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Thanksgiving meals can be heavy with a plethora of rich flavors and satiating dishes like candied yams, roasted turkey, and dinner rolls. Adding this salad to your menu will round out the flavors of your meal. The crispness of the green apples, radishes, and scallions paired with the brightness of parsley, cilantro, and thyme meld together with the fennel and chili-spiced walnuts to bring about balance and variety to one of the best meals of the year.

Adding fresh, seasonal herbs to salads improves the flavor and nutritional value. Sweet apples and walnuts pair nicely with a refreshing and cleansing variety of herbs, and the balsamic, dijon dressing will aid in digestion.

Fresh Herb Salad with Apples + Spiced Walnuts
Author: Bauman College
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 4 cups baby lettuce mix
  • 2 cups arugula
  • ½ cup Italian parsley, roughly chopped, loosely packed
  • ¼ cup cilantro, roughly chopped, loosely packed
  • 2 Tbs fresh thyme leaves, roughly chopped
  • 1 small bunch sorrel
  • 3 medium radishes, halved and thinly sliced
  • 4 whole scallions, cut on a bias
  • 1 cup walnuts
  • ¼ cup olive oil, divided
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds, crushed
  • 1 pinch chili flakes
  • sea salt, to taste
  • ¼ cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 Tbs + 1 tsp dijon mustard
  • 1 Tbs honey
  • 2 green apples, cored and thinly sliced
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Combine greens, herbs, radishes, and scallions in a large bowl.
  2. Preheat oven to 325°F. Place walnuts in a bowl and toss with 1 teaspoon olive oil. Add crushed fennel seeds, chili flakes, and a pinch of salt. Toss to coat and place on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Toast in the oven for about 15 minutes or until crisp, checking frequently.
  3. Whisk together vinegar, mustard, and honey. Whisk constantly while drizzling in remaining olive oil until emulsified.
  4. To serve, toss apples and walnuts into bowl with greens and herbs. Coat lightly with dressing. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve and enjoy!
Notes
Allergens: nuts, nightshades
3.5.3229

 

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Just because summer is over doesn’t mean your love affair with salads has to end. With fall in full swing and winter drawing nearer it is time to embrace deep evergreens, blood red, and crisp autumn yellow colors – in our food that is (not just our wardrobe). Try this delicious collard green salad to titillate your taste buds.

Try this delectable emerald collard salad for an autumn-inspired vegan meal

Emerald Collard Salad with Balsamic Vinaigrette

Author: Bauman College Staff
Serves: 6

Ingredients
2 bunches collard greens, stems removed, thin chiffonade
¼ cup olive oil, divided
½ tsp sea salt, more to taste
¼ cup balsamic vinegar
black pepper, freshly ground, to taste
1 delicata squash, seeded, roasted, and sliced
¼ cup pumpkin seeds, lightly toasted
2 medium fuyu persimmons, diced
1 medium pink lady apple, diced
¼ cup pomegranate seeds

Instructions
Prepare collards as directed and place in a large bowl. Drizzle with 1–2 teaspoons olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Massage greens with your hands, kneading and squeezing until they begin to wilt and become soft. Set aside.

Add vinegar, remaining olive oil, and salt and pepper to a mason jar. Secure the lid and shake until well combined. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste. Add dressing to salad, just enough to coat the ingredients. Toss in squash, pumpkin seeds, persimmon, apple, and pomegranate seeds. Serve and enjoy!

If you’re interested in all things health, nutrition, and taste related then check out the Nutrition Programs at Bauman College, or call 1-800-987-7530.

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Thanksgiving meals can be heavy with a plethora of rich flavors and satiating dishes like candied yams, roasted turkey, and dinner rolls. Adding this salad to your menu will round out the flavors of your meal. The crispness of the green apples, radishes, and scallions paired with the brightness of parsley, cilantro, and thyme meld together with the fennel and chili-spiced walnuts to bring about balance and variety to one of the best meals of the year.

Adding fresh, seasonal herbs to salads improves the flavor and nutritional value. Sweet apples and walnuts pair nicely with a refreshing and cleansing variety of herbs, and the balsamic, dijon dressing will aid in digestion.

Fresh Herb Salad with Apples + Spiced Walnuts
Author: Bauman College
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 4 cups baby lettuce mix
  • 2 cups arugula
  • ½ cup Italian parsley, roughly chopped, loosely packed
  • ¼ cup cilantro, roughly chopped, loosely packed
  • 2 Tbs fresh thyme leaves, roughly chopped
  • 1 small bunch sorrel
  • 3 medium radishes, halved and thinly sliced
  • 4 whole scallions, cut on a bias
  • 1 cup walnuts
  • ¼ cup olive oil, divided
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds, crushed
  • 1 pinch chili flakes
  • sea salt, to taste
  • ¼ cup balsamic vinegar
  • 1 Tbs + 1 tsp dijon mustard
  • 1 Tbs honey
  • 2 green apples, cored and thinly sliced
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Combine greens, herbs, radishes, and scallions in a large bowl.
  2. Preheat oven to 325°F. Place walnuts in a bowl and toss with 1 teaspoon olive oil. Add crushed fennel seeds, chili flakes, and a pinch of salt. Toss to coat and place on a parchment-lined sheet pan. Toast in the oven for about 15 minutes or until crisp, checking frequently.
  3. Whisk together vinegar, mustard, and honey. Whisk constantly while drizzling in remaining olive oil until emulsified.
  4. To serve, toss apples and walnuts into bowl with greens and herbs. Coat lightly with dressing. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve and enjoy!
Notes
Allergens: nuts, nightshades
3.5.3229

 

The post Fresh Herb Salad with Apples + Spiced Walnuts appeared first on Bauman College.

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Just because summer is over doesn’t mean your love affair with salads has to end. With fall in full swing and winter drawing nearer it is time to embrace deep evergreens, blood red, and crisp autumn yellow colors – in our food that is (not just our wardrobe). Try this delicious collard green salad to titillate your taste buds.

Try this delectable emerald collard salad for an autumn-inspired vegan meal

Emerald Collard Salad with Balsamic Vinaigrette

Author: Bauman College Staff
Serves: 6

Ingredients
2 bunches collard greens, stems removed, thin chiffonade
¼ cup olive oil, divided
½ tsp sea salt, more to taste
¼ cup balsamic vinegar
black pepper, freshly ground, to taste
1 delicata squash, seeded, roasted, and sliced
¼ cup pumpkin seeds, lightly toasted
2 medium fuyu persimmons, diced
1 medium pink lady apple, diced
¼ cup pomegranate seeds

Instructions
Prepare collards as directed and place in a large bowl. Drizzle with 1–2 teaspoons olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Massage greens with your hands, kneading and squeezing until they begin to wilt and become soft. Set aside.

Add vinegar, remaining olive oil, and salt and pepper to a mason jar. Secure the lid and shake until well combined. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste. Add dressing to salad, just enough to coat the ingredients. Toss in squash, pumpkin seeds, persimmon, apple, and pomegranate seeds. Serve and enjoy!

If you’re interested in all things health, nutrition, and taste related then check out the Nutrition Programs at Bauman College, or call 1-800-987-7530.

The post Emerald Collard Salad With Balsamic Vinaigrette appeared first on Bauman College.

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My name is Mollie Lowery and I am enrolled in the Nutrition Consultant Training Program. I am originally from a small town in the Sierra Nevada mountains. My family moved to the Bay Area when I was a teenager. I have always been passionate about health and have felt destined to be a healer. While studying and working in psychology, and overcoming my own health issues through natural medicine, I developed a passion for holistic nutrition and functional medicine. I started looking for a program that would teach me how to help others obtain health and help me follow my dreams of revolutionizing healthcare. Bauman College has exceeded my expectations!

I’m a huge nutrition nerd, so it’s been incredibly fascinating to learn things like how we can have an addictive relationship with the foods we have an immune response to, that acid-reflux is caused by too little stomach acid rather than too much, or just about the complexity of all the different nutrients we need for our bodies to function properly. The psychologist in me really loves learning about the coaching aspect of working one-on-one with people and how to effectively guide them through the process of making diet and lifestyle changes to optimize their health. Hearing my instructors share anecdotal experiences of working with clients has been interesting and inspiring.

I am currently offering one-on-one nutrition consulting, hosting a workshop series on gut health, and have been involved with various other health events. I am super excited to host my next workshop which will focus on the gut-brain connection. I will also be formulating some group programs and will offer my services mostly online, so I can be as nomadic as possible. My goal is to host health events and retreats all over the world that incorporate physical, mental, and spiritual aspects of health to create a healing and restorative experience. I am passionate about community and human connection being a pillar of good health, so I would love to eventually open my own healing center with this emphasis. To learn more about me, please visit my website or follow me on Instagram.

I have found that holistic nutrition is one of the most direct ways to help people truly heal. The Nutrition Consultant Training Program at Bauman College is comprehensive and definitely one of the best programs around. It has been amazing for meeting like-minded people, building a community, and learning up-to-date information from the incredible instructors.

Chicken, Vegetable + Bone Broth Soup

During the program, I discovered one of my favorite health-supportive recipes: Bone Broth. Bone broth soup with vegetables, turmeric, ginger, sea salt, ghee or coconut oil, and dulse is an amazing elixir full of vitamins and minerals that help heal the gut, stimulate digestion, reduce inflammation, and support the immune system. Here is my recipe:

Author: Mollie Lowery, Nutrition Consultant Student
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
Bone Broth
  • 1–2 lbs organic chicken bones
  • 2 Tbs apple cider vinegar
  • 9 cups filtered water, or enough to cover bones or fill a slow cooker
  • 1 tsp sea salt
Soup
  • 6 cups bone broth
  • 2-inch piece ginger, thinly sliced
  • 2-inch piece turmeric, thinly sliced
  • sea salt, to taste
  • 3 carrots, sliced into half moons
  • 3 small zucchini, sliced into half moons
  • ½ lb raw ground chicken (can also use chopped, cooked chicken)
  • 4 cups spinach leaves
  • ½ cup coconut milk, optional (makes the soup creamy)
Instructions
Bone Broth
  1. Add all ingredients to a slow cooker and cook on low for 24 hours (or 1 hour 20 minutes in an Instant Pot).
  2. Allow to cool, then pour the liquid through a strainer or cheesecloth.
Soup
  1. In a large pot, heat bone broth, ginger, turmeric, sea salt, and carrots on medium-high until boiling.
  2. Reduce to low heat, add zucchini and chicken, making sure to break up chicken with a fork. Simmer for 2–3 minutes. If using cooked chicken, add it at the end.
  3. Add spinach and simmer for another 1–2 minutes.
  4. Add coconut milk, stir well, serve, and enjoy!
3.5.3229

The post Student Spotlight + Recipe: Mollie Lowery appeared first on Bauman College.

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By Lila Volkas, N.C.

We have entered the season of pumpkin-spiced treats, when these drinks, cookies, pies, and breads take over our kitchens and fill the counters of every cafe on every corner. We know that they are hard to resist, but they can wreak havoc on your blood glucose levels, making you feel moody, tired, spaced-out, and even depressed. Here are some tips to balance your blood sugar while still enjoying the sweetness of the season.

Spice it up with cinnamon

Try adding this warming spice to high-carbohydrate treats. The essential oils in cinnamon bark can help to regulate your blood sugar. Cinnamon helps to slow the gastric emptying rate and lower post-meal blood glucose levels.

Use a sugar alternative

(For more sugar substitution suggestions, see Sweet Alternatives: A Sugar Substitution Guide)

  1. Date sugar, made from unprocessed, dried, ground dates, is about half as sweet as white sugar; contains the same nutrients as dried dates, including potassium, magnesium, copper, manganese, iron, and vitamin B6; and is high in fiber and protein.
  2. Coconut sugar, made from coconut palm sap, contains potassium, magnesium, zinc, iron, and calcium, as well as vitamin C and many B vitamins.
  3. Organic raw honey is a natural sweetener that contains more minerals than refined sugar. It offers magnesium and potassium and trace amounts of copper, manganese, zinc, B vitamins, and several antioxidant compounds. Honey also contains all of the vitamins, minerals, and enzymes necessary for proper metabolism and digestion of glucose and other sugars.
  4. 100% pure organic maple syrup contains many important minerals such as manganese, zinc, calcium, and potassium; many different antioxidant compounds; and has a lower glycemic index than white sugar.

Don’t skimp on healthy fats

Healthy fats are vital for our well being and help make our food taste delicious. In the kitchen, fats carry the flavor of food. In our bodies, fats make us feel satiated after a meal or treat.

Adding healthy fats to spiced sweets slows the absorption of the treats in our bodies and helps us feel satisfied without needing to eat as much.

Some examples of healthy fats are:

  • Nuts
  • Avocados
  • Fresh, organic creamery butter
  • Cold-pressed extra-virgin olive oil
  • Flax, chia, hemp, or pumpkin seeds
  • Organic and pastured whole milk products
  • Pastured eggs
  • Coconut
Treat yourself (in moderation)

It is ok to have treats once in a while, however, moderation is key, even if you use healthy ingredients. Go ahead and have that pumpkin-spiced latte, but make it with whole organic dairy or almond milk and add some extra cinnamon so you’re not as prone to getting the blood-sugar blues.

The post Finding Your Blood Sugar Sweet Spot appeared first on Bauman College.

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My name is Jessica, and I am a student in both the Natural Chef and Nutrition Consultant Training Programs at Bauman College. Healthy food has meant many things to me over the years. Growing up in Georgia, it meant fat-free cookies and frozen yogurt. When I was working to lose the excess 30 pounds that I carried in my 20s, it meant low-calorie frozen meals and diet soda. It wasn’t until I moved to the Bay Area in my 30s that I began to learn about food quality and sustainability. I remember my first trip to the San Francisco Ferry Building—I was completely blown away by the celebration of food. My view of healthy eating began to slowly evolve into something very different than I had ever known.

I was inspired to enroll at Bauman College after my sister was diagnosed with acute kidney failure at a relatively young age. She was living with me at the time, and I witnessed firsthand how specific foods, that I knew to be healthy for me, would make her feel completely wrecked. Without much guidance from her doctors and a real lack of inspiring, kidney-friendly recipes on the internet, we had to get creative in the kitchen to come up with meals that she could eat with the extremely limited amount of ingredients her body could tolerate.

From this experience with my sister, I became inspired to help others who may be going through similar health crises and are looking for individualized nutrition support, whether they are suffering from a chronic disease, food allergies, or fatigue from the stress of everyday life. I also want to share that healthy eating can be an enjoyable and comforting experience rather than one filled with stress, avoidance, or shame. I can be followed on Instagram!

The focus on bio-individuality at Bauman College, and the non-dogmatic approach of the curriculum, really resonated with me. I initially decided to enroll in the Nutrition Consultant Training Program for the deep dive into holistic nutrition, but the Natural Chef Training Program kept calling to me. I have always loved to cook, and I knew that the knowledge I would gain would be the perfect complement to my nutrition training. I have been studying both programs simultaneously, and I really enjoy how they reinforce each other.

My biggest takeaway so far seems so obvious and intuitive that it’s hard to admit: you are what you eat. We’ve all heard it a thousand times, but the explicit reality of that statement has never really hit home for me until now. Food literally becomes our bodies, from our hair to our toenails and everything in between. The more vitamins and minerals that can be packed into each bite, the better.

Recipe Process + Inspiration

The most fun and equally valuable technique I have learned so far in the Natural Chef program has been fermentation. The impressive role that probiotics play in the body can’t be overstated. I have been experimenting with making my own sauerkraut and kimchi at home, in addition to fermenting all sorts of seasonal fruits. Fermented cherries are so easy to make and have become my summertime favorite. I was inspired to highlight them in a sweet, after-dinner bite that would aid digestion and keep me satisfied.

My favorite recipe I’ve created incorporating fermented cherries has been raw tartlets. The tartlets don’t require an oven, which makes them a perfect treat for hot weather. They can be stored in the freezer, then taken out to thaw just before sitting down to dinner.

Vegan Lacto-Fermented Cherry Tartlets

This recipe is raw, gluten-free, and can easily be vegan if the cherries aren’t fermented with whey or honey. Vanilla beans, spices, or almond extract can be added to the fermentation process to infuse different flavors.

Vegan Lacto-Fermented Cherry Tartlets
Author: Jessica Coulombe, Natural Chef + Nutrition Consultant student
Serves: 24 tartlets
 
Ingredients
Lacto-Fermented Cherries
  • 2 cups cherries, pitted
  • ¼ tsp orange or meyer lemon zest
  • 2 Tbs whey, kombucha, or water kefir
  • ¼ cup filtered water
  • ¼ tsp sea salt
  • 1 Tbs raw honey, optional
Raw Nut Crust
  • ½ cup pistachios, shelled
  • ½ cup almond meal
  • ¼ cup macadamia nuts
  • 4 dates, pitted
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp sea salt
Meyer Lemon Cashew Cream Filling
  • 2 cup cashews, soaked
  • 2 Tbs coconut butter
  • 2 Tbs maple syrup
  • 2 Tbs lemon juice
  • 1 tsp almond extract
  • ½ tsp sea salt
  • ¼ tsp lemon zest
Instructions
Lacto-Fermented Cherries
  1. Combine cherries with zest and place in a wide-mouth pint jar. Pour desired starter—whey, kombucha, or water kefir—over the cherries. Press down gently with your fist to pack cherries tightly into the jar.
  2. Heat filtered water enough to dissolve the sea salt and raw honey. If using a starter that contains sugar, omit the honey. Pour water over cherries to cover, leaving about an inch of headspace in the jar. Press down again to ensure all air pockets are filled with liquid.
  3. Place a fermentation weight in the jar to keep the cherries submerged completely. This could be as simple as a smaller jar filled with rocks. Cover with fermentation lid or a thin dish towel and rubber band.
  4. Allow cherries to ferment at room temperature, away from direct sunlight, for 2–3 days, or until bubbles appear in the jar. If left too long, the mixture will turn to alcohol, which is not the desired result here. The cherries will taste tart and slightly effervescent when ready.
Raw Nut Crust
  1. Chop pistachios in a food processor until the largest piece is less than ¼-inch. Remove from food processor and set aside.
  2. Pulse dates in food processor until broken up. Add chopped pistachios and remaining ingredients and process until the mixture holds together when pressed between your fingers. Be careful not to over-process, as this will lead to a sticky and oily crust.
Meyer Lemon Cashew Cream Filling
  1. Add all ingredients to a high-speed blender and blend until smooth and creamy. Taste and add more salt, maple syrup, and/or lemon juice as needed.
Assemble the Tartlets
  1. Line a mini-muffin tin with paper liners and press about 1 Tbs of crust into each liner. It should be about ¼-inch thick.
  2. Pour filling into each cup, leaving space at the top for the cherries. Place in the freezer until set, about 30–45 minutes. Meanwhile, chop fermented cherries.
  3. Top each tartlet with fermented cherries, cover, and return to freezer for at least 1 hour to set completely. Serve and enjoy!
Notes
Allergens:
nuts
dairy (if whey is used)
3.5.3229

 

 

The post Student Spotlight + Recipe: Jessica Coulombe appeared first on Bauman College.

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A simple “one-pot” meal, this dish can easily be scaled up to feed a larger group. The flavors in this recipe are particularly complimentary—with the sweetness of the potatoes, sour brightness of the citrus, depth from the variety of spices, finished with the salty punch of the olives.

5.0 from 1 reviews
Chili-Citrus Chicken with Olives + Sweet Potatoes
Author: Adapted from Bon Appetit, 2010
Serves: 6
 
Ingredients
  • 3 Tbs lime juice, 1–2 limes, divided
  • ⅓ cup orange juice, zest prior to juicing
  • 2 tsp orange zest
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 Tbs sea salt, divided
  • ¼ cup cilantro, roughly chopped, stems saved
  • ¼ cup parsley, roughly chopped, stems saved
  • ½ Tbs chili powder
  • ½ tsp smoked paprika
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • ½ tsp cumin
  • ½ tsp oregano
  • 2 Tbs ghee
  • 3 lbs chicken thighs
  • 2 leeks, cut into half moons
  • 2 lb sweet potatoes, large dice
  • 1½ cups kalamata or green olives
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. To make the braising liquid, combine citrus juices, orange zest, chicken broth, and 1 tsp sea salt in a mixing bowl. Tie parsley and cilantro stems together with cooking twine to make a bouquet garni. Add to braising liquid. Next combine all spices in a separate, small bowl.
  2. To sear the chicken thighs, place a medium sauté pan or dutch oven (that has a lid) over high heat, add 1 Tbs ghee. Pat thighs completely dry with a paper towel, and salt with 1½ tsp salt. Place thighs in skillet skin side down. Sear until browned and skin naturally releases from pan, then flip and repeat on the opposite side. Remove chicken and set aside.
  3. Next, add leeks to cast iron pan with a pinch of salt. Sauté for a few minutes until translucent. Add spice mixture and continue to sauté for 1–2 minutes. Add chicken, sweet potatoes, and olives. Slowly add the braising liquid until it covers the chicken thighs about half way. Cover and place in oven for about 20 minutes.
  4. Remove from oven and check to make sure chicken is cooked through. Then remove chicken and vegetables from pan using a slotted spoon, leaving liquid. Reduce liquid over low heat. Add remaining ghee and immediately whisk to emulsify. Season with salt, lime juice, and orange juice to taste.
  5. Remove bouquet garni and top with chopped herbs. Serve hot.
3.5.3229

 

 

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My name is Natalie Wells and I am a graduate of the Natural Chef Training Program.

Although I am originally from San Diego, I moved to Boston to study at Northeastern University, where I received my bachelor’s degree in communications. After 5 years, I decided I was done with the cold and moved to the Bay Area.

My initial plan was to work in the food industry and use my degree in communications. I got a job at a small public relations firm in the Mission where we represented some popular Bay Area restaurants and food brands, but I would often sit at work and daydream about my next meal. I knew that I wanted to make food my career, but I didn’t want to work as a line cook or night shift baker and felt there had to be another way.

I applied to work at both Nourish Café and Seed + Salt, two natural, mission-driven restaurants in San Francisco, but couldn’t stomach working unconventional hours. A few months later, I began working with a local chef and fell in love with cooking.

While I had a passion for delicious food and working in the culinary field, I was also suffering from chronic, debilitating stomach aches, food sensitivities, and unexplained weight gain (later diagnosed as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or “SIBO”). I decided to enroll in Bauman College’s Natural Chef program not only to bolster my own culinary skills, but to better understand my health issues, learn more about how food can help us heal, and gain the tools to help others with similar issues.

As a self-taught chef, I didn’t know the proper way to chop vegetables or how long it takes to caramelize an onion. The Natural Chef Training Program allowed me to really hone my skills and I enjoyed everything I learned, especially the benefits of soaking and sprouting seeds. The program also debunked a lot of food myths I had learned from trendy health magazines.

Since graduating, I’ve started my own business, Nat King Kale. I provide meal delivery services for a range of clients. I began with a lot of clients with conditions such as SIBO and candida yeast overgrowth, as these were conditions I suffered from myself. Now I have moved more towards preparing whole foods that are seasonal and delicious for those who are just too busy to cook!

Korean Braised Short Ribs with Celery Root Purée Photo: Miguel Gomez

One of my favorite recipes is my Korean Braised Short Ribs with Celery Root Purée—a tender, sweet, and salty dish that’s sure to satisfy any meat eater’s palate. This is one of those meals that tastes more complicated than it is to make. It’s a total crowd pleaser and a dinner party staple.

Photo: Miguel Gomez

 

Korean Braised Short Ribs
Author: Natalie Wells, Natural Chef
Serves: 2–3 (1 rib per person)
 
Ingredients
  • 2 lbs grass-fed, pasture-raised beef short ribs, brought to room temperature
  • salt, to taste
  • 1 Tbs sesame oil
  • ½ cup coconut aminos, tamari, or soy sauce (if using tamari or soy sauce, you’ll need to add ½ cup vegetable, chicken, or beef stock to dilute)
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger, grated
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 Tbs rice wine vinegar
  • ¼ cup coconut sugar (or brown sugar)
  • 2 Tbs honey
Instructions
  1. Lightly season the ribs with salt on both sides. Add sesame oil to a cast iron pan and sear meat on all sides (or in a pressure cooker or slow cooker if it has the option).
  2. Combine remaining ingredients in a bowl and taste. If using tamari or soy sauce in place of coconut aminos and it’s too salty, adjust taste by adding more stock or coconut sugar.
  3. Once meat is seared on all sides, add the liquid to the slow cooker or pressure cooker and add the meat. If slow cooking, cook on low for 6–8 hours or 45 minutes in a pressure cooker. Meat is done when it is tender and falling off the bone.
  4. Remove the meat and shred using your hands or two forks.
  5. Reduce the remaining sauce for about 15 minutes, until it coats the back of a spoon. Taste and adjust the salt or sweetness level if necessary. If too salty, add more broth. If too sweet, add more salt. Then toss the meat in the sauce.
3.5.3229

 
Celery Root Purée
Author: Natalie Wells, Natural Chef
Serves: 2–3
 
Ingredients
  • 2–3 celery roots, peeled and medium diced
  • 3 Tbs coconut cream (if using canned coconut milk, the cream is the thick part at the top of the can)
  • 3 cloves garlic, roasted
  • salt to taste
Instructions
  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the celery root to the water, reduce heat, and simmer until tender.
  2. Drain and add celery root and remaining ingredients to a high speed blender or food processor. Blend until smooth, careful not to over blend.
  3. Taste and adjust salt level as needed.
3.5.3229

 

The post Alumni Spotlight + Recipe: Natalie Wells appeared first on Bauman College.

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Written by Lia Rubinoff, Nutrition Consultant graduate

Fad diets are everywhere. From Paleo to the South Beach diet, through the Zone diet and back to Atkins, countless weight-loss plans have cropped up over the years, each offering varying degrees of efficacy and theoretical support.

Part of the allure is how wildly successful (at least at the outset) these diets can be, even though some may have detrimental effects over a long period of time.

Ultimately, no matter what the protocol may be, if you are interested in trying out a diet, it is important to understand how this new way of eating affects your body and why it yields the results its reputation claims.

The Keto Diet: Healthy or Harmful?

In addition to the aforementioned diets, the Keto diet is another way of eating that has recently earned press as a widely effective weight-loss plan. And not only is it gaining notoriety as one of the most popular current weight-loss trends, Keto is also touted as an energy-boosting diet with potential additional health benefits.

Despite this prestige, there are opposing claims that a ketogenic style of eating can instead be harmful and lead to such negative health effects as heart disease, weakening of the gut microbiome, and acidity and ketoacidosis.

So what are we to believe? Is Keto another fad diet or does it hold legitimacy as a lifestyle choice? To answer this question, we have to look at what ketosis is and how the diet interacts with our body.

What is Ketosis?

At its root, a ketogenic diet refers to a way of eating that will create a state of ketosis within the body. Ketosis is the circumstance in which cells utilize ketones—a derivative of fats—to make energy rather than the glucose—a derivative of carbohydrates—they typically use in energy production.

Although glucose is the most common form of fuel for the human body, ketones have a similar molecular shape to glucose and can also be used to make energy once the body has depleted its glucose reserves and needs additional sources.

This process usually only takes a few days, but it might be months before the body learns how to effectively adapt to ketones as its new primary energy source.

Thus the Keto diet actually changes the way we metabolize by changing the molecule we use to metabolize. It is useful to know that this metabolic modification can bring about temporary symptoms such as hunger, fatigue, headaches, nausea, diarrhea, constipation, muscle cramps, and bad breath.

To induce ketosis, it is crucial to monitor the ratio of macronutrients—that is, carbohydrates, proteins, and fats—consumed. In fact, the ketogenic diet not only refers to creating a state of ketosis, but it also specifies a diet with high-fat content and very few carbohydrates.

Generally speaking, Keto diets are diets in which carbohydrates range from 0%–10% of the diet, protein makes up 15%–30%, and fats account for at least 60% of the diet and as much as 90%.

This means that, technically, you can eat anything as long as you maintain the prescribed macronutrient ratios. Thus, it is crucial to understand that there are both healthy and unhealthy ways to eat a ketogenic diet.

Interestingly, many of the health concerns associated with Keto derive from cases in which people are not making healthy choices within the ketogenic program.

For instance, a person may be eating within the macronutrient ratios of Keto, but choosing nutrient-poor, low-quality foods like processed foods, GMOs, toxic fats, large quantities of low-grade meats, and limited to no vegetables.

Eating habits such as these will ultimately lead to adverse health effects no matter what, and in certain cases like heart disease, eating a ketogenic diet with high quantities of low-grade fats and fewer vegetables will compound the already detrimental effects of eating those poor-quality foods in the first place. (Unfortunately, this is how many people on the Atkins diet developed heart disease when that diet was first introduced to the world).

Therefore, no matter what new eating style we choose, we need to make sure to practice it with care.

How Keto Can Be Healing

Though there is still much research to be done surrounding ketogenic diets, there are scenarios in which Keto is healing.

To see why ketones can be a preferred energy source, we must understand more of the inner workings of the glucose-insulin relationship.

When we eat carbohydrates, the beta cells of the pancreas release insulin to carry the glucose from the digested carbohydrates, out of the bloodstream and into cells for energy production or into tissues for storage as glycogen.

This process is very effective for energy production but is susceptible to disruption in cases in which individuals are eating processed, nutrient-poor carbohydrates and refined sugars, without enough healthy, nutrient-dense fats, proteins, and vegetables.

In such cases, the pancreas begins producing increased insulin in an attempt to manage the excess glucose in the blood, which can, in turn, down-regulate insulin receptors, limiting the ability of insulin to help glucose into cells for energy production.

If this process continues unabated, the body can develop chronic blood sugar imbalance, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, and the visceral weight gain leading to obesity.

Keto helps in these situations because, once the individual is in ketosis and no longer relying upon glucose, the pancreas can relax its insulin production, lowering insulin levels and allowing the body to regain its insulin sensitivity and blood sugar balance. This process offers healing as it will lead to improved balance within the body.

Conclusion

Finally, to return to the original question about fad weight loss diets, we can now see why Keto can be effective for those who have excess glucose in their systems that cannot be used to make energy. Insulin signals the liver to store glucose as glycogen so that the body can make energy between meals or during times of famine.

However, once glycogen reserves are full, the body begins to store excess glucose as triglycerides (fats), which is how the body gains weight.

Thus if an individual is dealing with obesity or just wants to lose fat, creating a state of ketosis will limit glucose and provide an opportunity for the body to first burn glycogen stores, and then naturally turn to its fat storage to utilize as fuel.

Therefore Keto is not just a fad diet, but also a theoretically sound method by which to achieve weight loss.

Regardless, please always keep in mind that every body is different, and although the method may be theoretically the same, each individual’s actual path to healing will differ.

Lia Rubinoff graduated from the Nutrition Consultant Training Program in 2018 and currently offers nutrition counseling and food-centered medicine to Bay Area residents looking to make health-centric changes in their lives.

Follow Lia on Instagram @liahelenahealing!

The post Ketosis: Can We Eat Fat to Lose Fat or Is It Just Another Fad? appeared first on Bauman College.

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