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My name is Michelle Cave and I am a Bauman College graduate. While exploring career paths, I did a lot of soul searching. When I discovered the field of nutrition, I immediately knew that I had found my niche. Then, when I came across Bauman College, I knew I had found the right school to help me pursue this path because their curriculum offered a holistic approach to healing. Studying nutrition is the best decision I have ever made—it was the beginning of a journey with many stepping stones, ultimately leading me to where I am today.

Along the way, my children have been my inspiration—I always wanted to make sure that they ate nutrient-dense foods, so when they were young I started developing whole-food recipes. Little did I know that this would kickstart my career as a nutrition educator and natural chef. I started out by planting an organic garden at my kids’ school and providing nutrition education and cooking classes to the school’s students and parents. This ultimately led me to become a natural chef and start my own business.

In 2017, I opened Red Bicycle Catering in downtown Redding, CA. We prepare nutrient-dense meals for families, cater events, and recently launched a line of organic grab-and-go wellness bowls that we sell at a few local grocery stores. We are fortunate to have a wealth of organic farms available to us in Northern California, so we use locally-sourced ingredients whenever possible. I like to think that there’s a little bit of our community in every wellness bowl we prepare. Red Bicycle Catering also provides nutrition education and cooking classes to the community. We regularly work with the local Redding Rancheria tribal community and the McConnell Foundation.

I have also had the privilege of being a guest chef for Tehama Together’s third annual field-to-fork dinner hosted at Lucero Olive Oil in Corning, CA. We served a five course dinner using almost entirely local ingredients from Shasta and Tehama counties to 80 guests, and incorporated Lucero’s olive oils and vinegars into each course. The event was a tremendous success and a very memorable evening.

Bauman College changed my life and set the stage for my career as a nutrition educator and whole-foods chef. My advice to anyone considering a career in nutrition or the culinary arts is to follow your heart and go for it! You will not be sorry—the opportunities are endless and our communities are yearning for nutrition education and guidance.

Follow Red Bicycle Catering on Facebook and Instagram and enjoy the recipe below:

Summer Tomato Eggplant Curry with Raita
Author: Michelle Cave, Red Bicycle Catering
 
Ingredients
Curry (Vegan/Vegetarian)
  • 2 Tbs coconut oil
  • 2 large onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp mustard seeds
  • 1 tsp fennel seeds
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 Tbs turmeric
  • 1 Tbs coriander
  • ¼ tsp cayenne
  • 1 Tbs dried oregano
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 Tbs sea salt
  • ¼ tsp white pepper
  • 3 medium eggplants, stems removed and chopped into 1”–2" pieces
  • 1½ lbs fresh tomatoes, diced or 2 28 oz cans diced tomatoes
  • 4–5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2" piece ginger, minced or 2 tsp dried ground ginger
  • 1 cup cilantro, chopped
Steamed Rice
  • 4 cups water
  • 2 cups brown or white basmati rice, rinsed well and drained
Raita (Garnish)
  • 2 cups whole-milk yogurt
  • 1 Tbs mint, minced
  • Sea salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
Curry (Vegan/Vegetarian)
  1. In a large stockpot, heat coconut oil over medium heat.
  2. Add onions and sauté until translucent.
  3. Add cumin, mustard, and fennel seeds and cook until they begin to pop (about 5 minutes).
  4. Add cinnamon stick, remaining spices, and eggplant and stir thoroughly. Reserve garlic and ginger for later.
  5. Add tomatoes and cover the pot with a lid. Reduce heat and simmer for 10–15 minutes. Stir in garlic and ginger, continue simmering until eggplant is very soft and falling apart, 10–15 minutes longer. When the eggplant is tender, stir in the cilantro.
  6. Serve immediately with steamed basmati rice and a dollop of raita.
Steamed Rice
  1. Bring water to a boil in a large pot. Add the rice and return to a boil.
  2. Cover the pot with a lid and reduce heat to very low. Cook for 20 minutes for white rice or 45 minutes for brown rice.
Raita (Garnish)
  1. Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and stir until combined.
Notes
Allergens: nightshades, dairy
3.5.3251

 

 

The post Alumni Spotlight + Recipe: Michelle Cave appeared first on Bauman College.

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By Claire McCann, Natural Chef Alumna

What is a personal chef?

At Bauman College, we train a variety of professionals including skilled, therapeutic natural chefs. Many of our Natural Chef Program graduates go on to become personal or private chefs. What does this career entail? Well, a personal or private chef works for individuals and/or families, preparing personalized meals that suit their unique needs and preferences. Personal chefs usually visit their clients’ homes once every week or two, where they prepare meals that can be stored, reheated, and enjoyed throughout the week or as desired. Unlike personal chefs who tend to work with multiple clients, private chefs usually work with just one client; cooking and serving them fresh meals several times per week, depending on the client’s needs.

Why are personal chefs in demand?

As nutrition and the importance of a whole-foods diet become more widely recognized, the market for personal and private chef services continues to grow and evolve. Many people are finding themselves spread incredibly thin as they care for their growing families, work full-time jobs, and maintain a multitude of responsibilities, all while trying to make time to improve their health, get adequate exercise, cultivate meaningful relationships, etc. This makes it hard to find time to cook wholesome meals, not to mention learn how to shop for, store, and prepare healthy foods. Many people resort to take-out or pre-packaged, store-bought meals and meal delivery services. However, these options are often lacking in variety, flavor, and nutrient-density, and also tend to be quite pricey.

What’s the problem with meal delivery services?

Although health-focused meal delivery services like Sun Basket, HelloFresh, Plated, Blue Apron, and Thistle are becoming more prevalent and may seem like good alternatives to cooking or buying prepared foods, they have some glaring downsides. Not only are they expensive, but they also negatively impact the environment. The individually pre-measured and -packaged ingredients create a lot of unnecessary waste, not to mention the environmental impact of the delivery itself. Additionally, due to high volume, the variety of dishes these companies can prepare each week is limited, resulting in fewer options for the consumer.

What are the benefits of working with a personal chef?

A natural chef goes above and beyond, catering to each client’s preferences and dietary restrictions; using high-quality foods that fit their client’s liking and budget; and including fresh, nutritious ingredients while excluding processed foods, refined sugars and carbohydrates, and harmful additives. When working closely with clients, personal chefs get to know their clients’ palates, brand preferences, grocery budgets, and more. Working with a personal chef means that your meals will literally be catered to your needs and taste buds and those of your family. For more and more busy individuals and families, this is a better and more cost effective alternative. The time saved, health benefits gained, and stress reduced as a result make the cost more than worthwhile.

As the personal chef market grows, services are evolving to become accessible to a growing population. Historically, having a personal or private chef was thought of as an extreme luxury—only for the wealthy. However, the cost is becoming more affordable, and when working with an individual as opposed to buying a product from a company, clients can negotiate a rate and schedule that works for both parties. After a couple of weeks, clients start to see the positive results from hiring a personal or private chef—improved health, more free time, and peace of mind to name a few!

If you’re interested in hiring a personal chef, check out our Alumni Directory. To include a job opportunity in our weekly job flash, please complete this form.

If you’re interested in becoming a personal chef, check out our Natural Chef Program or book an appointment to speak with a helpful admissions representative who will answer all of your questions.

The post Personal Chefs Are the New Food Delivery Service appeared first on Bauman College.

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My name is Shannon Valle and I am a graduate of the Natural Chef Program. I was born and raised in San Francisco and for the past 24 years I have lived in Union City, CA.

After graduating from UC Davis and Sonoma State University with a teaching credential, I taught English and history at a junior high school in Santa Rosa, CA. After three years of teaching, I became pregnant with my first of five children. I was 25 and was suffering from poor digestion and a peptic ulcer. I started to research holistic modalities to heal my condition and diets that could help relieve my symptoms.

As a new mom, it became vital for me to figure out how to best nourish my family. I went on a quest, researching everything from specialty diets to homeopathic medicine, acupuncture, Ayurveda, and herbs. Some time in the early 90s I learned about Bauman College and took a community cooking class at their Sonoma County location in Penngrove, CA, which fueled my passion for holistic health and cooking. In my early twenties I had thought about attending culinary school, but the cost prevented me from pursuing this dream. I became a home cook, which was satisfying, but left me craving more culinary knowledge.

I kept returning to the philosophy of food as medicine. This was intuitive to me because food had always been the glue that held my family together. My grandfather emigrated from the Philippines and became a sous chef at the Sir Francis Drake Hotel in San Francisco. My Native American and Aztec grandmother shared her cultural traditions, which always included gathering to eat and laugh as a community.

While raising my family and teaching almost 20 yoga classes per week, my health started to deteriorate from stress. Then, three life changing events led me back to Bauman College. My mother-in-law was diagnosed with scleroderma and passed away three months later. A few months after her passing, my father was diagnosed with cancer, then my husband lost his job due to severe clinical depression and grief. These events made me realize that I needed to follow my heartfelt intention to learn how to prepare restorative and healing food. So, about 17 years after first learning about Bauman College, I decided to follow my heart and apply to the Natural Chef Program.

I love Bauman College’s mission to support people in achieving optimal health. Their comprehensive program offered the knowledge, tools, experience, atmosphere, and instructor support that I needed to shift the way I thought about food and how I was living my life. I wanted to walk my talk and deepen my understanding of food and wellness.

I loved every minute of my time at Bauman College. I began the program at a challenging time when both my father and husband were not well—my father passed away during my second week of the program. However, being in the program was very healing and grounding for me. It was challenging (in a good way) and pushed me outside of my comfort zone. After finishing the program I knew it was up to me to find my niche. At first I wasn’t exactly sure how to use my knowledge, so I made a commitment to myself to cook something new every day. I also kept studying nutrition and other chefs’ work, cookbooks, and shows. I applied everything I learned to my work.

I am currently a personal chef. Chef Camila Loew, one of my instructors at Bauman College, took me under her wing and shared many job opportunities with me. In the beginning I said “yes” to almost every cooking opportunity that came my way, whether it was paid or not. This networking led to paid cooking opportunities and long-term clients. I have had the opportunity to cook for professional athletes including a boxer, a basketball player for the Golden State Warriors, and two football players for the Oakland Raiders. I have taught cooking classes, organized community dinners, cooked plant-based meals for weekend retreats, served four-course meals to large groups, and traveled to Spain for a culinary tour. My two sons will be completing the Bauman College Nutrition Consultant Program soon and we plan to join forces to work with athletes together. We are also looking into selling coffee, tea, and healthy breakfast foods at local farmers markets.

Bauman College offers comprehensive training with the information and hands-on experience to be successful in the culinary world. It is up to each individual to hone their skills through daily practice, self-study, and research that enlivens their passion to share the Eating for Health® model. Cooking is not only healing, it is an art and offers unlimited, creative ways to earn a living.

For recipe inspiration, follow me on Instagram.

The post Alumni Spotlight: Shannon Valle appeared first on Bauman College.

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Every nutrition school has unique strengths and reasons why they are the best choice for people who are pursuing holistic nutrition education. If you are one of those people, consider the following 3 little-known facts about Bauman College:

1. We’ve Been Teaching Holistic Nutrition for 30 Years

Bauman College was founded by Dr. Ed Bauman in 1989. He recognized the need to spread nutrition knowledge in order to help ourselves and others live healthier and more fulfilling lives. Bauman College is one of the oldest schools delivering holistic nutrition education in the United States. Our focus has been on holistic nutrition since day one, and we’ve created multiple programs over the years around this singular focus.

Our longevity is due in no small part to our community of students placing value on rigorous, in-depth, and science-based education. We continually strive to deliver nutrition programs that imbue our students with the confidence to go into the world and succeed.

2. Bauman College is a 501(c)(3) Nonprofit Organization

Yes, you read that right. Since day one, Bauman College has been a nonprofit organization dedicated to delivering quality holistic nutrition education. Dr. Bauman built this school  from the heart and created programs with the goal of changing the world through nutrition.

Getting your holistic nutrition education at Bauman College means that you believe in the same mission. Your tuition payments aren’t used to pad the pocketbooks of those who lead this organization, they are reinvested into the school so that we can fulfill our mission and continue to provide the most up-to-date and in-depth holistic nutrition programs for our students.

3. Regulated by the Bureau for Private and Post-Secondary Education (BPPE)

Bauman College is based in California, and as such we are regulated by the BPPE, one of the strictest regulating agencies for private post-secondary educational institutions in the United States.

Many new California-based schools try to find ways to avoid having to be regulated by the BPPE. Some structure themselves to be exempt, while others create offices in states with more lenient regulatory requirements.

We stand behind what we offer. Bauman College and our programs have always been regulated in California, even before the BPPE was formed in 2009. We see this as a badge of honor that reflects our integrity and trustworthiness.

Dedicated to Holistic Nutrition

There are many reasons why we think that Bauman College is the best choice to start or continue your holistic nutrition education. We chose to highlight the 3 reasons above because they are easy to overlook when investigating schools.

Bauman College’s primary goal is to further health and wellness through holistic nutrition. We do this by educating others so they too can influence change. No matter which school you choose to attend, we hope that your journey is fun, meaningful, and fulfilling.

Is a Rewarding Career as a Nutrition Consultant Right for You? Get More Information…

If you’re interested in learning more about a career as a nutrition consultant and exploring whether this is the right path for you, fill out this form to receive more information.

A helpful Bauman College admissions representative will answer all of your questions, from program details to career opportunities, and will help you discover the best option for you.

For immediate questions, call us at 1-800-987-7530.

Get Info!

The post Holistic Nutrition Education – 3 Reasons to Choose Bauman College appeared first on Bauman College.

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My name is Shelly Chang and I’ve completed both the Natural Chef and Nutrition Consultant programs. I grew up in Vancouver, British Columbia, and moved to the Bay Area for work in 2013. A finance professional by trade, I am accustomed to working in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment. Years of stress and poor eating habits led me to pursue an education in holistic health, as I wanted to learn how to use food to help recover my energy levels and overall health.

I enjoyed learning the science behind different nutrient groups and culinary techniques. It was fascinating to understand the profound impact food has on our mood, energy, and productivity. Beyond providing energy to fuel our daily activities, I was excited to learn that food is the best safeguard against and medicine for chronic illness.

Throughout the programs, I was exposed to research in food science that had not been publicized in mainstream media and learned how important it is to keep an open mind and bring a lot of rigor to your own research. When it comes to finding a dietary regimen that works best for each of us, no one knows our own bodies better than we do!

I am still exploring ways to put my holistic health education into practice. I plan to start volunteering as a small business advisor in the local and sustainable food industry. This will allow me to combine my finance skills and nutrition education to serve a need in the food community.

Throughout the programs, I learned about many new ingredients and their healing properties and developed a number of recipes including this stir-fry recipe.

Chicken, Black Fungus + Mushroom Stir-Fry

I created this recipe while experimenting with black fungus, a dark mushroom native to Asia that is widely used in Asian cuisine and Chinese medicine. Black fungus promotes heart health and is known to improve circulation due to its ability to inhibit blood clotting. It also has a hypoglycemic effect on the body.

Black fungus has a neutral flavor and slightly crunchy texture, making it a versatile ingredient. It is often added to cold plates, cooked dishes, and soups. I created this Asian-fusion recipe with the aim of introducing black fungus to a broader audience.

Chicken, Black Fungus + Mushroom Stir-Fry
Author: Shelly Chang, Nutrition Consultant + Natural Chef Alumna
Cuisine: Asian Fusion
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 6 oz boneless skinless chicken breast
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 cup dried black fungus
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 scallions
  • 2 Tbs olive oil, divided
  • 1 Tbs rice vinegar
  • 8 cremini mushrooms, quartered
  • ½-inch piece ginger, minced
  • 1 cup chicken or vegetable stock
  • ½ bunch cilantro, chopped
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame oil
  • ¼ tsp red chili flakes
Instructions
  1. Season both sides of chicken breast with salt and pepper. Set aside for 15 minutes to marinate while preparing other ingredients.
  2. Soak black fungus in warm water for 5 minutes. Fungus will expand once rehydrated. If fungus comes in big pieces, slices into smaller, 1-inch pieces. The edges will curl up after cooking.
  3. Prepare scallions by separating white stalks from long green leaves. Remove and discard the root end and mince the remaining white stalk. Chop green leaves into ½-inch long pieces.
  4. Cut chicken breast into bite-size cubes, measuring about ½-inch.
  5. In a large pan over medium heat, add 1 tablespoon olive oil, then add chicken pieces. Cook until browned on both sides, about 1 minute. Remove chicken from pan and set aside. Without turning off heat, add rice vinegar to deglaze pan.
  6. Add 1 tablespoon olive oil, fungus, mushrooms, ginger, and white stalk of scallions to the pan. Cook for about 1 minute, then add chicken pieces back into pan, along with 1 cup of stock. Continue cooking until all ingredients are cooked through and liquid has reduced, about 5–7 minutes.
  7. Stir in cilantro and green scallion pieces, saving some for garnish. Add sesame oil, red chili flakes, salt, and pepper to taste. Remove from heat.
  8. Garnish with cilantro and green scallions. Serve warm over short-grain brown rice or quinoa.
Notes
Allergens: nightshades
3.5.3251

 

The post Alumni Spotlight + Recipe: Shelly Chang appeared first on Bauman College.

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Becoming trained as a natural chef is a progressive approach to a traditional skill set. It’s a way to help people connect to our symbiotic relationship with food—we nourish the soil that gives life to our sustenance, and the food we eat keeps us thriving. It’s no longer enough to simply know how to prepare delicious foods; it’s vital that we understand how whole foods support our bodies, how farming practices respect the Earth and its ecosystems, and how to pay homage to those whose hands play a part in delivering the food we depend on.

As communities become invested in developing a deeper connection to their food, the demand for natural chefs is greater than ever before. More and more, consumers are looking for restaurants, products, and services that embody a grounded and holistic culinary approach.

Here are just a few career paths our Bauman College Natural Chef Program graduates have taken to meet this demand:

Image source: http://www.nourishcafesf.com 1. They Own Cafes

Bauman College graduates Sungsoon Park, founder of Cafe Umami in Oakland, CA, and Brighton Miller, founder of Nourish Cafe in San Francisco, CA, took the skills they learned in the kitchen as well as the knowledge of nutrient-dense foods to open cafes that offer health-promoting dishes bursting with creative flavor. Have you ever wanted to go out to eat, but struggled to choose a restaurant, knowing that quality and nutritional value are usually compromised to keep costs low? These entrepreneurs are offering a solution to that dilemma with nutrient-dense menu options like sardines and miso brown butter on traditional sourdough toast and bone broth soup with toppings like sansyo and smoked paprika available at Cafe Umami, and “nourish bowls” with quinoa, yams, avocado, sprouts, beet sauerkraut, and more at Nourish Cafe. Yum!

2. They Run Personal Chef Businesses

Many of our students come to the Natural Chef Program because they are experiencing challenges with their own health or with the health of a loved one. Training as a natural chef gives graduates the unique skills to not only create dishes that meld tastes, textures, and ingredients to maximize flavor, but also to make nutrient-dense and health-supportive meals. This can be especially beneficial to clients facing health challenges, and potentially following ketogenic, paleo, vegan, SIBO, or special carbohydrate diets. Bauman College graduate Giovanna Garcia, owner of A Purified Life, a business offering personal chef services to the San Francisco Bay Area, utilizes her skills to help busy people enjoy customized, delicious, and healthy home-cooked meals.

3. They Run Corporate and Retreat Center Culinary Programs

Can you imagine having a career in the kitchen without working late nights and weekends? Hard to believe, but it’s now a reality, with career opportunities in the kitchens of progressive corporate companies and retreat centers. As more and more people are realizing the relationship between food and well-being, companies are investing in the nourishment of their employees to support their well-being and professional performance. Retreat centers are also integrating meal services that prioritize quality and health. Natural Chef Program graduate, Miriam Feiner, culinary program director at the tech company SynapseFi, designs weekly menus using her culinary skills and creativity to execute dishes for the entire staff. Graduates Levi Halberstadt, chef at Spirit Rock Meditation Center, and Wendy Neff, chef at Facebook HQ, have created similar culinary programs to keep their company’s employees well-nourished.

Image source: https://muffinrevolution.com/products/24-carrot-gold 4. They Develop Products

Have you ever thought of a food product you wish were on the market, but isn’t yet? Or are you tired of packaged foods filled with preservatives, artificial flavors, and nutrient-poor ingredients? Our Natural Chef Program graduates have gone out into the world to make their mark by creating nutritious products without sacrificing flavor. Natural Chef Program alumna, Marirose Piciucco, owner of Muffin Revolution, teamed up with her business partner to create paleo muffins with ingredients like almond meal and cassava flour, naturally sweetened with fruits like dates, bananas, and apples. Her products can be found at Whole Foods Market throughout California and in several other states.

As people’s interest in developing a greater connection with their food grows and they recognize the healing potential of whole foods and customized menus, the demand for natural chefs continues to increase. Natural chefs trained at Bauman College are uniquely positioned to follow a number of exciting career paths.

Is a Rewarding Career as a Natural Chef Right for You? Get More Information…

If you’re interested in learning more about a career as a natural chef and exploring whether this is the right path for you, fill out this form to receive more information.

A helpful Bauman College admissions representative will answer all of your questions, from program details to career opportunities, and will help you discover the best option for you.

For immediate questions, please call us at 1-800-987-7530.

The post Thinking About Becoming a Natural Chef? Explore These Unique Career Paths appeared first on Bauman College.

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By Lila Volkas,
Nutrition Consultant Alumna + Owner of Kombucha to the People

What is Kombucha?

Kombucha is the bubbly, sometimes sweet, and tangy drink that has taken over grocery store refrigerators across the country. This trendy beverage has been around for hundreds of years and is made by fermenting tea with sugar using what is called a SCOBY, or a symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast.

Who’s Drinking Kombucha?

Kombucha is not only trendy in the health space, but has also become popular among soda-lovers seeking a healthy alternative. The fermented tea drink is enjoyed by consumers young and old who appreciate its creative flavors and fizz.

Health Benefits of Kombucha Probiotics

You know that healthy bacteria everyone has been talking about? Well, kombucha has plenty of those! Your gut contains 100 trillion bacteria that affect everything from your digestion to your immune system, weight, and even your mood. The goal is to nurture that precious bacteria, and consuming plenty of fermented foods and beverages is a great way to do that.

Healthy “Soda”

Kombucha satisfies fizz and caffeine cravings without all of the chemicals and sugar that come with a soda. Plus, with all of those probiotics, you’ve got a beverage that is contributing to your health instead of depleting it!

Antioxidants

Kombucha contains health-supportive antioxidants that neutralize free radicals and combat oxidative stress, as demonstrated in a recent research study. This is important because oxidative damage plays a role in the development of chronic diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disease, to name a few.

Why Are People Making Kombucha at Home?

More and more people are feeling inspired to make kombucha at home because it’s much less expensive than purchasing it from the store. Kombucha goes for $3–$5 per bottle at the grocery store, but only costs about $0.50 per gallon (that’s eight bottles) to make at home!

Brewing kombucha is easy—it’s as simple as making a giant pot of tea with sugar, from there, the SCOBY does the work. Plus, making your own kombucha gives you 100% control over the sweetness, flavor, and level of carbonation.

Making kombucha at home empowers you to have a deeper connection to your food. It is so gratifying to enjoy something homemade versus something store-bought. Read on to learn how to make your own kombucha at home.

DIY Kombucha Recipes Before You Begin

You will need a SCOBY (symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast) and a ½ cup of starter liquid, which is already brewed plain kombucha. A SCOBY can be purchased online or you can attend one of Kombucha to the People’s monthly workshops in the Bay Area to get a kombucha starter kit, which includes a SCOBY and starter liquid.

Part I: Primary Fermentation

Ingredients
8 cups or 1 gallon water
2 Tbs black tea, loose leaf in a tea infuser (or 4 disposable tea bags)
½ cup cane sugar
1 kombucha SCOBY
½ cup starter liquid

Supplies
Large pot
Brewing vessel, ½ gallon glass jar
Muslin cloth or clean dish towel

Instructions

  1. In a large pot, heat water to a rolling boil, then remove from heat.
  2. Add black tea to hot water, steep for 10 minutes, then remove tea infuser or tea bags.
  3. Add sugar to tea, stirring to dissolve.
  4. Allow tea to cool to room temperature, about 2–3 hours.
  5. Pour tea into brewing vessel, then add starter liquid and SCOBY.
  6. Cover the opening of the vessel with a muslin cloth or clean dish towel and secure it with a rubber band.
  7. Set in a warm location out of direct sunlight. Allow the tea to ferment for 7 days.
  8. After 7 days, taste the fermenting tea. If it is too sweet, continue fermenting for up to two weeks total, or until the taste is to your liking. If the tea is too acidic, shorten the fermentation time for the next batch.
  9. When the kombucha is fermented to your liking, enjoy plain or transfer to a bottle to add flavorings (see Part II below).
  10. Save a ½ cup of kombucha for starter liquid for the next batch and repeat the steps above.
Part II: Secondary Fermentation

After the primary fermentation process, you can drink your kombucha plain or jazz it up with fun flavors. A secondary fermentation increases the carbonation and enhances the taste of your beverage. A good rule of thumb is 80–90% kombucha and 10–20% flavoring. You can use fresh fruit, dried fruit, juice, herbs, spices, or extracts to flavor your kombucha. Get creative! There is no one right way to do it.

Supplies
34 oz snap-top bottle
Funnel
Flavoring, fresh fruit, dried fruit, juice, herbs, spices, or extracts
Mesh strainer
½ tsp cane sugar

General Secondary Fermentation Instructions

  1. Place the desired amount of your flavoring of choice in a 34 oz snap-top bottle. Using a funnel, pour kombucha over the flavoring, leaving 2 inches of room at the top.
  2. If you are not adding fruit, juice, or a flavoring containing sugar, add ½ teaspoon sugar to the bottle.
  3. Close the top and allow kombucha and flavoring to ferment at room temperature for 2–4 days. “Burp” the bottle every day to release the pressure by opening and closing the snap top.
  4. When the desired level of carbonation and flavor is reached, strain kombucha into a fresh bottle using a mesh strainer and funnel, then place in the refrigerator.
Flavor Variations Ginger Lemon Kombucha

Ingredients
2-inch piece of ginger
2 Tbs water
1 Tbs lemon juice
½ tsp cane sugar
Plain kombucha from primary fermentation

Supplies
34 oz snap-top bottle
High-speed blender

Instructions

  1. Place ginger and water in a high-speed blender and blend until ginger is completely pulverized.
  2. Strain liquid into a jar.
  3. Add 1 tablespoon ginger juice, lemon juice, and sugar to snap-top bottle.
  4. Fill the bottle with primary fermentation kombucha, leaving 2 inches of space at the top.
  5. Close the top and allow kombucha and flavoring to ferment at room temperature for 2–4 days. “Burp” the bottle every day to release the pressure by opening and closing the snap top.
  6. When the desired level of carbonation and flavor is reached, place in the refrigerator.
Elderberry Orange Kombucha

Ingredients
2 tsp orange zest
3 tsp dried elderberries
Plain Kombucha from primary fermentation

Supplies
34 oz snap-top bottle

Instructions

  1. Place the orange zest and elderberries in snap-top bottle.
  2. Fill the bottle with primary fermentation kombucha, leaving 2 inches of space at the top.
  3. Close the top and allow kombucha and flavoring to ferment at room temperature for 2–4 days. “Burp” the bottle every day to release the pressure by opening and closing the snap top.
  4. When the desired level of carbonation and flavor is reached, strain kombucha into a fresh bottle using a mesh strainer and funnel, then place in the refrigerator.
About the Author

Lila Volkas, N.C., is a graduate of the Bauman College Nutrition Consultant Program and teaches kombucha brewing workshops at their Berkeley location. Lila has been leading kombucha brewing workshops since 2012 and has shared her culture with hundreds of people all over the world. In addition to running Kombucha to the People, Lila also has a private nutrition practice.

The post DIY Kombucha appeared first on Bauman College.

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We are preparing to write an exciting new chapter in the incredible Bauman College story, but we cannot do it alone. Please read about the journey on which we are about to embark, and if you’re able, we humbly ask that you donate to help us to help those in most need. You can donate by clicking here or by reading below for more details.

Three decades ago, Ed Bauman started teaching people how to “eat for health”. He knew it was possible to change the world through nutrition, so he founded Bauman College. Now, thirty years, thousands of graduates, and countless advocates later, Bauman College, and Ed Bauman’s original vision, is stronger than ever. We are one of the longest standing and highest regarded holistic culinary and nutrition schools in the world. Our reputation as having the very best science- and evidence-based curricula in our field is virtually unrivaled. We have succeeded. And yet, we know there is still so much more work to be done.

Poverty. Statistics show that nearly half of the world’s population lives in poverty, with 1.3 billion of those living in what is considered extreme poverty. In our own backyard, the San Francisco Bay Area has over 1.5 million men, women, and children living in poverty. Families that are homeless. Children that are hungry. Parents that want to provide for their families but simply don’t have the resources. We teach the virtues of healing through food, but what about those who can’t afford the nourishment that we say is so vital to health and prosperity? Bauman College has always been committed to holistic health and global wellness, yet we understand that we cannot thrive if our neighbors and members of our community are not thriving. There is so much work to be done.

In keeping with our original vision that food heals and that you can change the world through nutrition, Bauman College has created our Lifting Communities Through Nutrition initiative. Our mission: To alleviate poverty in the Bay Area and beyond by providing meaningful career development through nutrition, health, and wellness education. Our goal is to offer our training programs to marginalized communities and create a clear path to employment through partnerships with employers, innovators, and like-minded nonprofits. In working with this population, we aim to create a robust and meaningful vocational training to employment pipeline.

We know we can’t do this work alone. As a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization, Bauman College, like all nonprofits, relies on the kindness and generosity of like-minded souls to fulfill our mission. We humbly ask that, if you believe in our mission now and our vision for the future, you will consider a donation to help us in helping those who need it most.

With health and wellness at the heart of everything we do, and with a new focus on supporting our communities with nutrition education and employment opportunities, Bauman College can continue to change the world through nutrition for the next 30 years and beyond…

Click here to donate now. Thank you so much for your support!

The post We Need Your Help appeared first on Bauman College.

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This year Bauman College is celebrating 30 years as a leader in the holistic health movement! On May 1st, 2019, we launched two new programs: the all-new Nutrition Health Coach Program and our newly updated and modularized Nutrition Consultant Program. These cutting-edge programs will prepare students with strong foundational and practical knowledge of whole-foods nutrition and the latest trends in coaching and consulting.

New Nutrition Health Coach Program

The all-new Nutrition Health Coach Program centers around a holistic coaching technique called narrative health coaching. The method goes beyond conventional coaching and prepares students to help their clients gain awareness of mindsets that are keeping them from reaching optimal health. In addition to becoming skilled coaches, students develop a strong foundation in holistic nutrition. With our robust curriculum, graduates are prepared to motivate clients in supporting the healing of chronic illness through dietary and lifestyle changes. The program is an approved transitional program by the National Board for Health & Wellness Coaching (NBHWC) and graduates are eligible to become National Board Certified Health & Wellness Coaches® (NHC-HWC).

Modularized Nutrition Consultant Program

The newly updated and modularized Nutrition Consultant Program offers students the flexibility to customize their educational journeys. The program begins with Foundations of Nutrition, which is a component of both the Nutrition Consultant and Nutrition Health Coach programs. Foundations of Nutrition will now also be available as a stand-alone course for students who are still exploring the direction of their career path or who are looking to expand their knowledge of nutrition for personal growth. The refreshed Nutrition Consultant Program offers a state-of-the-art delivery model that combines engaging multimedia, practical activities, and real world applications to engage modern learners and optimize assimilation and retention. The Nutrition Consultant Program is approved by the National Association of Nutrition Professionals (NANP) and graduates are eligible to become Board Certified in Holistic Nutrition® or BCHNTM.

Thirty years ago, Bauman College was founded to help spread knowledge and heal the world through better nutrition. Our goal remains the same—to change the way people consume food from convenience to conscious eating. By combining that philosophy with the latest nutrition information and coaching techniques, our graduates go on to improve the health of their clients and communities as a whole.

We hope you will join us in our mission to heal the world through nutrition. For questions, contact our Admissions Team or call us at 1-800-987-7530.

The post We’ve Launched 2 New Programs! appeared first on Bauman College.

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By Lila Volkas, Nutrition Consultant Alumna

The internet is chock full of “anti-inflammatory” foods, beverages, herbs, and supplements. But what is inflammation and why do we want to reduce it? The word “inflame” means to “light on fire.” When our bodies encounter something harmful, like injury, infection, or stress, they react with the “heat” of inflammation. Inflammation is by no means all bad; it is a natural component of healing. Let’s first look at the two different types of inflammation.

Acute Inflammation

This is the body’s immune response and protective reaction to injury, infection, and stress. These events signal our white blood cells to launch an immune response to address the issue. This localized, emergency response is necessary for healing to take place. The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines inflammation as “a local response to cellular injury that is marked by capillary dilatation, leukocytic infiltration, redness, heat, and pain and that serves as a mechanism initiating the elimination of noxious agents and of damaged tissue.” Once healing takes place, acute inflammation goes away. Think about when you were a little kid, fell down on the playground, and scraped your knee. It bled, got swollen, scabbed over, and then after a few days, it healed. Swelling is an acute inflammatory response that recedes once the body has healed the wound.

Chronic Inflammation

This is a different story. Chronic inflammation becomes a low-level hum in the background. Similar to a scrape on the surface of our bodies when we fall down, our cells experience trauma on a much smaller level. Unlike acute inflammation, chronic inflammation does not dissipate, so the “wound” doesn’t heal. A few major causes of chronic inflammation are things we come into contact with every day like foods we have sensitivities or allergies to, environmental chemicals, and stress. A never-ending battle with these stressors creates chronic inflammation and can lead to disease.

Causes of Inflammation

“Nutrition Bandits”

  • Processed foods
  • Highly heated refined vegetable and seed oils
  • Refined white sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and soda
  • Artificial sweeteners
  • Refined grains like white bread
  • Excessive alcohol
  • Food additives and preservatives
  • GMOs and pesticides
  • Factory-farmed animal products

Environmental Factors

  • Water quality
  • Air pollution
  • Environmental chemicals
  • Toxic cleaners
  • Artificial fragrances

Lifestyle Factors

  • Unaddressed trauma
  • Physical or emotional stress
  • Lack of sleep
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Smoking
Total Load

Part of the chronic inflammation picture is the concept of “total load.” One bad night of sleep or a package of Oreos is not going to ruin your health; it is the sum of everything going on in your life physically and emotionally that has a lasting impact.

“Total load” can be represented by a bucket of water. Each drop of water is a challenge for your body to address, whether it is a stressful job, processed food, or harsh chemical cleaning products. At some point, your bucket may overflow with these challenges, leading to negative symptoms.

Some examples of the health effects of chronic inflammation (when your bucket is full or overflowing) include autoimmune disease, heart disease, neurodegenerative disease, cancer, and diabetes, to name just a few.

What to Do

In a nutshell, decrease exposure to inflammatory stressors and increase anti-inflammatory foods and practices!

The Good News

We get to make choices every day to fight inflammation with what we allow on our plates and in our homes and even by the way we perceive the world.

A direct and delicious way to fight inflammation is to avoid those “Nutrition Bandits” and eat nourishing, anti-inflammatory foods.

Recommended Anti-Inflammatory Foods

  • Leafy greens
  • Cruciferous vegetables like cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and cabbage
  • Dark-colored berries like blueberries
  • Vegetables from the allium family like garlic and onions
  • Herbs and spices, especially turmeric and ginger
  • Fermented foods like sauerkraut, kimchi, and kombucha
  • Avocados
  • High-quality olive oil
  • Fatty fish like salmon

Recommended Lifestyle Practices

  • Regular exercise
  • Time outdoors
  • Plenty of quality sleep
  • Meditation

Anti-Inflammatory Recipes to Try

Keep in mind that there isn’t just one thing or food that reduces inflammation in our bodies. It is a combination of providing our bodies with the quality nutrients needed to function, supporting our detoxification pathways, engaging in healthy lifestyle behaviors, and not adding more to our “total load buckets.”

The post Inflammation 101 appeared first on Bauman College.

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