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  1. Attackmen Penalties - In most cases, the reason attackmen get penalties is lack of discipline. There is absolutely no excuse for committing a foul 40+ yards from your team’s goal. The difficulty for attackmen in the ride is finding a prudent balance between all-out hustle and wise conservatism. Some inexcusable blunders include an attackman taking one hand off his stick, slashing uncontrollably, accidentally sprinting over the midfield line, or pushing a ball-carrying defensemen in the back. In the ride, simply prevent goalies from outletting the ball to short-stick middies, float in the direction the ball goes, and remain in a poised defensive posture. Ignorant attackmen will think their job is to “take the ball away,” or “regain possession.” Wrong! Get in front of a man, force him to make a difficult decision, and take advantage of the clearing team’s errors. Do NOT commit a foul because of over-aggression or a lapse in judgement; you will hurt your team for no gain whatsoever.
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  3. Palms Up - To put it simply: referees are always going to suck. Because of your own biased standpoint, you will hardly ever get the calls you want. And referees will hardly ever reverse a call. Even after the victim of the call hoots and hollers, yells and screams, throws his cap into the dirt: the referee will stick by his original decision. To this end, there is no gain in complaining to the referee, especially if you are a player on the field. Revered coaches may hold some sway in their sideline bargaining with the refs, but players should, at all times, keep their mouths shut. The most useless form of body language is the “palms up” gesture. After committing a foul, stepping out of bounds, or otherwise losing a call, the stagnant, palms up, Ref, are you serious? body language is utterly ineffective, and ultimately puts a player at a disadvantage. If a referee wrongs you, simply drop the ball and prepare for the next play. Standing there with palms up is a weak, futile look, and one that will sting even more if the other team takes due advantage.

  4. Drifting Away From the Cage - Perhaps because this habit was drilled into my brain by angry and audible college coaches, I now view the tendency of a shooter to drift towards low-angle shots as completely unacceptable. When I describe the correct way to finish a goal to my players, I ask them if they play or watch basketball. Is a more reliable shot the Dirk Nowitzki corner fade-away, or the Zion Williamson slam dunk? Dirk can definitely hit threes, but I would put my bet on Zion any day of the week. In lacrosse, the same rule applies. Why drift down the alley and lose your angle when you can move as close as you can to the front of the crease? “Finish in front” is a term I repeatedly use at practice. Good goalies will gobble up fading prayers, but have no chance saving a shot from in front of the goal. Finishing in front is not always easy; sometimes a player must take a hit from a sliding defensemen, endure a desperate check to the gut, or get completely laid out, but lacrosse is not a sport for the meek. The toughest players will take one for team if the ball is in the back of the net.

  5. Walking on the Field - “If you’re walking, you’re wrong” is something my dad always told my youth lacrosse teams during practice. In fact, all coaches hate when players walk on the lacrosse field. Not only does the habit appear unenthusiastic and lazy, but it wastes everybody's time, and diminishes the productivity of the practice. Most teams only have between an hour to two hours of practice scheduled each day. That’s it. If the entirety of that time is not efficiently spent on improving and practicing game-like habits, why else practice? In practice, players should build habits of running onto the field and running off of the field. Because if you walk around in practice, you will walk around in games.

  6. Asking for Water - Another habit I take issue with is when a player asks the coach for water. There is plenty of time to drink water before and after practice. Hydrate up. But during a legitimate team practice, the coach will decide when the players earn a water break. Unless there is an obvious medical issue, never should a player ask a coach: Hey Coach, can we get some water? I’m tired and thirsty. The same goes for sitting on the field, walking on the field, or taking helmets off during practice. It makes you appear weak, and when you appear weak, you do your opponent a huge favor. During games, players will need to suck it up for extended periods of time. They must learn to manage fatigue. They must become mentally tough. The mental components of the game are equally as important to the game as scooping, passing, and catching, and must be developed and emphasized during practice hours.

  7. Sulking / Slamming Stick - Frustration is a part of the game. A player will never make all of his shots; he will not always have a good day on the field. But there is no time in the game of lacrosse, or any sport for that matter, to feel sorry for yourself. After throwing a bad pass or getting stuffed by the goalie, standing still and brooding over the mistake only compounds the flaw. The most mature players understand that their inevitable mistakes only present an opportunity to redeem themselves, ride the ball back, and make up for a bad play with a series of positive plays. So if you err on the field, don’t get all pouty. Don’t slam your stick into the ground and risk breaking it. Don’t throw your helmet on the bench. You are only creating more problems for you and your team. Tell yourself that mistakes happen in the game of lacrosse, and work even harder to get the next one.

  8. Chasing Sticks - From a defensive perspective, “chasing sticks” means going for the big, highlight reel-type checks. The temptation of throwing these types of checks is real. When an attackman gets a step on a defensemen, for example, more times than not he will bring his stick back to shoot, leaving the perfect opportunity for the recovering defensemen to throw a desperate trail check. Sometimes, these checks are the only chance a beat defenseman has left to throw, and throwing them is valid. It might be late in the game, and the defensive team needs the ball back. They need to take risky desperation checks. But the general philosophy of “chasing sticks” is not one any coach wants his players to adopt. Chasing sticks is a final resort, non-fundamental style of defense, and means only that a player lacks proper body position and defensive technique. The most disciplined defenses are capable of throwing takeaway-type desperation checks, but rarely do. In fact, they rarely throw checks at all. Instead, their defense looks like a well-coached basketball team’s defense: low and physical, but also conservative and smart.

  9. Shoulder Toss - When young players throw with a lacrosse stick for the first time, their first instinct is to use their shoulder for support. They will set their stick upon their throwing arm’s clavicle, and use it as a launching pad for their toss. This tendency is not due to physical weakness, but to a lack of proper technique and muscle memory. To correct the habit, I relate throwing a lacrosse ball to pitching a baseball or throwing a basketball. Just how a proper basketball shot or a baseball pitch is one, full-body motion, a lacrosse pass requires a synchronized step, snap, and follow through. When a player passes from his shoulder, he pushes the ball out of his stick instead of snapping it out properly. A fundamentally-sound toss requires that the passer’s arms are disconnected from his body, his stick is up in the air (“pointed to the moon,” as I like to say), and his elbow is pointed directly at target. From there, he must only step, snap, and follow throw.
     
  10. The Hero Play - In any competitive activity, everybody wants to be the guy who gets his name in the paper. Who scores the game winner in overtime. Who appears at the top of the box score, or sets a team scoring record. Everybody wants to be a hero.

    But lacrosse, don’t forget, is a team sport. No one man can do it all. And no team should only rely on only one guy. Sure--there are skilled players who can help carry a team, and every team needs go-to scorers. But the best teams--the ones that win championships--need all hands on deck. Some players’ roles lie in getting groundballs. Some players are expected to cheer loudly from the bench and encourage their teammates. Whatever the role, every player is equally important to the team’s objectives. Lacrosse is the ultimate team game, and if you want to be a hero, go play singles tennis.

    The selflessness I have described is a key to any team sport. Due to the natural selfish tendencies of the individual, players on undisciplined teams will often try “the hero play.” They will try to run through five defenders and score the game winner. They will look off an open player and take a 15-yard shot. They will refuse to make the “one more” pass so they can get theirs. Nobody likes a guy who seeks the hero play, and teams with heroes will never achieve true success. It’s one of the duties of a coach to break down the egos of his players in the beginning of the season, humble the individual, and demand a total team buy in. This job is extremely difficult, especially because parents, friends, and outsiders will often ask silly, insignificant questions like How many goals did you score today, Johnny? or Who had the most goals today at practice? Subsequently, immature players begin to believe that scoring goals is the most important aspect of the game, and thus cherish their individual goals over the team’s. If a team wishes to succeed, players, coaches, parents, and programs should internalize John Wooden’s lasting words: “It’s amazing how much can be accomplished if no one cares who gets the credit.”

 

Related Boathouse Lacrosse Articles:

THE TEN S’S YOUTH LACROSSE PLAYERS MUST AVOID
Think you don’t have any bad habits in your lacrosse game? Think again. Boathouse Ambassador Jake Scott has compiled a list of the top ten bad habits he sees most frequently in youth players. Eliminate them and improve your game. Continue them and waste precious time and energy on the lacrosse field. From spinning your stick and snatching, to shooting high and standing still, here are the top ten S’s that youth lacrosse players should cut from their game.

ABOUT PROJECT SOFT HANDS LACROSSE
One day when I was throwing against the wall, the concept of Project Soft Hands suddenly emerged. I created a video of myself playing wallball--throwing creative passes and making difficult catches. I showed the video to my friends and teammates. I posted it to social media. I began making more videos, and got my friends and teammates involved. I called the movement “Project Soft Hands.”

ABOUT THE FIND YOUR WALL LACROSSE CHALLENGE
The "Find Your Wall" Lacrosse Challenge is a collaboration between Project Soft Hands Lacrosse and Boathouse that encourages young lacrosse players to find "their" wall and practice wallball. The more time you play wallball, the better the lacrosse player you’ll become – which is what makes this activity a core fundamental to improving lacrosse skills of all levels. 

LACROSSE TRAINING 101
Conducted by father/son lacrosse enthusiasts, Jake and Peter Scott, the Boathouse Lacrosse Training Series is intended to educate lacrosse players of all ages in the strategic technique necessary to enhance their skills and win games. READ MORE

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In part four of our ongoing “Happy Team Guaranteed” series we customize USA Deaf Track & Field (USADTF) uniforms for the 2019 World Deaf Indoor Athletics Championships in Tallinn, Estonia. The team designed patriotic track and field uniforms in red, white & blue with sublimated stars in order to properly rep the USA on a global scale – American made athletic gear that would make the Founding Fathers proud.

This video documents the full production process from online customization to factory direct shipping and every aspect of the American manufacturing process in-between. The order was shipped factory direct in four weeks to the elite athletes of USADTF in time to compete and win in Estonia. At Boathouse we believe in the mantra "look good, feel good, play good” which proved to the the case here as the USADTF returned from the 2019 World Deaf Indoor Athletics Championships with one gold, three silvers and a bronze medal.

 

Happy Team Guaranteed – USA Deaf Track and Field - YouTube

 

While this video focuses primarily on the production of the compression pants and half-zip training top with sublimated star side panels, USADTF also ordered and customized men's steeple singlets and women's racer singlets, as well as the custom fleece tech sweater, embroidered hats, and gear bags. 

 


Boathouse has been proudly providing custom training apparel, uniforms and outerwear to Team USA Deaf Track & Field since 2001. We look forward to outfitting these elite athletes for many years to come in our American made athletic apparel. Learn more about customizing your team's athletic apparel at https://www.boathouse.com/pages/custom-sports-apparel

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The Schuylkill: a Philadelphian river that has made itself a topic of discussion in the rowing community for years. Depending on who you go to, you’ll hear different things about the good ‘ol Schuy. I corresponded with some national team folks--since the national team is always the most interesting team--to hear their thoughts on America’s historic boathouse row river. Here’s what they said.

A national team lightweight sculler preparing for senior trials for world championships in May, Boathouse Ambassador Emily Schmieg grew up in Philadelphia, and attended the University of Pittsburgh, where she began rowing. Emily describes the city as “bringing rowing to her attention”, mainly through the river’s unique history and culture. During our talk, she acknowledged the Schuylkill as a “staple” to the rowing world (but yes, she relates to the #strugglelife of Strawberry Mansion Bridge). All in all, she states that it’s what made her who she is.


A USRowing Coach/Director coins the Schuylkill River as a “blast because of the deep tradition and history that the body of water brings”. To outsiders who don’t understand the power of the river, she states that the Schuylkill “always held an air of rowing mysticism that wasn't a part of my daily training”. She even provides and image that would make every literature professor sob:

For me racing on the Schuylkill will always bring back memories of crazy mixed double head racing with my now husband followed by the annual Penn AC Halloween Party and hot/sticky summer sprints that ended with the winning of a watch and drinking a cold Yuengling on one of the boathouse docks with July 4th fireworks bursting overhead.

ACTUAL. TEARS. Can’t you just FEEL the summer humidity, and sweat clinging to your forehead after a 2k by the grandstands?

So, here’s the ~~tea~~: races were potentially going to be moved off of the Schuylkill because of excessive silt. The process of dredging to clear out the silt costs around $4.5 million dollars, and lobbying efforts failed on the public end. Now, the private side is funding the clean-up of the river, and the dredging is happening in Summer 2019.

Well, I’ve never planned on writing an article praising the Schuylkill, mostly because I’ve believed the crazy tales of eels lurking in the waters from my crewmates. I realize now why so many people have come together to dredge the Schuylkill. When I consider my collegiate victories on the river in April, and the memories of driving by boathouse row at night time--while the houses resembled gingerbread houses from vibrant lighting--I realized why we all care about it.

Scratch the first paragraph of this article. Even though I hear dozens of various comments concerning the Schuylkill, every conversation concludes in the same way: we still care about it.

We care because Boathouse Row and the Schuylkill are rowing’s foundation. Across America, the lit-up boathouses are seen as the home of the rowing community, to athletes of every level. When Ray Grenald outlined the decrepit Victorian boathouses with LED lights back in the 70s, he fought to preserve them. It became evident to me with time that preserving my identity and pride in rowing equates to preserving its landmarks. The Schuylkill is a river often taken for granted, that puts out Olympic champs like Silverstein’s Giving Tree handing out apples. In order to conserve crucial parts of ourselves as a rowing family, we must take steps to ensure that there isn’t just a stump left at the end of our Schuylkill stories--yet more--for the longevity of our community.

More Rowing Articles From Our Boathouse Ambassadors:
THE SEVEN THINGS THAT ONLY A ROWER CAN UNDERSTAND
Boathouse Ambassador Tymir Green-Ellis shares his perspective on life as a rower – From the dreaded "canoeing comparison" to the agony of watching a novice on the erg, a rower’s life is something that not everybody can understand. Here's Tymir's top 7 things most people outside of rowing culture will never get.

THE EIGHT THINGS TO BE AWARE OF AS A ROWER
From learning how to effectively "pull your own weight" to knowing the different levels of competitive rowing, there's a LOT to know about the rowing community. Read this to discover the top 8 things you must know to get by in the rowing world.


References:
“Boathouse Row (Philadelphia) - 2019 All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos).” TripAdvisor, www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60795-d312455-Reviews-Boathouse_Row-Philadelphia_Pennsylvania.html.


Doyle, Chris. “If the Schuylkill Isn't Cleared of Silt, Penn Rowing May No Longer Get to Use It in 2020.” The Daily Pennsylvanian, The Daily Pennsylvanian, 20 Sept. 2018, www.thedp.com/article/2018/09/schuylkill-river-dredging-environmental-crew-penn-athletics-upenn-philadelphia.

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Think you don’t have any bad habits in your lacrosse game? Think again. Boathouse Ambassador Jake Scott has compiled a list of the top ten bad habits he sees most frequently in youth players. Eliminate them and improve your game. Continue them and waste precious time and energy on the lacrosse field. From spinning your stick and snatching, to shooting high and standing still, here are the top ten S’s that youth lacrosse players should cut from their game.

  1. Second-bar Syndrome - When you  buy your first lacrosse helmet, there are all kinds of defects you must correct. The helmet obviously isn’t broken in. The chinstrap isn’t fitted yet. And so, usually, young players end up awkwardly peering through the bottom two bars of the face-mask. Erroneous! There is an understanding amongst all knowledgeable lacrosse players that "tilt"—the lower your helmet tilts downward upon your head—accurately correlates with how talented you are at the game. It’s a style thing. True or not, the fact remains: players must fit their helmets to their head, and to acquire tilt (you'll thank me later) tighten the top straps of the chinstrap, and lower the bottom ones. "Second-bar syndrome," as the unfortunate appearance has been denoted, makes a player look funky, unskilled, and naiive to the stylistic standards of lacrosse.


  2. Snatching - The most common bad habit I see among young players is snatching at passes. The aim for catching lacrosse balls, in general, is to do something productive with the ball once it enters your stick. Snatching takes time, puts a player in a compromising, easily-guardable position, and almost always leads to a missed opportunity. I teach my players to develop "soft hands," and to let the ball enter their stick—as if it was an egg. They then occupy a dangerous "triple threat" position, where they can carry, pass, shoot, and read the defense effectively. Snatching is a habit eradicated by hours and hours of wall-ball.

  3. Shoulder Pad Attachments - Depending on how young a player is (and whether or not he plays box lacrosse in the off-season), shoulder pad attachments are absolutely unnecessary and can be removed. They make a player look the opposite of tough, and are entirely ineffective, anyway; defensemen rarely check between the shoulder pads and the arm pads, and if they do, the ball-carrier will seldom notice, and the defender will most likely be called for a cross-check. 

  4. Stopping and Scooping (otherwise known as "raking") - This is something you learn on Day 1 as a young player. Get low and run through a groundball; don’t stop and cover it with the back of your stick. The rugby scrums that often materialize in youth lacrosse games occur because kids do not get low and run through groundballs. Instead, they us the back of their sticks as covers, and by the time they are ready to scoop, another player has dug the ball out and raked the ball himself—an infuriating cycle of bad lacrosse habits. At higher levels of lacrosse, very seldom do players rake; they run through the ball, kick it out to space, or "goose it" to a nearby teammate.

  5. Shin Guards (for goalies) - This isn’t soccer. If you sign up to play goalie, you need three things only: a chest protector, cup, and neck guard. Oh—and a willingness to stand in front of a hard rubber ball humming towards your vital organs. The point is: as a goalie, you’re going to get hit by the lacrosse ball however you spin it. Shin guards and extraneous padding will only make you appear unfit for the position.

  6. Swinging Your Stick - This is a big one for youth, high school, and college players, too. On defense, never swing your stick in an uncontrolled fashion. And never take a hand off of your stick, either. Those big, one-handed wrap checks are unpromising risks; the ref will rip his flag out before your check even lands. A better alternative is using two hands, getting low, shuffling your feet, and pushing off when necessary. In the ride, merely "turn your defenseman back," and force him to get rid of the ball. Reckless swinging of the stick means you are hardly moving your feet, leaving yourself susceptible to getting run by, and most likely finding yourself at the end of the bench.

  7. Shooting High - I played with a kid in youth lacrosse named Nick Schultz. Nick was a decent athlete, but no bigger or more talented than the other kids. Yet he consistently scored 5, 6, or 7 goals a game. We could never understand how. The reason for Nick’s success was this: every time he shot the ball, he shot low. Goalies couldn’t read his shot because it was strictly overhand, and he changed levels. When he was near the crease, he shot high-to-low. When he was on the perimeter, he’d score overhand bounce shots with ease. Youth goalies have such a difficult time corralling low, overhand bouncers, and although they are not as pretty and thrilling as sidearm high shots, they will result in more goals, as well as individual and team success.


  8. Standing Still - My youth coach (my dad) always told our teams, "If you’re standing still in the game of lacrosse, you’re wrong." As a player, you should notice when you are standing flat-footed and merely watching the ball-carrier, and make an effort to move and create space. Even if your movement only involves two or three steps in one direction, a momentary flash to open space, or a curl to the ball-carrier, your motion is not in vain; it confuses the defense and clears space for your teammates. And who knows: you might find yourself wide open in front of the net.

  9. Spinning Your Stick - A habitual phase we’ve all been through, this inefficient habit costs precious time on the lacrosse field. Eliminate it from your game immediately. Practice catching and throwing with no cradle. Again, hours of wall-ball is recommended. Or, have somebody lob you passes in front of a goal, and catch and shoot them without cradling. Once mindless spinning of the stick is omitted, you will become more of a threat on the field—a player who can both distribute and shoot the ball with speed and fluidity.

  10. Stepping in the Crease - We’ll end with an obvious one. Know that giant white circle that surrounds the goal? Yeah, you can’t step in it. There’s this new thing called "the dive," which we’ll discuss later, but for youth offensive players who are still learning, you must understand the importance of staying out of the crease. Due to simple lack of awareness you will cost your team a turnover. Remember this also: even if your pinky toe touches a fraction of the crease line, the ball is going the other way. Be cautious.

 

Related Boathouse Lacrosse Articles:

ABOUT PROJECT SOFT HANDS LACROSSE
One day when I was throwing against the wall, the concept of Project Soft Hands suddenly emerged. I created a video of myself playing wallball--throwing creative passes and making difficult catches. I showed the video to my friends and teammates. I posted it to social media. I began making more videos, and got my friends and teammates involved. I called the movement “Project Soft Hands.”

ABOUT THE FIND YOUR WALL LACROSSE CHALLENGE
The "Find Your Wall" Lacrosse Challenge is a collaboration between Project Soft Hands Lacrosse and Boathouse that encourages young lacrosse players to find "their" wall and practice wallball. The more time you play wallball, the better the lacrosse player you’ll become – which is what makes this activity a core fundamental to improving lacrosse skills of all levels. 

LACROSSE TRAINING 101
Conducted by father/son lacrosse enthusiasts, Jake and Peter Scott, the Boathouse Lacrosse Training Series is intended to educate lacrosse players of all ages in the strategic technique necessary to enhance their skills and win games. READ MORE

 

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A Tidbit of History...

1) “Pull your own weight” 
Meaning that no one gets a free ride here. Except for the coxswain, duh. But “pulling your own weight” is a phrase that originated from rowing, meaning that each crew member must make him or herself worth putting into the lineup. It’s funny because it seems that more people know of this phrase than of the Head of the Charles or the British Henley--not that they know where it comes from. This is the most famous rowing has (secretly) ever been people!!  

For the Novice… 2) “Catching a Crab”

When I started coxing, I was quite seriously shook because I’m a vegetarian and I’m an animal person. BUT, we ain’t crabbing here. “Catching a crab” confuses so many non-rowers because, well, crabs are the most RANDOM animals and completely irrelevant to rowing. Why can’t we “go fishing” instead when the blade gets caught at the catch? That’s what it means, by the way. Getting the blade stuck and receiving a friendly whack in the face by your oar. How it involves crabs, and the history of that phrase….I do not know.

For the Coxswain…

3) The 9th Seat
So Mary Whipple is this super awesome / hilarious / approachable woman who happens to be a three time Olympic medalist as a coxswain. If you’re involved with rowing, you should know who she is. She started the 9th seat as a way to educate coxswains, because they don’t receive much coaching. Most coached don’t really know how to handle coxswains in my opinion. She has summer camps that develop coxswains, as well as providing resources. Below is the website. At the least, check out “Whips Tips” for some seriously sick Head of the Charles tips on steering the perfect course. 

4) Ready all, Row
Another wonderful resource that I don’t think has been updated in a while, but really should be. Kayleigh provides some thoughts on riding in the 9th seat, and touches on issues ranging from managing novice coxswains to understanding the tricky coxswain complex. Read some of Kayleigh's blogs on the Medium

5) Coxswain Recordings Online Mostly Suck
Dear Past Self: Do. Not. Listen. To. Them.

They’re a good way to hear how other coxswains command their crew when one first starts coxing, but every coxswain has their own style, and each crew needs something different. The best advice I could give to coxswains is to not say much/really anything the first few months and develop steering and boat feel. Be a mime!! Send smoke signals for power 10s!! Once a cox has those skills down, he or she can work on making calls based off of those things and off of important information

In General… 

6) Paralympic Team
If you’re a coxswain or an impaired athlete hoping to make the national team, this may be a good outlet for you! The paralympic team competes globally and at the Olympics. You even get cool medals that make sounds! The paralympics is critical to making rowing a more universal and inclusive sport.  

7) The IRA
I made it through years as a D1 athlete without understanding what the hell the IRA REALLY is beside a way of saying I’m-the-Michael-Phelps-of-Rowing-and-can-wear-my-pjs-while -racing-and-still win. For the most part, the IRA is a really competitive group of athletes, mostly at ivy league schools. Turns out that the IRA stands for “Intercollegiate Rowing Association”. The IRA is the oldest collegiate rowing championship in the US, and you have to be invited to it. It’s like sitting with Regina George in Mean Girls: the elite select you and ya do what you can.

8) People are Approachable!!
This is the most important part of this article. If you are thinking of taking the sport as far as you can, or are just looking to get involved, REACH OUT. I have no idea how I’ve gotten where I am today, but it has a lot to do with people’s patience and belief in me, along with a dash of luck. The rowing community is wicked small, so people understand where you are coming from, and will be excited to help out.

 

 

More Rowing Articles From Our Boathouse Ambassadors

THE SEVEN THINGS THAT ONLY A ROWER CAN UNDERSTAND

Boathouse Ambassador Tymir Green-Ellis shares his perspective on life as a rower – From the dreaded "canoeing comparison" to the agony of watching a novice on the erg, a rower’s life is something that not everybody can understand. Here's Tymir's top 7 things most people outside of rowing culture will never get. Read Tymir's Story

BOATHOUSE BRAND AMBASSADOR PROFILE – A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A COXSWAIN

Meet Jesse – He's one of the main coxswains for Boulder Community Rowing in Colorado, as well as their novice coach. He first heard of Boathouse while rowing for Colorado Junior Crew when he was ordered his first Gore-Tex Stevenson. Since then he's accumulated total of three different Stevenson Jackets, one of which was purchased in 2016 at the Head of the Charles Regatta to have autographed by the United States' Women’s 8 gold medalists. We asked Jesse to share a typical day  training for fall race season in Colorado, and explain his thoughts on what makes a great rower, the challenges of training on the water in Colorado, and why getting “out of your head and into the boat” is a game changing mentality for rowers. Read Jesse's Story

TURNING GRIEF INTO THE ACTION THAT WOULD FULFILL MY DREAM OF BECOMING A ROWER

Tragedy and loss can galvanise us into action, making our priorities crystal clear, and give us a strength we did not know we had. Boathouse Ambassador and Navy Veteran Russell Gernaat knows this all to well. When his wife of 22 years passed away from cancer, Russell focused his grief into the energy needed to fulfill his lifelong dream of learning to row and train for in the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics. Having come out the other side of grief, Russell knows that when tragedy strikes you only have two choices “You can spin circles and go nowhere, or you can get up and move forward.” Read Russell’s Story.

 

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In part three of our ongoing “Happy Team Guaranteed” series, we customize our iconic Mission Pullover Jackets for Marjory Stoneman Douglas HS Lacrosse in Parkland, Fl. Check out the full production process of this unique order, from online customization in minutes to the team’s jackets hitting the production floor of our Philadelphia factory, where they’re produced and shipped factory direct in only four 4 weeks. Learn more about the custom jacket capabilities of Boathouse.

Order details: The Stoneman Douglas Eagles ordered our top-selling 2-color supplex Mission Jacket in black and white with matching black zippers, self collar and knit cuffs to match their signature Stoneman Douglas Eagles brand colors. They also received left chest embroidery and 2-color silkscreening on the back.

When you order your custom team uniforms and Elite Performance Outerwear with Boathouse we put our factory at your fingertips from the convenience of your computer. You choose the style, colors and fabric, upload your art then let us do the rest! All custom orders ship factory-direct from Philadelphia in 4 weeks. Another Happy Team – Guaranteed!

 

Happy Team Guaranteed Part 3 – Marjory Stoneman Douglas Lacrosse - YouTube

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Boathouse Blog by Chris Snee - 3M ago

Conducted by father/son lacrosse enthusiasts, Jake and Peter Scott, the Boathouse Lacrosse Training Series is intended to educate lacrosse players of all ages in the strategic technique necessary to enhance their skills and win games.  

 Your Lacrosse Trainers:

Jake Scott: Attended Conestoga High School in Pennsylvania, where he was four-year varsity letter winner and US Lacrosse Academic All-American. He was class president and captain of the lacrosse team as a senior, and helped the team to back-to-back state championship victories during his four years. Jake graduated from Harvard University, where he played as an attackman on the varsity lacrosse team, and is currently faculty and coach for  the varsity lacrosse team at Gilman School in Baltimore, Maryland.

Jake is also the founder of the Project Soft Hands Lacrosse Movement. 

Peter Scott: Peter is a Philadelphia Lacrosse Hall Of Famer who has over 40 years of playing & coaching lacrosse at all levels: youth, HS, Coll, Club. Both boys and girls lax. He’s a 3x NCAA All-American – Johns Hopkins University.’84 Undefeated NCAA National Championship team.

Lacrosse Training Video #1: Answer The Phone

“Answer the Phone” means bringing your stick up by your head where you can then look for a forward pass or the other team will commit a foul by hitting you in the head. Watch the video for proper technique and demonstration.

Lacrosse Training 101: Video 1 "Answer The Phone" - YouTube

Every week we will be releasing a new training video, so be sure to check back for more lacrosse tips and tricks guaranteed to improve your game!
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The "Find Your Wall" Lacrosse Challenge is a collaboration between Project Soft Hands Lacrosse and Boathouse that encourages young lacrosse players to find their wall and practice wallball. The more time you play wallball, the better the lacrosse player you’ll become – which is what makes this activity a core fundamental to improving lacrosse skills of all levels.

The Details: The first 200 people to post video on INSTAGRAM finding and hitting their wall will receive a FREE limited-edition Soft Hands Lacrosse tee from BOATHOUSE.

The Rules: Players who accept this challenge must tag @BoathouseLAX and @ProjectSoftHands along with the hashtag #FindYourWallChallenge to grab your free gear. Challenge ends April 31st, 2019.

Those who participate in the challenge will receive an Instagram message with a one-time-use code that can be redeemed for their FREE limited-edition Soft Hands Lacrosse tee by Boathouse.

Learn more about the "Find Your Wall" Challenge:

The "Find Your Wall" Challenge - YouTube

*Code is 1-time use and unique to each participant in the challenge. Expires  April 31st, 2019 and limited to the first 200 participants of the challenge. Limit one shirt per participant in the challenge. First run of limited edition tees to ship factory direct Feb 22.

 

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Throughout my entire lacrosse career, coaches constantly told me to “hit the wall.” When my dad coached my youth teams, he told me and my teammates at almost every practice: “The way you get good at this game is by throwing against a wall.” 

Only after I reached the Division I level of college lacrosse did I realize that all coaches who know anything about the game preach the same message. Hit the wall. You might find this advice too simple. But it is so unbelievably useful and true. The more time you spend playing wallball, the better the lacrosse player you’ll become.

In eighth grade, I attended a summer lacrosse camp called the Top 205 Lacrosse Camp. At camp, several college coaches spoke about the college lacrosse recruiting process. One of the coaches stood up in front of the entire camp. It was Bill Tierney, a living lacrosse legend. He won six National Championships at Princeton, and has since built a national powerhouse at Denver University. Coach Tierney shared one piece of advice that has stuck with me since. “If you hit the wall every day, for at least an hour,” he said, “I guarantee that you will have the opportunity to play Division I Lacrosse someday.”

I was only in middle school at the time, but I took Coach Tierney’s advice to heart. I wanted very badly to play Division I Lacrosse someday. So I took time each day to throw the lacrosse ball against my garage door (sorry, Mom). I found a solid brick wall near my middle school, and played against it after the final bell. I carried my stick wherever I went, hoping to find a wall where I could improve my game.

When I made the high school team, I remember hitting the wall near our locker room before practice. I then went on to play at Harvard University. More than ever, the wall became part of my day-to-day routine.

I played wallball in college all the time. I practiced fundamental throws, and improved my ability to guide imperfect passes into my stick. I also worked on skills I would never dare attempt in a practice or a game. Left handed side-arm passes. Behind-the-back catches. No-lookers. I worked to master them all.

The time I spent on the wall made me realize just how essential wallball is to an individual lacrosse player’s game. On the wall, players develop skilled hand-eye coordination, pinpoint accuracy, and the necessary confidence to become successful on the field. More than anything, wallballers bond with their lacrosse sticks. But wallball represents much more than the practical benefits it produces. It represents what lacrosse is all about.

During my junior year of college, I was beginning to lose the spark of passion I always felt for lacrosse. It was the dead of winter in New England, my team was getting run into the ground by daily practices and workouts, and worst of all, none of our collective hard work was paying off. We were losing games. We were emotionally deflated. Practices didn’t help our spirits much. Every practice was designed exactly the same. The season was becoming monotonous and dreadful.

In the midst of the gloom, the wall became a haven for me. I would seek the wall whenever I could, as it reminded me why I love the game of lacrosse. On the wall, I was free from the added pressure of our practices and from the perfection our coaches demanded. The wall symbolized the creativity and intuition that makes lacrosse such a great game.

The Concept of Project Soft Hands

One day when I was throwing against the wall, the concept of Project Soft Hands suddenly emerged. I created a video of myself playing wallball--throwing creative passes and making difficult catches. I showed the video to my friends and teammates. I posted it to social media. I began making more videos, and got my friends and teammates involved. I called the movement “Project Soft Hands.”

Beyond just wallball and lacrosse, there are several endeavors in life that advise you to keep “soft hands.” The term is mostly used in athletics. An athlete with particularly smooth, quick, or dexterous hands is said to possess soft hands. Swift hand-eye coordination – demonstrated by throwing, shooting, hitting, or (especially) catching – allows an athlete to stun fellow players and audiences.

But the term is used elsewhere, too. Don’t slam your fingers on the piano keys; play them fluently. Don’t hack at the strings of a guitar; strum them with smooth, agile, gentle hands.

The softest hands are crafty and inventive, and grace the extremities of athletes, musicians, artists, chefs, and coordinated individuals of any endeavor.


Partnership with Boathouse

We have recently partnered with Boathouse to design and build functional outerwear for our customers. We plan to roll out several new products, including t-shirts, hoodies, hats, jackets, and more, in 2019.

We promote the talent of those who demonstrate soft hands by accepting and post creative content to our social media platforms. By embodying creativity, we encourage others to pursue their creative passions.

Please continue to share the creativity of your soft hands with us by sending content to @projectsofthands on Instagram.

With the expertise and apparel of Boathouse, we are excited to continue building the Project Soft Hands brand, and creating quality products in 2019. We seek to represent those who share our core value: to celebrate creativity across all endeavors that require soft hands.

 

About Jake Scott

Jake attended Conestoga High School in Pennsylvania, where he was four-year Varsity Letter winner and US Lacrosse Academic All-American. As a senior, he was class president and captain of the lacrosse team, leading the team to win back-to-back state championships.

Jake graduated from Harvard University, where he played as an attackman on the varsity lacrosse team, and is currently faculty and coach of the Varsity Lacrosse team at Gilman School in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Read Full Article
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Throughout my entire lacrosse career, coaches constantly told me to “hit the wall.” When my dad coached my youth teams, he told me and my teammates at almost every practice: “The way you get good at this game is by throwing against a wall.” 

Only after I reached the Division I level of college lacrosse did I realize that all coaches who know anything about the game preach the same message. Hit the wall. You might find this advice too simple. But it is so unbelievably useful and true. The more time you spend playing wallball, the better the lacrosse player you’ll become.

In eighth grade, I attended a summer lacrosse camp called the Top 205 Lacrosse Camp. At camp, several college coaches spoke about the college lacrosse recruiting process. One of the coaches stood up in front of the entire camp. It was Bill Tierney, a living lacrosse legend. He won six National Championships at Princeton, and has since built a national powerhouse at Denver University. Coach Tierney shared one piece of advice that has stuck with me since. “If you hit the wall every day, for at least an hour,” he said, “I guarantee that you will have the opportunity to play Division I Lacrosse someday.”

I was only in middle school at the time, but I took Coach Tierney’s advice to heart. I wanted very badly to play Division I Lacrosse someday. So I took time each day to throw the lacrosse ball against my garage door (sorry, Mom). I found a solid brick wall near my middle school, and played against it after the final bell. I carried my stick wherever I went, hoping to find a wall where I could improve my game.

When I made the high school team, I remember hitting the wall near our locker room before practice. I then went on to play at Harvard University. More than ever, the wall became part of my day-to-day routine.

I played wallball in college all the time. I practiced fundamental throws, and improved my ability to guide imperfect passes into my stick. I also worked on skills I would never dare attempt in a practice or a game. Left handed side-arm passes. Behind-the-back catches. No-lookers. I worked to master them all.

The time I spent on the wall made me realize just how essential wallball is to an individual lacrosse player’s game. On the wall, players develop skilled hand-eye coordination, pinpoint accuracy, and the necessary confidence to become successful on the field. More than anything, wallballers bond with their lacrosse sticks. But wallball represents much more than the practical benefits it produces. It represents what lacrosse is all about.

During my junior year of college, I was beginning to lose the spark of passion I always felt for lacrosse. It was the dead of winter in New England, my team was getting run into the ground by daily practices and workouts, and worst of all, none of our collective hard work was paying off. We were losing games. We were emotionally deflated. Practices didn’t help our spirits much. Every practice was designed exactly the same. The season was becoming monotonous and dreadful.

In the midst of the gloom, the wall became a haven for me. I would seek the wall whenever I could, as it reminded me why I love the game of lacrosse. On the wall, I was free from the added pressure of our practices and from the perfection our coaches demanded. The wall symbolized the creativity and intuition that makes lacrosse such a great game.

The "Find Your Wall" Lacrosse Challenge

The "Find Your Wall" Lacrosse Challenge is a collaboration between Project Soft Hands Lacrosse and Boathouse that challenges young lacrosse players to find "their" wall. The more time you play wallball, the better the lacrosse player you’ll become which is what makes this activity a core fundamental to getting better at lacrosse.

The first 200 people to post video finding and hitting their wall will receive a FREE limited-edition Soft Hands Lacrosse tee from BOATHOUSE. Tag @BoathouseLAX and @ProjectSoftHands along with the hashtag #FindYourWallChallenge to grab your free gear. Challenge ends April 31st, 2019.

Learn more about the "Find Your Wall" Challenge:

The "Find Your Wall" Challenge - YouTube

 


The Concept of Project Soft Hands

One day when I was throwing against the wall, the concept of Project Soft Hands suddenly emerged. I created a video of myself playing wallball--throwing creative passes and making difficult catches. I showed the video to my friends and teammates. I posted it to social media. I began making more videos, and got my friends and teammates involved. I called the movement “Project Soft Hands.”

Beyond just wallball and lacrosse, there are several endeavors in life that advise you to keep “soft hands.” The term is mostly used in athletics. An athlete with particularly smooth, quick, or dexterous hands is said to possess soft hands. Swift hand-eye coordination – demonstrated by throwing, shooting, hitting, or (especially) catching – allows an athlete to stun fellow players and audiences.

But the term is used elsewhere, too. Don’t slam your fingers on the piano keys; play them fluently. Don’t hack at the strings of a guitar; strum them with smooth, agile, gentle hands.

The softest hands are crafty and inventive, and grace the extremities of athletes, musicians, artists, chefs, and coordinated individuals of any endeavor.


Partnership with Boathouse

We have recently partnered with Boathouse to design and build functional outerwear for our customers. We plan to roll out several new products, including t-shirts, hoodies, hats, jackets, and more, in 2019.

We promote the talent of those who demonstrate soft hands by accepting and post creative content to our social media platforms. By embodying creativity, we encourage others to pursue their creative passions.

Please continue to share the creativity of your soft hands with us by sending content to @projectsofthands on Instagram.

With the expertise and apparel of Boathouse, we are excited to continue building the Project Soft Hands brand, and creating quality products in 2019. We seek to represent those who share our core value: to celebrate creativity across all endeavors that require soft hands.

 

About Jake Scott

Jake attended Conestoga High School in Pennsylvania, where he was four-year Varsity Letter winner and US Lacrosse Academic All-American. As a senior, he was class president and captain of the lacrosse team, leading the team to win back-to-back state championships.

Jake graduated from Harvard University, where he played as an attackman on the varsity lacrosse team, and is currently faculty and coach of the Varsity Lacrosse team at Gilman School in Baltimore, Maryland. 

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