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Attack Magazine by Ivan Sholomove - 3d ago

Launching his project earlier this year Das SPEZIAL has an eclectic sound fusing multiple genres. We asked him to introduce himself.

Who are you?

Das SPEZIAL!

What do you sound like?

Psychedelic & Electronic.

Why should we listen to you?

Das SPEZIAL is a new project launched in 2019 fusing house, techno, big beat and indie to produce a psychedelic & electronic experience. It’s fun and there’s not much around that sounds like it !  :)

What have you released so far? What else have you got coming out in the near future?

SPEZIAL 01 and SPEZIAL 02 were released on 1st June. Both releases have been well supported and we’re excited to share it with the world!

SPEZIAL 01 - Very Nearly Almost 

SPEZIAL 02 -  SPZL Battle Weapson

[advert] What song sums you up? Why?

Hard to pinpoint an answer …….. I am a collection of thoughts and experiences channelled through the art of music to produce SPEZIAL.

I see music as an art form and a medium to express and connect people. So to me …..every song has its moment and you can’t just pick one!

It’s like asking: What’s your favourite colour..!?

What or who is your biggest influence and why?

Growing up in the UK during the 90s had a big influence on me with rave, breakbeat, jungle and indie music all having an impact. I believe A&R back then were very forward thinking and brought great talents to the table. All the music from back then, has had a big influence on me today.

I’m very honoured to be able to work with and have the support from a strong talented group of creative people including The Overman, Steve Dubs, Justin Drake, Julian at Dispersion, Sam at Above Board and Dr Rosa at HQ!

Where can we hear your music?

You can find my music on Beatport here or on Soundcloud below:

Where will you be in five years' time?

Climbing trees.

Tell us an interesting fact about yourself.

I like to breed guinea pigs.

Das SPEZIAL’s ‘SPEZIAL 1’ & ‘SPEZIAL 2’ are out now.

Find him on Instagram, Twitter & Soundcloud.

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Attack Magazine by Ericadmin - 3d ago

Finding and programming a universe of drum sounds has become a colourful, visual feast thanks to XLN Audio’s powerful, spaced-out drum machine. James Russell has had a blast, as he reports back to ground control.

XLN have become known for their Addictive Drums line of realistic drummer instruments, but with XO (VST2/AU/AAX), the Swedish developer are taking a step towards electronic beats with this workstation, which incorporates sequencing and sample browsing.

You get a fully functional drum sequencer with eight lanes, sixteen steps with A and B variations, the usual drum controls such as Pan, Pitch, Enveloping, etc, two send effects (delay and reverb). But these standard functions are where XO’s comparisons to most other drum machines end.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L7AlhOt7Pdg
Space Drums

With its Space tab, the instrument shows you its main selling point: the ‘nebula’ of drum samples, whose colours and positions represent the different types of kit element (Kicks, Snares, Open and Closed Hats, Toms, FX, Clicks and Rimshots, and Crashes). Simply hit Play in XO’s interface, and the currently selected kit elements will pulsate as they play.

By clicking through the nebula, you can audition the samples, leaving trails between them. You can zoom in to get closer to the cloud of, say, kicks, and you’ll find that samples placed closed together in the Space tab have similar sounds. The whole process is both fun and inspiring, and still useful and straightforward. Indeed, it’s a vital part of XO’s workflow throughout.

XO displays its own library of drum sounds in its Space browser, and can analyse your own folders of samples, adding them to the night sky

Not content with offering this for its Core Content library of over 500MB (that’s quite a lot for drum samples), XO also lets you import your own folders, scanning and placing them into the nebula along with the rest. The detection process is flawless, as far as I’ve discovered, although XO should use just the filename to name the sample instead of using its directory location.

You can shortlist samples from the nebula to find them again more easily, select similar samples without zooming in, and work your way back through your browsing history. Pretty genius. The shortlist also functions to hold sample you liked while changing presets and kits, letting you save elements that you like from one and add them back to another.

You get to store your sample browsing history, and you can earmark other candidates in XO’s shortlist of ten sounds
XO Planets

There are 135 presets, each consisting of both a sequenced beat and a selection of sounds from the Factory library. Each has its own tempo, but you can lock XO to your host’s tempo if you choose.

Right from the preset browser, you can choose from 14 variations of your currently playing preset – the beat stays the same, but the sounds are swapped for similar kits. Actually, this functionality is available from anywhere using a left/right selector, but it’s nice to have 15 immediate alternatives right there in the browser. What would be even nicer is if XO could offer slight variations on each 'beat' as well.

Choose from 14 variations of a kit when auditioning presets, and hot-swap individual samples, hearing them in situ

If you’re worried how these features will take toll on your computer’s performance, don’t be – I tried running eight instances of XO on a seven-year-old laptop, and it only ran to about 20% CPU capacity, with about 100MB of RAM used per instance… give or take, of course.

One of the most crucial parts of the XO experience is hot-swapping. Your eight selected kit pieces are listed down the left-hand side, and each element can be auditioned with new sounds while the beat is playing, letting you try out new hi-hats, snares, or anything else, in context. It sounds simple, but it makes a huge difference in how useable XO is.

[advert] Sequencing and Programming

Now for the second, less headline-grabbing portion of XO. The Edit Page is a bit overwhelming at first, and there’s a lot to get used to.

Unfortunately, there’s little sense of priority in the interface for adjusting the sounds and sequencing them, with both significant and less significant controls being pretty small.

Colour co-ordination for each kit piece does help, but the learning curve takes a while to ascend before the sequencer becomes less staggering.

There may be colour co-ordination to help you out, but XO’s sequencer has a lot to decypher

Groove and swing are handled per-instrument and/or globally, and the other options attached to the whole sequencer’s playback are quite novel – you get A and B patterns, which you can either select at will, or play through chained as AB or as AAAB. Nice touch.

Another novel touch is the Accentuator, which works by superposition of cycles, with a randomisation control in tow to handle this unintuitive way of working.

Dial in variation of accents through the sequence by adjusting a wave cycle for 1/2, 1/4, 1/6 and 1/8 of a bar
Drum Machine Controls

Back on Terra Firma, the Edit page offers similar controls to any drum machine, with Sample Start, End and Fades accessed through floating windows, panning, enveloping, Pitch, Tone, filtering, Velocity Sensitivity, routing and choke groups.

It’s relatively straightforward, but this seems to be one of the areas where a more concise approach to interface design could have decluttered the whole thing and made every part of the Edit page that much more accessible.

Traditional drum editing controls are on-hand, but they take up a lot of real estate that could be better left to calm the interface – and new users.

Elsewhere, there are two FX Sends, each selectable between nine types of reverb and six types of delay. Controls here are minimal but effective – anything else would probably have been overkill. There are also master Tuning, Level and Send controls, and a novel output strip containing filtering, soft clipping, and a choice from eight distortion effects.

Sample Combiner and Beat Combiner tabs offer ‘playgrounds’ where you can freely experiment with drum sound and pattern sequence combinations in a different way, helping you remove creative blockages if you have any.

If you’ve come up with something good, you can leave it, but both these tabs allow you to instantly reset back to your original sequence or sound selection. It’s nice to have a different way to program beats and kits, but not everyone will want to take advantage of them.

Verdict

With XO, XLN Audio have scored a hit. It’s nothing short of inspirational, while at the same time being hella useful as well. It’s not the easiest prospect to come to terms with, though – its size can be intimidating, and there are moments of information overload in the Edit page.

But if you can afford it – and once you’ve learned how to use it – XO presents little danger of wasting time while searching for the right drum parts, refining the groove, and tweaking your near-perfect sound into a finished drum part.

If price is a barrier, XO brings to mind another similar idea from last year: Algonaut’s Atlas sampler, which takes a similar, visual bent on drum selection and playback, for $99. It's worth considering if you don't want to shell out $179.95.

Then again, when you do just want to get creative and mess around, it’ll be the perfect companion for the some of the most enjoyable beatmaking sessions you’ve had in a while and the credit card balance will become an afterthought.

[rating buy="XLN Audio XO" price="$179.95" link="https://www.xlnaudio.com/products/xo" value="3" sound="4" ease_of_use="4" overall="5" text="Making beats is simple yet inspiring and creative – it’s a hit."]
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Attack Magazine by Ivan Sholomove - 3d ago

Launching his project earlier this year Das SPEZIAL has an eclectic sound fusing multiple genres. We asked him to introduce himself.

Who are you?

Das SPEZIAL!

What do you sound like?

Psychedelic & Electronic.

Why should we listen to you?

Das SPEZIAL is a new project launched in 2019 fusing house, techno, big beat and indie to produce a psychedelic & electronic experience. It’s fun and there’s not much around that sounds like it !  :)

What have you released so far? What else have you got coming out in the near future?

SPEZIAL 01 and SPEZIAL 02 were released on 1st June. Both releases have been well supported and we’re excited to share it with the world!

SPEZIAL 01 - Very Nearly Almost 

SPEZIAL 02 -  SPZL Battle Weapson

[advert] What song sums you up? Why?

Hard to pinpoint an answer …….. I am a collection of thoughts and experiences channelled through the art of music to produce SPEZIAL.

I see music as an art form and a medium to express and connect people. So to me …..every song has its moment and you can’t just pick one!

It’s like asking: What’s your favourite colour..!?

What or who is your biggest influence and why?

Growing up in the UK during the 90s had a big influence on me with rave, breakbeat, jungle and indie music all having an impact. I believe A&R back then were very forward thinking and brought great talents to the table. All the music from back then, has had a big influence on me today.

I’m very honoured to be able to work with and have the support from a strong talented group of creative people including The Overman, Steve Dubs, Justin Drake, Julian at Dispersion, Sam at Above Board and Dr Rosa at HQ!

Where can we hear your music?

You can find my music on Beatport here or on Soundcloud below:

Where will you be in five years' time?

Climbing trees.

Tell us an interesting fact about yourself.

I like to breed guinea pigs.

Das SPEZIAL’s ‘SPEZIAL 1’ & ‘SPEZIAL 2’ are out now.

Find him on Instagram, Twitter & Soundcloud.

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Attack Magazine by Ivan Sholomove - 3d ago

This week's mixes include DJ Zinc for BBC 6Music, Hybrid Man for Melbourne Deepcast and Special Request for Bleep.

Hybrid Man for Melbourne Deepcast. Presenting a 'a journey into time and space' for the ever reliable Melbourne Deepcast is Hybrid Man. Spinning laid back electro, sunshine breaks and more.

MDC.220 Hybrid Man - SoundCloud
(3369 secs long, 1277 plays)Play in SoundCloud

DJ Zinc for BBC 6Music. To help celebrate drum and bass for a day, Zinc dropped a set of iconic, genre-defining DnB cuts for Lauren Laverne's show. Clocking in at only 20 minutes, this one's all killer and no filler, as Zinc crams numerous gems into this mini-mix.  

[advert]

Physical Therapy for Clash Magazine.  The highly eclectic Physical Therapy stops by to provide the new mix for Clash Magazine. The Allergy Season records boss blends an hour of house and techno of the downtempo kind 'soaked in dystopian atmosphere but riveting nonetheless'. Enjoy!

Clash DJ Mix - Physical Therapy - SoundCloud
(3782 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

Special Request for Bleep. The freshest podcast in the Bleep series comes courtesy of bass music aficionado Special Request. Celebrating the release of his new Vortex album, Paul Woolford's alter ego continues to slay dancefloor's globally, and this energetic, jackin' and relentless mix is a perfect example why.

Bleep Mix #61 - Special Request - SoundCloud
(2759 secs long, 3390 plays)Play in SoundCloud
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Can studying your audience help the music you make relate on a deeper level? In his own words, Boxia reveals how crowd reactions indicate the emotional connection will always triumph over bangers and how society could learn from the dancefloor.

Throughout the last few decades, iconic films have often presented their image of dystopian futures by blaring 145bpm acid 303s, accompanied by intense strobe lights in dimly lit basements, flooded with sweaty people in rave gear with facial tattoos and piercings while all seemingly off their tits. For the uninitiated, it’s a message that the world has gone to hell in a hand-basket. For the rest of us, it’s your average Sunday morning in Berlin.

Even as the last pillars of humanity are falling, films frequently use underground music to craft their narrative which is either “hope and community spirit prevails in this future only through illegal raves” or “we are all fucked.” Of course this is the overly dramatised Hollywood twist, but as art mirrors life and life mirrors art, it isn’t a million miles from the truth. 

"I hope that in everyday life, society can embrace and replicate the passive equilibrium of the dancefloor"

Rebellion and escapism go partially hand in hand and I consider raves are one of the last places on Earth where people can put aside their problems aside and be who they want, together as one. Music has always had its offshoots into escapism which have defied the status-quo, but enough has been written on the subject by people far more qualified than me covering influential movements such as punk in the 70s and the mid 80s birth of acid-house.

[advert]

The 'current trend' in music is of less interest to me than those it affects, and that's because however mainstream or underground a genre is, as soon as this 'new sound' loses its audience, it almost retreats into non-existence. However, when a sound becomes obsolete...the world doesn’t stop partying. People don’t stop looking for a place to let go. Their problems don't evaporate along with that particular flavour of music. As a producer, I think it's vital to study, adapt and release music that connects with a crowd, rather than focusing on fads.

Most genres are ever-evolving. They go forwards and backwards, borrowing from their own past but also the history of others. These days, trends are also influenced by something someone somewhere played at a big festival which maybe sent social media into meltdown and subtly influenced the future direction of the genre or possibly swept up all before it like a giant 'sound of the summer' tidal wave. And what follows? A huge ripcurl of music made in the same style.

[quote align=right text="I often wonder if nightclubs exist so that for a few hours, we don’t have to."]

For me, stagnation is fraught with danger. When ravers pay to come and see an act, they are coming to see a show. You are their guide. Experimenting with different sounds, speeds and mixing styles could be a travesty. However, I’d have more regrets for performing with an outdated style over trying to introduce a new crowd to an old classic like G.T.O. Pure (Pure Energy).

Part of the excitement in being a producer is trying to foretell progressions in music. I study what bpm people are responding to and explore whether we are producing with new techniques, new DAWs, new drum machines etc. However, predicting future sounds is understandably tough but when touring you do get a sense of what resonates on the floor and that connection, from the perspective of both a raver and a DJ, has been a personal life long study.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBo0QC2Y50Q

I feel there is a delicate balancing act when producing. The music has to be mixable for a start otherwise DJs aren't going to play it. Secondly, it needs to be identifiable. I don’t think anyone ever sets out to be dubbed 'the next' anybody. You want to carve your own sound. Thirdly, and most importantly, it has to emotionally resonate with your audience. Producers who have mastered that over the years such as Laurent Garnier, have created indelible memories for many including myself and it's a fact that dancefloor experiences stay with people for life.

There is also a global element to consider. Whilst in one club there could be a group of people dancing entirely naked and no one shows any surprise, in another, security might throw a guy out for not having a T-shirt on. The way audiences behave and react from city to city can be vastly different not to mention continent to continent. In short, not everything you make will connect with everyone, and neither should it.

This is another thing that drives my production. I try to paint what I see with sound, and hope it resonates with my intended audience. When I decided to write my first LP, it wasn’t about making a 'Now That’s What I Call Techno' extended EP. I wanted to make something to reflect personal feelings, portray interactions collected over many years and not simply align with current trends. Different tracks respond with different people and at different times in their lives. However, all have been inspired by contrasting stories which makes it harder to stick with just one genre.

[advert-inline]

I see a lot of myself, as well as people I know, when I look at how crowds react in various environments. Whether the track is inspired by a Saturday night encounter, or the after-afterparty at 2pm on a Monday, my recent work has felt like a particularly personal experience. I set out with the ambition to create connections and not bangers.

Every dancefloor has a “John”. He works in accounts and wakes up every day feeling as if he has settled. So he goes wild at the weekend. Or a “Sally" who just came out of a bad three year relationship and just wants to be left alone to dance till the morning. Or there is Terry, who constantly questions the existential meaning of the universe. 

We all have our reasons for escapism. For some it's nothing more than a fun thing to do on a Friday. For others, it’s better therapy than any psychiatrist can overcharge for. Let’s be honest, the world isn’t quite at the macabre finale painted in those iconic film scenes I mentioned earlier. However, the collective spirit those film directors depict is accurate and I see the beauty in the unity presented.

[quote align=right text="The story of a great dancefloor isn’t purely in the music (open secret...there’s often drugs involved too) but how music brings everyone together."]

There are a myriad of reasons why we hit the dancefloor. There are those who like to let off steam, others who have serious life traumas and develop a dancing alter ego, to some its a passion whilst for a few its a disposable form of entertainment to pass a few hours similar perhaps as a visit to the cinema or amusement park.

The story of a great dancefloor isn’t purely in the music (open secret...there’s often drugs involved too) but how music strengthens disparate bonds. Whether you are John, Sally or Terry each and everyone is united regardless. The dancefloor transcends class, race and gender while creating an environment of unconditional acceptance sadly not common enough elsewhere in society.

I often wonder if nightclubs exist so that for a few hours, we don’t have to (at least not in our current form anyway). No one here gives a shit about your end of year report or whether you hit your target. You aren’t defined by the suit you wear or what floor in the building you work on. Your accent isn’t a point of derision. Skin colour does not define which social group you cling to. You can just be... for the sake of being and no one is there to judge you.

The corporate world is now slowly waking up to this and attempting to encourage us to accept one another. However, I would proudly argue that dance music has always been ahead of the corporate curve and far more progressive in accepting people different to one another. For years, the dancefloor has created a safe space for minorities, whilst also encouraging those who were perhaps culturally secluded in childhood, to flourish and embrace alternative ways of life. I hope that society can grasp this and replicate the peaceful harmony of the dancefloor.

Boxia's debut album 'A Night in the Life Of" is out now on Drumcode.

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Can studying your audience help the music you make relate on a deeper level? In his own words, Boxia reveals how crowd reactions indicate the emotional connection will always triumph over bangers and how society could learn from the dancefloor.

Throughout the last few decades, iconic films have often presented their image of dystopian futures by blaring 145bpm acid 303s, accompanied by intense strobe lights in dimly lit basements, flooded with sweaty people in rave gear with facial tattoos and piercings while all seemingly off their tits. For the uninitiated, it’s a message that the world has gone to hell in a hand-basket. For the rest of us, it’s your average Sunday morning in Berlin.

Even as the last pillars of humanity are falling, films frequently use underground music to craft their narrative which is either “hope and community spirit prevails in this future only through illegal raves” or “we are all fucked.” Of course this is the overly dramatised Hollywood twist, but as art mirrors life and life mirrors art, it isn’t a million miles from the truth. 

"I hope that in everyday life, society can embrace and replicate the passive equilibrium of the dancefloor"

Rebellion and escapism go partially hand in hand and I consider raves are one of the last places on Earth where people can put aside their problems aside and be who they want, together as one. Music has always had its offshoots into escapism which have defied the status-quo, but enough has been written on the subject by people far more qualified than me covering influential movements such as punk in the 70s and the mid 80s birth of acid-house.

[advert]

The 'current trend' in music is of less interest to me than those it affects, and that's because however mainstream or underground a genre is, as soon as this 'new sound' loses its audience, it almost retreats into non-existence. However, when a sound becomes obsolete...the world doesn’t stop partying. People don’t stop looking for a place to let go. Their problems don't evaporate along with that particular flavour of music. As a producer, I think it's vital to study, adapt and release music that connects with a crowd, rather than focusing on fads.

Most genres are ever-evolving. They go forwards and backwards, borrowing from their own past but also the history of others. These days, trends are also influenced by something someone somewhere played at a big festival which maybe sent social media into meltdown and subtly influenced the future direction of the genre or possibly swept up all before it like a giant 'sound of the summer' tidal wave. And what follows? A huge ripcurl of music made in the same style.

[quote align=right text="I often wonder if nightclubs exist so that for a few hours, we don’t have to"]

For me, stagnation is fraught with danger. When ravers pay to come and see an act, they are coming to see a show. You are their guide. Experimenting with different sounds, speeds and mixing styles could be a travesty. However, I’d have more regrets for performing with an outdated style over trying to introduce a new crowd to an old classic like G.T.O. Pure (Pure Energy).

Part of the excitement in being a producer is trying to foretell progressions in music. I study what bpm people are responding to and explore whether we are producing with new techniques, new DAWs, new drum machines etc. However, predicting future sounds is understandably tough but when touring you do get a sense of what resonates on the floor and that connection, from the perspective of both a raver and a DJ, has been a personal life long study.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KBo0QC2Y50Q

I feel there is a delicate balancing act when producing. The music has to be mixable for a start otherwise DJs aren't going to play it. Secondly, it needs to be identifiable. I don’t think anyone ever sets out to be dubbed 'the next' anybody. You want to carve your own sound. Thirdly, and most importantly, it has to emotionally resonate with your audience. Producers who have mastered that over the years such as Laurent Garnier, have created indelible memories for many including myself and it's a fact that dancefloor experiences stay with people for life.

There is also a global element to consider. Whilst in one club there could be a group of people dancing entirely naked and no one shows any surprise, in another, security might throw a guy out for not having a T-shirt on. The way audiences behave and react from city to city can be vastly different not to mention continent to continent. In short, not everything you make will connect with everyone, and neither should it.

This is another thing that drives my production. I try to paint what I see with sound, and hope it resonates with my intended audience. When I decided to write my first LP, it wasn’t about making a 'Now That’s What I Call Techno' extended EP. I wanted to make something to reflect personal feelings, portray interactions collected over many years and not simply align with current trends. Different tracks respond with different people and at different times in their lives. However, all have been inspired by contrasting stories which makes it harder to stick with just one genre.

[advert-inline]

I see a lot of myself, as well as people I know, when I look at how crowds react in various environments. Whether the track is inspired by a Saturday night encounter, or the after-afterparty at 2pm on a Monday, my recent work has felt like a particularly personal experience. I set out with the ambition to create connections and not bangers.

Every dancefloor has a “John”. He works in accounts and wakes up every day feeling as if he has settled. So he goes wild at the weekend. Or a “Sally" who just came out of a bad three year relationship and just wants to be left alone to dance till the morning. Or there is Terry, who constantly questions the existential meaning of the universe. 

We all have our reasons for escapism. For some it's nothing more than a fun thing to do on a Friday. For others, it’s better therapy than any psychiatrist can overcharge for. Let’s be honest, the world isn’t quite at the macabre finale painted in those iconic film scenes I mentioned earlier. However, the collective spirit those film directors depict is accurate and I see the beauty in the unity presented.

[quote align=right text="The story of a great dancefloor isn’t purely in the music (open secret...there’s often drugs involved too) but ihow music brings everyone together"]

There are a myriad of reasons why we hit the dancefloor. There are those who like to let off steam, others who have serious life traumas and develop a dancing alter ego, to some its a passion whilst for a few its a disposable form of entertainment to pass a few hours similar perhaps as a visit to the cinema or amusement park.

The story of a great dancefloor isn’t purely in the music (open secret...there’s often drugs involved too) but how music strengthens disparate bonds. Whether you are John, Sally or Terry each and everyone is united regardless. The dancefloor transcends class, race and gender while creating an environment of unconditional acceptance sadly not common enough elsewhere in society.

I often wonder if nightclubs exist so that for a few hours, we don’t have to (at least not in our current form anyway). No one here gives a shit about your end of year report or whether you hit your target. You aren’t defined by the suit you wear or what floor in the building you work on. Your accent isn’t a point of derision. Skin colour does not define which social group you cling to. You can just be... for the sake of being and no one is there to judge you.

The corporate world is now slowly waking up to this and attempting to encourage us to accept one another. However, I would proudly argue that dance music has always been ahead of the corporate curve and far more progressive in accepting people different to one another. For years, the dancefloor has created a safe space for minorities, whilst also encouraging those who were perhaps culturally secluded in childhood, to flourish and embrace alternative ways of life. I hope that society can grasp this and replicate the peaceful harmony of the dancefloor.

Boxia's debut album 'A Night in the Life Of" is out now on Drumcode.

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iTunes says goodbye. The future of streaming looks profitable. Berghain recreated in Minecraft. Café Capital makes its return. 

Goodbye iTunes. 18 years after launching, iTunes is being discontinued by Apple. The announcement came at Apple’s annual developers conference. iTunes will be broken up into three separate macOS apps: Podcasts, TV, and Music as part of the next MacOS update, Catalina, which is coming fall 2019. While many DJs lamented the decision across social media, complaining that the app was still central to music sorting, iTunes was viewed as outdated by Apple and the general public, harking to an era when music, podcasts and movies were all purchased and stored in one place.

Make Your Music Make Money. Attack have released their second book 'Make Your Music Make Money' available now and priced just £6.99. The new 238 page PDF book from Attack Magazine, will show you how, armed with nothing more than a laptop, some talent and a decent work ethic, you can write and record your music, create an international profile and access a worldwide sales infrastructure to make money and build a fanbase from day one. You can check it out and buy your copy here.

Make Your Music Make Money - Attack Magazine

Ibiza’s new club. Taking over the former Sankeys Ibiza location is a new club called Octan. Located in Playa d’en Bossa, the new space opens on Sunday, July 7th with Steve Lawler's Warriors party, which is the club’s first announced residency. The club will focus mainly on house and techno events, pushing independent, underground artists to create a more "intimate and personal" environment than the average Ibiza club. Ryan O Gorman is the club’s musical director, and Lindsey Matthews, Kellie Allen and Stephane Ghenacia are its main residents. Find out more about the club here.

[advert]

Berghain Minecraft. Someone made a near-perfect rendition of Berlin’s Berghain in Minecraft. Originally shared as a video tour on Reddit’s r/techno by u/throwawayforlewdstuf, viewers can get a virtual glimpse of nearly every area of the club, including the notorious dark rooms. The creator gave their reasoning behind the project, stating: “I know there are a lot of people who can't really travel to Berlin, so giving this little sneak peak inside to those people was kinda my intent!” Watch the video below. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ACOfnGdDTEc

Golden future. Investment firm Goldman Sachs has forecasted that by 2030, the global recorded music industry will be pulling in $45 billion in annual revenue. That forecast comes via an update to its 2017 report, Music In The Air, which predicted huge gains for record labels. The update also outlines a booming future for paid streaming, with predictions of $27.5 billion in  revenue generated for labels and artists in 2030, with overall annual global trade streaming revenues reaching $37.2 billion. These predictions are predicated in part on the firm’s belief that by 2030, 1.5 billion people will be paying for music streaming as it grows in popularity worldwide — two thirds of subscribers will come via “emerging markets” like India, the firm states, rather than “established markets” like the US and Europe. For a more in depth look at the report, head to MBW

Clear your mixes. DJs can now legally clear their mixes through Pioneer’s new DJM-REC app for iOS. Once a mix is uploaded, rights management company Dubset analyses it for copyrights, then distributes the mix through music streaming services like Spotify and Apple Music. When someone listens to your mix, royalties are paid to the labels and publishers who own the copyrights. Dubset CEO Stephen White called the app a “seamless live performance-to-distribution model” that DJs have long been asking for. To find out more, head to the Pioneer website.

Connecting borders. As part of the DMZ Peace Train Festival, Seoul Community Radio will be hosting an electronic music stage promoting peace between North and South Korea. The festival takes place this weekend at Soi Mountain in South Korea's Gangwon Province, which sits at the DMZ, or Korean Demilitarized Zone between North and South. Several local acts will perform, alongside artists from Cuba, Denmark and Japan. DMZ Peace Train was launched last year with the help of veteran British promoter Martin Elbourne, who’s best-known for booking Glastonbury Festival. 

Café Capital returns. Nine years after a devastating fire destroyed Café Capital, the Antwerp venue will reopen as Grand Café Capital, with the first party taking place on June 9th. While the venue will only host sporadic club nights initially, more events are expected to take place in the future. The space itself features a restaurant, terrace, a small club area equipped with an HK soundsystem, and "Japanese-inspired" design. Before it burned down, Cafe Capital was one of the city’s most popular venues, regularly hosting events with Theo Parrish, Four Tet, Marcel Dettmann and others.

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Attack Magazine by Ivan Sholomove - 1w ago

This week's mixes include Scsi - 9 for Magnetic Magazine, Afrodeutsche for NTS and DJ Taye for The Fader.

Afrodeutsche for NTS. Stepping up for her monthly residency on NTS, Afrodeutsche invites guest Tom Boogizm for an hour's b2b of Detroit electro and rave inspired house music.

AFRODEUTSCHE B2B TOM BOOGIZM | NTS | BLACK FOREST | 11TH MAY 2019 - SoundCloud
(3519 secs long, 680 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Scsi - 9 for Magnetic Magazine. Taking the reigns for the latest in Magnetic Magazine's mix series, Russian duo Scsi - 9 blend together 70 minutes worth of deep and soulful grooves.

Magnetic Mix 030: Scsi - 9 - SoundCloud
(4227 secs long, 953 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Pseudzero for Lucky Me Records. Returning for their regular slot on Rinse FM, the Lucky Me show is hosted by trusty residents The Blessings. For this incarnation they invite France's Pseudzero for a spin. The Vulgar Records boss lays down some excellent hip hop and soul. 

LuckyMe with Pseudzero (Vulgar Recs) - 19th May 2019 - SoundCloud
(7251 secs long)Play in SoundCloud
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DJ Taye for The Fader. Music, style and culture magazine The Fader provide this new mix from Chicago based footwork producer and selector DJ Taye. He keeps the tempo up throughout, skilfully interlacing elements of hip hop, techno and chiptune in this 35 minute session.

FADER Mix: DJ Taye - SoundCloud
(2214 secs long, 3721 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Kölsch for Circo Loco. With Ibiza season back upon us, it's time to get in the mood with the latest session of Circoloco's radio show. For this episode Danish superstar Kölsch makes a mix of melodic techno, jackin' house and acid vibes. 

Circoloco Radio 086 - Kölsch - SoundCloud
(5505 secs long, 3289 plays)Play in SoundCloud
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We're proud to announce the release of our second book: Make Your Music Make Money.

In Make Your Music Make Moneya brand new 238 page PDF book from Attack Magazine, we show you how, armed with nothing more than a laptop, some talent and a decent work ethic, you can write and record your music, create an international profile and access a worldwide sales infrastructure to make money and build a fanbase from day one. 

The book is available now via the Attack store, with a special introductory price of just £6.99 for a limited time only. Customers can also expect their download immediately upon purchase.

  • Make Your Music Make Money - Attack Magazine
  • Make Your Music Make Money - Attack Magazine
  • Make Your Music Make Money - Attack Magazine
  • Make Your Music Make Money - Attack Magazine

Over nine chapters, packed with illustrations, we break down the jargon and offer the ultimate, bang-up-to-the-moment guide to turning ideas and passion into a brand and money-making enterprise. Our self-help style chapters, include:

  • The Music Business: Historic overview of how things were, how technology has always driven progress, and why we are where we are.
  • How Music Makes Money For You: Unravelling the complexities of royalties and detailing every income opportunity to exploit, from streaming and live shows to vinyl and branded T-shirts.
  • Your Brand: It’s not enough to just make great music. It has to be heard. We explain how to develop ‘Brand You’ and craft a captivating story that will generate followers, likes, and listens.
  • Spreading The Word: Engage with social media; write a press release; reach the tastemakers and follow our three month schedule for releasing a record. 
  • Taking Care Of Business: The hows and whys of accounting for a growing music enterprise. Tax returns, allowable expenses, VAT and how to stay out of trouble - all explained.
  • Your Team: What does a manager do? When will you need a lawyer? What does a plugger plug? And will you really need a book-keeper? Meet the musician’s dream team and learn what to expect from them.
  • The Record Deal: For many artists 'The Deal’ is the holy grail. But what kind of deal? When should you sign (and when should you not?). What are the benefits of choosing a major or an indie? And can you go it alone? No-nonsense insights from those who’ve trod the path to stardom.
  • The Publishing Deal: What a music publisher does, and why you will definitely need one as your career builds.

Guides to the music business proliferate. But Make Your Music Make Money is a unique self-help manual from an author who’s seen the industry from all angles - Top 10 artist; Music Week journalist; A&R man; songwriter; producer; and now mentor to the stars of tomorrow. 

Informed by dozens of interviews and case studies from professionals in all sectors of the music industry, and insights from, among others, Rick Rubin, Dr Dre, Mute Records’ Daniel Miller, Warner Chappell’s Guy Moot, Jonathan Dickins and Hypercolour’s Jamie Russell, we outline the State of the Musical Nation and advocate a hands-on approach to building a career.

Whether you’re a solo musician, a band, a producer or an industry entrepreneur; and whether you make dance, folk, indie or hip-hop, Make Your Music Make Money is likely to be the best investment a career-minded musician can make.

Make Your Music Make Money is available now from the Attack Magazine store priced at £6.99 for a limited time only.

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Once described by Tony Wilson as having "all the energy of Joy Division but with better clothes", unsung heroes A Certain Ratio celebrate 40 years on the floor. Dave Simpson sits down with the band to relive their catalogue.

Manchester’s A Certain Ratio are remembering the time they had a young Madonna as their support act at New York’s Dancetaria club in December 1982.

“Madonna walked in and the first thing she did was tell us off,” grins drummer Donald Johnson. “She said, ‘All your gear will have to be moved.’ It had taken us an hour and a half to set up. We were like, ‘No way is this going anywhere.’ It ended up in a massive argument.” Another chuckle. “I’ve liked her ever since, because she stood up to all these guys.”

A Curtain Ratio. Photo by Paul Husband

ACR have lots of stories like this, but few are as remarkable as their own. The Factory Records/Manchester dance music legends were portrayed in the film 24 Hour Party People and had a fan Joy Division’s Ian Curtis was a fan. Their pioneering “punk funk” never gave them a hit (although a cover of Banberra’s Shack Up made the US dance charts in 1981) but they have been highly influential. The trademark ACR punky-funky sound can be heard in bands from the Red Hot Chili Peppers to the Rapture; when James Murphy was recruiting musicians to form LCD Soundsystem, he told them to listen to Ratio’s 1979 cut Do The Du for guidance.

This month, ACR celebrate their 40th anniversary with a box set and their biggest ever tour. After years of racing forward – often to their commercial detriment – they’re taking a pause with us to look back over 40 years as the cult dance “Mancunian funk machine”, who have outlasted many of their peers.

[quote align=right text="People would come expecting to hear our new album and instead we’ve played new songs we just wrote that week. It’s been like that for 40 years."]

“If we’d had a hit, I’m not sure we’d be still together and talking to you now," says guitarist/trumpeter Martin Moscrop, at the Salford studio where they are working on new material. “Record companies would have demanded more of the same, which is not what we’re about.” He chuckles. “People would come expecting to hear our new album and instead we’ve played new songs we just wrote that week. It’s been like that for 40 years.”

THE SOUND

In the beginning - because they’d been that bit too young for punk – the idea was to fuse post-punk group Wire’s choppy guitar sound with Brian Eno ambient noise, and George Clinton/James Brown funk. The latter components were difficult without a drummer. The initial ACR line-up on Factory debut single All Night Party featured Moscrop and Peter Terrell on guitars, Jez Kerr on bass and Simon Topping on vocals and noise generator (essentially a synth with no keys, built for him by a mate). However, Granada TV/Factory man Tony Wilson (so affectionately spoofed by Coogan in 24 Hour Party People) had started managing the band and heard whispers about Johnson, who’d progressed from drumming with his mum’s knitting needles on the sofa to being talked about as the “funkiest drummer in Manchester.” Wilson made the introductions, and ACR had their groove.

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“I was a big Tony Wilson fan from watching him on the telly,” smiles Johnson. “He put on Iggy Pop and Debbie Harry in thigh length boots on at 6.30pm before the watershed. He came round to my house and sat in the kitchen telling me about ACR. When I went to their rehearsal room in Stockport, I hadn’t heard a note of their music, but after hearing their rhythms, I played along. It just clicked organically from that point.”

THE LOOK

ACR’s distinctive chic has been almost as significant as their music. In the beginning, they favoured a 1940s, austere look – demob suits, white shirts, and motorcycle boots (for Topping, who had a trials bike).

A Curtain Ratio. Photo by Kevin Cummins

“There was a big warehouse in Manchester full of unwashed secondhand clothes,” remembers Moscrop. “It stunk like anything, but there were all these suits issued to soldiers after the Second World War. In the late 70s, charity shops in Manchester were full of them.” In the 80s, ACR adopted a more military look, inspired by Bristol peers The Pop Group – the so-called “desert rats” chic once sported by British WW2 troops under Field Marshall Montogomery. “Andy Weatherall [a longtime fan] calls it the ‘Ain’t Half Hot Mum look’,” chuckles Moscrop. Fans have also copied the band’s whistles – band and audience tooting along together to tracks such as Si Firmi O Grido is quite a spectacle. “There’s an element of the fanbase that follow us around, the ACR Barmy Army. When we played in Liverpool recently I saw this guy that looked like Andy Weatherall, going nuts in the front row. I bumped into him a few months later and asked, ‘Were you right at the front at our Liverpool gig?!” and he was!’”

THE CATALOGUE

TO EACH (1979)

ACR’s ace Factory debut long player paired them with legendary Joy Division producer Martin Hannett, for this set of pioneering monochrome funk and the classic 1980 12”, Flight. Does that distinctive circular drumbeat on To Each’s track Winter Hill really resurface 10 years later on the Stone Roses’ I Am The Resurrection?

“People tell me that all the time,” smiles Johnson. I’ve never asked Reni [The Stone Roses’ drummer]. I probably should.”

“The Roses used to come and see us at the Hacienda,” says Moscrop. “They were at the front.”

What was working with Hannett like?

“You’ve got to remember that he was off his head a lot of the time. He used to smoke neat hash joints, take heroin and drink a lot, so studio sessions would be quite drug fuelled on his part. He’d give you these weird commands, ‘Play it faster, but slower.’ But in a way the confusion helped what he was doing. So we sound funky, but really weird!”

SEXTET (1982)

While recording To Each in New York, the band went to lots of Latin gigs, absorbed American black music and bought the percussion instruments behind another giant leap. With Kerr now becoming lead vocalist (Topping having followed his heart and a girl to NYC), Sextet’s esoteric, dreamily erotic avant funk also features the hazy, heady vocals of Martha “Tilly” Tilson. Lucinda, Skipscada and fan favourite Knife Slits Water feature in setlists to this day, and the album was their second indie No. 1, even scraping the national chart (at 53).

Moscrop: “Sextet captured what was in our heads at the time. It was us trying to be jazzy, but with Tilly’s angelic voice. She came to see us in New York, came back to Manchester to see Jez and ended up doing the vocals.”

Johnson: “I still hear this sound all over the place. I’ll hear something new and think, ‘Is that us?’”

I’D LIKE TO SEE YOU AGAIN (1982)

With Sextet barely in the racks, ACR shapeshifted again: to minimal, slightly jazzy, precision-cast funk.

Moscrop: “If we came up with something in the rehearsal room we'd want to play it straight away. So in 1982 we were playing whole sets of unreleased stuff that ended up on the third album. We were anti-promotion and anti-entertainment, and never liked using our own clichés. If a song became popular, we wouldn’t write another one like it.”

Johnson: “We weren’t thinking about being commercial. We were thinking about writing great songs.”

[quote align=right text="We were anti-promotion and anti-entertainment, and never liked using our own clichés. If a song became popular, we wouldn’t write another one like it."]

FORCE (1986)

Many a fans’ favourite, including perennial club hits/live favourites Wild Party and Mickey Way (The Candy Bar). A change of equipment produced a perfect collision of ACR’s experimental and pop sensibilities. Powered, as ever, by Johnson’s killer grooves.

Moscrop: “In the early ACR stuff we used a clavinet and a Multimoog, and then we got a ETI Powertran kit vocoder. When Andy [Connell, keyboards] joined we got a Fender Rhodes and a Yamaha DX7, and had the Moog going through the vocoder. We ended up with three vocoders. Andy was really into [jazz funk fusion band] Weather Report, who used them, so he was like ‘Wow.’”

GOOD TOGETHER (1990)

Their dance-pop major label debut for A&M still divides fans – and the band!

Moscrop: “I hated Good Together – it’s very smoothly produced - but I appreciate it more now. I think we thought we’d make a more commercial record, but it did the opposite [laughs].”

Johnson: “I love Good Together! It was us setting out to do something but ending up with something else, which is very ACR.”

ACR:MCR (1990)

A mid-period classic: at the height of Madchester and acid house, ACR embrace electronica.

Moscrop: “When we signed to A&M we invested the money into a studio, Dance Station. ACR:MCR was a reaction to all the money spent on Good Together. We had 808s, 303s, 101s, all the acid stuff, which came out strongly on that album because the studio didn’t have a live room and a control room, so it was really hard to record live drums. It cost virtually nothing: we used our own studio and charged A&M for the studio time to record it [laughter].”

UP IN DOWNSVILLE (1992) / CHANGE THE STATION (1997)

ACR go indie again, courtesy of New Order manager Rob Gretton’s prosaically named Rob’s Records. The Jon Dasilva-remixed 27 Forever was another dancefloor smash.

Johnson: “Rob was always there for us from 1979. Whenever the bailiffs came round he’d send them away. When he started his label he said, ‘You can’t be a record company if you haven’t lost money on ACR [laughter]”.

Moscrop: “Our first album for Rob’s was actually the demos for the next A&M album. They came to hear what we were doing and we played them Manik, really loud, showing the uncommercial side of ACR. We wanted to see their faces. I think that track made them drop us [laughter]. It was a relief, really. After Rob died [who died in 1999, aged 46], we spent several years not really doing anything and then Soul Jazz asked us to do a compilation [Early, 2002] and play a gig at Electrowerkz in London. We started practising the old tunes, and thought, ‘They’re really good, aren’t they?!”

ACR BOX (2019)

ACR’s last studio album was Mind Made Up in 2008, but now, old meets new as an exhaustive box set brings together classics, demos and unreleased gems. Their inimitable cover of Talking Heads’ Houses In Motion is already gaining radio and clubland traction. In 1979, both bands toured together – and probably influenced each other.

Johnson: “[Talking Heads’ singer] David Byrne stood at the side of the stage watching us every night. And lo and behold then they did [the much more funk-based] Remain In Light.”

A Certain Ratio & Grace Jones. Photo by Kevin Cummins

Moscrop: “But they influenced us as well. You can’t help but be influenced by bands you play with, like we were by The Pop Group. Talking Heads were really nice to us: gave us full use of the PA, lights, even a tuner, which was a first for us [laughter]. Houses In Motion was something we originally did with Martin Hannett in 1979, but never finished. We were supposed to do it with Grace Jones and she came down to the studio but didn’t sing a note. When [Jones’ label] Island found out, it all kicked off. I don’t think they wanted her working with Martin Hannett, and before we knew it the whole thing was off.”

Johnson: “But then recently we found the original multitrack after 40 years. It was in a right state but just needed rescuing. The voice is Simon [Topping] singing through Martin’s AMX delay, which meant you could change the pitch of Simon’s voice using a keyboard. It’s sampling, really, about 10 years before samplers were invented.”

Ahead of their time, as ever: here’s to another 40 years.

ACR:Box is out now on Mute. A Certain Ratio are on tour throughout the UK. More information here.

Dave Simpson is a music journalist, author of the book The Fallen (about The Fall) and very amateur drummer. Follow him on Twitter.

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