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<h1>Goose Island brew course and tasting</h1> <p><strong>Join Goose Island brewer Austin Niestrom to taste and make beers at UBrew in London</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ubrew-goose-island-brew-course-and-tasting-including-bourbon-county-stout-tickets-42747562109" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/6f0cc63cadc6a6eacd08c6efaa000c5c-bg.jpeg" /></strong></a></p> <p><a href="../../../goose-island-brewery" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Goose Island Beer Company</a>, the brewery who brought Bourbon County Stout into the world back in 1992, want to teach you how they brew dark beer. Goose Island Brewer Austin Niestrom is flying in from Chicago to hold an exclusive brew course at <a href="https://ubrew.cc/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Ubrew</a>, where you'll brew a recipe that was inspired by one of the brewery's exclusive Fulton &amp; Wood series. It&rsquo;s a sweet porter recipe inspired by a beer called Real Nice Surprise which was released in 2015. Once your beer's fermented and bottled, you'll be able to swing by and collect roughly 15 bottles to take home.</p> <p>In the downtime between boiling, mashing and pitching Austin will be taking you through an in-depth tasting of both rare and unreleased beers, including Cooper Project 3, a beer that has never travelled over to the UK. 2017 bottles of Bourbon County Stout will also be opened and tasted on the night, as well as the Sour Sisters - Halia, a 7.5% sour ale with peaches, Gillian, a 9.5% sour ale with strawberries , Madame Rose, a 9% Belgian style brown ale with sour cherries, Lolita, an 8.7% sour ale with raspberries, and finally Matilda - a bretted Belgian style pale.</p> <p>The course itself is just as hands on, challenging and informative as our normal brew courses - but this time you'll also have the opportunity to buy a recipe pack to brew more of the beer at home should you want a whole batch to yourself!</p> <p>Lunch will also be provided on the day from our neighbours, Bone Daddies. Tickets are limited, so grab yours while you can!<br /><br />&bull;&nbsp;Brew Course hosted by Goose Island Beer Co brewer Austin Niestrom<br /><br />&bull; Tutored tastings of exclusive beers such as Cooper Project 3, Bourbon County Stout, Goose Midway Session IPA<br /><br />&bull; 15 bottles of the beer you brewed<br /><br />&bull; Lunch provided by Bone Daddies</p> <p>The event is brought to you by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.gooseisland.com/">Goose Island</a>,&nbsp;<a href="../../../">Beerhawk</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://ubrew.cc/">UBREW</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/ubrew-goose-island-brew-course-and-tasting-including-bourbon-county-stout-tickets-42747562109" target="_blank" rel="noopener">BUY TICKETS HERE</a></p>
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Beer Hawk | Beer Zone by Maggie C. - 2d ago

<h1>Week 28: Planning a Recipe</h1> <p><strong>Now that we know what basic ingredients and kit we need to make a beer, it's now onto the fun stuff! Since most of the brewers we've "met" along this trip probably started as homebrewers, it makes sense that we plan our first homebrewing recipe. It's almost brew day!</strong></p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/c32c460404c7e51721a60d2f2328d071-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>For simplicity's sake, we're going to assume that we're planning an all-grain recipe. First-time homebrewers may have more success with an extract kit or a partial mash, but--hey ho--let's jump right in to all-grain. (For those still picking up the lingo, all-grain just means we're using, well, all grains to make the wort. It's a bit more difficult than using the powdered or liquid extracts.)</p> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Getting started</strong></span></h2> <p>Obviously, the first thing you need to do when writing your homebrew recipe is to decide on what style of beer you're going for. Now, homebrewing is supposed to be fun--so don't get too caught up in "rules". Besides, there's probably a whole lot that can go wrong if you're new to this (and, erm, experienced).</p> <p>Think of what you like to drink but, keep in mind that for most homebrewers, brewing an ale is going to be a lot easier and more feasible since you don't need a cave to lager your beer. Well, not an actual cave, but lagers need a consistently colder place to do their thing.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/341386f0f5a13f516af4af7ebd5908c3-smsq.jpeg" width="100" height="100" /></p> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Resources</strong></span></h2> <p>You've picked your beer style--yay! Now what? With a number of different malts, yeast strains, and hop varietals available you could either A.) buy a bunch of ingredients, chuck it in a bucket and see what happens (pretty sure that's how the Craft Beer Revolution started) or B.) go to some trusted resources that will break it down really well for you.</p> <p>We like the <a href="https://www.bjcp.org/docs/2015_Guidelines_Beer.pdf"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">BJCP guidelines</span></strong></a> for suggested ingredients for all of the accepted styles of beer. If you're looking for something that'll help you determine proper proportions (or how to play with things!) we suggest either our very own <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="../../../homebrew-100">Daniel Nielson's book, <em>Homebrew 100</em></a></strong></span> or Ray Daniels' <em>Designing Great Beers</em>.</p> <p>These resources will help you in picking which ingredients you should use to achieve the general style that you're aiming for. Homebrewing a stout will have you reaching for the chocolate malts while an American-style IPA will need hops like Columbus or even Simcoe (among a bazillion others). Yet, always remember, homebrewing--and beer in general--is about having a bit of fun. You can colour outside of the lines!</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/341386f0f5a13f516af4af7ebd5908c3-smsq.jpeg" width="100" height="100" /></p> <h2><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Running the Numbers</strong></span></h2> <p>Ok, so you've got your style picked and a rough proportion of ingredients figured out. Now it's time to really get down to science.</p> <p>As you would've noticed when browsing through the resources mentioned above, each style will have general guidelines as to what the ABV, Original/Final Gravity (OG/FG), colour as measured by EBC and bitterness (IBU) are. All of these numbers fluctuate based on the amount of ingredients you put in the brew. How long the hops are in the boil and small changes in temperature on account of the equipment used also have implications on the outcome. In order to have some control over the numbers and not leave it up to the Beer Gods, we suggest downloading beer recipe design software like <a href="http://beersmith.com/">BeerSmith</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p style="border: 3px solid #000000; padding: 1em; background-color: #e0eefa; text-align: left;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>EBC vs. SRM</strong> </span>Two different acronyms, measuring the same thing. Of course there can't be just one. Both of these terms measure the colour in a beer but are on different scales. EBC stands for the European Brewing Convention while SRM stands for the Standard Reference Method. While we won't get into spectrophotometers and the like here, for recipe design purposes ERM is almost exactly two times the SRM colour. So, if a beer style guide calls for an SRM of 4, try to get your BeerSmith recipe to fall around an 8 EBC (It's actually 1.97, but, come on. This is homebrewing.)</p> <p>While it's not free, there is usually a free trial available. This software makes recipe design virtually foolproof. All you have to do is input what and how much you're planning to use in the brew, the equipment you're using (and a few other factors) and, voil&agrave;, it churns out the estimated final numbers of ABV, OG/FG, IBUs and EBC. Then, you're able to see whether or not what you're planning to use will have your final product fall within the style guidelines you're aiming for. If not, you can tweak it and then see what you need to do instead!</p> <p>The only thing it can't account for though is actual fools.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/341386f0f5a13f516af4af7ebd5908c3-smsq.jpeg" width="100" height="100" /></p> <p>There you go--an intro to homebrew recipe design! We can almost taste the success!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>We thank you for keeping up with us here at BHU. We've had some technical difficulties of late which has made getting up these awesome lessons a bit of a challenge. Hopefully they've all been worked out so we can see you again next week when we get down to working out an actual recipe using BeerSmith. See you then--cheers!</p>
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<h1>Homebrew: electric kettle or propane burner?</h1> <p><strong>Both the propane burner and electric kettle have their advantages, but for reliability and speed, the burner is our preference</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/182f9b17bbdc05f90dde37521d72e6bf-bg.jpeg" /></strong></p> <p>There are almost as many different homebrew set-ups as there are homebrewers. And like all good hobbies, it can be started with very little investment, but as you become more experienced, you can begin to improve your gear and get better and better results. Throughout this book, we have used our favourite set up, but much of it can be substituted. Think of it as a modular system where you can upgrade elements when you want to work on bigger batches, go all-grain or make the brew day a little shorter.</p> <p>The first aspect to consider is the size of the brew. In homebrewing terms, the two most common brew sizes are 3.8 litres (one gallon) and 23 litres (five gallons). All the recipes in this book are for 23 litres but can be easily scaled down. One gallon brews (usually extract) can be made on the stove top with a large stock pot and a plastic fermenting bucket. As you jump up to five gallons, it&rsquo;s unlikely your stove will have enough energy to bring it all to a rolling boil (and your kitchen ceiling will thank you). You&rsquo;d need to invest in an electric kettle (a converted tea urn basically) or a burner and a large pot.</p> <p>We&rsquo;re fans of propane burners. They are reliable; they heat water very quickly, you can use the pot with an ice bath. They are, however, pretty fierce and need to be used with the utmost care. In my experience, the two electric kettles I've had have both failed pretty early on and the way they were contructed meant that I couldn't replace the element leaving them completely useless. Admittedly, it was my own fault leaving it to boil dry. The Edelmetall Br&uuml; Burner pictured, for example, churns out a whopping 72,000 BTUs. You&rsquo;ll need to invest in a propane cylinder and the gas, and it needs to be used outside. It is fierce!</p> <p>--------</p> <p><strong><a href="../../../burners" target="_blank" rel="noopener">See our burners here</a></strong></p>
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Beer Hawk | Beer Zone by Daniel N. - 1w ago

<h1>It's gin o'clock</h1> <p><strong>Along with craft beer, gin is having a moment. Occasionally the two mix. Wild Beer Co and Northern Monk are among the breweries eyeing up distilleries and making spirits</strong></p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/727e50749abbd92f433d5822e4685745-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>When life gives you preserved Moroccan lemons&hellip; make gin, as the adage sort of went. Gin, it&rsquo;s no secret, has exploded alongside craft beer in the last five years. There&rsquo;s an astonishing range of gin available now, but the ones we&rsquo;re interested in are those with meaningful links to breweries. There&rsquo;s a clear overlap: they&rsquo;re both booze after all, but with an increasing interest in provenance and of local ingredients then it's no surprise the two go hand-in-hand. And no one ever pretended that beer lovers only drink beer.</p> <p>When <a href="http://www.wildbeerco.com/stories/tepache/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Wild Beer Company</a> announced they were not only making gin but basing it on one of our favourite ever beers from them, we had to stock it. Wild Beer Co make some of the country's most exciting beers, and specialise in barrel ageing beers and using wild yeasts (some of it harvested from orchards around its Somerset brewery). So we were pretty sure this gin would be unusual. The &lsquo;Wild Spirit&rsquo; range of two gins and &lsquo;Spirit of Pogo&rsquo; were released at the beginning of 2018. Sleeping Lemons Gin takes inspiration from the brewery&rsquo;s spritzy Sleeping Lemons beer that uses preserved Moroccan lemons. In the gin, they follow the sherbert tang of the this alongside lemongrass, lemon verbena and lemon peel as botanicals. Now just imagine that in a G&amp;T!</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/7d8158c5b3da6bf38eca92a5afc287c7-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>Schnoodlepip Gin also takes one of its most loved beers, a red wine barrel-aged sour saison brewed with pink peppercorns, hibiscus and passion fruit (yes!), and have taken that and added it into the gin. This collaboration with <a href="http://www.microdistillery.co.uk/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Psychopomp</a> in Bristol lively passion fruit, delicate hibiscus and a whiff of pink peppercorns to chase.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/465470a964a3f274faee871186a52dae-bg.jpeg" /><br /> <br />Wild Beer Co is not the only brewery that has started distilling grain. Leeds brewery <a href="https://www.northernmonkbrewco.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Northern Monk</a> teamed up with Manchester distillery Zymurgorium. Together they produced Cahokia, new world hop gin with a delightfully fruity punch, down to, in no small part, to the addition of, deep breath, juniper, mango, pineapple, tangerine, vanilla, lime, coffee, orris root and Mexican royal blue agave.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/e034c374a6eea8059349c0814c6e57d3-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>But some gins we just stock because we love them. <a href="https://www.harrogatetipple.com/about_us" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Smokehouse Distillery</a> in Harrogate (our hometown) is an example. Infusing fresh botanicals from Harlow Carr, the Royal Horticultural Society&rsquo;s Garden, Harrogate, with lavender and pink grapefruit, this is the perfect gin with Mediterranean Fever Tree tonic and a slice of peeled cucumber. <br /><br />When life gives you grapefruit, as the adage never went...</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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<h1>Is this the ultimate beer shed?</h1> <p><strong>When we put a shout-out for the best beer sheds on the Perfect Draft Facebook group, we didn't expect this</strong></p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/756445ef6f0be0b9666dfc5c9cb771d6-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>When we put a shout out for the best home bar on our Perfect Draft Facebook page we weren&rsquo;t expecting quite the response we got. It seems our Perfect Draft customers are a passionate lot with some seriously impressive bars out there. Just look at the pictures above. The photo below is from Nick Haynes, who converted his double garage in to an &lsquo;entertainment palace&rsquo; to quote Nick. Out of shot is a gazebo and a hot-tub.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/d2bc9c95403b5047f8b8573711700c0a-bg.jpeg" /><br /><br />&ldquo;We call it The Rehearsal Room, so all the guys can just say &lsquo;I&rsquo;m going to rehearsal&rsquo; when they come. We have regular nights and run it like a pub.&rdquo; And the beer for the summer? Munich&rsquo;s classic L&ouml;wenbr&auml;u.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/7d25e947aa860a2949bc1ed91056cd43-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>Richard Shenton&rsquo;s &lsquo;Shack&rsquo; (pictured above and below) is his pride and joy, and rightly so, this is a seriously impressive bar. The bit he&rsquo;s most proud of? Just look at the hand made shelving around Perfect Draft Machine. &ldquo;We&rsquo;ve really paid attention to detail,&rdquo; he says with understatement. And the current favourite beer is Hoegaarden.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/57957c1f9fc8d97aa87bb5e06d63cab1-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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<h1>Do you need a hot liquor tank?</h1> <p><strong>Why a hot liquor tank will make your brewday go quicker</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/54d6e5043bfa071418a3e1a422536d6f-bg.jpeg" /></strong></p> <p>There are several methods for heating water depending on your set up. Our chosen method is to use a hot liquor tank (HLT). This is an essential part of a large scale brewery, but it is optional when homebrewing. This separate insulated vessel is useful for several reasons.</p> <p>The HLT is used in the first instance just before mashing. Once the water for the mash is heated to the right temperature, it is then decanted into the HLT. The water from the HLT is then used during the mash. By moving the water from the kettle to the HLT, you can then immediately fill up the kettle and heat it up for the sparge water. Without an HLT you'll find yourself waiting for the sparge water once you've freed it up. We've also found the HLT much easier to physically move around if you need that a scolding hot kettle. It keeps the heat brilliantly.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/a55a7ca363f148eb0e9e25bc2efe0003-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>One of most useful feature is that it allows careful control over your sparging rates &ndash; essential for hitting the right OG. The <span style="font-weight: 400;">Fermenter&rsquo;s Favorites Hot Liquor Tank </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> includes a silicone-reinforced valve port for eliminate leaks, a brass ball valve, high temperature tubing and siphon sprayer, all of which add up to an accurate flow control and optimal sparge rates for all batches. &nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/a089232eb8844dc93521c7d38b0e7eee-bg.jpeg" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brewmasters at America&rsquo;s Northern Brewer have tested the heat retention to ensure it will stay at your ideal temperature. </span></p> <p><a href="../../../search/products?phrase=hot%20liquor%20tank" target="_blank" rel="noopener">See our hot liqour tanks here</a></p>
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<h1>What makes Sori Brewing so great?</h1> <p><strong>Estonia's Sori Brewing crowdfunded in 2014 and 2015 and has since become very well respected in particular for its hoppy IPAs and dark beers. We spoke to CEO and co-founder Pyry Hurula to find out what exactly they are doing right</strong><span style="color: #212121; font-family: Arial; font-size: small; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; display: inline !important; float: none;"><br /></span></p> <p><a href="../../../search/products?phrase=sori" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/792731e2e04cb9ea17703b6e2a322d6f-bg.jpeg" /></strong></a></p> <p><strong>Your beer is amazing. What are you doing right?<br /></strong>Our team has done its homework. Our lead brewer (Heikki Uotila) is super talented and has a good understanding of all properties of the ingredients. Also, our team is full of academically-educated brewers putting their knowledge into use and sharing it with the rest of the team.</p> <p>The main philosophy behind most of our beers is to make very balanced beers and yet to have some twist to make it a recognisable Sori beer.</p> <p><strong>What was the ethos behind the brewery when you started?</strong><br />The idea behind Sori Brewing was to challenge the Finnish beer scene and its rigid regulation that was a troublesome environment for passionate brewers like us. We wanted to create world-class beers that people would want to drink across the world. Estonia provided us with a better overall environment to pursue that goal.</p> <p>We see that people who enjoy our beer like playful beers that push limits, and not just executing basic styles made right. There were plenty of brewers already brewing superb Pils or Brown Ale, so our mission had to be something different. Based on that idea we came up with our slogan: Serious Beer for not so Serious People.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/c55965e73a45bfca40710ecae08e67b5-bg.jpeg" /><em>Pyry Hurula</em></p> <p><strong>You crowd-funded to get it started. As well as the money, were the other benefits?</strong><br />Definitely one of the best aspects of gathering a lot of people around your thing is that you get motivated people to help you. We got a lot of good contacts through the crowdfunding investors that helped us, especially in the beginning. After that, they have been our family who faces our clientele as well. We are brewing for people, not for statistics or ratings.</p> <p><strong>What is the Estonian beer scene? What are its biggest influences?</strong><br />The Estonian beer scene was pretty non-existent before the first wave of brewers started their operations. Now we have plenty of good brewers, but the home market is very small for everybody which is the main reason why Estonian craft beer is mainly an export product.</p> <p>In Estonia, we would say that brewers are inspired by talented brewers around the world, as we need to look up to somewhere. If I had to raise three main points, it would be that in Estonia most brewers use American techniques in brewing, many are passionate about exotic ingredients, and overall people here enjoy dark beers.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/d13e9de3b506e6eefd8192bb65908247-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p><em>Heikki Uotila</em></p> <p><strong>How have you managed to get a name for yourselves over in the UK? Was it always a plan to export?<br /></strong>Sori Brewing has been a couple of times in UK craft beer festivals such as London Craft Beer Festival and Bristol Craft Beer Festival. And for some reason, we meet a lot of our UK fans in the Netherlands and the Nordic countries as well. It seems that Sori Brewing has a lot of followers from the UK which makes us humble.</p> <p>Our plan was to create interesting beers worth exporting from the beginning. It's a whole different game obviously, but it keeps it interesting for us.</p> <p><strong>You've started a barrel-ageing programme. What are your plans for this?</strong><br />Our first barrels were freshly emptied Chianti Classico barrels from Candialle, Tuscany. We collaborated with a winery to create our Conca d'Oro barrel-aged Imperial Stout. After that thing escalated and we got hundreds of barrels more. Sori Brewing has released seven barrel-aged beers and planning to release five or six more this year.</p> <p><strong>Which one Sori beer should everyone try?</strong><br />In addition to all our barrel-aged beers, everyone should try 'Dark Humor Club Bourbon Vanilla' Imperial Stout and of course everything from DHC series. It&rsquo;s a multilayered stout with espresso, cacao and vanilla. Every sip reveals something new. Very balanced, nice big stout.</p> <p><strong>Any top tips for new breweries?</strong><br />Stay brothers to fellow brewers, stay humble and never let success go to your head. Small brewers are always underdogs and there comes a day that you need all the friends possible. Most brewers came to this industry sharing the passion for brewing and craft, not just making money and brand. If you do things right, those two will follow.</p> <p><strong>How will Sori develop over the next five years?</strong><br />Sori will release more and more barrel-aged beers, but also developing our range further. Becoming more accessible to people all over the world and hopefully, we can open some more restaurants. Steady growth with our eye on the product. Keeping on brewing serious beers for not so serious people.</p> <p>-----</p> <p><a href="../../../search/products?phrase=sori" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>See our huge range of Sori Brewing beers here</strong></a></p> <p><a href="../../../search/products?phrase=sori" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/086ef0edf1188e0564e270c575689eb8-bg.jpeg" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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<h1>Is this Britain's most beautiful brewery?</h1> <p><strong>We visited Wylam Brewery in Newcastle for the first time and was blown away at the stunning building they inhabit. The beer was pretty special too. Here's a peek into the brewery</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/beadbe263e88bb482a42e254e2742167-bg.jpeg" /></strong></p> <p><em>The Palace of Arts, built of the 1929 North East Coast Exhibition and now home to Wylam Brewery</em></p> <p><strong>&nbsp;<img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/2dd6d392011848efbeb3a17b5b3a91d0-bg.jpeg" /></strong></p> <p><em>The Grand Hall where Wylam Brewery host events such as Craft Beer Calling as well as gigs</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/df8923edaa386406db57d9c26d06552e-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p><em>The beautiful lobby</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/a400df2202c896bfafdcf4e791db909d-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p><em>Head Brewer Ben Wilkinson (right) and his team</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/7218fd21d4af202c248d3665fe7c1802-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p><em>Spic 'n' span. The immaculately tidy brewery</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/02ea05ab4169171f6ae2967348baf38b-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p><em>Wylam's taproom in the same building</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/b7ff49e6b232ef9a0144fd70bfd94322-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p><em>Beers on at the taproom</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/9ab35ae06a4f75e8dffd8a372cf250ff-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p><em>Wylam Brewery's Director Dave Stone</em></p>
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<h1>Peak brewing</h1> <p><strong>We speak to Sierra Nevada's beer ambassador Steve Grossman about Sierra Nevada's amazing past and what the future holds for the brewery</strong></p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/691ad2237eb55f1d4e46ca3a288899d1-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>It&rsquo;s hard to overstate the influence <a href="https://sierranevada.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sierra Nevada</a> has made on the world of beer. This brewery, based in Chico, California, was launched in 1979 in the first wave of US craft breweries that would change the world. It was founded by avid homebrewers Ken Grossman and Paul Camusi. They also turned to local ingredients, including hops from the Yakima Valley. The first beers they made are still benchmarks in craft brewing&rsquo;s most famous beer styles. Steve Grossman, Sierra Nevada&rsquo;s Beer Ambassador, curates a case of beers that highlight the brewery&rsquo;s best as well as picking out the beers that are much-loved by Sierra Nevada. We caught up with him on a recent visit to the UK.</p> <p><strong>People namecheck Sierra Nevada beers as the beers that got them into craft. How does Sierra Nevada stand up now?</strong> <br />Well, we&rsquo;ve not done a very good job of telling our story through the years, but it&rsquo;s an interesting story of starting from a very small brewery that my brother [Ken Grossman] had built, to becoming one of the larger craft breweries in the States. We have had many many brewers come up to us saying we were their inspiration, and it&rsquo;s very gratifying. My brother started a business out of a love of brewing and a love for beer, and I don&rsquo;t think he had any idea where it would lead.</p> <p><strong>What did the future look like in the 1970s?</strong><br />It was hopefully an avenue to express his creativity and his passion for brewing and make a living out of doing what he loved, and the expectations were fairly modest. If you read the original business plan, I think it was to sell 1,200 cases a week, maybe even more modest than that, and at that time there was not such a thing as craft beer.<br /><br /><strong>Were you changing perceptions and tastes as you went?</strong> <br />It was a brand new market, and tastes took time to develop, and it didn&rsquo;t happen overnight. I mean from 1980 to 1989 we were in a ten-barrel brewhouse. We started branching out to other states, but it took a while to get a population of consumers to appreciate the stronger flavoured beers. And then more breweries started popping up around the country, and as there was more exposure to beers that had flavour, people became aware there was something other than traditional American style lager beers.</p> <p><strong>So what does the future look like now for Sierra Nevada?</strong> <br />I think we need to remind people that Pale Ale is still an awesome beer and maybe introduce it to the new drinkers coming along. We&rsquo;ve had a fantastic, extremely well-balanced beer for 37 years now. I think the future is up to us to tell the story a little more effectively and reach more consumers with <br />our story.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/c8d4e1b62f07fed23e348da6213f0c7c-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p><strong>Sierra Nevada is big for craft beer. What are the advantages or disadvantages of size?</strong> <br />I think an advantage, and as we have become more successful over the years we have been able to invest in more technology, including state-of-the-art brewing and lab equipment. We are able to invest in cutting-edge sustainability initiatives. That&rsquo;s been really important for us. We generate, most of the time, 100 per cent of our electricity at our site in Chico, California. We have up to 600 solar panels, we have four microturbines, and we&rsquo;re working on a project with Tesla around storage batteries so we can store the extra electricity that we generate. I think it&rsquo;s also enabled us to keep improving the quality of our beer. We always look at ways to increase shelf life, increase hop utilisation, get better hop aromatics in our beers. It&rsquo;s made us a better brewery. I think it&rsquo;s also important that we are still family owned. My brother is the sole owner for the last 15 years or so, and it enables us to put money back into the brewery, in our people who are incredibly valuable resources and have a brewing tradition in our family.</p> <p>-----</p> <p><strong>THREE TO TRY</strong></p> <p><a href="../../../sierra-nevada-sidecar" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>Sidecar / 5.3%</strong></a></p> <p><a href="../../../sierra-nevada-sidecar" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/06461ae0c908aa0d2a2d7e396c409b3a-bg.jpeg" /></a></p> <p>We are excited to be the only online retailer in the UK to stock this beer, and it is a thing of beauty! They said: &ldquo;We always wondered what it would be like to punch up the citrus while maintaining a crisp hop bite and balance. The result is this new take on the hoppy pale ale brewed with Cascade, Equinox, and Mandarina hops with a hint of orange peel to add a zesty pop of bright orange flavour.&rdquo;</p> <p>-------</p> <p><a href="../../../sierra-nevada-otra-vez" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>Otra Vez / 4.3%</strong></a></p> <p><a href="../../../sierra-nevada-otra-vez" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/ca2cf36d11ccedd45a6955cc3d886b33-bg.jpeg" /></a></p> <p>Sierra Nevada head south of the border, by way of Germany, for this fascinating beer. Gose is a slightly tart and slightly salty beer that is becoming increasingly popular again among craft brewers. No wonder, it&rsquo;s one of the most refreshing styles out there. Sierra Nevada&rsquo;s twist is to add lime and blue agave nectar for a tangy zip of a beer. It&rsquo;s not overpoweringly sour or salty, but perfectly drinkable like all Sierra Nevada&rsquo;s beers.</p> <p>------</p> <p><a href="../../../sierranevada-torpedo-355" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>Torpedo, 7.2%</strong></a></p> <p><a href="../../../sierranevada-torpedo-355" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/07031a49119cdccc22434a953ef9886c-bg.jpeg" /></strong></a></p> <p>Sierra Nevada&rsquo;s regular hop bomb and the first to use their dry-hopping &lsquo;Hop Torpedo&rsquo; &ndash; essentially a wind funnel for the fermenting beer &ndash; which imbues a huge hoppy aroma without the associated bitterness leaving a lush citrus and pine resin flavour to come through. This is one of the classic West Coast IPAs and much loved around the world. We hope you enjoy!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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<h1>The History of Beer &ndash; Part 2 &ndash; Commercial Brewing</h1> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px 0px 10px; font-size: 14px; color: #000000; font-family: 'Arial, Helvetica', sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-weight: 400; letter-spacing: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: #ffffff; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial;"><strong style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bold;">The third part in an exclusive series of articles about the history of beer by one of the world's best beer writers</strong></p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/4d86281c089913f8fcc4b6c112ce3467-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>For most of our history, beer has been drunk on the same premises it was made: in homes, monasteries, inns, taverns and alehouses.</p> <p>But naturally, some people are better at making beer than others, and from the Middle Ages onwards some brewers had outstanding reputations for their art. The problem is, when we say beer doesn&rsquo;t travel well, until relatively recently that was true in ways we can barely imagine now. Beer is heavy, and when the roads were deep mud for nine months of the year, drinking local was the only option. The Industrial Revolution changed this, along with almost every aspect of beer and brewing.</p> <p>In the 16th and 17th centuries, works were undertaken to make rivers navigable for transport. In the 18th century, this was followed up by the creation of the world&rsquo;s first national canal network. Suddenly, people could move stuff around, and make things on a bigger scale.</p> <p>Like everything else, brewing benefited from economies of scale. &lsquo;Common brewers&rsquo; emerged when pubs expanded and started selling beer to their neighbours, or even further afield. (There are reports in the East India Company&rsquo;s records of Burton ale being consumed a little too heartily in Madras in 1717.) <br /><br />With brewing becoming a full-time rather than occasional activity, yeast could be pitched from one brew to the next. Although brewers had no idea what was happening with the foamy stuff, re-pitching it kept the yeast healthy, and it evolved to suit the environment in the specific brewery where it was kept. A brewer&rsquo;s beers would have become more consistent at this point.</p> <p>This is when named breweries emerged. You often see claims on beer labels such as &lsquo;Brewed since 1366&rsquo;. But when you explore them, it turns out that the date refers to the earliest evidence of brewing on that site, or even in that town, not the foundation of the actual brewery. Truman&rsquo;s began brewing in 1666, Shepherd Neame in 1698, Whitbread in 1742, and then they start coming thick and fast, with Worthington in 1745 and both Bass and Hall &amp; Woodhouse in 1777 being among the names we still recognise today.</p> <p>That these breweries survived when thousands of other common brewers didn&rsquo;t is in large part due to their early adoption of the technologies thrown up by the Industrial Revolution. Steam power allowed brewing vessels to be built bigger than ever before. The microscope and the hydrometer allowed brewers to control and analyse the brew. What had long been considered an art slowly became a science, though not without its hiccups. Horace Tabberer Brown, a brilliant scientific brewer at Worthington in Burton-upon-Trent, remembered strong resistance to the idea of setting up a laboratory in the brewery:</p> <p>I soon found out that the real objection on the part of my chief was due to a fear that the display of any chemical apparatus might suggest to customers who went round the brewery the horrible suspicion that the beer was being &lsquo;doctored.&rsquo;</p> <p>The Industrial Revolution had profound effects on the demand for beer too. For centuries, most of the population had lived a rural lifestyle, working on farmland. The enclosures displaced huge numbers, who found themselves drawn to cities where the men were put to work in factories, mines and mills. Before this point, whole families had lived and worked together. But the factory system&rsquo;s need for heavy manual labour created a large, concentrated male work force, with women and children doing separate jobs or keeping the home. In jobs such as mining or glass blowing, large quantities of liquid were needed at the end of the day to replenish what was lost in sweat. Pubs became places for men &ndash; just men &ndash; to indulge in heavy drinking. Beer itself, and the breweries that made it, took on a distinctly urban character, in contrast to the cider that was still drunk in farming country.</p> <p>The improving science allowed the consistency that saw particular styles begin to develop. And the concentrated demand favoured brewers who could brew those styles consistently and at scale.</p> <p>The first beer of the Industrial Revolution was porter. There are many myths and suppositions about its origins, but nothing can be known for sure. This is because beer styles are invariably evolved rather than invented. Beers were often stored and aged for up to a year before being drunk. Today, Belgian gueuze beers are a blend of sharp, fresh young beers and more mellow, complex aged beers. Some British ales used to be made in a similar fashion (and very probably had a similarly sour edge to their character as a result). One rumour is that porter was the result of a brewer trying to replicate the taste of old and new beer mixed together in one brew. Whatever the truth of it, porter emerged in the first half of the 18th century and quickly became the drink of choice of London&rsquo;s working classes (the term &lsquo;porter&rsquo; was used to describe a much wider selection of jobs than we think of today.)</p> <p>And porter really benefited from being brewed on a larger scale, to the point where most pubs could buy beer cheaper from a big brewer than they could brew it themselves. London was the centre of porter brewing, and its brewers began building bigger and bigger vats to store it in. A fashion emerged for celebrating the completion of new porter vats &ndash; or tuns &ndash; by having dinner inside them before they were filled with beer, and these dinners grew to seat over 200 people.</p> <p>This fashion was curtailed by the Meux brewery disaster of 1814, when a colossal porter tun holding over a million pints of 10-month old porter exploded, crushing a second vat holding an additional 700,000 pints, and caused a tidal wave of beer to cascade through some of the poorest parts of London, killing eight people.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/b055bb1ab936e37bc2c1f7e83f8f2673-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p><em>Aftermath of the Meux brewery disaster </em></p> <p>But porter remained the drink of Georgian and Victorian England, becoming a symbol of Britishness, with one foreign visitor declaring it &lsquo;the universal cordial of the populace&rsquo;. Roast beef and porter were the defining features of an Englishness that was starting to assert itself at the head of a powerful empire, superior to the over-fussy wines and cuisine of the French. The Prince Regent, later George IV, went so far as to boast that &lsquo;beer and beer have made us what we are&rsquo;.</p> <p>Porter&rsquo;s challenger to the title of the most important beer of the era was another gradual evolution. &lsquo;India Pale Ale&rsquo; was first mentioned in the British press in advertisements in the 1820s, appealing to civil servants who had made their fortunes in India, returned home, and missed the flavours of the sub-continent. By this point, pale ale had been exported to India for at least forty years, probably longer. It most likely evolved from October ales, brewed strong to be kept and aged.</p> <p>Even when IPA was drunk domestically, it was aged in cellars for a year, just like porter. But the six-month sea journey seems to have accelerated and altered the maturation process so the beer arrived in India perfectly &lsquo;ripe&rsquo;. The flavours suited the climate and the cuisine, and while porter was still drunk at least as widely at home and abroad, IPA was the more celebrated beer. Bass became the world&rsquo;s first global brand, recognised on every continent by its red triangle, Britain&rsquo;s first ever registered trademark.</p> <p><img style="max-width: 100%;" src="https://beerhawk.s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/article-image/cache/74b90293a01ec9c620d6438a4d0ed78b-bg.jpeg" /></p> <p>IPA&rsquo;s growth at home was influenced by the arrival of affordable glassware. It was pale and sparkling rather than dark and murky, and pale ale became the fashionable drink of the empire.</p> <p>But its success was assured by that other great engine of the Industrial Revolution: the arrival of the railways. Pale ales brewed in Burton were simply better than those brewed anywhere else. For a long time, no one could figure out why, and then the town&rsquo;s brewing scientists worked out that it was the composition of the water. London brewers who wanted to brew pale ale as well as porter had to open up satellite breweries in Burton if they wanted to compete. The railways allowed this little landlocked town to be linked to the ports of London and Liverpool, and, from there, the world. When St Pancras station was built in London in the 1860s at the terminus of the Midland Railway, the station undercroft (now the Eurostar terminal) was specially designed to hold thousands of hogsheads of Burton ale. Beer had become big business, and the world&rsquo;s first industrialised nation had transformed its scale, production and flavour. London had given birth to the two greatest beer styles.</p> <p>But Britain&rsquo;s supremacy was already under threat. As we&rsquo;ll see in the final part of this series, in a few short decades, IPA and porter would be swept aside by another beer flood: the rise of Pilsner lager.</p> <p>&bull; Pete Brown&rsquo;s new book Miracle Brew: Hops, Barley, Water, Yeast and the Nature of Beer, is out now.</p> <p>------</p> <p>HISTORICAL TIMELINE</p> <p>Middle Ages: Individuals begin to establish reputations as good brewers.</p> <p>16-17th centuries: Rivers were made navigable, allowing beer to be transported relatively quickly, which allowed brewers to export.</p> <p>18th century: The world&rsquo;s first canal network was established allowing brewers to efficiently transport beer around the country.</p> <p>17-19th centuries: Beer, now made by industrial brewers, was being transported around the world, in particular to the colonies of India.</p> <p>1666: Truman&rsquo;s begins brewing Shepherd Neame in 1698, Whitbread in 1742 and Worthington in 1745.</p> <p>18th century: Steam power allowed brewing vessels to be built bigger than ever before.</p> <p>1760-1840: Industrial Revolution had profound effects on the demand for beer too.</p> <p>18th century: Porter emerged in the first half of the 18th century and became the drink of London&rsquo;s working classes&rsquo;.</p> <p>1814: A colossal porter tun holding over a million pints of 10-month old porter exploded. Eight people drowned.</p> <p>19th century: Porter remained a drink of early Victorian England, a symbol of Britishness.</p> <p>1820: &lsquo;India Pale Ale&rsquo; was first mentioned in the British press appealing to civil servants who had made their fortunes in India and missed the flavours.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>
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