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Below is a handy list of smoking times and temperatures. Beginners and experts alike sometimes need to reference internal temperatures and the time to smoke certain cuts and varieties of meat. For accurate measurements, use an instant-read thermometer.

These numbers are an approximation and should be used as a guideline. Smoke times will be dependent on a number of factors; including your smoker style, weather conditions, and ambient temperature.

Smoking Times and Temperatures

Looking for something specific? Use the search function above the table. If something isn’t listed, please let us know and we will be sure to add it.

Type of MeatSmoking Temperature (°F)Smoke TimeFinished Temperature (°F)
Sausage225-25030-60 minutes160
Tri-Tip225-2502-3 hours130-140
Beef Brisket225-25012-20 hours190-205
Spare Ribs225-2505-6 hours190-203
Short Ribs225-2506-8 hours190-200
Back Ribs225-2503-4 hours185-190
Rump Roast225-25030 mins/lb145 (Well Done)
Whole Ribeye225-25025 mins/lb135 (Medium)
Tenderloin225-2502.5-3 hours190-200
Pork butt225-2501.5 hr/lb205
Pork Loin225-2504-5 hours145
Pork Sausage225-2501-3 hours165
Whole Hog225-25016-18 hours205
Belly BaconLess than 1006 hours140
Pork Spare Ribs225-2505-7 hours180-185
Pork Baby Back Ribs225-2505 hours180
Pork Tenderloin225-2502.5-3 hours160
Lamb Rack200-2251-1.25 hours135-140
Lamb Shank225-2504-5 hours190
Lamb Leg225-2504-8 hours140-150
Lamb Shoulder225-2505-5.5 hours170
Whole Chicken275-3502-3 hours170
Whole Duck225-2504 hours165
Cornish Hens2402 hours165
Chicken Quarters275-3501-2 hours170
Chicken Thighs275-3501.5 hours170
Chicken Wings275-3501.25 hours170
Whole Turkey275-3504-5 hours170
Quail / Pheasant2251 hour165
Turkey Wings275-3502-2.5 hours170
Turkey Leg275-3502-3 hours170
Turkey Breast275-3504 hours165
Whole Salmon200When it stars to flake145
Whole Trout2251 hour145
Salmon Filet2201 hour145
Tilapia Filet2201 hour145
Lobster Tails22545 minutes140
Oysters22530-40 minutesn/a
Scallops22545-60 minutes145
Shrimp22520-30 minutesn/a

Consumer Safety Warning and Reminder

Consuming raw or undercooked meats, poultry, seafood, shellfish, or eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness.

Billy Stewart

Chef and Reviewer for Barbequesmoked.com

BBQ Smoking Times and Temperature ChartBBQ Smoking Times and Temperature Chart

Below is a handy list of smoking times and temperatures. Beginners and experts alike sometimes need to reference internal temperatures and the time to smoke certain cuts and varieties of meat. For accurate measurements, use an instant-read thermometer. These...

Read More
Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?

Kamado grills are designed after ancient clay cooking pots found in the Far East. Modern versions combine the age-old cooking method with modern features, resulting in grills that are both versatile and economic. Even though it’s not strictly a kamado, the design...

Read More
What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?

One of the most popular foods in the US is Bacon. Not only is it easy to make, but it’s also delicious and can be eaten anytime. You can also pair bacon with just about anything, from sandwiches, soup, and burgers. However, pork belly is another cut that is more...

Read More
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Kamado grills are designed after ancient clay cooking pots found in the Far East. Modern versions combine the age-old cooking method with modern features, resulting in grills that are both versatile and economic.

Even though it’s not strictly a kamado, the design and features of the Primo Ceramic Charcoal Grill highly resemble those of other kamado grills. Both the Kamado Joe and the Primo are among the best grills in their price range.

Kamado Joe vs Primo
BrandKamado JoePrimo
Preview
Cooking Surface256 sq. inches210 sq. inches
Heat Range225°F – 750°F95°F – 750°F
Weight188 lbs95 lbs
Learn MoreCheck PriceCheck Price
Quick Background on Kamado Joe

When you think of Kamado style grilling, Kamado Joe is one of the biggest names out there, if not the biggest. They are an American brand with manufacturing in China. With that said, it’s not a cheap Chinese imitation.

It’s important to remember that Kamado style ceramic cooking ovens originated in Japan, possibly dating even further back to India (tandoor). Most of the people manufacturing in China are in regions like Yixing, which is known for their ceramics. Not much more is said about Kamado Joe other than they manufacture in China.

Features of the Kamado Joe Classic

One of the first things to consider about any grill is the regulation of temperature. The grill itself is made of 1″ thick ceramic walls which hold the heat and radiate it through the grill effectively. This leads to a consistent temperature throughout your smoking process. The only air that can get out is through vents that you have full control of. There are no other gaps or leaks, and the seal is exceptional. Kamado Joe notes a rating of 225 to 750 degrees Fahrenheit. In order to reach these temperatures you only need a single pile of lump charcoal that will last up to 12 hours.

While the heat regulation is exceptional, these grills are beasts. As you can expect, the ceramic is quite heavy weighing in at 188 lbs. Taking this to a friends house for a BBQ or a tailgate just isn’t going to happen. Several people have these installed directly into their patio furniture for a reason! The only other downside is the amount of cooking space readily available. If you are looking for a competitive smoker, possibly consider their XL version for more cooking surface, or just buy two.

All things considered, if you take good care of this grill, it should last at least a decade. The grill has a patented, all-aluminum, rust and rainproof top vent. The built-in thermometer is also a bonus and is quite accurate at +/- 5 degrees. The all-new feathertouch air-lift hinge is an added bonus too. It prevents the dome from slamming down and potentially shattering the grill.

Pros and cons
  • Optimal temperature control
  • Easy to use
  • Great quality for China!
  • Uses almost no charcoal
  • Super heavy
  • Expensive, but not bad for a Kamado style grill
Quick Background on Primo

If you’re about American made products and supporting what that movement stands for, then Primo grills should be your go to. Primo notes they are the only ceramic grill brand that manufactures their products in America (Tucker, GA to be specific). Once you start going down the rabbit hole of Kamado grills you will soon discover the lack of transparency in manufacturing.

As you can expect, the pricing is going to reflect these manufacturing processes, but at least you’re supporting American workers and true American brands. There are four major players in the Kamado grilling industry, and Primo is the only one that is manufacturing in America.

Features of the Primo Oval Junior

Again, the most important feature of any smoker is temperature regulation and having a consistent temperature. While Primo doesn’t detail the thickness of their ceramic, they do note the grill uses a unique oval design for more flexible grilling. The temperature is controlled by a vent on the bottom and a circular vent on the top.

They also detail that the exterior is a premium-grade ceramic blend that prevents scratches. This is super important because most metal grills are prone to paint bubbling at high-heat. Due to the ceramic heat retention, the glaze isn’t affected by low-quality paint problems. Considering ceramic grills can reach 750+ degrees Fahrenheit, this is absolutely necessary.

The hardest part of any ceramic grill is the cleaning process. We weren’t joking when we said the Kamado Joe was heavy, luckily the Primo is a bit lighter at 95 lbs. You also have the added issue of being cumbersome due to the oval setup. Granted the oval design leads to more flexible cooking that we’ll look at in the comparison below. Once you have the lid off though it’s a relatively easy clean-up.

The Primo XL is a true ceramic grill. As with most ceramic grills, it can be difficult to learn how to regulate temperature but once you do it’s a breeze.

Pros and cons
  • American made
  • 20-year warranty on ceramic parts
  • Versatile
  • Easy to use
  • Heavy
Comparing These Models

Both Primo and Kamado Joe are solid brands when it comes to ceramic grills. With that said, both of these grills approach their brands in different ways. The most obvious is the manufacturing process. Primo prefers to have all manufacturing and material sourcing done in the United States. This is admirable in a time when companies try to outsource to other countries to save on operational costs. They are also super transparent when it comes to this and the information is readily available online. In contrast, the other three major brands don’t readily have this information unless you look for it.

The next thing to consider is how you plan to use your ceramic grill. Something that Kamado Joe does is they “divide and conquer.” Primo grills uses an oval shape that allows for coals to be placed strategically.  For instance, if you want direct heat for your meat and indirect heat for your vegetables you can set this up by positioning the coals on one side.  You can also arrange the grill for searing as well as general grilling, baking, smoking, and roasting.

Kamado Joe offers a variety of features that primo does not.

The first is the feathertouch airlift hinge. This hinge reduces the weight of the dome by 96% making lifting and closing a breeze. One of the biggest problems with charcoal is the clean-up. Since these grills use lump-charcoal, they run into the same sort of problems. The Kamado Joe has a slide-out ash drawer making this process much easier.  Kamado Joe also comes with accessories like integrated tables and casters. These accessories are also available for the Primo at an additional cost.

Conclusion

Primo and Kamado Joe are both great brands when it comes to ceramic grilling.  If you are after something made in the USA with American craftsmanship, then the Primo is the best option. It is also the easiest to use and best for beginners and enthusiasts alike. If you’re after an all in one solution with additional accessories then Kamado Joe could be a great alternative.

Happy Grillin’ Folks!

References
Billy Stewart

Chef and Reviewer for Barbequesmoked.com

BBQ Smoking Times and Temperature ChartBBQ Smoking Times and Temperature Chart

Below is a handy list of smoking times and temperatures. Beginners and experts alike sometimes need to reference internal temperatures and the time to smoke certain cuts and varieties of meat. For accurate measurements, use an instant-read thermometer. These...

Read More
Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?

Kamado grills are designed after ancient clay cooking pots found in the Far East. Modern versions combine the age-old cooking method with modern features, resulting in grills that are both versatile and economic. Even though it’s not strictly a kamado, the design...

Read More
What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?

One of the most popular foods in the US is Bacon. Not only is it easy to make, but it’s also delicious and can be eaten anytime. You can also pair bacon with just about anything, from sandwiches, soup, and burgers. However, pork belly is another cut that is more...

Read More
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The post Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best? appeared first on Barbeque Smoked.

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One of the most popular foods in the US is Bacon. Not only is it easy to make, but it’s also delicious and can be eaten anytime. You can also pair bacon with just about anything, from sandwiches, soup, and burgers.

However, pork belly is another cut that is more versatile and equally palatable like bacon. The main question here is, are they the same?

Pork Belly vs Bacon

A quick search will tell you, technically yes. Bacon and pork belly are similar. Bacon can come from pork belly, but before we define the differences it’s important to understand what each cut is.

What is Pork Belly?

The name alone suggests the meaning. Pork belly is a cut from the abdominal area of a pig. It is non-cured and is globally used for many recipes. If you buy it from your local butcher or meat shop, it comes unsliced. This means that you get a whole slab of meat.

Since its unsmoked and uncured, its versatile and is used in various recipes. In most cases, its cooked by deep-frying, braising, or roasting. However you cook it, the meat will be tender and its fat will also be very soft which is why it melts in your mouth.

What Cut is Bacon?

Bacon, on the other hand, is cured meat from pork. The curing of bacon involves soaking it in salt and then drying it and preparing it for smoking or boiling. Bacon undergoes an intense process of curing. However, its cooked normally before consumption, mostly by baking, frying, or grilling to make them crispy.

In the United States, the most common type of bacon is the “streaky bacon.” This type of bacon is a cut from the pork belly or the pig’s side. They are more like the fatty meat strips that have a rind. Unlike pork belly, bacon can be prepared from different parts of a pig like the back, loin, shoulder, and cheeks.

Non-pork bacon varieties have become popular because of certain rules and religion. You can find chicken bacon, beef bacon, lamb bacon, and turkey bacon in your supermarkets.

Most people eat bacon for breakfast with eggs like a hamburger or sandwich filling, or sometimes as a pizza topping. However, due to the curing process, it has a high nitrate content and high sodium which tends to cause heart diseases, blood pressure, and cancer as well.

So, What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?

For starters. Pork belly is an unsmoked, uncured whole large slab of meat from the abdominal area of a pig. It usually comes from the skin which makes it fatty. Bacon, on the other hand, is a long thin slice from pork belly. Bacon is typically smoked and cured.

Even though people commonly compare the two, bacon can come from different parts of the pig, not just the belly. Pork belly, however, unlike bacon, can be used in a number of recipes because it is raw unprocessed meat. As long as the recipe calls for pork, pork belly can qualify.

Pork belly can be cooked by braising, frying, deep frying, or roasting. Bacon can be cooked by baking, grilling, or frying because it is processed meat which allows it to achieve a crispiness. Since bacon is brined/cured, it has high levels of nitrate and sodium because of the preservatives. Pork belly is uncured meaning it lacks all the additives that bacon has.

Just like the name suggests, pork belly is as it sounds. So just like the pig’s belly, it has high-fat content which is why most people find it intimidating to prepare. If you fail to handle pork belly correctly, the muscle and fat seize up, which results in a rubbery, chewy mess.

Conclusion

Most bacon is actually pork belly. However, not all pork belly is actually bacon. Bacon is cut from a pork belly slab, the side, back, or from the pork loin. In essence, you can boil, smoke, grill, or bake both types of meat. However, since the pork belly is raw, you have more opportunities to experiment.

References
Billy Stewart

Chef and Reviewer for Barbequesmoked.com

BBQ Smoking Times and Temperature ChartBBQ Smoking Times and Temperature Chart

Below is a handy list of smoking times and temperatures. Beginners and experts alike sometimes need to reference internal temperatures and the time to smoke certain cuts and varieties of meat. For accurate measurements, use an instant-read thermometer. These...

Read More
Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?

Kamado grills are designed after ancient clay cooking pots found in the Far East. Modern versions combine the age-old cooking method with modern features, resulting in grills that are both versatile and economic. Even though it’s not strictly a kamado, the design...

Read More
What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?

One of the most popular foods in the US is Bacon. Not only is it easy to make, but it’s also delicious and can be eaten anytime. You can also pair bacon with just about anything, from sandwiches, soup, and burgers. However, pork belly is another cut that is more...

Read More
Barbeque Smoked Sign up for new recipes and reviews every week
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The post What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon? appeared first on Barbeque Smoked.

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Pellet grills are becoming ever more popular, partly because the pellets are an economical fuel source. There is an increasing number of pellet grill brands on the market, but Traeger and Louisiana Grills remain the most well-known.

Both companies established themselves rather early in the Pellet grilling world. Traeger made the first one but Lousiana grills weren’t far behind the wave. These brands are different in a few aspects. Let’s see how they look when compared.

Traeger vs Louisiana Grills
BrandLouisiana GrillsTraeger
Preview
Hopper Capacity14 lbs18 lbs
Cooking Surface933 square inches646 square inches
Weight166 lbs125 lbs
Learn MoreCheck PriceCheck Price
Quick Background on Traeger

Pellet grills are actually Traeger’s invention. They developed the first pellet grill in 1985 and patented it in 1986. Ever since then, they have been dominating the market and today they are an established and trusted brand.

Traeger makes pellet grills of various sizes, from small portable grills like the PTG+ to extra large professional grills like the Traeger XL. All Traeger Pellet Grills have a durable powder-coated steel construction and have a knob-style thermostat. They can all be started with an electronic auto-start ignition system.

Features of the Traeger Texas Elite

The Traeger Texas Elite 34 is a 6-1 grill allowing for you to grill, smoke, bake, roast, braise, and bbq your food. If you’re looking for functionality, while still getting the benefits of a pellet grill then this is a solid option.

The dial temperature control just feels old, and that’s because it is. As a result, the temperature can only be increased by 25 degrees at a time. This also leads to temperature inaccuracies of +/- 20 degrees. With that said though, nothing beats simple and easy barbecue. Technology can tend to complicate things and in the case of Traeger, it keeps things simple for beginners and enthusiasts alike.

Most pellet grills are quite energy efficient. Traeger specifically notes 300 watts for the first 5 minutes in order to heat up and then only 50 watts after that. Combined with the relatively low cost of wood pellets, it quickly becomes one of the best options for small families and hobbyists.

Pros and cons
  • Trusted brand
  • Beginner friendly
  • Energy efficient
  • Temperature control could be a lot better. Thermostat systems like this are dated and are prone to having this problem.
Quick Background on Lousiana Grills

Louisiana Grills was founded in 2006, and is one of the most established pellet grill makers after Traeger. They have differentiated themselves from the competition and gained the trust of consumers by making quality pellet grills with advanced features at a relatively affordable price.

Like Traeger, Louisiana Grills offer pellet grills in a range of sizes that can satisfy every customer’s needs. Whether you need a small, portable grill for camping or a large grill that can feed a big group of people, they’ve got you covered.

Features of the LG900

Even though they come in many sizes, all Louisiana Grills are pretty similar. Besides the main cooking space, they have an upper rack and a lower storage shelf. They feature a one-touch PID controller that allows you to set the temperature with great precision. Although there are cheaper options than Louisiana Grills, when compared to other grills with a PID controller the price point is pretty low.

The LG900 has temperature ranges from 170 to 600 degrees Fahrenheit. The instructions note that before every smoke you should bring the grill to 450 degrees and then bring the temperature down. If you don’t do this you will risk temperature fluctuations that are a pain to deal with. Included is a meat probe that allows for set it and forget it cooking.

Something that Louisiana can do that other grills can’t is that it is easily upgradeable. The hopper that comes with this grill is medium sized at best. The hopper capacity can be increased with the hopper extension, meaning it can go from holding 14 lbs to 34 lbs. You can also add-on a smoke cabinet for an additional 1396 sq. inches of space for smoking and curing.

Pros and cons
  • PID temperature control (+/- 5 degrees)
  • Trusted brand in the pellet grilling industry
  • Ability to upgrade easily
  • Quite expensive
Comparing These Models

Both of these brands have been around since the beginning. Traeger creating the first, and then shortly after Louisiana Grills. Both of these grills are similar across all of their models. With that said, both grills appear to have gone different routes in terms of their target audience. You can see that in the way they market their products and the overall builds. Traeger is definitely geared more toward beginners and all-purpose grilling. Lousiana grills are targeted more towards enthusiasts.

The Traeger grill uses a thermostat system that increases the temperature by 25 degrees. This system is rather dated, but it is also super easy to just turn a dial. The Lousiana grills system uses a proportional with integral and derivative control, more popularly known as a PID. A PID is able to maintain temperatures within 5 degrees of the target temperature. If you are someone who is after precise temperatures then the PID system is something you should look for.

Conclusion

Traeger and Lousiana Grills are known for creating high-quality grills and smokers. If you are a beginner to pelleting grilling then the Traeger would be your best. Any of their models would be great to learn on. If you are more experience and you are looking to elevate your smoking experience then Lousiana Grills should be on your radar.

Happy Grillin’!

References
Billy Stewart

Chef and Reviewer for Barbequesmoked.com

BBQ Smoking Times and Temperature ChartBBQ Smoking Times and Temperature Chart

Below is a handy list of smoking times and temperatures. Beginners and experts alike sometimes need to reference internal temperatures and the time to smoke certain cuts and varieties of meat. For accurate measurements, use an instant-read thermometer. These...

Read More
Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?

Kamado grills are designed after ancient clay cooking pots found in the Far East. Modern versions combine the age-old cooking method with modern features, resulting in grills that are both versatile and economic. Even though it’s not strictly a kamado, the design...

Read More
What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?

One of the most popular foods in the US is Bacon. Not only is it easy to make, but it’s also delicious and can be eaten anytime. You can also pair bacon with just about anything, from sandwiches, soup, and burgers. However, pork belly is another cut that is more...

Read More
Barbeque Smoked Sign up for new recipes and reviews every week
Notice: JavaScript is required for this content.

The post Louisiana Grills or Traeger? Which Model is Best? appeared first on Barbeque Smoked.

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Choosing the right pellet grill is not easy, especially to the untrained eye, because there are so many options out there. In the end, it comes down to what size and features you are looking for and how much money you’re looking to spend.

Both Green Mountain and Traeger pellet grills are decent options that offer a great value for your money. We’ve looked at two similar models (GMG doesn’t have many) and compared them. Both of these are options are portable and versatile and would be great for tailgating or camping.

Let’s take a look at what these two have to offer.

Traeger vs Green Mountain
BrandGMGTraeger
Preview
Hopper Capacity9 lbs18 lbs
Cooking Surface219 square inches418 square inches
Weight68 lbs98 lbs
Learn MoreCheck PriceCheck Price
Quick Background on Traeger

Traeger is the first name you think of when you start talking about Pellet grilling. The founder, Joe Traeger started production in the late 1980s and produced the first pellet grill. Only later in the mid to late 2000s did competitors like Louisiana Grills, Camp Chef, and the likes of Green Mountain start to pop up. Needless to say, Traeger and company had a solid head start in the grilling game and have a solid track record.

Features of the Traeger Lil Tex

The Traeger pellet grill features digital controls that make the grilling process more convenient and precise.

The Digital Thermostat Control means that this Traeger model can control the temperature inside the grill all by itself. The thermostat can detect temperatures inside the grill and send this information to the auger, which will fuel the firepot and release pellets accordingly. You can still set the temperature manually to smoke, medium, and high. With it’s electronic auto-start system it can reach up to 450 degrees.

One of the best features is that it’s very energy efficient. It requires 300 watts of energy in the first 5 minutes to start working, but after that, it runs on only 50 watts which is less than a light bulb. This is significantly better than most electronic grills and smokers on the market.

Pros and cons
  • Reliable and great brand
  • Heats up quickly
  • Energy and fuel efficient
  • Easy to clean
  • Difficult to reach temps past 400 degrees
  • Temperature control could be better. It is rated at +/- 20 degrees because of the thermostat is set up in 25-degree intervals.
Quick Background on GMG

Green Mountain Grills doesn’t have much information other than their small about page. Luckily Jason Specht did an interview on their official website. It appears his father’s love for pellet grilling and his innovative mindset allowed him to elevate his pellet grill and in 2008 released their first pellet grill.

Something that GMG does a bit different from most brands these days is they make their grills only available through reputable retailers. This ensures that there is competent communication on the topic of pellet grilling. This sort of mindset is rare to see in an age where big box stores and online chains threaten the livelihood of small businesses. With that said, it can still be hard on brand awareness, as not many people can readily learn about your brand or even buy one.

Features of the Green Mountain Davy Crockett

The Green Mountain Davy Crockett model could really surprise you with all the features it has for its size. It has the very popular open flame system and a digital WiFi controller that allows you to control and monitor your grill through Green Mountain’s iOS or Android mobile applications. To make this possible, this grill has a thermal sensor that constantly monitors the temperature called a Sense-Mate. This PID controller is excellent at keeping a stable temperature inside the unit.

Furthermore, this grill can run on both 12V or 120AC. This means you can take it with you anywhere you want and you won’t have trouble turning it on. This differs from the Traeger as you need to purchase their inverter in order to use it with your vehicle.

Pros and cons
  • Easy to use and spot on temperature (+/- 5 degrees)
  • Great customer service
  • Compact and portable
  • Very well made
  • While it is portable, it is quite heavy. Then again this is somewhat of a bonus as you can tell it’s not cheap and is made to last.
Comparing These Models

There are obvious differences based on size alone. These aren’t really worth mentioning because you can easily just buy a bigger grill for more grilling and hopper capacity. With that said, both of these companies apply the same sort of practices and engineering to their larger models.

Probably the most important factor with grilling and smoking is temperature control, and this is where the GMG really shines. The control panel allows for 5-degree adjustments, and their app allows for 1-degree adjustments. The Traeger uses an analog dial system that allows for 25-degree increments. This is likely why they note temperature accuracy as +/- 20 degrees. Overall the GMG app is super useful and has a lot of features that you wish most pellet grills had.

While GMG doesn’t offer their other grills online, we’re not sure if it’s scarcity for the sake of being scarce. As we mentioned in their background information they want to ensure that the retailers they work with are respected and can offer customer support. Where-as Traeger has most of their models listed online. Considering how nice the Davey Crockett is, one can only imagine how well the larger models perform. When using their site to find local dealers, you then have to deal with the local dealer’s website, and usually, these are lackluster. Then they may not even have the item in back stock and need to order it from GMG.

Conclusion

Hopefully, this guide has helped steer you in the right direction. Either one of these grills is a winner in our book. You can’t beat the brand reputation that Traeger has garnered. You also can’t discredit the way Green Mountain has decided to operate.

Happy Grillin’!

References
Billy Stewart

Chef and Reviewer for Barbequesmoked.com

BBQ Smoking Times and Temperature ChartBBQ Smoking Times and Temperature Chart

Below is a handy list of smoking times and temperatures. Beginners and experts alike sometimes need to reference internal temperatures and the time to smoke certain cuts and varieties of meat. For accurate measurements, use an instant-read thermometer. These...

Read More
Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?

Kamado grills are designed after ancient clay cooking pots found in the Far East. Modern versions combine the age-old cooking method with modern features, resulting in grills that are both versatile and economic. Even though it’s not strictly a kamado, the design...

Read More
What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?

One of the most popular foods in the US is Bacon. Not only is it easy to make, but it’s also delicious and can be eaten anytime. You can also pair bacon with just about anything, from sandwiches, soup, and burgers. However, pork belly is another cut that is more...

Read More
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The post Green Mountain Grills or Traegar? Which Brand is Best? appeared first on Barbeque Smoked.

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Smoking meat is a long-standing tradition in many cultures. It was one of the best ways to preserve meat for a prolonged period before refrigerators came along. There is no way to duplicate the unique smoky flavors you can get from smoking meat using anything else but a smoker.

Traditionally, the meat would need to be cured in salt, then hung in a smoker and gradually dried and infused with flavor. These smokers were primarily wood burning, and each type of wood used would give the meat a different flavor. The meat would then be hung high to dry in cold weather, and smoked again for several turns.

Nowadays, meat smoking has been made easier and more attainable with the creation of propane and electric smokers. Let’s take a look at which is best and why.

Differences Between Gas and Electric Smokers
Footprint or Cost of Operation

Both electric and gas smokers require a source of power in order to operate. In the case of gas, they will all use a standard propane tank. Electric smokers are simply plugged into an outlet.

In this comparison, we will be looking at two Masterbuilt models. Masterbuilt is known for their quality in the smoking community.

Cost of a Propane Smoker

To save you all the math. It costs around $0.40 per hour with Propane.

A standard propane tank weighs around 20 pounds. This number can vary by a pound or two depending on the temperature and surrounding air when the tank is filled. This variance is noted by a tare weight or TW. Tanks are filled to around 80% capacity to allow for expansion of molecules as temperature rises.

A gallon of propane weighs approximately 4.2 lbs and a “full” 20 lb tank should contain roughly 4.7 lbs of fuel. The BTU content of 1 gallon of fuel is 91,333 Btu, meaning a full tank contains 429,265 Btu.

The Masterbuilt MPS 250 XL has two 8,250 BTU burners.

Assuming you had both burners at 8,250 BTU, the total heat capacity is 16,500 BTU. Doing some quick math (429265 / 16500) tells us that the smoker can run for 26 hours.

This number isn’t really “realistic” though. Most people don’t run their smokers at full blast. Typically you will run at half of that, so 8,250 BTU across both burners. Meaning your total runtime doubles to 52 hours.

Assuming you already have a propane tank, a refill is normally cheaper than an exchange and only costs $20. This number varies based on where you get it refilled, but you can expect to pay $3 to $4 per gallon.

Lastly, you need to determine the cook time for the item you are smoking. Assuming it’s brisket, most people smoke for an hour and 15 minutes per pound at 225 degrees. Assuming it weighs 8.7 lbs (for the sake of math). That’s roughly a 10-hour cook and will require $4 in propane consumption. Meaning propane costs $0.40 per hour.

Cost of Electricity

Again, if you’re not a fan of math. A quick breakdown tells us it will cost $0.13 per hour at full power.

In this example, we will use the Masterbuilt MES 130 electric smoker. The heating element is rated at 800 watts.

We are assuming the same cook time as the propane grill, 10 hours for the brisket

You then need the kilowatt-hour, an average for where I live is 16.16 KWh (New Hampshire).

Doing some quick math: 800 watts x 10 hrs = 8,000 watt-hours. There are 1,000 watts in 1 kilowatt. So 8,000 /1000 = 8 KWh

Then take this rate and multiply it by your state: 8 * 0.1616 = $1.30 for 10 hours or $0.13 per hour. Similar to the other grill you may not even run at full capacity. Maybe 50 to 75 percent of capacity. Meaning that cost could be $0.07 per hour.

Operation

Without a doubt, in ideal conditions, it is easier to use an electric smoker. Now with that said, let’s break-down a few comparisons of operation.

Reliability

In order to use an electric smoker, all it takes is plugging it in and punching in the desired heat level. Some feature analog dials, but as technology has advanced, most will have digital readouts. If your smoker is decent you can normally set it and forget it.

This assumes that you have electricity and it’s not raining. Electricity and water don’t mix, and you don’t want to risk frying your controls or the grill itself.

If you cook a lot of food that requires a higher level of heat, I’d suggest using propane instead. You could also smoke them in the electric grill and also finish it off in the oven at a higher temperature.

Propane smokers, on the other hand, are quite reliable. Essentially it’s just a propane barrel attached to a regulator valve. That is then hooked up to a box that smokes your meat. As long as you have propane in the tank you will be able to run your smoker.

Similar to electric smokers, in rainy conditions you can still run your smoker. The issue you run into though is performance based. You will definitely have trouble maintaining a steady temperature due to the heat loss of the rain.

Taste and Temperature

Taste is pretty hard to determine. We don’t necessarily know what your taste buds prefer. This can also vary based on what you’re smoking. For instance, if you’re smoking items at lower heat like ribs, electric can do the job marvelously.

Typically you will find that propane can output at higher heat and thus create a more smoky profile than electric. Most electric smokers can achieve up to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. You won’t get much more out of them, but due to their low operational costs, they can run forever.

Propane smokers can hit 250 degrees Fahrenheit easily. They can also reach up to the 350 degrees Fahrenheit or more. These temperatures will improve the bark and texture of the food you’re making through the Maillard reaction.

Billy Stewart

Chef and Reviewer for Barbequesmoked.com

BBQ Smoking Times and Temperature ChartBBQ Smoking Times and Temperature Chart

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The post Propane or Electric Smokers? Which is Best and Why? appeared first on Barbeque Smoked.

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For us foodies and meat-eaters, ribs can be both a hearty meal as well as a delicacy. The preparations of different types of ribs vary, making for some very unique finger-licking flavors. From barbecue to oven baked, fried or smoked, you can not go wrong with ribs.

The most common and well-known cut are the so-called baby back ribs, but is that really all the meat industry has to offer? Therefore, let’s take a quick look at the different types of ribs you can get.

Different Types of Ribs:
1. Pork Spareribs

These are ribs found lower, by the belly of the pig. The name “spare” ribs stand to denote the small amount of meat upon the bone. This is because the belly of the pig is mostly used for bacon as that is the prime cut. As a result, the spare ribs keep only a scarce amount of meat, because it is cut very close to the bone.

How to Prepare Spareribs?

Given that the cut is so fine, spare ribs do great baked in the oven. They won’t take too much time to bake and the flavor is easily elevated by using a simple dry rub and some brown sugar for caramelization.

2. St. Louis Style ribs

Image from seriouseats.com

These ribs are actually from the same cut as spare ribs. The difference is that St. Louis style ribs have a universal rectangular shape. This is achieved by removing the rib tip and the skirt, making them easier to handle and cutting the cooking time significantly.

How to prepare St. Louis Style ribs?

You can dry rub them and even divide them into individual ribs to fry in a pan, bake them in the oven, or put the whole rack onto the grill. They pair deliciously with sweet and spicy sauces. Again, these do not have too much meat on them, so they will cook faster than most other types of ribs. They will take 2.5 to 3 hours in the oven.

3. Baby Back pork ribs

Image from thekitchn.com

This is a wonderful cut, which is why it has gained such popularity. Namely, Baby back ribs are taken from the muscle that runs along the back of the pig. This is a rather meaty cut containing high-quality meat.

How to prepare Baby Back pork ribs?

Naturally, you can’t go wrong whichever way of cooking you choose. Among the all-time favorite ways is oven baked or on the grill. Spice it with your favorite mix and wrap in aluminum halfway through the baking process. They will take an hour and a half, up to two hours in the oven.

4. Flanked short ribs

Image from thekitchn.com

This cut comes from the bottom of the rib cage but is uniquely cut across, containing a number of bones. It is noteworthy that we have now veered away from pork into the beef territory. Moreover, from the same area, we get English style short ribs, which are cut individually and parallel to the bone. Interestingly, they are tougher and work best braised.

How to prepare Flanked short ribs?

Coming from a somewhat more greasy part of the animal, Flanked ribs are most commonly used for soups and stews.

5. Country-style pork ribs

Image from nibblemethis.com

This type of ribs tends to contain the most meat. Most commonly, the cut comes from the shoulder, but sometimes it may come from the loin.

How to prepare Country-style pork ribs?

The best preparation varies depending on where the cut comes from, so be sure to ask your butcher if you got shoulder or loin. For instance, the shoulder will benefit more from lower temperatures and a longer cook time. On the other hand, the loin is leaner and will cook faster. Everything else is completely up to your personal taste.

Billy Stewart

Chef and Reviewer for Barbequesmoked.com

BBQ Smoking Times and Temperature ChartBBQ Smoking Times and Temperature Chart

Below is a handy list of smoking times and temperatures. Beginners and experts alike sometimes need to reference internal temperatures and the time to smoke certain cuts and varieties of meat. For accurate measurements, use an instant-read thermometer. These...

Read More
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Kamado grills are designed after ancient clay cooking pots found in the Far East. Modern versions combine the age-old cooking method with modern features, resulting in grills that are both versatile and economic. Even though it’s not strictly a kamado, the design...

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One of the most popular foods in the US is Bacon. Not only is it easy to make, but it’s also delicious and can be eaten anytime. You can also pair bacon with just about anything, from sandwiches, soup, and burgers. However, pork belly is another cut that is more...

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The post 5 Different Types of Ribs: Something Besides Babyback! appeared first on Barbeque Smoked.

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When we buy celery from the grocery store, we hardly use all of them at once. Most of the recipes only require one or more ribs, and by the time we get to the rest of them, they get damaged beyond use. You know how it feels when you have to dump them unused. It’s not pretty at all, especially when you have a nagging wife like mine. It’s plainly annoying, to say the least.

Fortunately, there are quite a few things that can be done to make celery last longer.

Get to Know Celery

Humans have been planting celery for thousands of years. It’s a tasty, diet-friendly vegetable made of primarily water. While celery is a tasty vegetable, it can go bad and wilt rather quickly. This is because celery contains the hormone ethylene. This hormone is responsible for the aging and ripening of plants. Often times people will only buy as much celery as they need for a specific meal and plan to use it because it can decay and wilt rather quickly.

If you’re like my mom, you’ll find a way to use all the celery. Whether that means your meal is getting more celery, or you’re putting the celery ribs into a glass of water and munching on them while you cook.

Some people aren’t like my mom though and that’s totally fine. Storing celery is rather easy once you know what to do and what not to do.

Wrapping Celery in Tinfoil

This process is fairly straightforward.

  1. Grab your celery and trim off the ends and the attached leaves.
  2. Next, chop the celery ribs in half to make them easier to store.
  3. Grab your tinfoil and loosely wrap the celery in aluminum foil.

Fairly simple right? There are reasons to use tinfoil rather than something like a plastic sandwich baggie. If you were to use a plastic baggie, the ethylene would be trapped inside and make the ribs limp. The tinfoil is able to let the ethylene escape at a controlled rate. It’s also better than storing it with nothing at all. You risk having the water molecules freezing and ruin the celery.

This method will keep your celery fresh for up to three to four weeks.

Damp Paper Towels?

Remember, celery is almost entirely made of water. Like most things (people included) that are made of water, over time they will start to “dehydrate.”  As I mentioned above, my mom likes to cut up the remaining pieces of celery and put them into a glass of water while she cooks. This process keeps the celery hydrated and crisp.

You can use this as a supplement to the tinfoil method. The tinfoil will allow the ethylene to escape and the damp paper towel will keep the celery hydrated. Something to be wary of is the temperature inside the refrigerator. If you aren’t careful you may freeze the water molecules making the celery worse than if you did nothing.

Signs that Celery Has Gone Bad

When celery is fresh they are crisp and stiff. If you go to bend them they will snap. When celery goes bad it will become rather “sad” and limp. The rib will feel like rubber and have very little stiffness.

The next thing to look for is discoloration. When celery is fresh the stalk is bright green throughout. As celery starts to age it will develop brown spots and star to turn white.

References
Billy Stewart

Chef and Reviewer for Barbequesmoked.com

BBQ Smoking Times and Temperature ChartBBQ Smoking Times and Temperature Chart

Below is a handy list of smoking times and temperatures. Beginners and experts alike sometimes need to reference internal temperatures and the time to smoke certain cuts and varieties of meat. For accurate measurements, use an instant-read thermometer. These...

Read More
Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?

Kamado grills are designed after ancient clay cooking pots found in the Far East. Modern versions combine the age-old cooking method with modern features, resulting in grills that are both versatile and economic. Even though it’s not strictly a kamado, the design...

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What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?

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Grilling with wood gives you a unique opportunity to give your food a flavor that just can’t be achieved with any other type of heat source. The level of smokiness and the flavor of your meat will depend on the type of wood you choose, so this is obviously a very important decision. Hickory and mesquite are both very popular options with very distinctive flavors, so let’s compare them.

Hickory

The Taste

Hickory has quite a strong taste compared to apple or oak, but it’s definitely milder than mesquite. It gives a sweet, fruity, fragrant smoke. Most people like the taste, but for some, it can still be too strong. In this case, mix it with oak or other milder woods.

When to Use

Hickory is probably the most versatile wood used in barbecue. It compliments all meats, but it’s still quite heavy, so it’s strong enough to be used with larger cuts of meat. Hickory goes perfect with beef and pork, but it can be used with chicken too, and even fish. One thing you should definitely try is a hickory smoked chicken, seasoned with some olive oil, black pepper, paprika, and thyme.

Mesquite

The Taste

Mesquite is most popular in Texas, where it’s abundant and it’s probably the strongest smoke wood out there. Because it’s so strong, it can easily overpower the taste of your food, but if used right it results in an amazing flavor that can hardly be compared to anything else. If you are new to mesquite, it’s best to use it sparingly, combined with hickory or oak.

When to Use

Mesquite, on the other hand, has a very strong taste unlike any other and it goes only with certain types of dishes. The only case where you can safely use mesquite alone is with robust chunks of red meat, like briskets. However, small quantities of mesquite in combination with other, milder smoke woods can be used to complement almost any dish. To cook a perfect mesquite smoked brisket, rub it with spices of your choice and leave to rest for 12-24 hours before cooking.

Conclusion

There are people who use mesquite exclusively for any type of barbecue because of its unique taste. However, if you are just trying it out it’s best to start with a large cut of beef. Hickory, on the other hand, goes best with pork, but you can’t really use it incorrectly as it goes with everything.

Getting the perfect taste with mesquite requires some skill and experience, but with hickory, it’s super easy to get amazing barbecue. Mesquite also burns hotter and longer than most other smoke woods and produces a really thick smoke. Because of this, it is sometimes first reduced to coals and then used for grilling. Both hickory and mesquite can be soaked in water for a couple of hours before cooking in order to burn slower and smolder. This produces thin blue smoke that everyone is after.

Lastly, there is a lot of space to experiment with combinations of different types of wood. You can find the right combination only by learning from experience, and everyone should try both hickory and mesquite at least once.

References
Billy Stewart

Chef and Reviewer for Barbequesmoked.com

BBQ Smoking Times and Temperature ChartBBQ Smoking Times and Temperature Chart

Below is a handy list of smoking times and temperatures. Beginners and experts alike sometimes need to reference internal temperatures and the time to smoke certain cuts and varieties of meat. For accurate measurements, use an instant-read thermometer. These...

Read More
Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?Kamado Joe or Primo Grills: Which Brand is Best?

Kamado grills are designed after ancient clay cooking pots found in the Far East. Modern versions combine the age-old cooking method with modern features, resulting in grills that are both versatile and economic. Even though it’s not strictly a kamado, the design...

Read More
What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?What’s The Difference Between Pork Belly and Bacon?

One of the most popular foods in the US is Bacon. Not only is it easy to make, but it’s also delicious and can be eaten anytime. You can also pair bacon with just about anything, from sandwiches, soup, and burgers. However, pork belly is another cut that is more...

Read More
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Not sure if you are a microwave fan or not. But, I thank the inventor of this device almost every day. If I knew the inventor in person, I would have written pages and pages of thank you notes. Truthfully speaking, I don’t need someone to vouch for the fact that a microwave is a creative genius. In my nine years of cooking, it has been a huge part of my identity. Make no mistake, nothing much will change about me without this unit. However, it’s a handy tool in the kitchen. It’s a nice ‘rush’ device for me. Anyways, let me drill down to the topic without boring too many of you guys out there.

Know your Microwave a Little Better

For the most part, a microwave is used for heating food. At least, I never saw anyone cook food from scratch within a microwave. To bust the bubble over here, a microwave can actually be used to cook foods from ground zero. So, it doesn’t have to be just another heating device. Of course, there will be some restrictions on the kind of food you can cook on a microwave because it may not produce enough heat energy like your conventional cooking device.

Microwaving a Sweet Potato

Nevertheless, you can microwave a sweet potato to relish your taste buds. So, what will be the payoff over here? Here’s the thing. You will get results equivalent to your traditional cooking unit for less than half the time. So, it will prove to be a huge time-saver. Of course, it’s also much easier to use a microwave for cooking. Better yet, no one will be able to tell the difference. Not to forget the fact that sweet potatoes are naturally sweet and nutritious. So, let’s dig into the content. I will tell you exactly how I go about microwaving a sweet potato. You will surely enjoy the deliciously baked sweet potato.

Steps to Reach Microwaved Baked Sweet Potato

First and foremost, scrub the raw potato until it’s sparkling clean. Hygiene is the first step, isn’t it? You can use running water to clean the potato. It pays to have a fork beside you because the next thing you will do is literally stab the sweet potato all over its body with a fork. Remember, you can’t afford to skip this step. If you do so, the potato will explode inside the microwave. I am talking from experience, so don’t take this advice lightly because it will backfire on you. My wife’s taunts are still fresh in my mind. So, don’t make my mistake. Also, don’t force the fork too deep. You only need to break through the skin of the potato. That will do the trick.

Let’s Keep Moving!

Believing that you have taken my advice to heart, let’s move ahead. Now, take a wet paper towel and wrap it around the potato. Gently get rid of the excess water. The paper towel wrap will create a steaming effect. So, the potato will get soft and fluffy from the inside. Also, it will prevent the potato from shrinking. Here’s another word of advice for you. Don’t use an aluminum foil over here. It will create sparks inside the microwave. Therefore, do yourself a favor and stick with the paper towel.

Let’s Get Cooking Now!

The next step would be the final step for the most part. Simply place the potato on a microwave-safe plate inside the microwave on a high mode for approximately five to six minutes, until it’s tender. Don’t forget to flip it once halfway down the road. Once done with the cooking, unwrap the potatoes and allow it to cool for few minutes. Of course, smaller potatoes will take lesser time. Once you cook a few of them, you will get a good idea about the right amount of time taken to cook your potatoes. As a tip, use the fork to test the softness.

Final Steps

Once the potatoes have cooled down, use a knife to slice the potatoes in half. Of course, don’t forget to admire your work or at least pat your back. Add desired toppings for the icing on the cake factor. Goes without saying, if you have spent any time in the kitchen, you will know that the choices for toppings are literally endless. At the end of the day, it guns down to your personal taste and preference. My favorite includes melt butter, vanilla almond butter, or avocado. You can also add some sweet corn and bacon. It will fit the bill perfectly over here.

Additional Tips

If you don’t plan to consume the potatoes right away, make sure to store them in a cool, dry place. Also, do not refrigerate them or else they will dry out. Choose firm potatoes while shopping for them. Also, don’t go for the oversized ones; rather consider small or medium ones. They take less time for cooking, and they turn out well too. Potatoes tend to burn quickly, so keep an eye on the microwave while it’s cooking. Remember, they can come out uneven if they are overcooked or undercooked.

Truthfully speaking, it might require a few attempts to churn out perfectly baked sweet potatoes. So, don’t give up if your first attempt was not the best. Truthfully speaking, you will get better with every attempt. Also, do not be afraid to experiment with the sweet potato. It’s a highly versatile food, so you can totally experiment with it. Trust me; it won’t mind. So, keep trying new ingredients or toppings. They are going to taste good no matter what. Above all, have fun cooking them.

Conclusion

Finally, we come to an end. There was nothing rocket science about microwaving a sweet potato, isn’t it? Truthfully speaking, it’s easy-as-pie procedure. Believe it or not, you will see yourself microwaving a sweet potato very often. Remember, it’s packed with Vitamin A, C, B6, and potassium. Not to forget the fact that it’s a much better alternative to the unhealthy French fries. Personally speaking, the lazy person in me loves this dish. I am not trying to represent my laziness. However, I do miss not knowing this cooking hack during my college days. Right from the cooking process to the end-result, it’s worth a shot for me. Why don’t you try it too today?

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