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BookKeeping Express (BKE) Announces Partnership with MSP Consulting.

BKE is proud to announce a new business relationship with MSP Consulting, an experienced advisor specializing in high-performance merchant payment service.

“We’re always looking for ways to help our clients save money and time so they can focus on running a successful business. Our partnership with MSP Consulting reflects BKE’s dedication to helping business owners simplify their back office,” said BKE CEO Keith Mueller.  

Both BKE and MSP offer their clients industry-specific knowledge and advice in their respective categories, helping businesses lower costs and identify growth opportunities.

“Having access to time and money-saving tools and technology is really important for small business owners who are trying to do more with less,” said Mueller.

BKE was founded in California in 1984 to provide professional bookkeeping designed specifically for the needs and budgets of small businesses. Now serving clients across the nation, BKE’s innovative technology platform and skilled financial specialists remove the need for business owners to spend time on day-to-day bookkeeping tasks­­.

In 2003, MSP Consulting began offering high-performance merchant payments services with the mission of helping clients adapt to the changing payments landscape and innovate. MSP Consulting has more than 65 years of combined expertise in management consulting, payment systems technology, credit card processing, mobile payments and accounting.

“MSP and BKE are both dedicated to helping small businesses succeed in an increasingly competitive landscape. Our solutions similarly help business owners operate in a more cost effective and efficient manner so they can focus on meeting and exceeding their own customers’ needs,” said MSP Consulting Partner Mike Higgins.

Learn more about the MSP and BKE partnership.

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It’s November. You’re smack in the middle of the fourth quarter, and suddenly you realize that you’ve got receipts stored in three different places and your accounts haven’t been reconciled since April — or maybe March.

As the end of the year looms, you don’t quite know where you stand financially. Worse, you’re not sure what year-end moves you need to make for the best tax advantage.

Don’t panic. Follow this five-step plan to get back on track.

1. Get organized

Go on a search-and-retrieve mission to gather as many documents as you can. You may have accumulated transaction records in boxes, corners of your office, or even your email inbox. Download your bank statements and collect any copies of deposit slips or checks you kept.

Once you have as much documentation as you can find, separate each receipt, invoice, or other record into income and expenses. Then, sort them by month. This will give you a chronological record of most or all transactions.

2. Enter transactions

If your bookkeeping isn’t up to date, it’s hard to track whether your income and expenses are what they should be. Whether you work on this yourself or get help from an outsourced bookkeeping solution, get your general ledger up to date by listing all transactions. Once you have a comprehensive general ledger, you can create a profit and loss statement (P&L) to help you project operating costs and identify where to cut expenses or make investments.

3. Calculate income

Next, review your revenue for the year. Is it up or down? Have your expenses held steady or have they increased or decreased? These top-line numbers will give you a sense of whether your tax liability may have changed this year and if you need to adjust tax payments accordingly.

4. Review deductions

Starting in 2018, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 may affect your tax liability and several deductions. Some of the changes that could affect you this year include:

  • The corporate tax rate is now 21 percent.

  • Pass-through entities, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies (LLCs), S-corporations, may deduct 20 percent of their qualified business income, if taxable income is below $315,000 for married taxpayers filing jointly, or $157,500 for single taxpayers. Those who earn more are subject to additional conditions.

  • Some business deductions, such as entertaining clients, are no longer allowed. You may still deduct business-related food and beverage costs up to 50 percent if they are not extravagant.

  • The new law temporarily allows 100 percent expensing for business property acquired and placed in service after September 27, 2017 and before January 1, 2023. 

The new law also makes other changes that relate to equipment expenses, business interest deduction thresholds, and other areas.

5. Get help

The new tax law adds more challenges to the plates of already overwhelmed business owners. An August 2018 survey by business-to-business research website Clutch.co found that nearly one in three small business owners feel that they are already overpaying their taxes.[i]

As you prepare for the end of the year and begin to understand what the new tax law means for you, a qualified CPA can give you advice about the best moves to make before the end of the year, such as making purchases or qualified charitable donations, to give you the best tax advantages possible.

Business owners wear many hats and juggle an array of responsibilities. If bookkeeping is overwhelming or you need help getting your books in order in time to make the right moves for your financial situation, consider outsourcing. A reliable bookkeeping solution can help you maintain accurate and current records, while giving you more time to do what you do best: run a successful business. Need help prepping your books for tax season? Reach out for a free consultation.

[i] “Small Business Accounting in 2018: 4 Tips to Manage Small Business Finances,” Clutch.co, August 28, 2018.

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As your business grows, any bookkeeping system that includes a shoebox full of receipts just won’t cut it anymore. Keeping accurate financial records is essential for everything from preparing taxes to assessing the health of your business. One of the first financial tools a maturing small business needs to establish is a general ledger.

Think of the general ledger as the master list of the financial actions that go on in your business. Different from the general journal, which is simply a chronological listing of transactions, the general ledger details changes to the company’s assets, liabilities, equity accounts, and other financials. If there is an increase or decrease in any of these accounts, it should be listed here. These entries can also reclassify amounts, correct accounting errors, and close accounts at the end of fiscal years.

Why do you need a general ledger?

A general ledger isn’t just more paperwork. It gives you a 360-degree view of your company’s financial health and better insight into your financial strengths and weaknesses. Some of these may include:

·         Seasonal changes in revenue, indicating a need for new cash management strategies

·         Increases in debt that may slow business growth

·         Profit growth, signaling an opportunity for reinvestment in the business

·         New or increased expenses that may affect overall business costs and profitability

By having all of your business account details in one place, you can spot changes and review or address them easier than if your financial information is stored in multiple places (or a shoebox). Having a well-constructed and up-to-date general ledger gives you the information you need to prepare an range of financial statements. It is also signals to bankers, lenders, investors, and potential business partners that you are serious about your business and its financial management — which is critical if you’re aiming to grow.

Creating a general ledger

The general ledger is based on the company’s chart of accounts, a document that lists all main accounts associated with the business, including:

·         Current assets

·         Fixed assets

·         Current liabilities

·         Long-term liabilities

·         Owner equity accounts

·         Sales revenue

·         Expense accounts

·         Gains and losses

Within the ledger, these accounts are broken down into four categories:

Assets: Assets are the items and elements of value within your business. For a small business, asset accounts usually include cash, accounts receivable, and physical assets, such as equipment or real estate. For larger businesses, this can also include larger parcels of real estate or a factory or plant, as well as intellectual property, such as patents or trademarks.

Liabilities: Liabilities are the monies owed by your business. These accounts include accounts payable, salaries payable, notes payable, and any other transaction where you pay money owed for a product, service, debt, or other expense. These transactions may be money owed now or in future fiscal years.

Equity accounts: Equity accounts are meant to reflect the capital invested into the business. Think of equity this way: If the business used its assets to pay off all its liabilities, the remaining amount is the balance in the owner’s “capital” or “equity” account.

Other transactions: Journal entries may also reclassify amounts, especially those that are time-sensitive, as well as correct errors, and close out temporary accounts. This type of detail gives a complete and accurate picture of the company’s transactions over time.

Keep it organized

Once you create the ledger — whether you choose to do so manually or with software — keep it updated regularly to ensure it’s valuable to your business. It’s a good idea to:

1.       Ensure all transactions are entered in the appropriate journals

2.       Summarize transactions and add them to the general ledger at least once a month

3.       Give each account a separate page, if you’re entering transactions manually to avoid confusion and give you ample space to record transactions

Sorting through your financial documents to create a general ledger may seem daunting, but it can deliver clear advantages. And Bookkeeping Express can help you harness the power of your company’s financials. From helping you prepare accurate financial statements to managing bill payments to systemizing payroll and more, our team of expert bookkeepers and accountants can help you put more time into what’s important: focusing on your business. To learn more, reach out.

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Few things have changed the way people shop more than the internet. Today, about eight in 10 Americans turn to their computers or phones rather than brick-and-mortar stores for purchases. According to the Washington Post, people buy something online about as often as they take out the trash — at least once per week.  

That can be a game-changer for small businesses. With the availability of ecommerce, businesses — no matter the size or industry — can reach customers around the country.

However, a June 2018 Supreme Court decision is about bring some big new challenges to small businesses that sell online. In South Dakota v. Wayfair, the Court ruled that states can now require merchants to collect sales taxes on online purchases. The ruling overturns a 1992 decision in Quill Corp v. North Dakota, which found that states could not require retailers to collect sales taxes unless they had a physical presence — a store, plant, or other facility — in the same state where the buyer is located.  

Bottom line: Now, states can require that small businesses charge and remit sales tax on an item that is purchased online and shipped to that state. Here’s what that could mean for your small business.

The Challenges

For big businesses with large accounting departments, this ruling could mean little more than some additional paperwork and tax filing requirements. However, for small businesses with limited staff and resources, these new requirements may be daunting. As these new tax requirements go into effect, businesses may be required to:

  • Track the sales tax rates and requirements of various states.

  • Calculate and apply the appropriate tax on each online purchase according to the state where it will be shipped.

  • Send monthly sales tax payments to each state where the business made sales.

  • File the appropriate tax forms for each state where sales were made and sales tax sent.

And, don’t forget that some states don’t have sales tax at all, while others have use tax, which is the buyer’s responsibility to calculate and pay. And some states may also apply thresholds that exempt small businesses from having to report and collect sales tax.

In short, selling online may soon become a logistical nightmare for small businesses.

The Good News

Before you start shutting down your company’s e-commerce function, take heart: There are some good news and solutions to make selling online easier as the new tax requirements come into effect.

First, just nine states — Georgia, Tennessee, Indiana, Wyoming, Colorado, Alabama, Massachusetts, North Dakota, and South Dakota — have current online sales tax laws. Six more, including Illinois, Iowa, Connecticut, Hawaii, Kentucky, and Vermont, have enacted laws that will go into effect in January 2019, according to a June 2018 report in Digital Commerce 360. And, so far, these states have a minimum threshold of $100,000 in sales or 200 transactions before a business is required to collect and remit sales tax.

So, depending on where you make sales (and the volume of sales you make), you may not be impacted as much as you expected.  

The Next Steps

Still, it’s essential to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to sales tax calculations. Small businesses should:

  1. Track revenue at least weekly and keep accurate records. This will allow you to spot whether you’re close to meeting the thresholds for sales tax remittance in the states that require it.

  2. Establish a monthly process for calculating and tracking sales tax. Make sure you file the appropriate forms and remit payment by the required deadline in each state.

  3. Appoint one person to spearhead sales tax tracking and remittance to ensure that you’re aware of when payments are due and how much your business owes.

 The new sales tax requirements that stem from the Supreme Court decision, will certainly require some adjustment and new procedures in the way many small businesses track and pay their taxes. However, since the thresholds require a substantial amount of sales in each state where taxes are due, not all small businesses will be affected.

If you’re still confused about these changes, Bookkeeping Express can help. From helping you track sales in various states to finding new ways to streamline bookkeeping processes, we can help you solve this and many other tax problems. To learn more, reach out and put our team of experts today.

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Few things have changed the way people shop more than the internet. Today, about eight in 10 Americans turn to their computers or phones rather than brick-and-mortar stores for purchases. According to the Washington Post, people buy something online about as often as they take out the trash — at least once per week.  

 

That can be a game-changer for small businesses. With the availability of ecommerce, businesses — no matter the size or industry — can reach customers around the country.

 

However, a June 2018 Supreme Court decision is about bring some big new challenges to small businesses that sell online. In South Dakota v. Wayfair, the Court ruled that states can now require merchants to collect sales taxes on online purchases. The ruling overturns a 1992 decision in Quill Corp v. North Dakota, which found that states could not require retailers to collect sales taxes unless they had a physical presence — a store, plant, or other facility — in the same state where the buyer is located.

 

Bottom line: Now, states can require that small businesses charge and remit sales tax on an item that is purchased online and shipped to that state. Here’s what that could mean for your small business.

 

The challenges

 

For big businesses with large accounting departments, this ruling could mean little more than some additional paperwork and tax filing requirements. However, for small businesses with limited staff and resources, these new requirements may be daunting. As these new tax requirements go into effect, businesses may be required to:

·         Track the sales tax rates and requirements of various states

·         Calculate and apply the appropriate tax on each online purchase according to the state where it will be shipped

·         Send monthly sales tax payments to each state where the business made sales

·         File the appropriate tax forms for each state where sales were made and sales tax sent

 

And, don’t forget that some states don’t have sales tax at all, while others have use tax, which is the buyer’s responsibility to calculate and pay. And some states may also apply thresholds that exempt small businesses from having to report and collect sales tax.

 

In short, selling online may soon become a logistical nightmare for small businesses.

 

The good news

 

Before you start shutting down your company’s ecommerce function, take heart: There is some good news and solutions to make selling online easier as the new tax requirements come into effect.

 

First, just nine states — Georgia, Tennessee, Indiana, Wyoming, Colorado, Alabama, Massachusetts, North Dakota, and South Dakota — have current online sales tax laws. Six more, including Illinois, Iowa, Connecticut, Hawaii, Kentucky, and Vermont, have enacted laws that will go into effect in January 2019, according to a June 2018 report in Digital Commerce 360. And, so far, these states have a minimum threshold of $100,000 in sales or 200 transactions before a business is required to collect and remit sales tax.

 

So, depending on where you make sales (and the volume of sales you make), you may not be impacted as much as you expected.

 

The next steps

 

Still, it’s essential to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to sales tax calculations. Small businesses should:

1.       Track revenue at least weekly and keep accurate records. This will allow you to spot whether you’re close to meeting the thresholds for sales tax remittance in the states that require it.

2.       Establish a monthly process for calculating and tracking sales tax. Make sure you file the appropriate forms and remit payment by the required deadline in each state.

3.       Appoint one person to spearhead sales tax tracking and remittance to ensure that you’re aware of when payments are due and how much your business owes.

 

The new sales tax requirements that stem from the Supreme Court decision will certainly require some adjustment and new procedures in the way many small businesses track and pay their taxes. However, since the thresholds require a substantial amount of sales in each state where taxes are due, not all small businesses will be affected.


If you’re still confused about these changes, Bookkeeping Express can help. From helping you track sales in various states to finding new ways to streamline bookkeeping processes, we can help you solve this and many other tax problems. To learn more, reach out and put our team of experts today.

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For most businesses, it’s clear who you need to hire. A gym needs fitness instructors. A restaurant needs cooks. A salon needs hair stylists. But what’s not always clear is how you should categorize those people. Should they be employees or independent contractors?

 

Companies across the U.S. are struggling to answer this question. For example, are Uber drivers independent contractors or employees? While Uber has historically defined them as “partners” (i.e., contractors), several recent lawsuits have argued the opposite. And one worker sued GrubHub for back wages, overtime, and expense reimbursement, insisting that he was an employee, not a contractor. 

 

And in the growing gig economy, the question will only become more common. In 2017, 36 percent of the U.S. workforce were freelancers. If the trend continues, more than half the population will work as independent contractors or freelancers within just 10 years.

 

But it doesn’t only come down to your (or your employees’) preference. There are laws that help determine whether workers should be classified as independent contractors or employees, and if you do it wrong — intentionally or not — there can be hefty penalties. Beyond fines and back taxes, you could face criminal penalties, up to $1,000 per misclassified worker and one year in prison.

 

To keep your business on track for success — and to avoid fines and penalties — make sure you understand how to choose the right classification. Here’s where to start.

 

The Basics: Employee vs. Independent Contractor

 

How you classify your workforce is about more than whether you hand employees a W-2 or a 1099. It will determine if you’re responsible for withholding taxes and providing benefits, as well as how much control you have over how and when the individual completes his or her work.

 

In general, if you hire an independent contractor, you can only control the result of the work — not how or when it will be done. For example, a salon may hire hair stylists as independent contractors. That means the salon has control over the end result (e.g. completing a haircut or color service), but can’t specify the products the stylist uses, what the stylist wears to work, or if that stylist chooses to also work at another salon. The benefit, of course, is that as an independent contractor, the stylist is considered self-employed, so the salon doesn’t have to withhold taxes or provide benefits.

 

If you hire employees, on the other hand, you do have control over how and when the work is completed. You can require restaurant employees, for example, to wear a certain uniform, show up at a specific time, and prepare food using particular ingredients and processes. Employers who hire employees are responsible for withholding taxes for those individuals. 

 

There’s Still More to Consider

 

OK, you may understand the basics of the two designations — but is your evaluation accurate? Once you start looking at specific elements — like if you reimburse expenses for the worker, require him to attend meetings, or prohibit him from working for another employer — the line between employee and contractor can blur.

 

To help you think through the classifications in a more detailed way, the IRS developed three categories of questions to consider:  

 

1.      Behavioral: To what extent can your company control how an individual does his or her work? For example, can you require the worker to stick to a set schedule? Can you specify the processes he or she should follow to complete the work? When you evaluate the worker, do you critique how the work is performed, rather than just the result of the work? These all point to the designation of employee, rather than a contractor.
 

2.      Financial: Can you control financial aspects of the worker’s job? For example, does the worker have to buy his or her own equipment, without submitting anything for reimbursement? Can the worker make his or her services available to other (potentially competing) companies, in addition to your business? These elements typically point to a contractor, rather than an employee.
 

3.      Type of relationship: How do you — and your workers — perceive your relationship? Do you provide benefits, like a retirement account? Do you assume that the individual will work for you for an indefinite period of time, rather than a set, limited timeframe? These may point to an employer-employee relationship.

 

Even given these categories, there are no hard and fast rules. For example, while independent contractors generally don’t receive benefits from an employer, a lack of benefits doesn’t necessarily mean the worker is an independent contractor. The key is to look at the individual holistically in regard to the definitions and the three IRS categories.

 

If you are still struggling, don’t panic. You can fill out form SS-8 (Determination of Worker Status for Purposes of Federal Employment Taxes and Income Tax Withholding), and the IRS will review the circumstances and determine the worker’s status for you.

 

The Costs of Misidentification

 

If you classify an employee as an independent contractor — meaning you aren’t withholding taxes as you should be — you will be liable for employment taxes for that individual, as well as an additional penalty up to 25% of the total tax liability. Plus, if the IRS suspects intentional fraud or misconduct, it can issue additional fines.

 

For businesses that want to reclassify workers as employees, the IRS provides an option that will lead to benefits in future tax periods. The Voluntary Classification Settlement Program (VCPS) will reclassify workers and grant relief from federal employment taxes to employers that treat their workers as employees. Businesses must meet certain eligibility requirements to qualify for the program.

 

 

Still struggling with worker classification or other issues that impact your taxes? Bookkeeping Express can help. We can take the pain out of taxes, accounting, and payroll — just get in touch

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Back in March, you were probably swamped and maybe feeling like you needed to organize those books a bit, so you filed for an extension on your taxes. Good move. You likely saved yourself some money by not guessing or being sloppy about what you submitted. But if you are a small business owner who filed for a tax extension, your deadline is fast approaching: September 15, 2018. While this extension may have brought you some relief, here are a few things to keep in mind to make sure you are staying on the good side of the IRS as the deadline approaches:

 

1.       You should have paid any taxes for the 2017 fiscal year.

Any tax due to the IRS had to be paid by March 17 or your IRS extension will be invalidated. If you didn’t pay but should have, there is a late payment penalty of 0.5 percent per month, a 3 percent generated interest on all taxes owed, and a 5 percent late filing penalty if your extension isn’t validated.

Golden rule: In the future, even if you can’t pay the full amount, file anyway. There are more consequences and fees for those that fail to file than those who file and pay whatever they can.

 

2.       You should be paying estimated taxes based on taxes due for the coming year.

In addition to that payment you owed the IRS for last year, you should be paying estimated taxes each quarter based on what you believe you will owe for this year. Be honest about how much you can pay, though. It’s much better to have under paid than to not pay at all. If you are under, you only have to pay interest for the remaining balance. Additionally, there are certain circumstances in which the late fee gets waived.

Because the IRS uses a pay-as-you-go system, there are quarterly deadlines for when taxes need to be paid. Below are the exact deadlines for 2018 and the months of revenue that fall within each:

April 17, 2018 (January, February, and March)

June 15, 2018 (April, May, and June)

September 15, 2018 (July, August, September)

January 15, 2019 (October, November, December)

 

3.       If you intend to use the extension, you have to actually file by September 15.

The extension period will fly by before you know it so make sure you file before the extended deadline. If not, there will be additional fees and interest added to existing tax bills. If you miss the deadline yet manage to file within the 60 days of the extension deadline, there will be a 5 percent penalty on all unpaid taxes, on top of interest, each month. However, the total penalty rate is capped at 25 percent for all taxes.

If you wait longer than 60 days after the deadline to finally file, the penalty is either $210 or 100 percent of the unpaid tax, whichever is less. Most importantly, there is no way to apply for a second extension, so file your taxes by the final deadline of September 15 to avoid the really steep penalties.

 

4.       While you may have helped yourself with securing the extension, don’t wait until September 14 to think about it.

Most tax worries come from being unprepared and unorganized. If you haven’t done so already, start working to get your bookkeeping in order so you’re ready to file on (or before) the deadline. Use the extra time to make sure you have all documents and forms, and above all, are confident in what you are filing.

Still struggling to figure out how you will get that tax filing together by the extended deadline? Bookkeeping Express can help. We’ll take the weight of taxes — or tax extensions — off your shoulders. Get in touch and we’ll take a look at your books for free.

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Time is one of your business’s most valuable resources and, as someone who runs a business, you know that there always seems to be a shortage of it. Juggling paper timesheets and time cards isn’t what you should be spending extra time on, and it can be even more of a drain when you have to correct errors and mistakes, your employees are late with their paperwork, or forms are incomplete.

Unfortunately, even though tracking may not be the most inspiring part of running your business, doing it accurately is key to growth, maintaining clean books, and keeping employees happy.

Luckily, there is a way to make things easier and improve accuracy. Time tracking software allows you to keep track of billable time, check productivity, automate reporting, and more to help you maximize efficiency and better manage your business’s resources. Choosing the right platform may be among your most important decisions.

Like any good tool, time-tracking software needs to help you do what you do best. It should take the hassle off your plate while helping your business run smoothly and profitably. A feature-rich platform may even help you win more customers and discover where operations could be more efficient. One startup found that focus and productivity improved after the employees were encouraged to start tracking their time a few years ago.

Whether you’re tracking billable hours, monitoring project activities, or analyzing how your team spends their time, you need a nimble, reliable, uncomplicated system. Consider your needs and budget when shopping around, as each platform comes with its own options and pricing, from simple scheduling to invoicing, messaging, project tracking, and GPS monitoring.

To make the most its capabilities, the platform you choose should be able to integrate with relevant billing, accounting, payroll, or project-management software that your business relies on. Most time-tracking platforms often offer free trials, so you can test drive and find one that feels right for you.

Here are four sleek, cloud-based options to consider for keeping your business, and time, on track.

WorkflowMax

WorkflowMax, owned by Xero, works with more than 30 productivity-focused apps, including Google Drive, Dropbox, SalesForce, HubSpot, and Zendesk. Among other features, WorkflowMax helps you track customer leads, proposals, and manage your sales pipeline; quickly provide customized, branded quotes; manage projects; track worker productivity; and share documents.

The platform also generates reports that produce key business insights, like which customers drive your greatest profits. It offers an agile online invoicing function and lets you dispense with manually entering employee hours on a spreadsheet by allowing workers to log their hours online.

Pricing ranges from $15 a month for one user to $250 a month for up to 50 people, with premium upgrades available.

Harvest

Harvest, like other cloud-based programs, helps you handle timesheets, budgets, expenses, and invoicing from computers and mobile devices. It also grabs that data to help you analyze job progress, expenses, and profits, and allows you to accept payment online. Its companion product, Forecast, supports planning for future projects, employee schedules, and budgets.

Harvest integrates with PayPal, Basecamp, Slack, Trello, Asana, and QuickBooks, among other payment, invoicing, time-tracking, and project management tools.

A freelancer or other solopreneur can track an unlimited number of projects on Harvest for $12 a month, while teams pay $12 a person per month (or $10.80 a month if paying annually).

TSheets

TSheets, in addition to precise time tracking from any location, offers easy payroll syncing, billing, and invoicing, as well as scheduling by shift or task. Alongside employee mobile time tracking, the app includes GPS location stamping that lets managers find employees in real time. TSheets can also alert managers and employees when overtime is close to kicking in, and tracks accrued paid time off.

Geared toward multiple industries, TSheets notes that its software complies with U.S. Department of Labor and Defense Contract Audit Agency regulations.

TSheets integrates with ADP, QuickBooks, Gusto, Square, Expensify and Paychex, among others. Pricing ranges from free for one user – scheduling including –  to $80 a month plus $4 per person for businesses with 100 or more users, with scheduling costing another $1 a person per month.

Tradify

Tradify helps “tradies” like builders, plumbers, painters, landscapers, and electricians with one to 20 employees quickly handle quoting, invoicing, timesheets, job management, team communication, purchase orders, scheduling, and reporting.

The app, which works on iOS and Android, includes GPS mapping to track your team, and photo and note features to stay up to date on job progress. Full access, unlimited jobs, and phone and email support for one to nine users costs $20 a month per user. A discounted per-user price is available for larger businesses.

With the right app, you can, at minimum, enjoy greater ease and efficiency in tracking your team’s time, and may gain valuable insights that boost productivity and profits.

Could your company use experts to help you reconcile your books, track spending and payments, and manage payroll? BKE specializes in bookkeeping for small businesses, and works with numerous cloud-based tools. Contact us and we’ll review your books for free.

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