المنشقّين من مذاهب إيديولوجية متنوعة والأقليات غير الفارسية والصحافيين. فباتت إيران اليوم من أوّل الدول في العالم لناحية سجن الصحافيين، وقد صنّفتها منظمة “مراسلون بلا حدود” في المرتبة 170 من أصل 180. وفيما تُظهر صحافة الجمهورية الإسلامية درجة ملفتة من الحيوية والانفتاح ضمن خطوط النظام الحمراء، لطالما حظّرت السلطة القضائية الخاضعة للمتشدّدين إصدار المنشورات وزجّت الصحافيين في السجن.

ومع الإطاحة بالنظام الملكي القائم، وضعت الجمهورية الإسلامية نظاماً سياسياً غريباً اعتُبر تقليدياً أنّه قائم على ركنَين: الثيوقراطية (مع ترؤّس المرشد الأعلى الدولةَ) والجمهورية (مع مجلس نيابي ورئيس منتخبَين). غير أنّ الركن الثاني في هذا النظام هو في أفضل حالاته شبه جمهوري، إذ لا يسمح مجلس الأوصياء بالترشّح إلّا للمرشحين المُعتبَرين مؤيّدين للجمهورية الإسلامية. بالتالي، يقف هذا التشكيل الفريد عقبة أساسية أمام إحلال الديمقراطية. فلا تزال المؤسّسات غير المنتخَبة مهيمِنة، فيما تبقى تلك المنتخَبة وفية للنظام. والأهم أنّ السلطوية الهجينة التي تعتمدها الجمهورية الإسلامية قد صمدت بشكل ملفت ضدّ التغيير السياسي الفعلي، ممّا أدّى إلى تفشّي إحباط شعبي واسع النطاق اليوم إزاء فرعَي النظام كليهما، أي إزاء مَن يُعرفون بالمعتدلين بالإضافة إلى المتشدّدين أيضاً.

الاستقلال غير قابل للفصل عن الحرية

انعكست معارضةُ الثورة المحتدمة للقوتين العظميين كلتيهما في الحرب الباردة، الولايات المتحدة والاتحاد السوفياتي، في الشعار الثوري “لا شرقية ولا غربية، الجمهورية الإسلامية”. غير أنّ عداء الثورة لواشنطن هو الذي سيطر على علاقات إيران الدولية. وفيما وجدت إيران نفسها في مواجهة جيوسياسية مع الغرب، لم تكن يوماً مندمجة جيوسياسياً في الشرق. بدلاً من ذلك، وكما أظهرت سياسات روسيا والصين والهند في خلال العقوبات الأمريكية المفروضة المتزايدة، وجدت إيران نفسها مجبرة على تقديم تنازلات للقوى الآسيوية العظمى التي فضّلت دائماً علاقاتها مع واشنطن على علاقاتها مع طهران. نتيجة ذلك، شهدت إيران أنماطاً جديدة من التبعية للقوى العظمى الشرقية، بما أنّ مواجهتها ليست بخيارٍ طالما أنّ طهران على خلاف مع الدولة الأقوى في النظام الدولي.

وعلى ضوء هذه الخلفية، كيف بإمكان الإيرانيين أن يحفظوا رغبتهم القديمة في نيل الاستقلال في عالم مترابط في القرن الحادي والعشرين؟ لقد أصاب عميد دراسات سياسة إيران الخارجية الراحل روح الله رمضاني عندما ركّز على أنّه في عالم مترابط، ما من استقلال مطلق بل درجات من الاستقلال. بعبارة أخرى، ستواجه التنمية الوطنية في إيران صعوبة في حال حاولت اليوم على المحافظة على تعلّقها الإيديولوجي القوي بمفهوم مجرّدٍ عنوانه الاستقلال المطلق.

ويشكّل السياق السلطوي المحلّي في إيران تحدياً كبيراً آخر لصون الاستقلال، فهو يفضّل العلاقات الوثيقة مع الدولة السلطوية بدلاً من تلك الديمقراطية. فبهذه الطريقة لن يقلق الأمناء على الجمهورية الإسلامية المتشدّدون من احتمال أن تطرح أنظمة سلطوية شبيهة بنظامهم، مثل الصين وروسيا، مسائلَ مثل حقوق الإنسان والديمقراطية في العلاقات الثنائية. بالتالي، تكون النتيجة تفضيلاً جيوسياسياً لسياسة “النظر نحو الشرق” تميل إليه بالإجمال القوى المستفيدة سياسياً واقتصادياً من هذا التوجّه. وقد أطالت عداوة إيران مع الولايات المتحدة علاقة النزاع التي تربطها بالعالم الغربي. فهي لم تمنعها من تطوير كامل قدراتها عبر إنشاء علاقات وطيدة مع الغرب والشرق على حدّ سواء فحسب، بل دفعت بها إلى أحضان قوى الشرق التي استغلّت انعزال إيران عن الغرب وحاجتها إلى الشرق أيضاً. لهذا السبب، أصاب رمضاني في ملاحظته أنّ إقامة مؤسّسة سياسية ديمقراطية شرطٌ مسبق أساسي لتفادي التبعية، مشيراً إلى أنّ “انهيار سياسة القانون والسلطة القضائية المسيّسة سيُضعفان في نهاية المطاف قدرة إيران على الاحتفاظ باستقلالها في خضم السياسات العالمية.” وشدّد أيضاً على أنّ الحرية والاستقلال غير قابلَين للفصل.

وقد يتيح مناخٌ سياسي أكثر انفتاحاً، كما في الهند مثلاً، إقامة حوارات داخلية حول خيارات السياسة الخارجية وما يقف على المحكّ بالنسبة إلى السكان. بذلك، ستُحسّن الدمقرطة إلى حدّ كبير صورةَ إيران الدولية وربّما تعزّز قدرتَها التفاوضية مع القوى العظمى، ولا سيّما نظراً إلى ميل القوى الغربية نحو استعمال حقوق الإنسان أداةً لتوليد ضغط سياسي.

الخاتمة

إذاً، هل وفت الثورة الإيرانية بوعودها في نهاية المطاف؟ على الرغم من بعض الإنجازات، تبدو الصورة الإجمالية كئيبة، ولا سيّما عندما يتعلّق الأمر بوعود تحقيق الديمقراطية. أمّا إذا من الممكن عكس هذه الأعمال، فهذه مسألة أخرى. فالأزمة الثلاثية الحادّة – الاجتماعية الاقتصادية والسياسية والبيئية – التي تواجهها الجمهورية الإسلامية في عامها الأربعين والشعورُ المتنامي بالخيبة والإحباط الشعبيَّين الذي برز بقوّة في خلال الاضطرابات في العام 2017-2018 والمواجهةُ المستمرة مع الدولة الأقوى في العالم لا تترك أملاً يُذكر بأنّ هذا النظام عينه الذي عجز عن الإيفاء بوعوده لعقود سينجح في المستقبل.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Molly Montgomery

Heading into Ukraine’s July 21 parliamentary elections, new President Volodomyr Zelenskiy is riding a high. Having swept into office in late May with 73% of the vote, Zelenskiy is poised to take a commanding share of the Ukrainian Rada (parliament), if not an outright majority.

Most polls have his Servant of the People Party with somewhere between 42% and 48% of the vote, figures that are unheard of in a system in which a top party rarely wins more than one-third. The next most popular party, the pro-Russian Opposition Bloc, has only 15% of the vote according to polls.

Zelenskiy’s promises of change inspire optimism

Zelenskiy, a comedian who rose to fame playing a political-novice-turned-president on his television show “Servant of the People,” has promised a complete overhaul of Ukraine’s political system. Optically, he has succeeded. At 41, Zelenskiy is only 12 years younger than his predecessor, Petro Poroshenko. However, his boyish looks and unflagging energy stand in sharp contrast to Poroshenko, who frequently looked like an old dog resisting learning new tricks. Poroshenko, a long-time politician and the billionaire “chocolate king of Ukraine,” was a relic of the Soviet era and its tumultuous aftermath. Zelenskiy represents the new Ukraine—young, dynamic, European, and ready to throw off the burdens of Ukraine’s history and its corrupt and oligarchic system.

As he settles into his presidency and prepares for parliamentary elections, Zelenskiy has quite literally rolled up his sleeves—he frequently eschews the suit and tie—and begun to make changes. Many of these are cosmetic, designed to show voters that he is serious about using the instruments of the state to benefit the people, even without a loyal faction within the parliament to push through legislation. Zelenskiy canceled this year’s Independence Day military parade, and instead used the money to pay bonuses to Ukrainian service members fighting in the east. He has reduced the number of presidential staff and has announced plans to relocate from the imposing Presidential Administration building to a smaller, more welcoming space.

So far, Zelenskiy’s strategy is working, as I saw first-hand during a recent study trip to Ukraine, sponsored by the Heinrich-Böll Foundation. In a July 9 International Republican Institute (IRI) poll, 67% of Ukrainians approved of Zelenskiy’s job performance. More striking was Ukrainians’ change in attitudes from IRI’s September 2018 poll. Forty-eight percent of Ukrainians expected the economy to improve in the next 12 months, compared to 14% in the previous poll. The number of Ukrainians who said they were pessimistic about the future dropped dramatically, from 71% to 39%.

Questions remain about ties to oligarch Kolomoisky

Once the elections are over, Zelenskiy will need to move beyond symbolic gestures to the business of governing; that is where the questions begin. Zelenskiy’s early days in office have partly assuaged fears that he is a pawn of the notorious oligarch Ihor Kolomoisky, whose 1+1 channel carried Zelenskiy’s television show. Diplomats and others who have spent time with Zelenskiy praise his intellect, his commitment to conquering a very steep learning curve, and his talents as a natural communicator. But the records of those around him are mixed.

Observers estimate the composition of Servant of the People’s parliamentary list is one-third reformers, one-third individuals with personal or business ties to Zelenskiy, and one-third Kolomoisky allies. A leaked list of eight regional governor nominees was similarly checkered. Among his early appointees, Zelenskiy’s chief of staff, Andriy Bogdan, has raised the most eyebrows due to his former role as Kolomoisky’s attorney. Those inclined to give Zelenskiy the benefit of the doubt note that Bogdan has represented every powerful figure in Ukraine, so is likely beholden to none. According to this argument, Bogdan is the man you hire if you want to get things done, partly because he knows the oligarchs and how to balance them against one another.

Making difficult reforms a reality

Making good on his reform promises will require Zelenskiy to handle the oligarchs carefully and eventually face them head-to-head. In addition to immediate anti-corruption steps required by Ukraine’s current $3.9 billion International Monetary Fund stand-by arrangement, there is a long list of structural reforms necessary to strengthen governance and the rule of law, root out corruption, and draw foreign investment. All of these will touch on oligarchic interests.

The post-Cold War pattern of reform in Ukraine is two steps forward, one (or more) steps back. Laws are passed, but implementation lags or leaves holes for oligarchs to exploit, depriving the Ukrainian people of the benefits of reform. Over time, this backsliding inevitably results in a loss of faith in the country’s leaders. Periodically, this frustration boils over, causing Ukrainians to spill out onto the streets to demand more from their politicians. This is the story of the 2004 Orange Revolution and 2014’s Revolution of Dignity. To a lesser extent, it is also the story of Zelenskiy’s election, a revolution at the ballot box borne of dissatisfaction with Poroshenko’s unwillingness to break the corrupt, oligarchic system and commit fully to reform.

Zelenskiy’s popularity and the strength of his mandate are a double-edged sword. The parliamentary elections will give him the power necessary to fulfill his promises of systemic reform. Now he will have to use it. If he does, he will face fierce opposition from Ukraine’s oligarchy, the tentacles of which reach deep into Ukrainian society. If he does not, the Ukrainian people will quickly recognize once again that promises of reform don’t put food on the table or money in their pockets, and they will once again become disillusioned.

The agenda before Zelenskiy is daunting, and his choice will soon become apparent. If he chooses reform, the United States, the European Union, and the International Monetary Fund should redouble their support to ensure that reforms are carried through to implementation, that results touch the lives of ordinary Ukrainians, and that Zelenskiy has the tools he needs to battle Ukraine’s oligarchs.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Galip Dalay

On June 6, then-Acting Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan sent a strongly-worded letter to his Turkish counterpart over Turkey’s planned purchase of S-400 air defense system from Russia. The letter outlined a timeline to remove Turkey from the F-35 fighter jet program, should Turkey move forward with the purchase. Washington argues that if installed in Turkey, the S-400 system will compromise the F-35 technology.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan chafed at threats of sanctions and said that the S-400 purchase is a done deal. And indeed, last week Russia began delivering the system to Turkey.

As U.S.-Turkey relations are headed for further downturn, Erdoğan appears to have pinned his hope on President Trump in order to avoid U.S. sanctions. In fact, Erdoğan came out of his meeting with Trump on the sidelines of the G-20 Summit in Japan at the end of June satisfied, as Trump put the blame for the S-400 crisis on Obama administration and—in contrast to the messages from elsewhere in the U.S. government—gave the impression that he doesn’t favor putting heavy sanctions on Turkey over the issue.

It is, nevertheless, perplexing to observe how Russia is reshaping U.S.-Turkey relations.

A new chapter

It was the Soviet threat that gave birth to the U.S.-Turkey alliance. Through economic and military aid, President Harry Truman tried to prevent Turkey and Greece from falling under Soviet influence in 1947. With a twist of irony, it is now Russia that may break this alliance.

As the purchase of S-400 missile system illustrates, there has been an important change in tide, both in U.S.-Turkish and in Turkish-Russian relations.

Defying expectations, Turkey and Russia have fast deepened relations on multiple fronts in recent years. Syria was a magnet that Russia used to lure in Turkey. What started as a pragmatic engagement between the sides within the context of the Syrian crisis has already gone beyond Syria. Few predicted that Turkish-Russian courting could survive Syria’s ever-complicated crisis. Yet thus far, the relationship has survived and even further improved.

Such negative expectations for the future of Turkish-Russian relations were not baseless. Geopolitically, the two countries are on opposite sides of the spectrum on almost all issues in their shared neighborhood. Likewise, both countries’ local and regional alliance structures remain at cross-purposes. Recognition of Russia’s geopolitical ambitions, particularly towards the Eastern Mediterranean, was one of the major factors that drove Turkey to seek membership in different Western clubs.

Warming ties between Ankara and Moscow

So why is Turkey now seeking to form a partnership with Russia?

Russia’s military involvement in the Syrian crisis and Turkey’s subsequent shooting down of a Russian jet in the fall of 2015 were the crucial turning points. With the former, the regime-change scenario in Damascus has further faded from the horizon; with the latter, Turkey was effectively pushed out of the Syrian scene. By then, the West had already given up on the regime change in Syria, and the Kurdistan Worker’s Party (PKK)-affiliated Syrian Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) was fast gaining territorial control and political influence in Syria. In response, Turkey also set aside its regime-change goal, mended relations with Russia, and focused on curtailing Syrian Kurdish gains instead. This bet paid off. With Russian approval, Turkey undertook military operations in northwestern Syria, driving YPG forces east of the Euphrates river.

Yet such pragmatism wasn’t the only factor that has shaped the Turkish-Russian engagement since then. The U.S. is the invisible third party that shapes its trajectory.

Divergence and decoupling have been the dominant forces of U.S.-Turkey relations in recent years. Putting aside diplomatic courtesy, officials from both sides have thrown accusations and threats at each other. Turkey reprimands the U.S. for supporting the Syrian Democratic Forces, and the U.S. is increasingly vocal in its criticism of Turkey’s relations with Russia and Iran, as well as Ankara’s policy towards Syria. The name of the U.S. sanction that Turkey is facing as a result of the S-400 purchase—Countering America’s Adversaries Through Sanctions Act (CATSAA)—is telling. The level of trust between the two sides is at a historical low. Institutional ties are fraying, particularly at the military-to-military level. The Turkish public, political elites, and policymakers increasingly view the United States Central Command (CENTCOM) as a menacing force.

In April, Vice President Mike Pence asked Turkey to make a choice between NATO and Russia. Preferring strategic autonomy in both foreign and security policy, Turkey doesn’t want to make such a choice. It explores ways to reconcile its NATO membership and historical ties to the West with its improving relations with countries such as Russia, China, and Iran.

It isn’t just that Turkey believes that the U.S. isn’t very receptive to its interests: Turkey also thinks U.S. policy toward the Eastern Mediterranean directly undermines Ankara’s regional role. The Senate’s adoption of the “Eastern Mediterranean Security and Partnership Act” further aggravates Turkey’s fears that U.S. policy in the region, whether by design or by accident, culminates in a hard containment of Iran and soft containment of Turkey. Traditionally, Turkey was in fact one of the linchpins of U.S. policy towards Eastern Mediterranean. But this bill advocates lifting the arms embargo on Cyprus (first instated in 1987) and envisages Greece, Cyprus, and Israel as the new linchpins of U.S. policy towards the region. In this regard, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s attendance at the Israeli-Cypriot-Greek tripartite meeting on energy and security in the Eastern Mediterranean in Israel in March further contributes to Turkey’s fears. This and similar initiatives will further convince Turkish decisionmakers that the U.S. is pursuing a double containment strategy of Iran and Turkey. Not only will this make Turkey less cooperative towards any U.S. policy on Iran, but it will also further motivate Turkey to work even more closely with Russia and Iran.

Can the U.S.-Turkey friendship be rekindled?

Turkey’s newly found partnership with Russia is still fragile and evolving. The Russian-backed Syrian regime’s recent offensive on Idlib province in Syria glaringly illustrated the limits of Russian-Turkish cooperation in the Middle East and beyond.

Their relationship is no match for Turkey’s historical and institutional ties to the West. Yet these ties are fraying. A heavy set of U.S. sanctions on Turkey in response to Turkey’s purchase of the S-400 missile system may have the unintended consequence of making Turkey even more dependent on Russia. In this scenario, this deal will further turn into a choice of geopolitical realignment for Turkey, away from the West and closer to Russia. And peeling Turkey further away from the West and undermining NATO are precisely what Russia covets. Such a realignment will make Turkey even more introverted and democratically retrograde, and serve neither Turkish nor Western interests. This is the prospect that Turkish and American officials should prevent at all cost.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Eric Rosand, Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini

This week, diplomats and civil society activists will travel to New York to attend the annual U.N. High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) on Sustainable Development. This year’s theme is Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16, on working towards “peaceful, just and inclusive societies.” Meanwhile, the U.N. Secretary-General convened some 1,000 diplomats and civil society actors last week in Nairobi to discuss progress on preventing violent extremism (PVE) in Africa. The agenda was founded on the 2015 U.N. Plan of Action to Prevent Violent Extremism.

SDG 16 and PVE: Two sides of the same coin?

The SDG 16 and PVE agendas have much in common. These include the emphasis on strengthening civil society, particularly women and youth, and empowering local agents of change; building social cohesion and resilience and the role that inclusive cities can play in this regard; the need for government to be responsive to citizens’ needs; and the importance of respecting human rights and addressing grievances and inequality. More broadly, the 2018 Pathfinders for Peaceful, Just and Inclusive Societies’ report highlighted the need to scale up the prevention of violence (including extremist violence) for the most vulnerable segments of society if the SDG 16 objectives are to be met.

The vision and intent of both agendas are admirable and necessary. But progress on both has been far too slow and siloed. Many would argue that there has been regression. As the civil society statement emerging from the U.N. conference on SDG 16 in May noted that since governments adopted the SDGs in 2015, “funding for justice has decreased by 40%” and only 2% of total gross overseas development assistance is going towards conflict prevention in fragile contexts, with the lion share continuing to be spent on crisis response.

Many of the roadblocks to achieving progress on the two agendas are the same. When it comes to PVE, the U.N. itself and many others have identified the overly-securitized responses to violent extremism, weak governance, corruption, injustice, marginalization, exclusion, and contracting civic space as key obstacles. This is mirrored by assessments of the SDG 16 agenda. In the lead up to this week’s HLPF, a number of civil society groups identified “[s]tructural inequalities, rising authoritarianism, exclusion and tokenization, inadequate capacity, and lack of political will to address peace, justice, and governance issues” as limiting advancement of the agenda.

Pathways to progress?

Given that 40 countries are already experiencing conflict and a further 92 are less peaceful than they were a decade ago, the SDG 16 and PVE agenda are both in need of urgent and critical attention. So what can and must be done?

First, as advocates for peace, security, development, and human rights—as well as practitioners spanning governmental, U.N., and civil society organizations—we have to acknowledge that both agendas share the same goals. This is particularly true for the agendas on women, peace, and security, as well as youth, peace, and security.

At the same time, we must recognize the political sensitivities that these agendas can trigger. The PVE agenda remains highly contentious in many, particularly local, contexts. For many civil society organizations and other grassroots actors, PVE is too politicized, and therefore falls behind what they view as more pressing community-level concerns. From the standpoint of some states, embracing the PVE agenda means acknowledging that violent extremist movements exist within and pose a threat to the state; however, this recognition itself confers a degree of power and legitimacy to such groups. The PVE framework also requires states to be more transparent and inclusive than traditional counterterrorism and national security approaches allow.

Given these sensitivities, focusing on SDG 16 can serve as an entry-point for discussing and addressing the root causes of violent extremism, but through a more neutral, positive, and empowering agenda. This aligns with the approaches that women peacebuilders, including in the Women’s Alliance for Security Leadership, have developed based on their practical experiences. Preventing or countering violent extremism is necessary but not sufficient. To be effective and have sustained impact, it is essential to articulate what we also seek to promote: values, opportunities, and positive alternative pathways for communities to fulfill their aspirations and address their grievances. The SDGs, in particular SDG 16, provide much of this.

The U.N. Development Programme (UNDP) was the first entity within the U.N. system to acknowledge (following their 2016 global PVE meeting) the clear need for linking the PVE and SDG 16 agendas. But in terms of embedding this in country programming and interactions with governments, more needs to be done.

At a minimum, we should take stock of PVE activities that already further SDG 16 goals and vice versa. For example, a 2019 International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN)/UNDP report reflects on changes needed to existing justice and security processes to ensure that women and girls (as well as men and boys) are protected against violence and sexual abuse when interacting with state security actors. The report points to existing country programs as in Indonesia, where the government has partnered with civil society and community groups to develop standard operating procedures to address the challenges of returnees. As earlier UNDP research demonstrates, abuse by the security sector is a key driver of radicalization and violence. In other words, if more countries embedded respect of human rights, protection, and the rule of law into the ethos of the sector, it would not only advance the SDGs but also contribute significantly to preventing violent extremism.

Separating agendas in major U.N. conferences and publishing new resolutions before meaningful progress on existing ones has occurred does not help. This disconnect among the local, national, and global levels has practical consequences.

For example, by abrogating their responsibilities to tackle the SDG 16 priorities of inclusivity, justice, and rule of law, many member states are exacerbating feelings of marginalization and exclusion that drive extremist and other forms of violence. Additionally, many governments are continuing to reduce space for civic action. In addition to targeted attacks against environmental and human rights activists, peacebuilders are also facing increased threats. As the May 2019 statement recalls, “civil society faces barriers to participation, relating to inadequate funding, visa restrictions, and the scope, substance, and follow-up to participation.”

There are many reasons for this negative trend, but as a recent report by the U.N. Special Rapporteur on the protection and promotion of human rights while countering terrorism notes, many states—authoritarian and otherwise—are using the PVE agenda as an excuse to shut down or curtail civil society organizations in the name of security. Some organizations are privately voicing a growing concern that since the U.N. leads on the PVE agenda, governments are thus using the U.N. as a cover to justify their crackdowns. Therefore, instead of the U.N.’s PVE work complementing and moving the SDG 16 agenda forward, it is damaging it in practice.

Breaking down silos at the U.N.: learn from the locals

From the skyline of New York, bringing coherence to this uniquely U.N.-ese alphabet soup of entities and agendas may seem impossible. But on the ground, as people are affected daily by the failure of justice systems or rule of law and the rise of violent extremism, ordinary people leading local organizations—often women and youth—have come up with their own solutions. Some get international donor support, but many do not. They offer critical lessons in how a combination of common sense, courage, in-depth knowledge of local culture, and caring for their own people can be transformative.

In Kenya for example, the organization Advocacy for Women and Peace and Security in Africa tackled the issue of fear and mistrust between the police and community women in the Mombasa area through “police cafés” set up twice a month. The cafés provided a formal and safe space for dialogue between the police and 20 women leaders to discuss community security issues related to violent extremism and relations between the police and women in the community. This focus on building trust and initiating reform from the ground up is sustainable and cost effective, and the impact is evident immediately.

Other links also exist. Extremist movements often seek to divide communities and elevate singular religious or ethno-nationalistic identities, and a key antidote to their ideology is promoting and celebrating the pluralism that defines most of our societies now. SDG 16 calls for “inclusive societies,” which can be achieved in a variety of ways.

First and foremost, enabling a vibrant and independent civil society sector to thrive is essential. Civil society organizations offer a means for people of diverse backgrounds to unite around shared interests and common causes. They help strengthen the social compact by being a key interlocutor and bridge between state and society. Second, socio-cultural programs—ranging from exhibitions and concerts to revamping literature, arts, and history curricula to reflect a diversity of contributors—are a positive and empowering means of fostering belonging.

Here too, civil society organizations and community volunteer groups led by women and young people from Pakistan to Iraq have pioneered such programs. They resonate within their context and reflect their own traditions, while also demonstrating the universality of the desire for equality and peaceful coexistence.

When civil society peace builders can work for peace, equal rights, dignity, and pluralism at the grassroots level, they can provide effective activities that are transforming lives. But to sustain these efforts and scale them more widely, national and global leaders must acknowledge the urgency of the issues and demonstrate their support and respect for civil society as allies in this struggle.

This year’s HLPF offers a critical opportunity for a deeper review of the gaps and overlaps of the agendas, as well as a space to explore existing precedence for effective local practices.

The urgency cannot be understated. Progress across the 17 SDGs is patchy at best. If SDG 16 is side-lined, PVE is siloed, and peace and social cohesion are taken for granted, then other SDGs will become unattainable and efforts to prevent extremist violence will suffer. It is akin to providing Picasso with the best oils and most vibrant colors to paint a masterpiece, but offering him a shredded and torn canvas. Without a strong weave in the canvas, the painting could never exist.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By Sharan Grewal, M. Tahir Kilavuz, Robert Kubinec

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

On April 2, Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika resigned from office, becoming the fifth Arab president to fall to a mass uprising since 2011. Protests have continued since his resignation, calling for the fall of the entire regime. We conducted an online survey of over 9,000 Algerians, gauging their attitudes towards the protests and their goals. The survey also includes a large sample of 1,700 military personnel, allowing us to compare and contrast their attitudes with the protesters.

The majority of Algerians in our survey support the protest movement and want a complete change of the political system. Protesters and non-protesters alike are fed up with corruption and would prefer a transition to democracy. The lower ranks of the military—the soldiers and junior officers—largely agree with the protesters on these demands, but the senior officers are more resistant. However, moving forward, protesters are likely to come into conflict with military personnel of all ranks over the military’s political and economic privileges post-Bouteflika.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview