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We are committed to providing a website that is accessible to the widest possible audience, regardless of technology or ability. We are actively working to increase the accessibility and usability of our website and in doing so adhere to many of the available standards and guidelines. This website endeavours to conform to level Double-A of the World Wide Web Consortium W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0. These guidelines explain how to make web content more accessible for people with disabilities. Conformance with these guidelines will help make the web more user friendly for all people. This site has been built using code compliant with W3C standards for HTML and CSS. The site displays correctly in current browsers and using standards compliant HTML/CSS code means any future browsers will also display it correctly. Whilst we strive to adhere to the accepted guidelines and standards for accessibility and usability, it is not always possible to do so in all area...
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You Tube Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lixybJTWZ9Y Being active and engaged in a sport or hobby is a big part of life for lots of people, especially when you’re young. Disabled people should have access to all the opportunities to be just as active as non-disabled people, and many sports are easily adapted so people with ataxia can participate fully. Unfortunately, statistics show that people with disabilities are half as likely to participate in sports as those without. Fortunately this doesn’t have to be the case, and the number of people with disabilities taking part in sport is slowly improving, as there are now many more accessible programmes and initiatives for people with disabilities who want to get involved. When people think about disability and sports these days, people immediately think of the Paralympics, especially following the great success of the London 2012 Paralympic Games which encouraged a huge surge in participation– and altho...
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The Mark Dower Trust awards young adults with ataxia financial grants of up to £3,000 to support their independence - whether through further education, hobbies and interests, or equipment. In 2018, Piers won a portion of the grant to pay for an iPad Pro; he's studying illustration at university, and the iPad Pro accommodates his tremor caused by ataxia. Piers tell us more about how the grant has supported him. My name is Piers Schofield and I am a student studying Illustration at the University of Huddersfield. I am currently at the end of my second year. I really enjoyed my first year, because of the new facilities and equipment that I got to try out, and I excelled at my studies, having earned a high 2:1 grade for the year which I was really proud of. I was diagnosed with Friedreich’s ataxia when I was 16 and in recent times, the condition has started to have an impact on the quality of my work. When I put this issue forward to one of my tutors, he suggested I have ...
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Welcome... The 16-30 Website is live! We're delighted to be able to share with you the Ataxia 16:30 website. It's been a long time coming and certainly wouldn't have been possible without the generous support of Comic Relief.  To be able to provide a dedicated platform for young people who are battling ataxia is so important from our point of view and we're excited about the prospect of being the catalyst for new friendships and avenues of support. We hope you like the website and if you have any feedback please get in touch with Jonathan at communications@ataxia.org.uk 
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Let's be honest, living with ataxia can be pretty tough. Sometimes the simplest of things can be the most difficult. That's why we feel that having the opportunity to take advice and share coping techniques alongside other young people can be infinitely beneficial. We would love for all of members to chat, engage and maybe even meet up, but in the meantime, why not just take a look around. Have a look at the advice on offer and if you feel we’re missing something, gives us a shout! Across this website we have number of pages we think you'll find useful. Our Advice section has useful links, videos and guidance on several crucial topics including exercise, relationships and education to name a few. We also have a blog written by our 16:30 group. If you love to write and are eager to share your experiences, please get in touch! Need some financial support to gain the level of independence you want? Check out the Mark Dower Trust to see how to ap...
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It was an absolute pleasure to be involved at the 44th Naidex event held in Birmingham. So many people were there to better understand disability, from occupational therapists, to doctors, but most importantly, people with conditions themselves: individuals with MS, or cerebral palsy, wished to learn from one another, too. We're in control What was great to see was people living with a disability were actually in control – people from all professions were learning from us, and not the other way around! Seeing so many things, from bidets to budget wheelchairs, personal alarms to powered wheelchairs, there was something for everyone! Keeping with the musical analogies from my last blog, Nik Kershaw’s song “wouldn’t it be good,” springs to mind. The song is really a two-sided dialogue: ‘us and them,’ with many disabled individuals wondering if “...the grass is greener over there.” Well I can tell you, Naidex felt anything but that &...
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Lee Geohagen Check out Lee's blog, 'I'm Happy Being Happy,' about being a young man who lives with a disability. He hopes by keeping this blog to share his perspective, both with people who have and don't have disabilities themselves. Have you had similar experiences to Lee? Why not get in touch with him and share your own story? Also, send him requests you may have for a lasagna recipe, because apparently he knows a good one!  Click on the image below to have a read.
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Holly was awarded the Mark Dower Trust grant in early 2018, to assist payment for art classes and workshops. Holly is a professional painter, working in her gallery in Norwich and selling her artwork that incorporates her ataxic symptoms into her style. Below, she tells us about what winning the award has given her. I’m so unbelievably grateful to be awarded the Mark Dower Trust this year. It has enabled me to discover a new art form: pottery, which I have never done before. I have so enjoyed finding out different ways to express myself through my art. It was also really lovely to change up my routine: one day a week I was able to do something different, but equally creative to my usual work. I found the whole experience really relaxing and therapeutic. For anyone who has not tried throwing on a pottery wheel, I really recommend it! Through the medium of pottery, I was able to create art which wasn’t defined by my disability. Similarly with art – there is no direct...
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Thanks for taking the time to visit us! The fact that you're reading this is a great start. As with so many things, facing up to something you know little about can be a daunting prospect. However, you are not alone. There are thousands of young people in the UK living with ataxia and for the first time, Ataxia UK has been able to coordinate a platform where young people can all meet. What we do Ataxia: 16-30 is an online community of support and advice, designed at engaging more young people who have ataxia with one another, as well as offering practical guidance. Across the website you will find a mixture of tips and advice from other young people, as well as some handy directions for where to look if you find yourself in need of help. This help can come in many shapes and forms but we feel the best way to understand your ataxia is by hearing the stories of other people. People who know exactly what you are going through, who can of...
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The Ataxia UK Ambassador's project is an opportunity for our 16-30's group members to  become media savvy, tell their stories and represent Ataxia UK at events, to the media and online. Our Ambassadors are trained up to tell their story in a way that will resonate with the media and help raise awareness of ataxia, as well as confidence in telling their stories. Taking part in the Ambassador Project offers more opportunities to meet with friends, gain practice in networking as a representative of the charity and to build skills that can enhance employment, hobbies and other activities. What to expect Ataxia UK Ambassadors can look forward to liaising with our media trainer Trevor Barnes, radio presenter from the BBC; be taught how to blog/vlog their stories, with guidance from the Communications team; hop onto the Ataxia UK social media accounts for big events and participate in our social media strategies.  Amb...
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