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ART CAMP by Arielle Goddard - 4d ago
I love the silent hour of night,For blissful dreams may then arise,Revealing to my charmed sight What may not bless my waking eyes


- Anne Brontë Hard to believe that it’s been a whole year since we shared our hand painted fish softies with you! Also hard to believe that it’s been 10 weeks since I have written a blog post. We have Trixi (aka the world’s nicest kid-friendly sewing guru) to thank for pulling me out of blogger semi-retirement. If you are a “regular” here you already know about Sew-a-Softie. If you are new, definitely click that last link. Trixi has been spearheading this global sew-athon since 2016. We joined the party in winter of 2017 with the debut of our Fa-la-la-la Llama (also known as Llama Del Rey depending on who you ask). If you are interested in sewing with kids Trixi’s site Coloured Buttons should be your first stop. Ms. T shares tons of tips and tricks and has a wide array of free softie tutorials to meet the needs of every skill level. If you want to see this year’s line up of softies head over to the Gram. Each day a different crafty account is sharing a new softie tutorial.
Without further ado, I introduce you to our “DROP-CLOTH MOTH” softie. Yes, I love a good rhyme and YES, I love an abstract paint job and YES, splatter paint is still H’s favorite mode of art-ing. How do you feel about moths? If you are like my girls..and my dog you are not into the “real life” version. If you are like me, you might think they are maybe just a little bit cooler than butterflies? They are nocturnal (cool) they are amazing pollinators (good peeps) there are 11,000 moth species in the united states alone. They outnumber butterflies by more than 10 to 1! Moths range in size from the tip of a pencil (micro) to the size of a bird (I am looking at you Atlas Moth). When I say moth you are probably thinking drab…hold please: 

ATLAS MOTH PERCHED ON AN ADULT SIZE ARM!

     So now that we have been properly introduced and dare I say a wee bit inspired? Let’s talk process. If I was doing this project with a big group I would absolutely use a white sheet or canvas drop cloth and let the littles go BIG and wild collaborative painting style. For the sake of softie and fuzzy moth we used white felt and we kept our dribbles and drops contained. If you are working with a smaller group (like the 3 of us) or if you have never painted on felt..I say give it a go. Fuzzy is fun! 

Materials:

  • moth template(s) * see opt-in below

  • white felt

  • diluted acrylic paint

  • full bodied floppy paint brush

  • embroidery floss

  • needle

  • sparkly opalescent pipe cleaner

  • fluffy yarn (we used white and mint)

  • polyfill stuffing

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    1. print and cut out your moth templates 2. Trace your template onto your fabric (each moth shape needs to be traced twice to create a front and a back for your softie). The wings on our templates are not symmetrical so you want to make sure you flip your shape over when you trace “the back” to create a mirror image. This will ensure you paint the right side and that your front and back line up. 3. Time for some splatter and spot “drop-cloth-style” painting!
     A word to the wise: painted felt takes a LONG TIME to dry. If you want a fabric that dries quickly choose canvas or duck. If you are like us and you want your moths to be fuzzy and soft plan to paint in the morning and sew in the afternoon.  Once your moths have dried it is time to cut!  Line up your front and back and start to stitch. Ri started with a running stitch and then opted to switch to a whip stitch (much faster). I forgot to get a stuffing shot but basically we stuffed in sections. The back of a paint brush, chop stick, or knitting needle works really well to push the fluff into hard to reach spots.    H was not willing to sew for this round of sew a softie (something about extreme exhaustion and summer break being a time to “hang out and chill”) but she was willing to yarn wrap. So I decided to create a separate stuffed thorax and abdomen for her to wrap.    We used a tack stitch to create an un-stuffed nook for our yarn body placement:   H is a big fan of ALL that glitters and shines so we added an opalescent pipe cleaner as antenna to our closed wing moth.     Ri wanted to skip the pipe cleaner antenna on our open wing moth so the yarn wrapped thorax+abdomen was placed just below the felt head on this one. Two different looks..we can’t decide if we have a favorite. extreme close up because that paint job…        
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    ART CAMP by Arielle Goddard - 2M ago
    Nothing should stand in the way of strong girls with bold dreams-Barack Obama This project was created and inspired by the amazing work of Brooklyn-based artist, Erin Robinson. I reached out to Erin to ask if I could create an up-cycled doll inspired by her work to feature in my International Women’s Day SHEro/artist tribute series. Erin graciously said, “yes!”. Then the flu hit our house (not once, not twice but three times), the delayed projects and obligations started to pile up, and I have been in a state of catch-up ever since.  I am so excited that TODAY IS THE DAY that I finally get to share our up-cycled dolly with you AND most importantly, the artist who inspired her. YAY!   I was first introduced to Erin’s artwork when Obama was getting ready to leave the white house. Erin created a series of illustrations for a Washington Post article (Obama’s Legacy -A special commemorative section on the 44th president of the United States). One of the illustrations was a family portrait in silhouette depicting The Obamas standing hand in hand walking forward and away from a faded out White House. The portrait captured the end of an era in such a profound and moving way that it quickly began popping up all over social media paired with heavy hearted and personal good bye posts. The image is iconic and beautiful, the lack of artist credit..was not as pretty. I did a quick google search, found the artist behind the work and then began tagging Erin (@brooklyndolly) on every post I could find. This portrait was my introduction to Erin’s work and it was definitely love at first sight. 

    Illustration by, Erin Robinson for the Washington Post. Obama’s Legacy - a special commemorative section on the 44th president of the United States

     

    You can find these prints and more in Erin’s Etsy shop. Click the image to visit her shop.

    How dreamy are her illustrations? The color, the texture, the overlays. Erin is a Fashion Designer by trade but received a foundation in fine art from Parsons School of Design and the Corcoran School of Art. Her work is inspired by “travel, color, texture, the feminine shape and the many shades and coifs of Brooklyn. She works in a variety of mediums; watercolor, ink, markers, charcoal, stencil, collage as well as digital artistry.”  

    The quote + text is from Erin’s Artist feature on the Framebridge site. The Queen of Thrones artwork was found on her Instagram feed.

     I wanted to create a tribute project that was up-cycled and sculptural, with a generous nod to Erin’s roots in fashion and design. I also wanted the DIY to be open ended enough that little artists could really make them their own. I hope that I have inspired you to go do a deep dive into Erin’s work. Follow her on IG here. Peruse her Etsy shop here. Find her website here (full site coming soon).     

    Materials:

     Find a bottle with good curves. If your bottle has a wrapper or label you want to to remove that before you start to wrap the surface with string.   Paint a liberal coat of mod podge on your clean recycled bottle and begin to wrap your string. Add the mod podge in 3” sections as you wind your way down the bottle.    Keep going until your whole bottle is wrapped   You can use colored string from the get go or you can use a light color and paint designs on your string like we did. We created a striped bib inspired by some design details we found in Erin’s work but you might want to create a print or design of your own.   To create the stacked bun we rolled tin foil in 3 balls (S, M and L) and wrapped each tin-ball with yarn. This cuts down on the amount of yarn you need to use to achieve a full bun shape.  We stacked and attached each section of the bun with hot glue. Including the first bun that is glued directly to the lip of the bottle.   We traced and cut a circle shape out of kraft colored tag board. Sketched our hair and facial features and then started adding color to the face with white, pink, and black paint pen. We rubbed a little oil pastel on the face and cheek to create texture and visual interest. Erin’s work is beautifully layered and textured. The last step was gluing on a few pieces of yarn on top of the hair part that framed our doll’s face.    We drew inspiration from Erin’s Manushka Dolls and decided to add pom poms to our doll’s buns and a layer of lace applique to the top and bottom of our dolls “dress”.        
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    ART CAMP by Arielle Goddard - 2M ago
    The man who never alters his opinion is like standing water and breeds reptiles of the mind. - William Blake My love affair with up-cycled art projects continues with these little lizards. Sometimes when I go to execute an idea it feels close but not quite right. Other times it feels like a flop. Every once in awhile I have an idea and the end result is better than I imagined. I thought these little lizards would be fun to make. I did not expect them to be so life-like or that they would inspire so much imaginative play for my girls…that was a delightful surprise. The art teacher in me is imagining using these lizards in a lot of different projects. Here are some ideas I have been thinking about:
    • Build a small world habitat and home for the 3-d lizards
    • Decorate them with aboriginal dotty designs and mount them to a piece of tree bark
    • Add fantastical details (spikes, collars, scales) and turn them into alibrijes style creatures
    • Mount them to a grassy Warhol inspired background and create and turn them into POP ART lizards!
    • Add the lizards to a wild mixed media jungle painting for a 3-D pop
    Are you ready to make some of your own? The process is simple, the supply list short, the possibilities = endless! 

    Cereal box lizards make really great accessories…if you wear them out in public, people will definitely do a double take!

     

    Materials:

    Print out your ART CAMP lizard template. If you are using card stock and not a cereal box you can print directly on your card stock and simply cut out the lizard shape. If you are using a cereal box (like we did) you will have to print, cut, and trace the lizard shape onto the inside of your cereal box. If you have a good pair of scissors the cereal box should be pretty easy to cut.   We painted our lizards with acrylic craft paint but you could certainly use tempera paint or even tempera paint sticks. Once your paint has dried you are going to bend your flat cut-out lizard into a more realistic standing body. See how the red and peach lizards are bent at the “joints”? Also kind of round out your lizard head and body. Use your thumbs to create a spoon like bend of the head. Press the under belly of your lizard and pull down the sides so he is a little more “puffed up”.      See how the black lizards head has a pretty nice shape? That just takes a little finger tip manipulation. We weren’t sure if we wanted to add designs on top of our paint or not so we waited until they were fully formed before adding spots and stripes. The dots were created with paint pens. Please note: If you know you want to add details it is probably a bit easier to decorate a flat lizard.   The scaly, dusty, stripes on this guy were created with chalk crayons   You might want to look at some lizard photographs to get ideas for designs. We took a peek at some spotted lizard examples and tried to emulate the varying types of spots and streaks.   Don’t forget to give your lizard a branch to sun bathe on!       
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    ART CAMP by Arielle Goddard - 2M ago
    Nothing is worth more than laughter. It is strength to laugh and to abandon oneself, to be light.

    -Frida Kahlo Next Friday (3/8) is International Women’s Day. In honor of this glorious occasion I am going to be sharing some projects that are inspired by some kick-ass creative woman. This year I would like to celebrate a few legends we all know and a few of my own personal SHEroes. When I was playing with concepts for a Frida project I kept thinking of my friend Shannon and her paper plate dancers. Shannon is that rare breed of human that beams sunshine—like a cool, well-read, insightful, fuchsia loving’, pattern wearing, heart on her sleeve, real talk, funny as ____ sun beam.  She is a passionate educator, a literacy warrior, a wickedly-talented writer and maker, as well as a mom to three littles under the age of 5.  In addition to being an all-around gem, she can whip up a themed birthday cake like nobody’s business, she's the queen of painted tissue paper collage, and beautiful, accessible, crafts.  If you are not following her, RUN to catch up.  Your eyes will radiate hearts, your brain will be nourished with teacher tips and book recommendations, your mama cup will be filled with camaraderie, and you will get your daily dose of vitamin D.  On a personal aside, this warrior friend has slid into my DM over the past 6 months and created a never ending virtual ‘mixed tape’ for my grieving heart.  I share this because it really speaks to the core of who she is. Oh! Saving the best for last:  If you are in Sydney, you are a golden ticket holder because Shannon is taking her love of little people, storybooks, and creativity offline at in-person workshops! You can find out more about her READ + CREATE pop-ups and register for classes on her site.


       Frida Kahlo was born July 6th, just south of Mexico City, in Coyoacán, Mexico. She grew up in big blue house called La Casa Azul with her parents and 6 sisters. Frida was born three years before the beginning of the Mexican revolution. In her writing, Frida described being ushered into the house by her mother as gunfire rang through the streets of her hometown. As a young girl Frida preferred spending time drawing by herself versus playing with her sisters. At age 6, Frida contracted polio, which damaged her right leg making it smaller than the left. Frida hid this deformity under long skirts. When she was 18 she was in a terrible bus accident that broke her spinal cord, collarbone, ribs, pelvic bone, leg, foot, and shoulder. The injuries from this accident were so severe and pervasive that they impacted her for the rest of her life and left her unable to bear children. Suffering, isolation, longing, and loss are re-occuring themes in her portraits but they are accompanied by an unshakable strength. When you look at the intimacy and detail in these portraits you don’t feel pity you are left in awe of the survivor. Frida created her own style of painting blending the mystical qualities of surrealism with the rooted strength of Mexican folk art. Despite being a prolific and talented artist, Frida spent most of her life known as “Diego Rivera’s wife”. It wasn’t really until the late 70s that Frida’s work was recognized by art historians and political activists. In the 90s Frida reached Icon status as an artist, feminist, and indigenous rights activist.  

    Materials:

     You can find the full tutorial for Shannon’s paper plate dancers including a video here. We followed her step by step but made it our own Frida doll with a couple swaps and some added details that I have shown you in the pictures below:   Layer on some detailed pattern work with a paint pen, chalk pen or gel pen!   Add some pretty eyelets to one of your skirt layers with a hole punch!   How about some fringe?!   We included some of the paper plate scalloping because it added a fancy trim   Paint or color your Frida Doll Printable and then cut it out and glue it onto the front of your pipe cleaner.        Click the video below (sound on) to watch Frida dance!     
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    ART CAMP by Arielle Goddard - 3M ago
     It’s not like I decide I will now paint a rabbit with a smile or a scowl, or ears pointed this way or that, they just flow. It’s like a snowstorm, where each snowflake is different; this is a blizzard of bunny-flakes. - Hunt Slonem 

    Hunt Slonem’s infamous bunny wall. Now available as bunny wallpaper for your home! SWOON,

     I first discovered Hunt Slonem a few years ago while taking a long walk through the interwebs. I fell head over heels  in love with his colorful, neo-expressionist-style bunny paintings and his bold, mod, stacked bunny sculptures.  I have been dreaming of creating a Slonem tribute project for a long time. I am thrilled that this long-standing day dream has finally come to fruition. Just in time for Spring, Easter and HOP FEST! When I was developing this project I could not decide if I should go or bunny portraits or bunny sculpture..so I decided to do both. You can read all about Hunt and check out his stunning work here.    Hunt also has a super fun Instagram account  

    Materials:

    **This post contains affiliate links. This means we earn a tiny % of your purchase at no additional cost to you. We only link to materials that we use and love. Thank you for your support!

    Hunt’s loose, expressionist, portrait style lends itself beautifully to a variety of art mediums to explore. You could try sumi-e painting (japanese brush painting). You could use oil pastels, or charcoal or chalk pastel. We used ink daubers and paint pens for our bunnies. I will show you a little behind the scenes of our process but these portraits could be achieved with a variety of art materials. One of the tables in our home studio is partially covered in a big 7 foot piece of glass. This glass surface sees a ton of art action. It is so nice to have a non-porous surface to work on. It doubles as a paint palette and a printing station. It is also where we use the hot glue gun. When we are done we spray a little cleaning solution and wipe it down with a rag and it’s ready for the next art experience! Here is a bunny drawn with a dauber filled with india ink on the glass surface. Next we will lift the print with a piece of paper. Could we just ink the bunny portrait directly on the paper? Yes! But the girls had so much fun pulling these prints.  This is another bunny created directly on the glass surface with diluted periwinkle acrylic in a paint dauber. You can also ink your surface with a q-tip or even a paint brush! If you don’t have a 6 foot piece of glass laying around you could use a mirror, or a glass baking dish, an enamel tray, or even tinfoil   We wanted our bunnies to fit nicely inside our up-cycled mac and cheese cartons (soon to be gilded frames). So we coated the back rim of the container and created a print. This allowed us to see (roughly) how big our artwork needed to be to fit snugly inside.    Here is an example of a bunny drawn with paint pen. Our “bunny portrait printable” is on the right. The outlined and drawn bunny is on the left. The trace was done by my 7th grader with a black Posca pen on hot pink card stock.     Liquid gold leaf is A M A Z I N G. I have never seen a more vibrant gold at this price point but it is not kid friendly at all. The fumes were a bit much (like kick the girls out of the room stinky) and it was hard to get off my brush and hands. This is an adults only material, to be used in a well-ventilated space, with a mask…and honestly the back label had a pretty serious health warning so I think I would only pull this little bottle out for very special occasions. These two gold paints are not quite as vibrant as the gild but I love them and I would use them with kids over the age of 3 (who don’t put paint in their mouths).      I think the black and white prints are my favorite. They just jump off the frame next to that gold!     So in love with this monoprint that H made!       
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    ART CAMP by Arielle Goddard - 3M ago
     Repetition is like saying rosary or a prayer. I used to stay in an ashram in India and we used to take walks and look at nature and recite mantras. If you think about a tree, it is made up of millions of leaves that are all very slightly different, just like ­flowers or grass. So I put two and two together in my head and realized that repetition is a divine message. - Hunt Slonem 

    Hunt Slonem, 2016

     This project is inspired by the amazing stacked bunny sculptures of artist, Hunt Slonem. I first discovered Hunt’s work a few years ago while scrolling the interwebs. I fell head over heels  in love with his colorful, neo-expressionist-style bunny paintings and his bold, mod, stacked bunny sculptures.  I have been dreaming of creating a Slonem tribute project for a long time. I am thrilled that this long-standing day dream has finally come to fruition. Just in time for Spring, Easter, and HOP FEST! When I was developing this project I could not decide if I should go bunny sculpture or bunny portraits..so I decided to do both. You can read all about Hunt and check out his stunning work here.    Hunt also has a super fun Instagram account

    Materials:

    • kraft colored tag board

    • our modern bunny template

    • acrylic or Tempera Paint. We used diluted acrylic in ink daubers

    • daubers (optional but my kids love using them)

    • good Scissors

    • 1.5” wooden block

    • skinny dowel

    • hot glue gun

      **This post contains affiliate links. This means we earn a tiny % of your purchase at no additional cost to you. We only link to materials that we use and love. Thank you for your support!

      Sign up here to receive weekly ART CAMP updates in your inbox and our free Stacked Bunny Sculpture template!
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      Powered By ConvertKit Print out our bunny template or create your own. Cut out the bunny shape and trace it onto your tag board. Don’t have tag board? You can use cardboard or card stock. You just want the surface to be thick enough to handle the paint and stiff enough to stack. Once all of your shapes are traced it’s time to cut them out. You need at least 4 bunnies per sculpture.   You don’t have to use daubers to paint your bunnies. We used them because we had them out in the studio and my girls LOVE using them. A paint brush will work just as well to color your bunnies.     When your painted bunnies have dried you will start to build your sculpture. The base is created by drilling a small hole into the top of the wooden block and inserting the dowel into the hole. You want to make sure that the hole you drill matches the circumference of your dowel. When the dowel is standing upright you can start to stack and attach your bunnies with a hot glue gun. If you are working with little ones you could skip the hot glue and substitute with glue dots, double sided sticky tape or a stick of craft bond.          
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      ART CAMP by Arielle Goddard - 3M ago
       Repetition is like saying rosary or a prayer. I used to stay in an ashram in India and we used to take walks and look at nature and recite mantras. If you think about a tree, it is made up of millions of leaves that are all very slightly different, just like ­flowers or grass. So I put two and two together in my head and realized that repetition is a divine message. - Hunt Slonem 

      Hunt Slonem, 2016

       This project is inspired by the amazing stacked bunny sculptures of artist, Hunt Slonem. I first discovered Hunt’s work a few years ago while scrolling the interwebs. I fell head over heels  in love with his colorful, neo-expressionist-style bunny paintings and his bold, mod, stacked bunny sculptures.  I have been dreaming of creating a Slonem tribute project for a long time. I am thrilled that this long-standing day dream has finally come to fruition. Just in time for Spring, Easter, and HOP FEST! When I was developing this project I could not decide if I should go bunny sculpture or bunny portraits..so I decided to do both. You can read all about Hunt and check out his stunning work here.    Hunt also has a super fun Instagram account

      Materials:

      • kraft colored tag board

      • our modern bunny template

      • acrylic or Tempera Paint. We used diluted acrylic in ink daubers

      • daubers (optional but my kids love using them)

      • good Scissors

      • 1.5” wooden block

      • skinny dowel

      • hot glue gun

        **This post contains affiliate links. This means we earn a tiny % of your purchase at no additional cost to you. We only link to materials that we use and love. Thank you for your support!

        Sign up here to receive weekly ART CAMP updates in your inbox and our free Stacked Bunny Sculpture template!
        Subscribe

        We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time.

        Powered By ConvertKit Print out our bunny template or create your own. Cut out the bunny shape and trace it onto your tag board. Don’t have tag board? You can use cardboard or card stock. You just want the surface to be thick enough to handle the paint and stiff enough to stack. Once all of your shapes are traced it’s time to cut them out. You need at least 4 bunnies per sculpture.   You don’t have to use daubers to paint your bunnies. We used them because we had them out in the studio and my girls LOVE using them. A paint brush will work just as well to color your bunnies.     When your painted bunnies have dried you will start to build your sculpture. The base is created by drilling a small hole into the top of the wooden block and inserting the dowel into the hole. You want to make sure that the hole you drill matches the circumference of your dowel. When the dowel is standing upright you can start to stack and attach your bunnies with a hot glue gun. If you are working with little ones you could skip the hot glue and substitute with glue dots, double sided sticky tape or a stick of craft bond.          
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        ART CAMP by Arielle Goddard - 5M ago
        Nothing is worth more than laughter. It is strength to laugh and to abandon oneself, to be light.

        -Frida Kahlo Next Friday (3/8) is International Women’s Day. In honor of this glorious occasion I am going to be sharing some projects that are inspired by some kick-ass creative woman. This year I would like to celebrate a few legends we all know and a few of my own personal SHEroes. When I was playing with concepts for a Frida project I kept thinking of my friend Shannon and her paper plate dancers. Shannon is that rare breed of human that beams sunshine—like a cool, well-read, insightful, fuchsia loving’, pattern wearing, heart on her sleeve, real talk, funny as ____ sun beam.  She is a passionate educator, a literacy warrior, a wickedly-talented writer and maker, as well as a mom to three littles under the age of 5.  In addition to being an all-around gem, she can whip up a themed birthday cake like nobody’s business, she's the queen of painted tissue paper collage, and beautiful, accessible, crafts.  If you are not following her, RUN to catch up.  Your eyes will radiate hearts, your brain will be nourished with teacher tips and book recommendations, your mama cup will be filled with camaraderie, and you will get your daily dose of vitamin D.  On a personal aside, this warrior friend has slid into my DM over the past 6 months and created a never ending virtual ‘mixed tape’ for my grieving heart.  I share this because it really speaks to the core of who she is. Oh! Saving the best for last:  If you are in Sydney, you are a golden ticket holder because Shannon is taking her love of little people, storybooks, and creativity offline at in-person workshops! You can find out more about her READ + CREATE pop-ups and register for classes on her site.


           Frida Kahlo was born July 6th, just south of Mexico City, in Coyoacán, Mexico. She grew up in big blue house called La Casa Azul with her parents and 6 sisters. Frida was born three years before the beginning of the Mexican revolution. In her writing, Frida described being ushered into the house by her mother as gunfire rang through the streets of her hometown. As a young girl Frida preferred spending time drawing by herself versus playing with her sisters. At age 6, Frida contracted polio, which damaged her right leg making it smaller than the left. Frida hid this deformity under long skirts. When she was 18 she was in a terrible bus accident that broke her spinal cord, collarbone, ribs, pelvic bone, leg, foot, and shoulder. The injuries from this accident were so severe and pervasive that they impacted her for the rest of her life and left her unable to bear children. Suffering, isolation, longing, and loss are re-occuring themes in her portraits but they are accompanied by an unshakable strength. When you look at the intimacy and detail in these portraits you don’t feel pity you are left in awe of the survivor. Frida created her own style of painting blending the mystical qualities of surrealism with the rooted strength of Mexican folk art. Despite being a prolific and talented artist, Frida spent most of her life known as “Diego Rivera’s wife”. It wasn’t really until the late 70s that Frida’s work was recognized by art historians and political activists. In the 90s Frida reached Icon status as an artist, feminist, and indigenous rights activist.  

        Materials:

         You can find the full tutorial for Shannon’s paper plate dancers including a video here. We followed her step by step but made it our own Frida doll with a couple swaps and some added details that I have shown you in the pictures below:   Layer on some detailed pattern work with a paint pen, chalk pen or gel pen!   Add some pretty eyelets to one of your skirt layers with a hole punch!   How about some fringe?!   We included some of the paper plate scalloping because it added a fancy trim   Paint or color your Frida Doll Printable and then cut it out and glue it onto the front of your pipe cleaner.        Click the video below (sound on) to watch Frida dance!     
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        ART CAMP by Arielle Goddard - 8M ago
        Fear less, hope more; eat less, chew more; whine less, breathe more; talk less, say more; hate less, love more; and all good things are yours.

        - Swedish Proverb  We are delighted to be joining the lovely Gina of willowday + 24 spectacular creatives for the 5th annual Swedish Christmas Countdown Calendar. You might remember the pinecone angel ornament we made last year for the ‘Kids MAKE’ portion of the countdown. If you are on Instagram pop over to Gina’s account and give her a follow so that you don’t miss any of the shares! If you aren’t on Instagram you can catch up on all of the posts here.  While you are on Gina’s site, definitely take a peek at her new children’s book, ABC Animal Safari! It is a GORGEOUS romp through the alphabet via the most exquisite animal-botanical illustrations.    When I was brainstorming ideas for my calendar contribution my mind kept wandering back to nature and our foraged wreaths of holidays past. I really wanted to make another one…but I also wanted to turn it up a notch. What if we could keep the same minimal, undone, organic feel BUT hang it from the ceiling like a chandelier?!     

        Materials:

        • 3 wooden embroidery hoops in varying size

        • 2 different types of pine tree branches

        • dead tree branch

        • small pinecones

        • eucalyptus

        • white coffee beans

        • hot glue gun

        • thin copper wire

        • scissors

        • black marker

         I gathered some dead skinny branches from our yard and some foraged pinecones from our collection, and then I made my way to the floral section of our local market in search of some holiday green. I wound up with two different types of pine branches, some eucalyptus and some white coffee beans. I really love how all of the textures and tones work together in this spread:   We used 3 embroidery hoops as the base for our wreath tiers. In the past we have used floral wire to assemble our foraged wreaths. This time I wanted to forgo the pliers and gardening gloves and just head for the glue gun. It was an experiment but it really worked well with the wood hoops.    The reason this style of wreath is so fun to create is that it is free-form. You are not looking for perfection or uniformity. The more a-symetrical and imperfect the better (in my opinion). It really is an intuitive dance between your eyes and your fingertips. When something feels right..add a dab of glue and secure it to the hoop!   we worked on all 3 hoops a the same time. I would add a little to each one, give them a spin, step back and move on to the other hoop. Ri helped me build (and shoot). I gotta say, it is really nice having another set of eyes and hands when building these!   When you feel like your 3 wreath hoops are done it is time to assemble. We used a very fine gauge copper wire. We cut two long strips of copper wire, criss crossed them and created a hanging loop for the top of our “chandelier”   The two pieces of wire become 4 strands after you loop:   We measured out a 4” space between tiers. We marked it by adding a line of black permanent marker to our wire so we would know exactly where to attach our hoops.   1 tier - 2 tier - 3! Once we were done attaching our hoops we trimmed the access wire from the bottom of our smallest hoop.    It is so pretty and whimsical! Imagine it hanging above the holiday table, or a little bar cart, or a tall entryway in lieu of mistletoe.    We made you a little video clip, because you have to see her spin! We are so honored to be a part of this year’s Christmas Countdown Collective. All of these creatives are must follows:
        1. http://www.willowday.net
        2. https://blomsterochbakverk.se/
        3. @wenlise_fold 
        4. http://www.hannawendelbo.com/
        5. https://helenalyth.se/
        6. https://our-lovely-mess.com/
        7. http://www.musqotdesign.se/
        8. https://www.artcampla.com/
        9. http://www.lifeinkodacolor.com
        10. http://www.kriiskitchen.se/
        11. https://kreativakarin.com
        12. http://www.colouredbuttons.com/
        13.  https://www.instagram.com/chiarabelleshop/
        14. http://kinoko.se/
        15. https://www.soderbergagentur.com/interior-styling/idalauga/
        16. http://www.remainsoftheday.no
        17. http://www.projectkid.com/
        18. https://justwannahavefun.se/dnilva/
        19. https://hemmafixbloggen.se/diy/
        20. https://www.instagram.com/created_by_malin/
        21. http://linabythebay.se/
        22. https://www.diysweden.se/
        23. https://www.instagram.com/anekirstine.bilde/
        24. https://www.instagram.com/jennifer.anglade.dahlberg/
        25. http://www.poppyphotography.se
           
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