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The Bauman College Natural Chef Program is thrilled to announce a new partnership with the amazing, Oakland-based organization, Phat Beets Produce! Our culinary students will now be learning to create Eating for Health® dishes using their produce.

Phat Beets provides seasonal veggie boxes to the local community sourced from farmers they select based on specific criteria. Their farmers are all people of color, mostly immigrants, who grow pesticide-free and organic produce. They work with small, specialty farms that are dedicated to their craft—these include Avalos Farm, Vang Family Farm, Twin Girls Farm, and the farm at East Oakland’s Castlemont High School.

In addition to offering produce delivery, Phat Beets also runs a number of food justice programs. Their Urban Garden program emphasizes community and is open to all with no membership requirements or fees. Their gardens are strategically cultivated in highly populated areas with a true need for better access to fresh produce. Maintained by Phat Beets and volunteers, city-owned Dover Street Edible Park provides thousands of pounds of free produce to Oakland residents each year.

Phat Beets also runs two youth programs. Fresh Fellows is an internship program hosted at the Dover St. Edible Park for teens from the Healthy Hearts Clinic—a pediatric obesity prevention program at the local UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital. Teens work with youth leaders and learn about the foundations of a healthy lifestyle as well as gardening, cooking, and food justice. (Check out this video to learn more about the program.) Many teens who go through the internship go on to participate in the second youth program, Youth Pickle Co. This program teaches adolescents to make fermented, preserved, and pickled products from Phat Beets’ produce. Teen participants not only learn about food preservation, food justice, and health, but also gain vocational skills in business, finance, and catering.

Phat Beets’ food justice efforts don’t stop there! They also work closely with women- and youth-led food businesses in the Bay Area as part of their Kitchen Incubator program. Some of these businesses include Miss Arepita, Desta’s Ethiopian Cuisine, Two Chicks in the Mix, and Mama’s Kasoy.

Bauman College is so excited to collaborate with this incredible organization to continue cultivating a paradigm shift in our food system!

The post We’ve Partnered with Phat Beets Produce appeared first on Bauman College.

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My name is Teresa Wagner and I am a recent graduate of the Nutrition Consultant Program.

My initial interest in food and love of cooking came from when I was a teenager and I wanted to become a vegetarian. My mom, not knowing quite what to do with me, took me to a health food store to get some advice. I was an athlete, so she wanted to make sure that I was getting proper protein and nutrition. She also told me that I was going to have to help with some of my own meal preparation and cooking, as she did not have time to cater to my dietary needs with a family of six. I enjoyed cooking and learning how to make things taste delicious. After a while I began to eat meat again because I was preparing it for family dinners and knew I could make it taste good.

Cooking turned into a way to show my love and care for those around me. I enjoyed creating and sharing delicious meals with friends and family. I always had a bit of an artistic side, and cooking was an unexpected creative outlet. I never really liked to follow recipes and was not afraid to experiment. I have also always had a passion for traveling and new  culinary and cultural experiences. Learning from different masters (like cooking with a little Italian nona in her kitchen or making dumplings with my neighbor’s Cantonese mother and grandmother), reading cookbooks, recreating dishes from restaurants, watching culinary documentaries, having dinner parties, and teaching the skills I have learned will never get old for me.

I explored other interests, but my heart was always drawn to cooking. After graduating from the University of Santa Clara, I moved to San Diego, where I worked as a client relationship manager for a capital management firm. It did not take long for me to realize that this work was not for me, and I started thinking about returning to school. I was interested in a nutrition degree, so I started retaking some undergraduate classes. I ended up taking a tour of the San Diego Culinary Institute and decided to go that route.

I began working for a company that was preparing nutritious meals for private clients and professional athletes. When I finished my culinary program, I did an internship at one of the best fine dining restaurants in San Diego, L’Auberge Del Mar. I was offered a job at the end of my internship, which I thought would teach me supplemental culinary skills, but it ended up leading me down the rabbit hole of restaurant kitchen and management jobs. After more than ten years in the restaurant industry, I decided to return to my original plan of working with individuals on improving their health through nutrition.

My research into the different paths for nutrition education led me to Bauman College. The Nutrition Consultant Program really resonated as being the right fit for me with its holistic and client-centered approach. The class times were perfect for me to be able to keep my current job and simultaneously work through the program.

The in-depth curriculum covered many aspects of nutrition and other contributing factors to health and well being. Eating nutritiously is only one factor. I personally had a decent diet when I started the program, but I was still having health problems. Learning about the complexities of the digestive system was eye-opening. I realized that if my digestive system is not functioning optimally, I am not necessarily benefitting from all the good nutrients in the food I am taking the time to prepare.

My goal is to start my own practice, working with clients who would like to make some changes in their diets to move toward a healthier lifestyle. With my culinary background, I would like to support people who find healthy eating to be too time consuming, hard, or scary by teaching them the “hows” and “whys” of Eating for Health®.

Bauman College has really helped me to prioritize my own health and healing, which is always the first and most important thing to address before attempting to help others. This prioritization went hand-in-hand with carving out time for the program. We all have full lives and many responsibilities, which can make it hard to focus on the program, materials, and homework involved with going back to school. It takes discipline to dedicate the time. My advice is to stick with it because you will be surprised at how much you are learning.

Teresa’s Creamy Lentils

One of my favorite healthy recipes is Creamy Lentils. Lentils are a great source of protein and they help to increase energy, stabilize blood sugar, and aid digestive health.

Using sprouted lentils will make this dish easier to digest. You can sprout or soak your own lentils overnight with a capful of apple cider vinegar or buy sprouted, dehydrated lentils from brands like truRoots. Pre sprouting or soaking the lentils will significantly reduce the cook time, making this a great, quick meal option. Creamy Lentils pair well with fish, poultry, mixed vegetables, and more.

Creamy Lentils
Author: Teresa Wagner, Nutrition Consultant
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 3 cups mineral broth, stock, or water
  • 2 cups green lentils, soaked/sprouted
  • 2 Tbs extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 tsp red pepper flakes
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ cup shallot or red onion, small dice
  • ¼ cup fennel bulb, diced
  • ¼ cup sherry vinegar
  • ¼ cup labneh or thick greek yogurt
  • sea salt, to taste
  • pepper, to taste
  • ¼ cup fresh herbs (parsley, fennel tops, thyme, oregano)
Instructions
  1. In a large stock pot, bring broth to a boil, add lentils, and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook for 12–15 minutes (longer if not soaked/sprouted). Cover and let stand 5–10 minutes, then check for tenderness. Drain any remaining liquid.
  2. In a separate pan over medium heat, add olive oil, red pepper flakes, garlic, shallot, and fennel. Stir frequently making sure the garlic does not burn.
  3. Add sherry vinegar to the pan, and cook, stirring often, until reduced by half (about 2 minutes). Turn pan off.
  4. Fold in yogurt, and mix until smooth. Pour mixture over warm lentils and season with sea salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Sprinkle fresh herbs over the top, serve, and enjoy!
Notes
Allergens: dairy

Salting lentils earlier in the cooking process makes the outer shells tough. Only salt lentils (and other beans) after cooking.

To increase the anti-inflammatory properties of this dish, add turmeric.

For an additional nutrient boost, add spinach or other greens. A long-cooking green, like swiss chard, can be added with the lentils. Quick-cooking greens, like spinach, can be added to the garlic-shallot-fennel sauté.
3.5.3251

 

The post Alumni Spotlight + Recipe: Teresa Wagner appeared first on Bauman College.

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This easy-to-make quick bread is not only gluten- and grain-free, but it is also high in healthy fats and protein! A perfect nutritious and delicious snack.

 

Peanut Butter Zucchini Quick Bread
Author: Bauman College
Serves: 12
 
Ingredients
  • 1 cup peanut butter, unsweetened
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 Tbs vanilla
  • ⅓ cup + 1 tsp coconut sugar, divided
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 cup zucchini, grated, about 1 large zucchini
  • ½ cup chocolate chips
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • ½ tsp baking soda
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Grease glass bread pan and set aside.
  3. In a large mixing bowl add peanut butter, eggs, vanilla, ⅓ cup coconut sugar, and salt. Using an electric mixer, combine ingredients until thoroughly mixed.
  4. Squeeze zucchini to extract excess water—otherwise bread will be too moist.
  5. Fold in zucchini and chocolate chips.
  6. Fold in apple cider vinegar and baking soda.
  7. Pour batter into prepared bread pan. Sprinkle remaining teaspoon of coconut sugar on top of loaf and place in oven.
  8. Bake for 45–50 minutes. A knife inserted into the center may be slightly moist. This is normal. Allow to cool, serve, and enjoy!
Notes
The bread will keep for 2–3 days at room temperature in a sealed container. If you are not able to consume it within this time frame, it freezes beautifully.

Allergens: peanuts
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By Lila Volkas, Nutrition Consultant Alumna

You know the saying you are what you eat? Well it’s true! And more accurately, you are what you assimilate and don’t eliminate. In order to break our food into the essential nutrients that feed our cells and make up who we are, we need our digestive systems to be running on all cylinders.

Fortunately, there are some simple steps you can take to support your digestive system. Here are some tips you can implement into your daily routines to make sure your digestion is working smoothly:

1. Take three deep breaths before you eat

Breathing deeply and slowly lets your body know that it is safe to relax. Helping our bodies activate our parasympathetic system, or rest and digest mode, when we eat helps us properly digest our food.

Emotional, physical, mental, or environmental stressors can push our bodies into sympathetic overdrive, commonly known as fight or flight mode. In this state, our digestion is inhibited to allow us to escape from a presumed threat. Even stressful thoughts and emotions can have physical manifestations that affect the digestive processes, including inhibiting salivary response, acid and enzyme secretion, and gut motility.

2. Chew your food

Chewing well mechanically breaks food down into smaller particles that our bodies can absorb, which helps us to take full advantage of our food’s nutritional benefits. This process stimulates the secretion of enzymes in the saliva which start to break down carbohydrates and fats. Once the digestive tract is signaled that food is coming, it starts to secrete gastric juices. Remember that we don’t have teeth in our stomachs!

3. Boost your HCl

HCl, or hydrochloric acid, is a component of the gastric juice in the stomach. Its job is to denature (break down) proteins, ionize minerals and increase their bioavailability, and kill pathogenic organisms entering our systems with our food.

Some common signs of low HCl are indigestion, bloating, gas and belching after meals, feeling like food is just “sitting there,” and bad breath.

Tips to boost your HCl:
  • Eat bitter vegetables such as arugula, radicchio, radishes, and dandelion greens; take a bitters tincture before meals; and drink tea with bitter herbs like chamomile, dandelion, lemon balm, and gentian. The bitter the better!
  • Drink raw, unfiltered apple cider vinegar with meals, starting with two teaspoons in six ounces of water.
  • Make sure you are getting plenty of minerals (especially zinc and magnesium) in your diet, since the acid secretion process is magnesium-dependent. Some foods that are rich in magnesium are pumpkin seeds, spinach, swiss chard, sesame seeds, quinoa, and soybeans. Try this Nut + Seed Brittle recipe for a magnesium-rich treat.

4. Support your gut with beneficial bacteria

Did you know that there are more bacteria in the intestines than people on the planet?

Gastrointestinal microorganisms support digestion by helping to break down food, synthesize vitamins, regulate pathogen growth, support immunity, and detoxify hormones.

Enjoy fermented foods like sauerkraut, pickles, kimchi, kvass, kombucha, yogurt, kefir, miso, and tempeh. Try this Brown Lentil Miso Spread recipe at your next dinner party!

By tuning in to our breath, chewing well, boosting HCl, and supporting our gut’s beneficial bacteria with yummy foods, we can support our digestive systems and help our bodies get the nutrients they need.

The post 4 Simple Ways to Support Digestion appeared first on Bauman College.

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My name is Amanda Salazar and I am a recent Natural Chef Program graduate. My love for food stems from spending time in the kitchen with family. My passion for food combined with life experiences led to a desire for a healthier relationship with food, which brought me to Bauman College. No matter the external stress, food has always been my therapy. Spending most of my free time thinking about how to be involved with food, I knew I had to do something with that feeling and turn it into more than just a hobby.

Being able to nourish those I care for and create lasting memories by cooking meals for them drove me to pursue a change in career paths. I was fortunate to learn so much from the program. While I am excited to pursue a career as a personal chef, I am going to miss my time spent in the classroom, learning the ins-and-outs of the kitchen and working with my classmates to create beautiful dishes.

It is hard to pinpoint the most interesting thing I learned in the program—we covered a vast array of topics over the 5-month course. I will say that I found it absolutely fascinating learning about Indian cuisine and how it functions with six tastes, rather than the four or five we’re used to in most cuisines. They have sweet, salty, bitter, sour, pungent, and astringent, which I had never heard before!

My two favorite cooking techniques that I learned in the program are steaming fish in parchment paper, a technique called cooking en papillote, and the technique of blanching and shocking a tomato after making a couple of slices into it to remove the skin easily, called tomato concasse. They seem like simple techniques, but taking those extra steps while cooking plays such a huge role in the end result in terms of the taste and presentation of the dish. It feels great to confidently say that I have these tools in my tool box.

You can follow me on Instagram.

Squash + Sage Soup

Soup is great any time of year. With the subtle flavors of squash and sage, the tastes of the season come alive in this light, nourishing dish. Serve it for lunch, as a before-dinner treat, or make it the main feature of your evening meal. This soup is gluten free and can be adapted for those who are sensitive to dairy or nightshades.

Author: Amanda Salazar, Natural Chef
Serves: 10 (about 1 gallon)
 
Ingredients
  • 1 bunch sage, divided
  • ¼ cup olive oil, divided
  • 2 Tbs ghee*
  • 1 yellow onion, medium dice
  • 1 Tbs salt, divided + more to taste
  • 2 Tbs brown rice flour
  • 1 Tbs garlic, minced
  • 2 large summer squash, medium dice
  • 3 medium Yukon Gold potatoes*, medium dice
  • 1 tsp ground sage
  • 4 cup vegetable stock
  • 2 cup filtered water
  • 2 tsp ground white pepper
  • ⅓ cup lemon juice
Instructions
  1. In a high-speed blender, blend ½ bunch of sage with olive oil until sage is broken down. Pour blended mixture onto cheesecloth over a small bowl and squeeze out oil. Set aside.
  2. Heat a small saucepan on medium-high and add enough olive oil so that the bottom of the saucepan is covered. When oil is shimmering, add sage leaves and fry for about 30–40 seconds per side or until sage has changed color to a darker green. Remove from heat and place on a paper-towel-lined plate. Sprinkle with ½ teaspoon salt.
  3. Heat a large stock pot on medium and when warm, after about 2 minutes, add ghee.
  4. When ghee is shimmering, add onion and sauté until translucent, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon salt about 5 minutes in to help draw moisture out of onions.
  5. While stirring, sprinkle brown rice flour over onions, continuing to stir until onions are coated. Cook for 1–2 minutes or until flour begins to become fragrant.
  6. Add garlic and cook until fragrant, another 1–2 minutes.
  7. Add squash, potatoes, ground sage, and ½ tablespoon of salt. Cook until squash softens, 5–7 minutes.
  8. Add vegetable stock and filtered water, and raise heat to bring to a boil. Once boiling, lower heat and simmer for 20–25 minutes or until potatoes have softened completely. Once softened, remove from heat.
  9. Add soup to a blender in small batches, and blend until completely smooth. Once smooth, add back to pot and stir in pepper, lemon juice, and salt to taste.
  10. Garnish with a drizzle of sage olive oil and fried sage leaves. Serve and enjoy!
Notes
Allergens: dairy, nightshades
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The post Alumni Spotlight + Recipe: Amanda Salazar appeared first on Bauman College.

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In the late fall and winter months, seasonal vegetables can seem sparse and uninteresting after riding the coattails of summer’s avocado and tomato bounty. However, many varieties of satiating root vegetables and antioxidant-rich leafy greens are available, which are perfect for the cold winter months. Here is a handy list* of produce that is in season during the wintertime:

Arugula Cauliflower Garlic Onions
Beets Chard Herbs Parsnips
Bok choy Chicory Kale Radish
Broccoli Collard greens Leeks Romanesco
Broccoli rabe Cress Lettuce Rutabaga
Brussels sprouts Dandelion greens Mushrooms Spinach
Cabbage Endive Mustard greens Sprouts
Carrots Fennel Nettles Turnips

*For a complete list of seasonal vegetables, fruits, nuts, seafood, and flowers in Northern California, visit cuesa.org.

Some of these vegetables may feel unfamiliar, and you might wonder how to prepare them. What better way to experiment in the kitchen and broaden your palate than to select a new ingredient from the list above and try a new recipe! To get started, try our Roasted Garlic + Herb Root Mash recipe below that calls for cauliflower, rutabagas, and turnips. Pair this with a side of braised leafy greens for the beginnings of a delicious, grounding, and nutrient-dense winter meal.

Roasted Garlic + Herb Root Mash

This delicious, low-glycemic alternative to mashed potatoes showcases garlic, oregano, and thyme, which add powerful antibacterial and antimicrobial properties.

Roasted Garlic + Herb Root Mash
Author: Katherine Wilson, Natural Chef
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 2 small garlic bulbs, tops sliced off slightly exposing the cloves
  • 2 heads cauliflower, chopped into small florets
  • 2 medium rutabagas, peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 2 medium turnips, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 1 tsp fresh oregano, roughly chopped
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme, roughly chopped
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • ghee or coconut oil, optional
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Wrap garlic bulbs in parchment-lined foil. Place on a baking sheet or dish, and roast for 30–40 minutes, or until the cloves are soft and the edges are browned.
  2. Place cauliflower, rutabagas, and turnips in a steamer pot. Steam until tender when pierced with a fork, 15–20 minutes. The cauliflower may be softer than the other vegetables, this is okay.
  3. Place turnips, rutabagas, and cauliflower into a medium pot. Once garlic is roasted, squeeze out of the bulb into the pot.
  4. Add oregano, thyme, salt, and pepper. Using an immersion blender, blend until smooth (mashed potato consistency). For a chunkier mash, use a potato masher. Taste, and add more herbs, salt, and/or pepper as desired.
  5. For added creaminess and flavor, add a few tablespoons of ghee or coconut oil.
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The post What’s in Season in Winter appeared first on Bauman College.

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Walnuts provide healthy fats that are necessary to support a robust cardiovascular system. They also contain arginine, an amino acid that relaxes blood vessels and prevents build-up in the arteries. In this recipe, they are toasted over low heat to preserve their healthful fats and add a bit of crunch. Brussels sprouts are a nutrient-dense, cruciferous vegetable that support overall health. Roasting Brussels sprouts brings out their natural sweetness.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts + Toasted Walnuts with Dijon Vinaigrette
Author: Bauman College
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • ¼ cup shallots, minced
  • 3 Tbs white wine vinegar
  • 1 Tbs dijon mustard
  • 1½ tsp salt, divided
  • ¼ tsp ground black pepper
  • 3 Tbs flax oil
  • ½ cup walnuts, roughly chopped
  • 2 Tbs unsalted butter, cut into pieces
  • 1 lb small Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
Instructions
Vinaigrette
  1. Whisk together shallots, vinegar, mustard, ½ teaspoon salt, and pepper in a small bowl, then add oil in a slow stream, whisking to emulsify.
Brussels Sprouts
  1. Preheat oven to 200°F. Spread walnuts on a sheet pan and toast in the oven until fragrant, about 15 minutes. Set walnuts aside and raise heat to 350°F.
  2. Melt butter in a large, shallow baking dish (1-inch deep) in the lower third of the oven for about 3 minutes. Toss Brussels sprouts in the baking dish with butter and remaining salt. Arrange sprouts, cut sides down, in one layer and roast in lower third of oven until undersides of sprouts are golden, about 20 minutes.
  3. Transfer warm sprouts to a large bowl and drizzle with vinaigrette. Toss with walnuts, serve, and enjoy!
Notes
Allergens: dairy, nuts
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The post Roasted Brussels Sprouts + Toasted Walnuts with Dijon Vinaigrette appeared first on Bauman College.

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My name is Keiko Ichinose, and I am a Natural Chef.

Living in different cities throughout the U.S., traveling abroad, and exploring different cultures, I have always orbited around food. It was the point with which I centered my day. It was what I looked forward to the most. So, when I decided to leave my career in fashion design and enroll in the Natural Chef Training Program at Bauman College, it came as no surprise.

I had lived in California before, and with my love of fresh produce and farmers’ markets, it made sense for me to move back. When I learned about Bauman College, everything fell into place. Bauman offered an environment and philosophy that aligned with my values of working with ingredients of the highest standard—fresh, seasonal, local, and organic. And the knowledge of how these ingredients tie back to health and wellness was invaluable.

My class recently put on our final Culinary Showcase event where we demonstrated our mastery of ingredient selection, preparation, and presentation as well as our ability to plan and execute a large-scale, catered event. The experience as a team, creating a theme and full menu centering around the food we believe in, was incredible. It was a night I hope to recreate in the future.

My goal is to start a small business that builds community through local, seasonal, organic, well-intentioned food, one recipe at a time. You can follow me on Instagram.

Recipe Process + Inspiration

Summer, the season of picnics and BBQs, was my inspiration for this recipe. I wanted to create a dessert with a healthy twist for those of us with a sweet tooth who are trying to cut down on our sugar intake. The tartness of the lemon curd combined with the richness of the coconut cheese and slightly savory crust create a lovely balance of flavors. It is a wonderful treat for everyone, including those who are gluten and dairy free.

Gluten-Free, Coconut, Lemon Tart

Alumni Spotlight + Recipe: Keiko Ichinose
Author: Keiko Ichinose, Natural Chef
Serves: 12
 
Ingredients
Nut Crust
  • 1 tsp coconut oil
  • 1 cup pecans
  • ½ cup almond flour
  • ½ cup flaxseed meal
  • ¼ cup brown rice flour
  • 3 Tbsp filtered water
  • 3 medjool dates
  • 2 Tbs sesame seeds
  • 1 Tbs dried lavender buds
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • ½ tsp ground cinnamon
Coconut Cheese
  • 1 cup coconut butter
  • ¾ cup coconut milk
  • 1 medjool date
  • 1 Tbs coconut oil
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • Lemon Curd
  • 4 eggs
  • ⅓ cup raw honey
  • 1 Tbs lemon zest
  • ½ cup lemon juice
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • ½ cup unsalted butter, chilled and cubed
  • 1 cup blackberries, for garnish
Instructions
Nut Crust
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Grease a 9x9-inch glass pan with coconut oil.
  3. Add all ingredients to a food processor and mix until well combined.
  4. Empty the mixture into the pan and press down with parchment paper, making an even, consistent crust, about ¼-inch thick.
  5. Place in the oven, and bake for 15 minutes or until crust is fragrant and cooked through. Set aside to cool.
Coconut Cheese
  1. Set aside ¼ cup of coconut butter. Add all ingredients to a high speed blender. Mix until well combined and smooth, then add remaining coconut butter to blender. Blend until no chunks of coconut butter or dates remain.
  2. Spoon mixture from blender into a medium sized mixing bowl. Place in refrigerator for 15 minutes to help coconut thicken into cheese form.
  3. After 15 minutes, mix with a fork. It should have a thick, goat-cheese-like consistency. Set aside. Note, if the cheese is too hard to mix at this point, let sit at room temperature until it loosens up.
Lemon Curd
  1. Separate egg yolks from 2 of the eggs. Add 2 whole eggs and the 2 separated yolks to a bowl. Save egg whites for another recipe.
  2. Add raw honey, lemon zest, lemon juice, and sea salt to the eggs. Whisk together.
  3. Pour egg mixture into a medium sized saucepan. Place pan over low to medium heat. Mix consistently with a wooden spoon. As the egg mixture starts to thicken, add butter a couple of cubes at a time, while continuing to mix. Once all the butter has been added, keep mixing over low heat for 3 more minutes.
  4. Remove from heat and set aside to cool for 15 minutes.
  5. After cooling, pour lemon curd into a strainer sitting over a large bowl. With a wooden spoon, stir the curd through, leaving the small cooked egg white pieces behind. Now the curd should be nice and smooth.
To Assemble
  1. Spread coconut cheese over nut crust. Cheese should be about ¼ to ½-inch thick. Press down with parchment paper for a smooth, consistent surface.
  2. Pour lemon curd over coconut cheese and use an offset spatula to spread evenly.
  3. Cover and place in refrigerator for an hour.
  4. Remove from refrigerator, garnish with fresh blackberries, serve, and enjoy!
Notes
Allergens: nuts, sesame, eggs, dairy
3.5.3251

The post Alumni Spotlight + Recipe: Keiko Ichinose appeared first on Bauman College.

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My name is Maya and I am a recent graduate of the Natural Chef Training Program. I was born and lived most of my life in Israel until moving to California 7 years ago. In Israel, I worked as an architect in a boutique firm. I was drawn to the artistic elements of architecture and how living spaces make people feel.

I learned to appreciate and love the art of cooking from my grandmother and mother, who were both amazing cooks. Originally from Turkey, they had learned to prepare the delicious, traditional dishes of that culture, using only the freshest ingredients. I was lucky to have been exposed to such amazing cuisine that was also so healthy. My grandparents lived into their late 90s and were generally healthy all their lives.

When I moved to the United States, it was difficult to pursue my architecture career, so I turned to my other passion—cooking. I decided that I wanted to pursue a new career in the culinary arts, focusing on my early childhood experiences. I wanted to combine my love for fresh and healthy food with art and presentation. I also wanted to learn how to prepare delicious, nutritious meals for my 2 young sons. Since kids are notorious for refusing healthy foods, I wanted to be able to create dishes that they would enjoy and be happy to eat.

Making healthy food for my own family inspired me to make healthy food for other families, and Bauman College offered just the training I was looking for. Having gone through this amazing experience, I not only learned how to make great, beautiful food using different techniques, I am now fully aware of all the health benefits of various aspects of cooking—ingredients, cooking methods, and materials. With this knowledge, I will be able to provide a great service for families, helping them to solve their nutritional challenges, especially with children.

Recipe Process + Inspiration

One evening, while out to dinner with friends, we ordered a delicious chocolate tart. I could not get home fast enough to recreate a healthy version of this dessert. I wanted to make a treat using healthy fats and without the processed ingredients usually found in foods these days. I also wanted to create a healthy dessert that my sons could enjoy.

Vegan, Gluten-Free, Chocolate Tart

Author: Maya Harush, Natural Chef
Serves: 8
 
Ingredients
For the crust
  • 6 large Medjool dates, pitted
  • ¼ cup water, boiled
  • ½ cup almonds
  • ½ cup pecans
  • ¼ cup walnuts
  • ⅓ tsp sea salt
  • 2 Tbs almond flour, more if needed
  • 2 Tbs coconut oil
  • 2 Tbs maple syrup
For the filling
  • 3 large, ripe avocados, peeled and pitted
  • ¾ cup maple syrup
  • ¾ cup cocoa powder
  • 2 Tbs pure vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 Tbs coconut oil
  • 8 mint leaves
  • For the garnish
  • coconut flakes
  • raspberries
  • mint leaves
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Add all crust ingredients to a food processor and process until well combined.
  3. Empty into a 9-inch pie pan, and press firmly so that the crust evenly covers the pan all the way around. Bake for 8 minutes, then set aside to cool.
  4. Add all filling ingredients to a high-speed blender and blend until smooth.
  5. Using a piping bag, fill the crust.
  6. Garnish with coconut flakes, raspberries, and mint leaves. Enjoy!
Notes
Allergens: nuts
#version#

The post Alumni Spotlight + Recipe: Maya Harush appeared first on Bauman College.

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Another year has flown by and the winter holidays are already upon us. For many, this season is dedicated to searching for the perfect gifts for loved ones. Heading into the cold and braving the holiday shopping craze is not for the faint of heart, nor is it easy on the budget. It can be a stressful time for everyone. But there are ways to keep your sanity and budget in check by gifting your loved ones something handmade. Creating homemade delights with the health and wellness of each individual in mind is a great way to show how much you care and adds an extra special touch to this time of giving.

Straight from our staff, and in true Bauman College form, here are four creative and inexpensive gift ideas that curb stress and promote health (you might even want to save a few for yourself!):

1. Beeswax Candles

Who doesn’t love candles? They create a beautiful ambiance and set a calm tone for unwinding after a long day. Candles should not, however, be used to mask odors or make a home smell like freshly baked cake. Artificially scented candles are commonly made with paraffin wax, which emits hazardous chemicals when burned. To avoid introducing air pollutants into your home, it is best to use an alternative, like beeswax.

Our culinary support manager, Cheyenne Wright, makes candles every year for her family and friends. She uses this recipe from Wellness Mama, which recommends using a beeswax and a coconut oil mixture to ensure the candle will last while avoiding toxins. She uses small Mason jars for her vessels, which are budget friendly and create cute little gifts.

2. Personalized Tea Blends

One of the best aspects of DIY gift giving is including a personal touch. Personalized tea blends are one of the sweetest and easiest gifts to make. Lila Volkas, our nutrition program supervisor, takes into account the health of each family member and friend when considering what to include in their personalized blends. Some of her favorite concoctions include immune boosting, sleep promoting, and stress relieving herbs for people who need a little extra relaxation in their lives. After finishing a blend, she pours it into a jar and creates a custom label, which adds an extra touch of love to this gift.

This mixture from Healing Herbal Teas: A Complete Guide to Making Delicious, Healthful Beverages, by Brigitte Mars, tastes great and helps to reduce inflammation:

Inflammation Reduction Tea

2 parts marshmallow root
2 parts plantain leaf
1 part calendula flower
1 part chamomile flower
1 part violet leaf

3. Fermented Hot Sauce

For the folks who like to add a little spice to their lives, what more can you ask for than homemade fermented hot sauce? In California, summer pepper season wraps up around the end of October, so if you plan ahead and collect the last of the harvest, you can use this opportunity to flex your preserving skills. Or you can purchase organic peppers from your local grocery store.

Chef Claire McCann, our kitchen manager, says that making fermented hot sauce is easy to do. Fermented foods provide us with beneficial bacteria that feed our microbiome, which helps with digestion and keeps us healthy.

A fermented hot sauce recipe can involve any variety of chili peppers you like, allowing flexibility for preferred spiciness and flavor. After clearing your peppers of all their seeds, pop them into a jar with your choice of aromatics—garlic; fresh herbs like cilantro, thyme, or celery leaves; ginger; citrus peels; and anything else you like. Pour salt water brine over the mixture, and allow to ferment for 3–4 weeks. Store your ferments in a dark place or cover them with a towel. After 3–4 weeks, drain the peppers, reserving the brine, and transfer them into a blender. Blend, using the brine to thin out the mixture and reach the desired consistency.

Tip: Make a batch with green peppers and a batch with red peppers and tie the hot sauce bottles together with ribbon to create a festive holiday gift.

4. Fire Cider

For the ultimate immune-boosting gift, our nutrition program coordinator, Clove Cross, makes fire cider, an ancient folk medicine concoction. This beverage has become fairly well-known for its use in curbing cold or flu-like symptoms, acting as a decongestant, and stimulating digestion. Fire cider is packed with herbs, peppers, alliums, and ginger, and it has a very distinctive taste. The immune-boosting nutrients are anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiviral and the added heat of the peppers, alliums, and ginger pack an energizing punch. Fire cider can be added to water or taken by the tablespoon. Check out the recipe below:

Fire Cider
Author: Clove Cross, Nutrition Program Coordinator
Serves: 4–6 cups
 
The recipe and directions below are variable and can be altered per wellness needs, but here are some general guidelines:
Ingredients
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • ½ cup ginger, peeled and chopped
  • ½ cup turmeric, peeled and chopped
  • ¼ cup horseradish root, peeled and chopped
  • 10–12 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
  • 1 lemon, halved
  • 3 jalapeño peppers, chopped
  • ¼ cup herbs (thyme, echinacea, rosemary, etc.)
  • Apple cider vinegar (enough to submerge all ingredients)
  • ¼ cup raw, local honey
Instructions
  1. Add all ingredients, except for the honey, to a half-gallon jar. Cover the mixture with apple cider vinegar until all ingredients are submerged (you can also use a fermentation weight), and shake.
  2. Cover the jar with a piece of wax paper, secured with a rubber band, and store in a cool place, like on top of the refrigerator or in a closet. After 3–4 weeks, the mixture will be a beautifully spicy and fermented wellness treat.
  3. Strain the mixture or remove the lemon peels and blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender. Then add honey, stirring vigorously.
  4. Your cider is now ready to be portioned into bottles or jars and gifted to loved ones.
Notes
For the most nutrient density, use organic ingredients. You can also include additional spices like cinnamon, which is anti-inflammatory and antioxidant.

Tip: During a recent trip to Alembique Apothecary in Berkeley, California, a specialist gave us some pointers for making fire cider: bury your jar underground for a month, then add the raw, local honey. The honey will slow down the fermentation process.
3.5.3229

 

Taking the time to create homemade gifts is a great way to add an extra special touch to the holidays. Gifts created with love and intention are a sweet alternative to the typical store-bought items that are usually given at this time of year. No matter what you decide to do, a gift is special because it comes from you.

Wishing you and yours a very happy and healthy holiday season, from all of us at Bauman College.

The post Bauman College Staff Holiday Gift Guide appeared first on Bauman College.

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