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GUEST POST: How many of us have dreams that we never quite manage to achieve? OK – some of them would never happen, however much we want them to. But others are within our reach…..it just never seems to be the right time to do it. Or perhaps we are too scared to try…..maybe it sounds too hard and what if we fail?

A recent study from Cornell University suggests that maybe we should reach for those dreams…or we may well regret it. Apparently, we are more haunted by failing to fulfill our hopes, goals and aspirations than by regrets about failing to fulfil our more mundane duties and responsibilities. Over 3 quarters of the several hundred people interviewed said their biggest regret was not fulfilling their ideal self – the person they felt they should be or wanted to be.

Researcher, Tom Gilovich said “As the Nike slogan says: ‘Just do it!’” “Don’t wait around for inspiration, just plunge in. Waiting around for inspiration is an excuse. Inspiration arises from engaging in the activity.”

For some of us, the ideal self may be fitter and slimmer – able to take part in activities with kids or friends and feel good in our bodies, rather than struggling with excess weight and poor health. If that’s the case, don’t keep putting it off until tomorrow. As you know, the years can go by very quickly. Instead, use our Vavista and Bariatric Cookery approach to make some small steps in the right direction and gradually transform yourself into that person you want to be. Don’t diet – dieting rarely works. And don’t sign up for a crazy gym routine that you could never sustain. Start small with something you could enjoy and therefore keep going. Anything. As I’ve said before, Just Do Something!

Join a local walking group and meet new friends whilst getting fit; take up a new hobby to re-motivate you or finally learn to swim properly.

And don’t worry about getting out there, whatever your size. As Gilovich also said: “People are more charitable than we think and also don’t notice us nearly as much as we think. If that’s what holding you back – the fear of what other people will think and notice – then think a little more about just doing it.”

A further recent study showed that people who had a strategy for improving their lives that involved socialising with others, reported an improved satisfaction in life a year later, compared to people who had a less social goal. For example, people who decided to spend more time with family and friends or to spend time helping others were happier than those who focused on themselves and simply planned to stop smoking or to lose weight.

So, to get the most out of these two new studies, why not combine their recommendations? What do you want to achieve? Weight-loss, improved fitness, to stop smoking or reduce stress? Just get on and do it or the research shows you’ll likely regret it in the future. But don’t try to do it alone. Team up with friends or family to make it a sociable strategy. Work together to achieve your goals and you’ll reap double the rewards!

Shai Davidai, Thomas Gilovich. The ideal road not taken: The self-discrepancies involved in people’s most enduring regrets. Emotion, 2018

Julia M. Rohrer, David Richter et al. Successfully Striving for Happiness: Socially Engaged Pursuits Predict Increases in Life Satisfaction. Psychological Science, 2018

Feature courtesy of Dr Sally Norton.  NHS Weight Loss Consultant Surgeon.  Health Expert & Writer.  www.vavistalife.com

The post I Wish I Had … appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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Our latest Mid-Summer 2018 free Bariatric Cookery Newsletter has now gone out to all subscribers and we hope you have safely received yours. If you’re not a subscriber and would care to browse it then click on the link below

 

https://mailchi.mp/bariatriccookery/the-sunshine-issue-for-when-life-is-sweet

In this issue you’ll find some great nurturing recipes and valuable advice for the warmer months – see below for what you can expect:

       

The post Mid-Summer 2018 Newsletter Out Now! appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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GUEST POST: Today we wanted to discuss dumping syndrome. As basic as that may sound, we’ve realized that while it may sound familiar to some people, what dumping syndrome is, which surgery it happens with, why it happens, and how to manage it, is often misunderstood.  

What do I do if I’m in the middle of a dumping syndrome reaction?

If you’re experiencing early dumping syndrome, there is little that can be done to treat this. You’ll have to wait it out and be more careful next time.
If you’re experiencing late dumping syndrome (i.e. hypoglycemic reaction, or low blood sugar reaction) you can take the following steps:

Step one:
Test your blood sugar if you have a glucometer (a meter that tests your blood sugar). If your blood sugar is less than four (4.0 mmol/L) move on to step two. If you don’t have a glucometer to test your blood sugar, but you’re feeling symptoms of low blood sugar (i.e. weakness, sweating, shakiness, reduced concentration, and dizziness), you should also move on to step two.

Step two:
Quickly have one of the following:

  •    1⁄2 cup of juice (not diet juice); 
  •    1 tablespoon of honey; 
  •    1 tablespoon of maple syrup;
  •    3-4 dextrose tablets (you can find these in any pharmacy). 

 
Step three:
Sit down and relax for 15 minutes. If you have a glucometer test your blood sugar once more after 15 minutes to be sure your level is now above four (4.0 mmol/L). If you don’t have a glucometer and the symptoms have not reduced, or if your blood sugar is still less than four, repeat step two again. 

Step four:
Now that your blood sugar is no longer low, you’ll need to keep your blood sugar level stable. If your next meal or snack is more than one hour away, immediately have one portion of protein (e.g. 30 g cheese, 1⁄4 cup nuts, or 2 tablespoons of peanut butter). 
 
You may be worried about step two, which is advising you to have some sugar. If eating sugar caused this problem in the first place, why would we advise you to have MORE sugar? Because when your blood sugar is low, the only way to bring it up quickly is to have sugar. The amount of sugar that is recommended to treat your low bloodsugar, is likely a lesser amount than what caused your dumping syndrome. The sugar will increase your blood sugar and the protein will keep it there. If you miss the protein snack, within the hour, you risk having another episode of dumping syndrome.

Treating an episode is a necessary step, however this isn’t a trick or a solution that should encourage you to eat more sweets. If you’ve experienced dumping syndrome, the best treatment is to avoid sweets altogether or limit your intake to one to two bites rather than indulging.

NOTE: If you’re driving and you start to feel the symptoms mentioned above, pull your car over immediately. It’s dangerous to drive while experiencing a low blood sugar reaction.

Feature courtesy of bariatricsurgerynutrition.com 

The post Dreading Dumping Syndrome? appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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GUEST POST: We have grown up in an increasingly body and weight conscious era. From the waspish waists of the 50’s, through the mini-skirted 60’s, the let-it-all-hang-out 70’s and the Jane Fonda workouts of the 80’s, generations of women have been looking for the best tips to keep in shape. Despite this, from the 90’s onwards we have seen our weight increase, waistlines expand and our health deteriorate. At the same time the weight-loss tips, diet programmes and exercise classes have increased a hundred-fold to no avail.

Some Dieting Myths Debunked!

Every day we are bombarded with yet another new piece of advice to get our bodies in shape, yet they are often contradictory. So I try to clarify any areas of confusion wherever I can. So, what can we still believe from all of those ‘words of wisdom’ that have been handed down over the decades?

Well, here are a few that we can’t!…

Dieting is the best way to lose weight – FALSE

Research shows that when women, in particular, want to lose weight they turn to dieting. Unfortunately, research also shows that this is highly unlikely to lead to long-term weight-loss with over 85% of people regaining all of the weight they have lost, and more, by a year after the diet.

This can then lead to the misery of yo-yo dieting, which can be harmful for health and is no way to live your life.

Instead, you are much better making a few changes to your lifestyle and eating habits that you can keep up for good.

You need a good breakfast – FALSE

A recent study confirmed that whether you have a good breakfast or not makes no difference to weight loss. Everyone is different – you may be an early riser or a night-owl when it comes to sleep, so it is not surprising that your breakfast desires may be different, too. Listen to your body when it comes to eating – if you are having proper nutritious food, your body will tell you when it needs fuelling. If you focus on a bit of protein (as confirmed by other recent research) and avoid sugar and processed carbs then whether you have a quick snack or a feast for breakfast is entirely up to you!

Eat regular snacks throughout the day – FALSE

It is often said in dieting folklore that eating little and often stops you getting so hungry and encourages you to burn off more energy. However, I believe that our inner cavewoman would disagree. Our bodies weren’t built for constant snacking – particularly on the sort of food we eat nowadays. You are better off getting used to going without food for a few hours at a time – it helps you understand that you are often not eating from hunger, just from habit…and that “hunger” can be ignored for a while without us falling flat on the floor! Recent research backs up this view showing that women who ate 2 meals or 5 meals of the same calorie content, showed no difference in the amount of energy they burnt off. Interestingly, it also showed that eating more frequent meals produced more signs of inflammation in the body (and therefore may increase risk of disease) than eating less frequently.

Exercise doesn’t really help weight loss – FALSE

Yes, in a very literal sense, exercise does not lead to weight loss – if you believe that all an hour of exercise does is burn off 200 calories worth of a 400 calorie doughnut.

But it isn’t black and white like that. Losing weight isn’t just about making sure that energy out is more than energy in…we are much more complex as human beings than that overly simplistic model!

The research abounds with studies showing that exercise can help weight loss in other ways. Exercise builds up muscle – which burns more energy in the longer term. If we are more muscular, we are more toned, have better posture and thus look slimmer. Looking good makes us feel better about ourselves – and if we feel fit and healthy we are more likely to make healthier choices – which promotes weight loss. Rather than a vicious cycle (like dieting!) it is a win-win situation!

Also, exercise, particularly in the cold, seems to increase the ‘fat-burning’ brown fat, which is found more commonly in people who keep a healthy weight.

There is also evidence that aerobic exercise reduces the risk of developing tummy fat and metabolic syndrome (diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease).

What’s more, just getting out in the fresh air makes most of us feel so much happier – not to mention giving us a top up of Vitamin D!

I won’t be hanging up my trainers, that’s for sure!

We should be stocking up on low-fat foods to lose weight – FALSE

The myth that fat is bad has been particularly harmful to our health and waistline. Many fats are healthy in moderation – and yet we are bombarded with low-fat yoghurts, “slimming” ready-meals and processed spreads that are bulked up with sugar, salt or chemical nasties that provide little, if any, nutrition.

Butter, cheese, full-fat yoghurt and other dairy and animal fats are natural and seldom processed, unlike many low-fat alternatives. Coconut oil is another fat that has recently been enjoying popularity.

Of all of the diets that have been shown to help weight-loss, it is not the low-fat diet that wins out. In fact, the low-carb high-fat diet seems to be most successful – though long-term weight-loss is no better with this diet than with any others that can’t be made part of your day-to-day life.

You are therefore best off focusing on real food – that means avoiding anything processed wherever possible. By doing so you will automatically be reducing your refined carbs, eating natural fats and proteins, bulking up with fruit and veg – and dramatically cutting down on your sugar intake.

That is the best tip I can give for weight-loss that lasts!

References:

E Dhurandhar, J Dawson, D Allison et al. The effectiveness of breakfast recommendations on weight loss: a randomized controlled trial Am J Clin Nutr August 2014

Meal size and frequency influences metabolic endotoxaemia and inflammatory risk but has no effect on diet induced thermogenesis in either lean or obese subjects. M Piya, N Reddy, A Campbell et al. Abstr. British Endocrine Soc.

Cell Metab. 2014 Mar. BAT Thermogenesis: Linking Shivering to Exercise. Virtanen KA.

Society for Personality and Social Psychology. “How we form habits, change existing ones.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 August 2014

Feature courtesy of Dr Sally Norton.  NHS Weight Loss Consultant Surgeon.  Health Expert & Writer.  www.vavistalife.com    

The post So What Really Works for Weight-Loss – and What Really Doesn’t? appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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It’s certainly heatwave weather and so my recipe today suits not only the simple remit of ‘Super Simple’ to make but also ‘no need to cook’. Feta works really well with this melon and cured ham assembly but goat’s cheese also makes a delicious alternative. Hungry or non-wls diners might appreciate a little bread on the side.

MINTED MELON, HAM AND FETA SALAD

Ingredients

METRIC/US

1 melon (or about 400 g/14 oz melon chunks)

90 g/3½ oz rocket or argulas

7 slices Parma ham

100 g/4 oz reduced-fat feta cheese, roughly crumbled

2 tbsp chopped fresh mint

salt and  freshly ground black pepper

2 tbsp low-fat French dressing

½ tsp grated lemon zest

Method

  1.  Halve the melon, scoop out the seeds and discard. Remove the skin and cut into wedges or chunks.
  2.  Scatter three-quarters of the rocket or arugula over a large serving plate and top with the melon.
  3.  Tear each slice of ham in half then arrange over the melon along with the feta and remaining rocket or arugula. Sprinkle over the mint and seasoning to taste.
  4.  Mix the dressing with the lemon zest and drizzle over the salad. Serve at once.   

SERVES 4

WLS PORTION: ½-1

CALORIES PER PORTION: 120

PROTEIN: 10.6g

CARBOHYDRATE: 8g

FAT: 4.8g

Image courtesy of Waitrose 

The post Minted Melon, Feta and Ham Salad – Super Simple Recipe 2 appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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GUEST POST: Nothing says summer like a warm, Sunday afternoon with a charbroiled burger in hand and potato salad. But now that you have had bariatric surgery you might be wondering “what can I eat?” The good news is that after bariatric surgery there is still a variety of delicious options to choose from. Here are 8 tips to make your next summer barbecue yummy and bariatric friendly.

Tip #1- Marinate Your Meat

Marinating your meat serves two purposes. First, it helps to tenderize your meat which will likely lead to better digestion and flavor. Second, marinating your meat reduces the carcinogens formed while cooking. When meats such as beef, pork, poultry or fish are cooked at high temperatures heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons form. These chemicals have been shown to possibly cause cancer in animal studies. Marinating your meat may reduce these carcinogens because the surface of the meat stays cooler while cooking. Plus, let’s be honest. Marinating your meat just tastes better.

Tip #2- Switch Up Your Protein Options

While beef and hotdogs or sausages are traditional options at a barbecue there are so many other choices for your protein. A simple chicken, marinated in olive oil, salt, cumin and garlic powder can result in a satisfying meal. Grilled salmon or trout are also flavorful options and are full of anti-inflammatory fatty acids. Consider trying a salmon burger or a veggie burger if you can not tolerate red meat.

Tip #3- Include Roasted Veggies

Roasted veggies are my favorite way to eat vegetables. Brush them with olive oil and place directly on grill or in aluminum foil. Delicious options include courgettes/zucchini, aubergine/eggplant, bell peppers, and asparagus. Vegetables will help to increase the fiber in your meal and give you a boost of nutrients.

Tip #4- Utilize the Bariatric Plate Method

As you choose your food items at the barbecue keep in mind the bariatric plate method. These guidelines suggest your plate should be about 50% protein, 25-30% vegetables and 20-25% starchy vegetable or fruit. This balance of nutrients will help you feel more satisfied and may reduce mindless eating. See the Bariatric Portion Plate for more details (click here).

Tip #5- Choose Fruit Infused Beverages

Before the barbecue prepare a pitcher of water and toss in some citrus slices, mint or sliced strawberries. Let the flavors infuse over the course of a couple of hours before serving. Flavor-infused waters can be visually appealing and will offer a refreshing calorie-free beverage option for you and guests.

Tip #6- Pick Out Your Favorite 3-4 Items

Did you know that the more options at a meal the more likely you will eat more food? You usually want to try everything, right? You want to try even those stuffed mushrooms that you know you never really care for. My suggestion is to be more picky. Choose 3-4 items that you know you want to have even if it isn’t always the healthiest as long as it is medically safe then just be mindful with it. This way you will be more satisfied and less likely to graze on a bunch of food items that you don’t really care for.

Tip #7- Try Kebabs

Kebabs are a great way to have balance on your plate. They are easy to make and are bariatric friendly. Kebabs are already portion sized and you can include a variety of different proteins, vegetables and fruits. Plus you can make these up ahead of time and reduce your stress load during the barbecue.

Tip #8- Try Grilled Fruit for Dessert

If you like to have something sweet at a barbecue then consider grilling up some fruit such as peaches, apricots , bananas or plums. Grilling fruit brings out their natural sweetness and will please any crowd. You could pair it with cheese for a snack or with yogurt for more of a dessert. Yum!

Now that you have some ideas for your next barbecue what are you planning on cooking up?

Feature courtesy of Kristin Willard. Kristin is a Registered Dietitian who teaches bariatric patients how to eat healthy and maintain their weight after surgery. Join her Free Facebook Group to get recipes ideas and nutrition info while she creates her website, BariatricWholeLiving.com.

The post 8 WLS Tips From A Dietitian For Your Next BBQ appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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Those of you who follow me on social media will no doubt know that I have just had some shoulder surgery and am somewhat incapacitated. My arm is strapped to my body and will remain there for some weeks to come, save release during physio sessions. I have prepped well for this with some dishes stashed away in the freezer for quick reheating; some plans for deliveries of bariatric-friendly dishes that are ready-prepared; plans to take a few trips out to eat, and a few ideas of how to make the most of the deli. But it is true to say that rather like you tire of hotel food (no matter how delicious it might be) there’s nothing quite like a bit of home cooking from scratch, rather than reheated, and that itch to get back to something familiar or part of your regular bariatric eating routine. 

Ever the optimistic I thought this might be a good time to explore some new super easy, few ingredient dishes for the Bariatric Cookery blog. Many of my recipes can seem a bit foodie so here’s the opposite side of the coin – some basic ones that even a one-handed (or one-armed) bariatric can rustle up. Some will have ready-prepared convenient short-cut ingredients; some an express way of cooking; and others more a ‘no need to cook’ solution or arrange affair. All will still be bariatric-friendly and tested by me for tolerability, great nutrition, ease of preparation and storage (since why not cook twice as much and use half for another meal in a different guise from time to time)? I am calling these my Super Simple Recipes and I hope will build into a small collection for you to also fall back on.

The first is a stir-fry and it unashamedly uses a packet or carton of ready-prepared stir-fry vegetables (although I have also tried this recipe with diced vegetables from the salad bar too), some straight-to-wok ribbon rice noodles, a ready-prepared marinade and diced pork. All it really needs is tossing while cooking – and even I can do that with my left hand!

ONE-HANDED PORK STIR-FRY

Ingredients

Metric/US

250 g/8 oz diced pork

2 tbsp hoisin marinade or sauce (I used Blue Dragon Hoisin & Garlic Sauce)

220 g/7 oz pack mixed stir fry vegetable medley

low-fat cooking spray or mist

1 tsp ginger paste

1 tsp garlic paste 

150 g/5 oz pack straight-to-wok ribbon rice noodles (I used Amoy)

Method

  1.  Place the pork in a bowl with the hoisin marinade, stir well and leave to marinate for at least 20 minutes.
  2.  Remove the chilli from the medley and slice thinly. Chop the remaining vegetables into bite-sized pieces if they have not already been chopped sufficiently. 
  3.  Generously spritz a wok or large pan with the low-fat cooking spray or mist. Heat, add the ginger and garlic paste and half of the chilli and cook for 1 minute. Add the pork with it’s marinade and stir-fry for 3-4 minutes. Remove from the wok or pan with a slotted spoon and set aside.
  4.  Re-spritz if necessary then add the stir-fry vegetables and cook for 1-2 minutes.
  5.  Add the noodles and 1-2 tbsp water, cover and cook for a further 2 minutes, or until cooked to your liking.
  6.  Return the pork to the wok or pan and toss to combine.
  7.  Divide between serving bowls and garnish with the reserved chilli if liked.

SERVES 2

WLS PORTION: ½

CALORIES PER PORTION: 315

PROTEIN: 30.5g

CARBOHYDRATE: 36.1g

FAT: 4.3g

Image courtesy of tesco.com

The post One-Handed Stir-Fry Recipe/Super Simple Recipe 1 appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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We made this Spinach and Ricotta Frittata (a kind of Spanish omelette) to celebrate the arrival of our new Bariatric Bento Box. It’s protein-rich, easy to make and delicious both hot and cold. We like to serve with salad but it would make an equally good meal with other seasonal vegetables or just by itself.

New Bariatric Bento Box (available in 2 packages on the shopping page – click here)

Ingredients

METRIC/US

150 g/5 oz small Charlotte or waxy potatoes, sliced

250 g/8 oz spinach leaves

low-fat cooking spray or mist

1 onion, sliced

4 medium eggs, beaten

100 g/4 oz ricotta 

3 tbsp skimmed milk

salt and freshly ground black pepper

Method

  1.  Cook the potatoes in boiling water for 6-8 minutes until tender, then drain well. Place the spinach leaves in a large bowl, cover and microwave on FULL POWER for 2-3 minutes until just wilted, then squeeze the excess liquid out and roughly chop.
  2.  Meanwhile generously spritz a 23-cm/11-inch frying pan with low-fat cooking spray or mist. Heat, add the onion and cook for 3-4 minutes until softened. Stir in the potatoes.
  3.  Beat the eggs with the ricotta, milk, wilted spinach and salt and pepper to taste. Pour into the pan, mixing well to combine, and cook gently for 4 minutes.
  4.  Place the pan under a preheated hot grill/broiler for 3-4 minutes until the frittata is golden and completely set. Allow to cool slightly then slide out of the pan, cut into wedges and serve with salad if liked.

SERVES 3

WLS PORTION: ½-¾

V suitable for Vegetarians

CALORIES PER PORTION: 240

PROTEIN: 17g

CARBOHYDRATE: 15.8g

FAT: 11.8g

Main images © copyright of Bariatric Cookery (UK) Ltd; smaller image courtesy of Waitrose

The post Spinach and Ricotta Frittata appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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I like dishes that have a dual purpose – they can serve as a meal in themselves or take a side-line position as part of a buffet or become an accompaniment to a main meal. This tomato and puy lentil salad is just this kind of dish – I like it as a vegetarian light lunch but will also happily have it alongside some bbq fare, deli platter or add a little cheese, fish, poultry or meat if I want something more substantial.

For speed I used a ready-prepared sachet of cooked Puy lentils but you can cook your own if preferred and likewise I have used a low-fat and low-sugar dressing but you can use your favourite. Nutritional stats refer to my own version so will change if you alter. But since it is a versatile recipe and open to change – do as you please!

Could this be your most versatile salad of the Summer?

TOMATO & PUY LENTIL SALAD

Ingredients

METRIC/US

1 small red onion, finely sliced

1 tbsp white wine vinegar

salt and freshly ground black pepper

250 g/8oz pouch or equivalent cooked Puy lentils

100 g/4 oz radishes, finely sliced

115 g/4 oz pack or equivalent baby spinach leaves

1 gherkin, finely chopped

300 g/11 oz large tomatoes (I used ‘beef’ or Jack Hawkins variety)

2 tbsp roughly chopped fresh dill

3 tbsp fat-free French or other favourite dressing of choice

Method

  1.  Place the onion in a small bowl, toss with the white wine vinegar and a pinch of salt then set aside.
  2.  Put the lentils, radishes, spinach, gherkin, soaked onions and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl and toss well to mix.
  3.  Cut the tomatoes in half and then into thick slices and gently stir through the lentil mixture with most of the fresh dill and the dressing.
  4.  Scatter over the remaining dill to serve.

SERVES 4

WLS PORTION: ½

V suitable for Vegetarians

CALORIES PER PORTION:130

PROTEIN: 7.6g

CARBOHYDRATE: 19.2g

FAT: 1.5g

Image courtesy of Waitrose 

The post A Salad or Side? Tomatoes and Puy Lentils appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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We’ve had some up and down weather here in the UK (heat-wave one minute, torrential downpours the next) and many of you tell me these fluctuations are happening around the world. The US have had storms and very high temperatures and Australia is steadily moving into winter time. 

It makes food planning a bit of a hit and miss affair and it certainly pays to be flexible. Usually by now my everyday fare features salads, cold deli plates and barbecue offerings – and it still has on some days, but when the mercury drops even a little then I fall back on a couple of other tried and tested staples.

Here is one, a chicken chilli, which can be made in a trice (well 30 minutes) and is great for protein and fibre. The red lentils in the recipe when cooked make a kind of purée that helps to thicken the mixture without adding further carbs. 

You can make using leftover chicken or turkey, shred or chop into small pieces and stir into the pan for the last 10 minutes of the cooking time. It’s worth making double the batch too since it freezes well.

 

HEALTHY CHICKEN CHILLI

Ingredients

METRIC/US

low-fat cooking spray or mist

1 large onion, chopped

2 tsp grated root ginger

700 g/1½ lb mini chicken breast fillets, roughly chopped

400 g/14 oz can chopped tomatoes

100 g/½ cup red split lentils

2 sweet red peppers/capsicums, seeded and chopped

2 x 400 g/14 oz cans kidney beans, rinsed and drained

450 ml/2 cups chicken stock/bouillon

2 tsp chipotle paste (I used Discover Chipotle Paste)

salt and freshly ground black pepper

chopped coriander/cilantro leaves to garnish

plain or cauliflower rice to serve (optional)

Method

  1.  Spritz a large pan with the low-fat cooking spray or mist. Heat, add the onion, ginger and chicken and cook for 5 minutes until golden.
  2.  Stir in the tomatoes, lentils, peppers/capsicums, stock/bouillon, chipotle paste and salt and pepper to taste. Bring to the boil, cover and simmer for 20-25 minutes until the lentils and peppers/capsicums are tender and the chicken is cooked through with no pink meat.
  3.  Divide between bowls  to serve, scattered with chopped coriander/cilantro. Serve with plain or cauliflower rice if liked.

SERVES 6

WLS PORTION: ½

 * suitable for Freezing

CALORIES PER PORTION: 323

PROTEIN: 43.4g

CARBOHYDRATE: 35.6g

FAT: 2.8g

Image courtesy of Waitrose

The post A Healthy Chicken Chilli appeared first on Bariatric Cookery.

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