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AspenRidge Recovery Blog by Aspenridge Recovery - 1w ago

If you have recently quit drinking alcohol, then you’ve accomplished a great goal in your life. Going through the process of detoxing from alcohol is difficult; it also requires substantial strength. Now that you are through the initial phase of eliminating your body of the toxins of alcohol, you may feel that your hard days are over. However, many people have a hard time after they quit drinking because of uncomfortable symptoms they have (unrelated to withdrawal). In these situations, Campral is a medication that will ease your symptoms. What is a Campral treatment program? And how does Campral work? Let’s take a closer look at this effective medication for those recovering from alcohol use disorder.

What is Campral and What is it Used For?

Campral is a medication that is prescribed for people who have already quit drinking alcohol. It helps people maintain sobriety by eliminating symptoms that occur after the initial withdrawal is passed.

Chronic drinking changes the chemistry of the brain. Alcohol is a depressant and when the central nervous system becomes depressed, the brain responds by compensating. A neurotransmitter in the brain called glutamate is diminished when someone drinks. Over time it changes the chemistry of the brain so that when the person quits drinking, the level of glutamate increases. This part of the brain is responsible for hyperactivity. So this can lead to agitation, anxiety, insomnia, and so on. It may be difficult to sleep, focus, and feel comfortable thus leading the person to crave a drink to “calm” their nerves. This is where Campral steps in.

How Does Campral Work? 

Campral takes over to help to regulate things in the brain. Where alcohol once made the entire body and brain malfunction, Campral seeks to even out the chemicals of the brain. This will directly affect the activities of the body. You will notice a more relaxed and even chemistry. You’ll be able to sleep better and you won’t feel so anxious. All of this helps reduce your desire for alcohol which helps you maintain sobriety. How does it actually affect the brain? Campral works by inhibiting the release of glutamate as well as triggering the release of taurine. Taurine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter, which decreases the level of excitation the person experiences.

Who Should Use Campral?

When deciding to use a Campral treatment program for alcohol-related symptoms, it’s critical that your symptoms are NOT from alcohol withdrawal. Campral is not for that condition. In fact, the medication will not work on someone who is drinking alcohol or currently in the withdrawal process. Therefore, Campral can only be used for those who have already detoxed and are in the recovery process. In other words, those with alcohol use disorder who are actively involved in alcohol addiction treatment and are not experiencing withdrawal symptoms.

Finding Hope for Recovery

At AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood, we treat patients with compassion and care. Our serene and tranquil location will be a tonic to ease the stressors of life. Relax at our comforting treatment center with the Rocky Mountains as a backdrop. Find the comforts of home as you journey forward in life.

At our accredited center, we incorporate research-based therapies to facilitate your healing. Some of those therapies include:

Don’t let alcohol woes interrupt your success in life. Now that you know how does Campral work, you can have peace of mind and body. Contact AspenRidge Recovery for insurance verification at 866.977.8625, and begin your journey to a whole new you.

The post How Does Campral Work? appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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With the fourth of July coming up shortly, many people are preparing for a celebratory time. Picnics, cookouts, and fireworks mark this special occasion of celebration. For many, the atmosphere around the fourth of July can become rowdy as people stay up late partying and lighting their own fireworks. For those who are in recovery from drug or alcohol use disorder, having a sober fourth of July may seem like an impossibility. However, with a strong rehab alumni program, you have resources and tools to get you through these tough times.

What is a Rehab Alumni Program?

A rehab alumni program consists of members who have gone through the rehab process and are in recovery. These members are committed to supporting one another through activities and structured meetings. Alumni members realize the importance of having supportive friends to stay sober.

Program activities include:

  • Dinner get-togethers
  • Physical activities such as hiking
  • Supportive activities around the holidays
  • 24-hour support when someone is struggling
  • Volunteer programs to allow alumni to give back
Benefits of an Alumni Program

Being a part of an alumni program offers many benefits. It allows you to connect with new friends so that old friends don’t drag you backward. This type of program also provides you with a safety net in case you start to feel overwhelmed or stressed. You’ll always have a group of people who truly understand what you’re going through. Finally, an alumni program provides you with an outlet to give back to the community and help others who are starting their journey to healing. Through your story, others find inspiration and learn.

Tips for Having a Sober Fourth of July 

If you are part of an alumni group, then this fourth of July you can connect with them to help keep the night sober. If you’re not, then contacting a treatment facility to join is an important first step.

Having a sober fourth of July is possible with a few proactive steps in mind:

  • Make a plan in advance and stick with it
  • Attend family-friendly events where there is no drinking or drugs
  • Go out with a sober friend for the fourth of July
  • Watch the fireworks from home, if possible
Seek Treatment Today

If you are struggling with substance use disorder or in recovery, contact a drug addiction treatment center for assistance. Complete the insurance verification information and begin the admissions process. Take steps to make life better with AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

Our lovely location surrounded by the beautiful Rocky Mountains is the serene atmosphere you need to find healing for your mind and body. At AspenRidge, you’ll discover the following treatment programs:

Don’t let current or past drug addiction hold you back from enjoying life. You can overcome your problems and have a sober fourth of July. Contact AspenRidge Recovery at 866.977.8625, and we’ll help you every step of the way on your journey to healing and beyond.

The post Tips for Having a Sober Fourth Of July appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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June 27th each year marks National PTSD Awareness Day, a day dedicated to improving education and understanding of trauma related disorders. Experience with or exposure to trauma can cause PTSD, which stands for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Trauma can include witnessing a violent crime or experiencing a tragic event. PTSD is also one of the most common co-occurring disorders that accompany addiction. A co-occurring disorder is when you suffer from both addiction and a mental health disorder.

Trauma and PTSD can make it difficult to cope with day to day life. Symptoms can be overwhelming and even emotionally crippling, which can make drugs and alcohol a convenient method to self-medicate. Drugs and alcohol can help momentarily relieve symptoms like anxiety, but ultimately addiction significantly worsens conditions like PTSD. When symptoms become debilitating, seek a PTSD treatment program that can address all of your needs.

What is National PTSD Awareness Day?

National PTSD Awareness Day 2019 focuses on raising awareness about PTSD and other trauma related disorders. National PTSD Awareness Day started in 2010 after Senator Kent Conrad proposed designating a nationally recognized day to improve understanding about PTSD. Nearly 20% of people who witness or experience a traumatic event develop PTSD. PTSD can be disabling and causes serious symptoms, including:

  • Nightmares and night terrors
  • Avoidance of environments that remind you of the traumatic event
  • Flashbacks
  • Anxiety
  • Panic attacks
  • Insomnia
How PTSD and Addiction Are Connected

Nearly half of all people struggling with addiction have a co-occurring mental health disorder. If you have a mental health disorder, such as PTSD or depression, it can make you more likely to experiment with drugs or alcohol. Since drugs and alcohol can help alleviate anxiety, improve mood, and lower inhibitions, they can be an attractive option to cope with mental health symptoms. Mental health counseling often accompanies addiction treatment so each individual has the greatest chance at success.

Recognizing the prevalence of co-occurring disorders, many treatment centers offer dual diagnosis programs to help you recover from addiction while providing mental health treatment. Stabilizing your mental health can drastically improve your ability to recover from addiction. Properly managing mental health symptoms through therapy and medication helps improve treatment outcomes. Additionally, treatment helps stabilize your brain chemistry and teaches you healthy coping strategies. For example, if anxiety is a trigger for drug use, managing your anxiety can help prevent you from relapsing.

Dual diagnosis treatment can help you address past trauma and find ways to manage your symptoms without the use of drugs or alcohol.

Finding Help Today

When you decide you are ready to reach out for help with trauma or addiction, it can be difficult to find the right treatment center. Finding a treatment center that provides dual diagnosis and trauma related programs improves your chances of successfully beating addiction.

National PTSD Awareness Day 2019 demonstrates how common and serious PTSD is and that treatment can be a lifesaver. Reaching out to treatment centers directly is the best way to know what programs are offered and to complete additional steps like insurance verification before you arrive. Contact AspenRidge Recovery today at 866.977.8625 to find out more about how our PTSD treatment program can help you achieve your recovery goals.

The post National PTSD Awareness Day 2019 appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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AspenRidge Recovery Blog by Aspenridge Recovery - 3w ago

If you or a loved one is struggling with a substance abuse problem, you may be wondering what are synthetic drugs? Synthetic drugs, also known as designer drugs, are chemically-created drugs that are meant to give similar effects as drugs like opiates, stimulants, or hallucinogenics. Unlike drugs like heroin or cocaine, synthetic drugs are, in many cases, legal. Chemists design these substances in part to evade drug laws. This means online sellers and stores can distribute them without legal ramifications.

Examples of synthetic drugs include K2 and bath salts. Both became widely abused in the United States throughout the 2010s. When wondering what are synthetic drugs, you may wonder if they are as addictive as substances like alcohol and heroin. Although they may be chemically different than the drugs they emulate, these drugs are just as addictive. Finding a synthetic drug addiction treatment program can help you or a loved one begin to heal.

What Are Synthetic Drugs?

There are over 200 different types of synthetic drugs, many of which remain legal. Chemists create new drugs that cause almost identical effects as known substances like marijuana and cocaine. Therefore, availability spreads until legislators update laws to ban their sale. Some examples include:

  • K2 and Spice
  • Bath salts
  • PCP
  • LSD
  • MDMA
  • Fentanyl

Synthetic drugs are most popular among young adults and teenagers, although all age groups abuse them. Designer drugs are especially common at raves, parties, and night clubs because many of them create euphoric, amphetamine-like effects. In many cases, young people turn to synthetic drugs as a last resort to escape crippling mental health symptoms. Dual diagnosis treatment addresses any mental health concerns that precede or are caused by substance abuse.

Dangers of Synthetic Drugs

Synthetic cannabinoids, which replicate the effects of THC in marijuana, are among the most prevalent and easily accessible substances in the United States. K2 and spice are two types of synthetic cannabinoids. Bath salts, another type of designer drug, simulate the effects of amphetamines and methamphetamine.

Designer drugs are not only addictive but extremely dangerous. Users rarely receive information about their chemical composition. However, known side effects of drugs like bath salts and K2 include psychosis, confusion, hallucinations, and brain damage. If you are wondering what are synthetic drugs and why are they so dangerous, the simple answer is that only the chemist that created the drug truly knows the ingredients.

The risks of taking drugs magnify when you don’t know what they contain. Designer drugs can cause serious mental impairment and short term and long-term psychotic episodes. It is not fully understood what long-term consequences are associated with synthetic drug addiction. However, known dangers associated with continued use and overdoses can include seizures, memory loss, and personality changes.

Finding a Treatment Program 

Combating addiction can be difficult, especially if you are wondering what are synthetic drugs and are unclear about the risks associated with them. Don’t worry about the cost of treatment and insurance verification, the Affordable Care Act requires insurance providers to cover costs associated with substance abuse treatment.  Even if you feel hopeless or lost while trapped in addiction, recovery is always possible. Contact AspenRidge Recovery today at 866.977.8625 to learn more about how our Colorado addiction rehab can help you or a loved one overcome addiction and achieve recovery.

The post What Are Synthetic Drugs? appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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Drug addiction and substance abuse problems impact countless families. When looking for solutions, you must know that addiction and family are related. Even though it may seem like the only person impacted by addiction is the user, the truth is that it impacts everybody in the user’s network, including family members.

When you abuse drugs or alcohol, the impact of addiction causes ripples and effects your family and friends. Addiction causes you to change your behavior and priorities, which often creates conflict with your loved ones. The things you do in order to support your addiction can hurt your family emotionally and financially.

Addiction can cause you to neglect your parents, spouse, and children. If you experience financial problems because of your substance abuse issues, it may result in your family having to bear the costs of unpaid bills and mounting debt. Addiction is a family disease because watching a loved one suffer can be hurtful, confusing, and emotionally trying. You may feel helpless watching a loved one struggle with a drug or alcohol problem. A family therapy program helps all who participate in dealing with the stress, shame, anger, and other emotions that stem from being on both sides of addiction.

How Are Addiction and Family Linked?

Addiction can not only hurt those struggling to quit, but also their loved ones. If you have problems controlling your drinking or drug use, the consequences have likely impacted your family. Some of the ways that addiction can impact your family include:

  • Making your loved ones feel neglected
  • Damaging your relationship with your children, parents and/or spouse
  • Creating financial problems
  • Increasing the chances of your marriage ending in divorce
  • Causing custody problems
  • Forcing your family to worry about your safety and wellbeing

As seen above, struggling with a substance abuse problem can put significant strains on family relationships, especially among partners and spouses. Addiction and substance abuse is a common reason couples divorce or break up. Couples that deal with addiction issues are more likely to argue, experience domestic violence, and divorce. Having children while struggling with addiction can create additional problems with child care, as your partner or spouse may be uncomfortable with you interacting with your kids while intoxicated.

How Treatment Can Help Families Recover

While treatment centers all offer unique programs, many treatment centers provide you with the ability to include your family and loved ones in your treatment. Family therapy and marriage counseling can help you work with your loved ones to set up healthy boundaries, establish mutual understanding, and work as a team during your recovery. Family therapy accompanies other addiction therapy programs so you receive comprehensive treatment.

Also, family therapy sessions can help your loved ones express how your addiction has impacted them and their expectations of you following discharge. Learning to set and maintain healthy boundaries will help, especially when used alongside an addiction aftercare program. When choosing which program is best for you, make sure you receive insurance verification before arriving to prevent unexpected bills.

Finding Help Today

Addiction and family are linked. If you or a loved one is trapped in the pits of addiction, treatment can be your lifeline. Contact AspenRidge Recovery today at 866.977.8625 to learn more about how we can help you and your family recover from addiction.

The post How Addiction and Family Can Affect Your Life appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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If you or a loved one is using heroin, it is important to understand what the common heroin overdose symptoms are. Almost 1,000,000 Americans reported that they used heroin in 2016, and each year these numbers continue to rise. However, help is available. Finding a high-quality heroin addiction treatment program can guide you or a loved one to recovery.

Heroin use can impact anyone, regardless of age, race, gender, or income bracket. What makes heroin so dangerous is that many addicts choose to inject it in order to intensify its effects. This makes the risk of overdose extremely high among heroin users. Additionally, tainted heroin containing fentanyl, a powerful opiate that is stronger than morphine, adds to the overdose epidemic. Fatal overdoses are becoming a leading cause of accidental death in the United States as countless families are impacted daily by the heroin epidemic.

Even though overdoses can be fatal, they can be successfully treated by administering Narcan. In some areas, Narcan is available without a prescription in order to help prevent overdose deaths. Heroin overdose symptoms can be terrifying to experience or witness but understanding the signs of an overdose can help you or a loved one survive an overdose.

What Are Heroin Overdose Symptoms?

Because of the high risk of potentially fatal overdoses linked to heroin use, recognizing heroin overdose symptoms is essential if you or a loved one is addicted to heroin. Some of the most common signs that you or a loved one is experiencing a heroin overdose include:

  • Loss of consciousness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Twitches or tremors
  • Weak pulse
  • Confusion, disorientation or delirium
  • Blush nails or lips

When you recognize heroin overdose symptoms, it is imperative to get medical help immediately. Calling 911 can help save you or a loved one’s life. Many paramedics and ambulances carry Narcan, which can immediately reverse the effects of a heroin overdose. The sooner they can administer Narcan, the greater the chance that you will recover. Heroin overdoses can be fatal and result in serious medical complications like brain damage, a coma, or heart damage. Lack of oxygen to the brain during an overdose can cause irreversible cognitive impairments.

Treatment for Heroin Addiction

Heroin addiction can be treated in an inpatient or outpatient setting. Medically supervised detox services are also available at many treatment centers. Inpatient programs are the highest level of care and provide 24/7 access to medical professionals and therapeutic staff.

Additionally, treatment involves the utilization of evidence-based addiction treatments like cognitive behavioral therapy and group therapy. Individual, family, and marital counseling can also help you navigate the emotional complexities involved with recovery. Before finalizing treatment plans, make sure to complete insurance verification procedures with your treatment provider to ensure your care is covered.

It’s Time to Take the Next Steps

Heroin overdose symptoms can be terrifying, but they can also be a sign that you or a loved one needs help. Reaching out for help can be hard, but treatment offers you the opportunity to recover and regain control of your life. Contact AspenRidge Recovery today at 866.977.8625 to find out more about how our Colorado addiction rehab can guide you on your recovery journey.

The post Heroin Overdose Symptoms You Need to Know appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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When you seek help for your drug or alcohol addiction, you possibly suffer other conditions along with that substance use disorder. In fact, mental health problems like mood disorders prove very common in addiction. Either these mood problems lead to substance abuse and addiction, or you develop a substance induced mood disorder. Which condition came first matters less than getting the help you need.

Substance Induced Mood Disorder Signs

A substance induced mood disorder is a type of depression. This depression comes from substance use, like that of alcohol, prescription medications, or illicit drugs. If you find yourself stuck in the cycle of addiction, this cycle possibly includes a mood disorder.

You can recognize this type of mood disorder because you suffer deep depression for longer than a typical drug or alcohol “crash.” You possibly even lose interest in all aspects of your life. Many people feel suicidal with a mood disorder. If you feel suicidal, you need immediate help from a hospital, such as through a depression treatment program.

Sadly, many of those suffering these symptoms turn back to their drugs or alcohol to soothe their feelings. But instead of helping their mood, their continued substance abuse only makes the depression worse. Since you think of your substances as making you feel good in the past, you likely suffer some denial about how they actually cause depression.

There are many types of mood disorders and depression. So diagnosing your problem is not as easy as it sounds. Your doctor or addiction specialist in your addiction therapy program must gain an understanding of your symptoms and the substances you abuse. They also need to know about your mental health history, such as when you were not abusing drugs or using other substances possibly responsible for your depression.

Drugs Often Responsible for Mood Disorders

You can suffer a mood disorder with or without substance abuse. However, a mood disorder caused by drug or alcohol abuse often leads to very deep depression and a worsening addiction. Different drugs affect your mood in different ways. So the substances you abuse play a big role in the type and depth of your mood disorder.

Medications like antibiotics and steroids prove as likely to cause a mood disorder as illicit drugs or abused prescription medications. Some common drugs causing mood disorders include:

  • Alcohol
  • Hallucinogens
  • Inhalants
  • Opioids
  • Sedatives
  • Cocaine
  • Amphetamines
Help for Your Substance Induced Mood Disorder

If you suffer depression because of your substance abuse, you need help from a quality addiction treatment program. Doctors refer to the help you need as dual diagnosis treatment. Through dual diagnosis treatment, you gain help for your substance abuse and mental health problems at the same time.

The specific type of programs and services you need include:

All of these programs and services take place in Lakewood, Colorado at AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood. Through insurance verification you gain a clear understanding of how your insurance policy pays for treatment at AspenRidge Recovery. This also tells you the amount of your out-of-pocket expense, if any.

To learn more about available programs and to verify your insurance benefits, contact AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood now at 8669778625. You can get help for your substance induced mood disorder or other addiction-related mental health problems. Therefore, call AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood for this help now.

The post What is a Substance Induced Mood Disorder? appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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AspenRidge Recovery Blog by Aspenridge Recovery - 1M ago

Many people search the web wondering, “Is marijuana addictive?” One point of confusion is recent legalization of the drug for medicinal and recreational use. These new state laws make people unclear as to whether weed causes health problems or treats them. It also contradicts decades of government assertion that the drug is a one way street to major life problems.

Is Marijuana Addictive Exactly?

To understand the answer to the question, is marijuana addictive, you first need to understand addiction. Addiction leads to a compulsive drive to find and use more of a substance, even with knowing that the drug causes you harm. This harm reaches into your health, social life, relationships, finances, work, and freedoms. Eventually, drug addiction takes you to a drug detox center and rehab, if you want to end your substance abuse.

The Controlled Substances Act of 1990 classifies drugs according to their dangers, such as addictive nature. Marijuana is a Schedule I drug under this act. That means it has no medicinal value but carries a high risk of abuse. So this classification as Schedule I clearly goes against recent law changes for legal marijuana use by people needing its medicinal effects.

At the same time, many Americans believe legal drugs offer no dangers. They think marijuana is not addictive because you can legally use it in many states. But this is simply a matter of confusion. Marijuana is addictive to many people.

About Addictive Nature of Marijuana

Marijuana is addictive, but in different ways than other drugs. All addictive substances meet two basic indicators of addiction, those being tolerance and dependence with withdrawal. Tolerance happens when you need to use more of a drug over time to feel its effects. Dependence is needing the drug to function normally, then suffering some signs of withdrawal when quitting that use.

However, understanding marijuana addiction does not stop there. These two rules prove confusing when it comes to whether marijuana use affects an individual’s life. Even with tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal, you may not suffer actual addiction to weed. That is a truth almost unique to this drug because you can suffer addiction to it but not compulsively use marijuana.

Still, experiencing tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal with your marijuana use indicates your high likelihood of developing a substance use disorder. For that disorder, only a marijuana addiction treatment program helps you end your substance abuse for a better life.

Signs of Marijuana Addiction

Some signs point to your need for a marijuana addiction treatment program, relating to your own addiction. But you must be willing to see these signs. One of the biggest issues in this drug’s use is the users’ strong denial when they have a real problem.

Besides denial, other signs that you if marijuana is addictive include:

  • Suffering withdrawal symptoms when not using
  • Money problems related to drug purchases
  • Work problems and lost jobs
  • Using the drug despite knowing it causes problems
  • Giving up favorite activities to use your drug
  • Suffering personal problems with money, relationships and legal offenses
  • Wanting to stop using but not being able to do so

All of these signs show you need marijuana addiction treatment. Without professional help, the addiction may take control and lead to even more devastating effects.

Finding the Right Marijuana Addiction Treatment for You

Finding a good treatment program comes down to finding one that meets your personal needs to overcome the addictive nature of marijuana. This process includes insurance verification, to make sure your chosen rehab accepts your insurance policy. You also need access to a range of programs and therapies that include:

  • PHP, IOP and OP rehab programs
  • Drug detox
  • 90 day rehab
  • Trauma therapy and neurofeedback
  • Individual, group and family therapy

AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood provides all of these programs and services in Lakewood, CO. Contact AspenRidge Recovery now to learn more about available programs and gain answers to your questions like, “Is marijuana addictive?” Through the right help, you can build a better life in recovery. Call 8669778625 now for immediate assistance.

The post Is Marijuana Addictive? appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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AspenRidge Recovery Blog by Aspenridge Recovery - 1M ago

As such a dangerous and addictive drug, heroin leads to a number of side effects of symptoms. If you are worried that a loved one is abusing heroin, then it helps to know some of the most common signs. Take a look at some common signs of heroin use and plan how to respond if you recognize these signs.

Signs of Heroin Use Concerning Energy and Lethargy

Heroin is an opioid drug. When you take heroin, it can act as a kind of depressant on the entire body. That means that the body’s functions will start to slow down. When a person is under the influence of heroin, they might be lethargic or sleepy.

Often, someone who uses heroin seems fine until they experience a drastic drop in energy. They might fall asleep or close their eyes halfway through a conversation, for example. You might notice that their sleep cycles are random, or they might never seem fully rested.

Heroin Paraphernalia

Many of the common signs of heroin use are physical or behavioral. However, another way to determine whether someone is using heroin is by looking for drug-related paraphernalia. If you see needles or syringes but the individual doesn’t need them for medical purposes, that might be a red flag.

A few other items commonly associated with heroin use and abuse include the following:

  • Burned silver spoons
  • Stray shoelaces or shoes that are missing shoelaces
  • Aluminum foil with burn marks
  • Pipes
  • Small plastic baggies with or without white residue
Behavioral Changes

Signs of heroin use can impact users in countless ways. Some of the most problematic changes are not physical but behavioral. When you use heroin, a lot about your personality and your behavior will change.

Someone that used to be friendly and outgoing might become shy and withdrawn. Someone who loved getting dressed up and meeting with friends might stop all grooming and stay at home alone instead. Whenever a person’s behavior changes for seemingly no reason, it is worth exploring the cause. Heroin could be to blame for drastic and unexplained changes to a person’s behavior.

Small Pupils

One of the most common physical signs of opioid abuse, including heroin, is pupil constriction. When a person uses heroin, a natural response is for the pupil to constrict. This makes the pupil of the eye look a lot smaller, sometimes as small as a pinpoint. If someone has noticeably smaller pupils, then opiates like heroin are very likely to blame.

Slurred Speech

Another way that heroin can impact a user physically is when it comes to speech. When a person is under the influence of heroin, they might have trouble speaking properly. They might talk slowly and have a hard time choosing the right words, or their words might be slurred. Often, bystanders think that heroin users are drunk because so many of the symptoms are similar.

Responding to Common Signs of Heroin Use

Because heroin is so addictive, it is likely that a heroin user is also struggling with addiction. If you notice any of these signs of heroin use, then a heroin addiction treatment program is probably the right choice. At AspenRidge Recovery, clients can benefit from a drug detox center as well as ongoing rehab and support programs. Just a few of the many therapies and treatment methods available to clients include:

Recognizing the signs of heroin use is the first step in getting a loved one the right treatment. For insurance verification and to learn more about available rehab programs in Lakewood, Colorado, contact AspenRidge Recovery at 8669778625.

The post Common Signs of Heroin Use appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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AspenRidge Recovery Blog by Aspenridge Recovery - 1M ago

Once you have completed drug detox and rehab programs, you will emerge sober and ready to fight back against the risk of relapse. However, getting sober is not the same as staying sober. To learn how to stay sober, it is always smart to get professional guidance. Here are some of the most effective ways to stay sober once rehab is over.

Create a Solid Support System To Learn How to Stay Sober

No one has to go through addiction recovery on their own. That is usually a sentiment you hear about in withdrawal or in treatment, but it is just as true once treatment ends. No one has to deal with obstacles solo. Having a support system can hold you accountable and make it much, much easier for you to stay on track.

Your support system should be unique to you, your lifestyle, and your needs. Sometimes, family members can be an ideal form of support. You might prefer to build a support system from your peers, or it might be best to rely on friends you have met through recovery programs.

Avoid Situations Packed With Temptations

One of the biggest myths surrounding sobriety is that you can go straight back to your old lifestyle and stay sober with ease. Your old lifestyle is what caused you to struggle with substance abuse in the first place, so it will probably be problematic today as well.

Sometimes, it may be necessary to make big changes to create new, healthier environments. You might move to a new home or cut out friends that were also using drugs or abusing alcohol. Instead of meeting up with friends at bars, seek out ways to meet your friends for a coffee, a yoga class, or to do some shopping at the mall. In short, create your own environments that are free from common temptations.

Establish a Healthy Routine With New Habits

During a formal recovery program, you know how to stay sober because you have a set schedule every day. In fact, it is incredibly hard not to stay sober. When you’re living on your own, you might benefit from establishing your own regular routine.

A new routine means that you can establish new healthy habits. You won’t have to decide whether to eat breakfast or go for your morning walk because it will be an inherent part of your day. This also makes it easier to stay sober since you can reserve your willpower for the decisions that truly matter.

Find Outlets Where You Can Relieve Your Stress

In a life skills training program, clients will learn how they best relieve stress. There are countless ways to deal with stress in your life, but everyone has their own preferred methods. During rehab, it is important to figure out what works best for you and get in the habit of doing it regularly.

For you, that might mean going for a walk when you’re stressed. It could also be calling up a friend for a chat, cooking a fancy dinner for your family with music on, or going to a local support group meeting.

Learn How to Stay Sober For Life at AspenRidge

At a drug detox center and rehab center like AspenRidge, clients can learn how to maintain their newfound sobriety. A variety of treatments make it easy to stay on track, and they show clients how to remain sober for a lifetime. Common techniques and therapies include:

The best place to learn how to stay sober is in recovery. Contact AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood in Colorado at 8669778625 for more information and insurance verification.

The post Learn How to Stay Sober appeared first on AspenRidge Recovery Lakewood.

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