Loading...

Follow Araks - Lingerie, Swimwear & Sleepwear on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
“Anita has always been like an angel for me, sharing her thoughts and helping me out here and there with casting over the years.  She is one of the realest people I have ever known and I have always thought she would be a perfect contributor for this project because she has such a strong and very authentic point of view.” ~ Araks
  
 
 
Can you tell us a little about where you grew up?
South London. South of the River Thames. Housing estates, chip shops, pubs, we left the house in the morning, and came home when the street lights went on. We ran around, jumped trains and buses, hung out on commons. We listened to Northern Soul, and The Tim Westwood Show on a Saturday night, live from New York, through a CB radio. We took care of each other.
 
What was your childhood like, and how was creativity and self-expression cultivated in your adolescence?
My parents were both immigrants to the UK. They worked blue collar jobs. We had a meter for the electricity. It wasn’t uncommon for us to have nothing to fill the meter with. On those days we went to bed early, or stayed out late. We lived in nightclubs, at train stations, we hung out and listened to music, we dressed up, and dreamed about the future. 
 
What excited you as a child?
McDonalds, fashion magazines, tap dancing, shoplifting, Top of the Pops, daydreaming–mostly about being a part of Bananarama, and later on Soul to Soul.
 
How did you get your start in fashion? 
It was a long series of awkward and excited coincidences. I was scouted to model for Barbara Hulanicki in the early 80s, and then a series of unintelligible events that brought me to where I am today. I’ve been blessed by a fashion fairy, and allowed to grow up doing things that I love.
 

Photos by Anita Bitton for Lingerie On Film
 
You assisted Edward Enninful, who had become the fashion director of i-D, at age 18. Can you tell us what that was like and what you learned working with him?
I don’t remember it feeling like a job. I was very proud; I opened the mail, organized the diaries. I was excited to do the fashion closet returns on the bus. It was brilliant–I would then run across the piazza in Covent Garden and work an evening shift at TGI Fridays–it was an amazing time. I learned to speak up, speak out, and “always be closing.” I was always inspired. To do more, to be more. It was a magical time. I was hungry though.
 
Who are the people in the industry that have inspired you?
Aaron Sharif, Cathy Horyn, Freddie Leiba, Katie Ford, Katie Grand, Kim Sion, Lesley Goring, Marc Jacobs, Mark Picken, Paul Hunwick, Sachiko Okada, Terry Jones.
 
What inspired you to go into casting?
I always had a terrifying fear of authority, and while I was always a dedicated employee, I needed a job that was flexible, fun and didn’t require a resume.


What motivated you start your own business, Establishment Casting?
I didn’t start it, it started me. I was working, and eventually I was busy enough to start hiring others to help. The lessons have been invaluable. I’ve learned everything the hard way.
 
You were critical in helping to create the image of Alexander Wang's brand for 11 years. Can you share a little about that experience with us?
We were very lucky. It was another amazing and magical time; we took a lot of risks, had a lot of fun and got a lot of help. Alex was the ingenue of NYC fashion, and we were all ambitious enough to make it happen.
 
As a former model, do you think having that background has given you a special insight into casting?
I was an awful model, and far too young and insecure to ever make a difference. That said, it is one of the facets of my job, that as an adult I understand and appreciate.
  
Do you know initially if a model is going to be really big, or is it something that slowly comes into focus?
There are no assurances in any occupation, and the making and maintaining of a model’s career in 2019 is a very different and less predictable trajectory than before. Think The Hunger Games–“may the the odds be forever in your favor”. 
 
Social media has had such a huge impact on the fashion industry in general. How has it changed the way you do casting?  
Social media has increased the access across the board in fashion. Visibility has increased tenfold and the shows have immediate feedback. We used to have to wait for the results. Now they’re immediate. Everything has sped up exponentially and shelf lives have decreased.
 
What do you think it will take to see genuine diversity in fashion?
More people taking more action.
 
Do you have a favorite photograph from something you've worked on?

 
 
Irving Penn, Large Nude Woman seated “Epic Proportions”, Vogue Magazine April 2004.
 
 
Lynette Garland, Love Magazine Issue 21
 
 
Lynette Garland, Love Magazine Issue 21
 
 
What advice would you give anyone interested in casting? Or modeling?
Take a job based on your passion, and not on power or money. The fashion business is overrun with power-led egos, it’s easier to rise to the top when passion is driving you. The power play is temporary.
 
What is something you've loved for a long time?
Myself.
 
What’s something you wish you knew how to do or that you’re currently trying to learn more about?
Yoga.
 
What time of the day do you feel most energetic and what do you do in those moments?
I’m a morning person. I wake up early to work with Europe, and then to organize my son getting to school. I walk fifty blocks every morning through Central Park and onto Fifth Avenue. This has become an essential part of setting the tone for my day.
 
Are there any principles that help guide your day, actions, or lifestyle?
It is the only point of getting up every morning…… to make something good, to make something even better than before, not to give up, to compete, to be ambitious. ~ Lucian Freud
 
What is the best gift you have ever given someone?
My son.
 
What is the favorite gift you have received?
A poem from my son, and a diamond paperclip earring.
 

Photo by Anita Bitton for Lingerie On Film

 

What is something that you feel is overrated?
Meditation apps.

 

Underrated?
Book clubs.

 

What are you terrible at but love to do anyway?
Knitting.

 

Can you share a favorite quotation, lyric, or line from a book or song that has stuck with you?
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. ~ Aristotle

 

What is your favorite Instagram account?
@MARRAKECH_BROOKLYN

 

What are you currently…
Coveting - Rokh Official
Watching – Blakkklansmen
Listening – The Slow Home Podcast
Reading – Educated by Tara Westover
Dreaming - Summer.

 

Thank You, Anita!

Follow Anita ~ @bitton

Shop Anita's Style Edit

 

 

Discover more Lingerie On Film profiles.

Maayan Zilbermann

Reese Blustein

Reese Blustein

Georgia Hilmer

Brittany Asch

Nathalie Agussol

Olivia Kim

Sonia Boyajian

Daphne Javitch

Lexie Smith

How the series began ~ A conversation with Araks

 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

 

Illustration by Cerise Zelenetz

 


~ Switch up your morning jog by running to a special self-love playlist. Include all the sing-along hits such as ‘Big Girl (You Are Beautiful)’ and ‘Run The World.’

 

~ Take a trip to the local art museum with your partner, seeing who can identify the most floral varieties among the paintings throughout the day.
 

~ Make a list of resolutions just as you would for New Year’s, yet this time create the list with your partner. Focus on amorous goals to accomplish together according to the Valentine calendar.
 

~ Sophisticate the childhood tradition of giving store-bought Valentines to the entire class, by handing out custom notes of appreciation to your workmates (attached Hershey kiss optional.)
 

~ Forget the red this Valentine’s Day, and dress in a vibrant array of Araks instead (because love comes from the inside out, in every color of the rainbow.)
 

~ Prepare a care package consisting of a silk robe & slippers, face creams and chlorophyll to leave by your bedside Valentine’s Eve. When you wake, use the items to give yourself a much-needed morning of self-love.

~ Cook a dinner of three simple dishes for your Valentine, each inspired by a special memory you shared. Don’t forget to accompany this with plenty of pinot.
 

Enjoy other editions from the Why Don't You... series below ~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
  

We've compiled here a short list of some of our favorite films, so immersive in their moods
and environments, you'll be instantly transported around the globe.  

 

Little Women ~ Gillian Armstrong

Little Women (1994) - Trailer - YouTube

Watch on Amazon or iTunes

 

La Grande Bellezza ~ Paolo Sorrentino

The Great Beauty Official Trailer #1 - Paolo Sorrentino Movie HD - YouTube

 Watch on Amazon, iTunes, or YouTube.

 

Jane ~ Brett Morgen

Official Film Trailer: JANE | National Geographic - YouTube

 Watch on Amazon, YouTube, or Google Play.

 

My Brilliant Friend ~ HBO

My Brilliant Friend | Official Trailer | HBO - YouTube

 Watch on HBO

 

Harold and Maude ~ Hal Ashby

Harold and Maude - Trailer - YouTube

Watch on Amazon, iTunes, or Google Play

 

Shop our soft selection of pajamas, slips, and robes, the only pieces you need to enjoy this vacation.

 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This weekend we are excited to introduce you to Maayan Zilberman, founder of Sweet Saba, a conceptual candy company, and also one of this year’s Lingerie On Film contributors.  Below our conversation with Maayan about her beautiful hand carved one-of-a-kind edible creations.

 

 

Where did you grow up? How do you think this location has shaped you?
I was born on a kibbutz in Israel and grew up for the most part in Vancouver, Canada. We lived in Jerusalem for a short time when I was in middle school. In many ways it feels like that chapter of my life was much longer than it was in reality. I’m sure being an infant on the kibbutz made me independent, helped me problem solve, and take on inspiring projects. Moving to Canada as a kid had me feeling a bit like a fish out of water–I never felt comfortable in the cold and wet of the Pacific Northwest, and longed for sun on my face and dryness of the desert. Fashion and style were slightly tragic in these parts as well, growing up in the height of grunge and outdoor-chic was in such contrast to the high-gloss glam that I loved in the magazines. I dreamed of moving to NYC one day where I might meet one of my idols. This theme followed me around a lot, and made its way into my art later on.

 

Can you tell us about your upbringing and childhood?
My parents divorced when I was pretty little, around the time I started school in Canada. I had to navigate my way through explaining to kids on the playground who I was and where I came from. I always thought of my mom and I as a unit, I went everywhere she did. I didn’t have a lot of friends, but it didn’t matter so much because my favorite thing was being sent to my room so I could draw, make stuff, or daydream. I guess I mouthed off a lot at home because I wasn’t super afraid of the consequences. Our home was strict – education and discipline were valued above all else. We were observant Jews, went to synagogue every Friday and Saturday, and kept kosher.  I didn’t have an Oreo or bacon until I moved out, and boy was I ever bitter when I found out how delicious those things were.

 

What were you into as an adolescent? What were your ambitions?
I was super into the transformation of materials, things that varied in texture or purpose, like water freezing into ice, or honey crystallizing… even drying leaves or flowers and making potpourri. I had tons of shoeboxes full of projects like that in my room, each labelled like I was starting an archive. I also loved listening to music and recording songs off the radio. I only ever listened to music with headphones so I thought I was the only one in the world who knew about these songs. Of course I was shocked when I discovered some other kids at school would know about the same songs. Music was a really solitary experience for me, like making art or dreaming. I loved all the female rappers I heard on the radio. In 5th grade I remember the first time I heard the voice of a girl so strong, cool, and sexualized, and feeling a deep connection. Her voice spoke to me even though I had no idea what she looked like. When I ultimately saw pictures of some of my new idols, they were all wearing crop tops or thongs. I didn’t know at the time it was lingerie- but I knew it was something I was into.

 

Do you recall how or why you became a maker?
In terms of it being a hobby-turned-occupation, I think the first time I sold stuff I made was in 6th grade. I made Sculpey figurines for kids at school and they assumed I wanted cash for them. Someone else attached value to the act of my hands making something. Up until that point I didn’t realize that was a possibility. Why I became a maker professionally is something a bit more complicated, and something I’m still working out- it’s the eternal question… finding the reason why we do what we do.

 

How was creativity cultivated in your childhood?
I didn’t have a ton of traditional toys when I was a kid, most of my favorite things were tools meant for making artwork, so it was pretty easy to get into drawing and making things. On the weekends I would sit for hours drawing or painting with gouache (a set my Swiss grandma sent me, which I still use) Later in high school when we had drawing classes with a live model it felt so natural to work in long concentrated sessions.

 

Can you share a story about shooting your rolls?
For a long time I also had a lingerie line called The Lake & Stars- it’s actually how I met Araks back in the early 2000’s. It was a time before we used digital photography for everything, and it was definitely before we had phones with cameras. In my early days I used to do our lingerie fitting photos with disposable cameras into the mirror… It sounds hilarious, but looking back the photos are actually quite chic. I kept some of them, and they ended up being the inspiration for how I approached this photo project. Since a lot of our fittings were in hotel rooms in the garment district, I chose to wait for the hotel experience with one of my girlfriends to take the photos… It was fun reliving that experience of trying on lingerie and taking pictures with film that you couldn’t see right away.

 

What is your favorite shot, from your rolls and why?
My favorite shot is a picture my friend took of me using the disposable camera. It flashes me right back to those days when I did everything with that tool, and I was probably only ever wearing lingerie in those days too. When you work in the industry you end up doing fittings and then wearing it all day.



Was there anything that was surprising to you when you saw the film?

I forgot how vivid colors are when you work in film. Everything is so saturated, and your skin looks younger!

 

 

What was the transition from being a lingerie designer to a conceptual candy creator like? Are there any similarities in the creative processes behind each? How and why did you start making conceptual candy?

I stopped working in lingerie just over three years ago. I was at a point where I really missed making things with my hands that were a bit messier, or more immediate without relying on the use of other fabricators. I started experimenting with sugar at home to make small scale sculptures as a way to get back to my background as an artist. I really enjoyed the challenge of working with something both delicate and rigid in its chemistry. It reminded me of the early days of making lingerie.  I didn’t really understand how it worked until I had to go through the process of making it over and over and over again.

 

Do you have a history of enjoying making food or baking?
I do really love Bacon, but it’s not so much about food, it’s a lot more about experimentation and chemical reactions in the kitchen. I love transforming material, and approaching things from a new perspective with ingredients. I’m actually not a great cook!

 

What's behind the name "Sweet Saba?
I named the company after my grandfather who I miss very much. Saba is Hebrew for grandfather, and as a kid I used to spend time with him making things in the kitchen that were more like science projects than food.

 

You worked with a food technologist to develop several flavors including bubble gum, bacon, whiskey and mother’s milk. What are some of your favorite unexpected flavor combinations? 
Recently I did a collection of life-size pizza slices. Rather than making the candy taste like pizza we made it taste like doughnuts. I love when flavor is in direct opposition with what the work looks like. I also did a glass candy garden filled with both healing flowers and poisonous flowers. The “poisonous” flowers were made out of sugar and then tasted like sweet nectar. I loved the narrative of this, as guest would take one and eat it.

 

We love the sense of humor involved with your business. Can you share the most humorous piece you've done?
It depends on your sense of humor, but for my collaboration with Versace last year for the Met Costume Institute’s Catholicism themed Gala, we made giant rosaries. I loved the idea of people chewing on those.

 

What's your favorite thing about creating edible sculptures?
I love the delight people of all ages express when they discover that the work is candy and not plastic. That moment is always so pleasing to me. No matter where you’re from or who you are, you aren’t really immune to that emotion.

 

Are there any parts of the production process or details involved that you would like to talk about that you feel make your edible creations extra special?
I’m sure people don’t realize that I make all of my candy, and that the original for each piece is an artwork that I have carved out of clay with my own hands. Every piece is truly one of a kind. It’s a really lengthy process, but it’s worth it because it doesn’t look like Starbucks candy.

 

What does it feel like to create art that is temporal?
Part of the reason I started this project in the first place was to make things that were ephemeral. The first collection of candy I made was from molds that I cast of sentimental objects I had carried around with me for most of my life.


I liked the idea of making them edible, so you could share them with people and share those memories.


Conceptually, it was also a way of letting go of some of these belongings. Of course nowadays that idea is further away from the original concept, but each project I worked on now comes from that same place in my heart.

 

 

 

What is something you've loved for a long time?
I have always loved the desert.

 

What’s something you wish you knew how to do or that you’re currently trying to learn more about?
I wish I knew how to properly exercise. I have always valued physical strength, possibly because I’ve never really had it. I think if I felt physically stronger I would feel so much more capable of doing anything in the world. I remember when Madonna started working out a lot and doing yoga, and talking about feeling very strong. I think about that often.

 

What is the best gift you have ever given someone?
Unconditional love and an open door.

 

What is the favorite gift you have received? 
My mom gave need a set of tiny sculpture tools when I was a kid, I used them for ceramic class all through middle school and high school, and I traveled with them to New York when I moved here. I still use them as some of the primary tools in my art practice.

 

What is something that you feel is overrated? Underrated
Huge houses are overrated. A walk around the block is underrated. Sometimes the only prescription I need for a problem is just getting out of the building and walking around the block.

 

What are you terrible at but love to do anyway?
I love singing so much. I do a lot when I’m alone in the studio. My mom is an actual singer, and when I was a kid singing with her in the car I always thought that I sounded just like her because her voice would drown out mine. When I got older I realized that I didn’t sound like her at all… I was definitely horrified, but mostly just found it very funny.

 

Are there any parts of the production process or details involved that you would like to talk about that you feel make your edible creations extra special?
I’m sure people don’t realize that I make all of my candy, and that the original for each piece is an artwork that I have carved out of clay with my own hands. Every piece is truly one of a kind. It’s a really lengthy process, but it’s worth it because it doesn’t look like Starbucks candy.

 

Is there anything you could recommend to us?
I recommend using something from your closet that you haven’t worn in a long time, possibly because it reminds you of unpleasant memories, or because you think it doesn’t suit you know. Try wearing it out for one night, and see how you feel. Attach new memories to the piece and see what happens.

 

 

 

What is your favorite Instagram account?
@dswt The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust- last year we adopted a baby elephant orphan from here, and this year we adopted one for my mom for her birthday. I’m hoping that one day we can go as a family to visit them before they are released back into the wild.

 


What are you currently… 

Coveting? All the appliances on my renovation mood board… we’re about to renovate our house and I’m so excited for my new kitchen!

Watching? A while ago I watched every single episode of Law and order SVU, starting from current day going backwards to the first season. I just started Christiane Amanpour’s docuseries about love and sexuality in different parts of the world, and really enjoying it.

Listening? I just spent the week in LA listening to new Dipset album, and I listen to a lot of podcasts- Savage Love, Rupaul’s What’s the T, 3 Girls, 1 Keith, and of course all the Oprah shows.

Reading? All my baby books… I have a few months to go before I’m due and I forget everything I’ve read! I did love Godspeed, my friend Casey Legler’s new memoir. by Jill Lepore and Dreaming?by Rebecca Solnit

Dreaming? 
I keep dreaming I’m in the desert with lots of flowers that never dry out. It’s shimmery and quiet.

 

Thank You, Maayan!

All photography by Maayan Zilbermann

Follow Maayan~ @maayan.zilberman

Shop Maayan's Style Edit

 

 

Discover more Lingerie On Film profiles.

Reese Blustein

Georgia Hilmer

Brittany Asch

Nathalie Agussol

Olivia Kim

Sonia Boyajian

Daphne Javitch

Lexie Smith

How the series began ~ A conversation with Araks

 

 

 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

 


Illustration by Cerise Zelenetz

 

~ On rainy days, sport your favorite Araks swimsuit indoors while painting or drawing in hues of the same color-blocked palette you have on.

 

~ Blot your favorite summery lipsticks shades on a cream-colored silk scarf and wear as a hair tie to seal your outfit with a kiss.

 

~ Next time you get a meal to go, enjoy your food outdoors while listening to a podcast on your dish's country of origin. The Silk Road for example is a fascinating topic to discover, especially while enjoying chow fun.

 

~ Choreograph a simple synchronized swimming routine with your significant other to be rehearsed with each beach trip.

 

~ Bring your children to a quiet concrete court for their next homework session, giving them brightly colored chalk instead of laptops or paper to write out their arithmetic equations on the pavement.

 

~ Host a weekend gathering of friends, instructing everyone to bring along a single application of their favorite face mask. Swap masks at random and spend the afternoon comparing benefits and effects over mimosas and crudité.

 

~ Have each of your family members pick out a unique leash for your family dog.  Attach all of them to his collar and walk him together in stride.

 

~ Write down the first word that comes to mind upon waking, each day for the entire month. String them together in poetic form, collecting new stanzas throughout the year.

 

~ Go pick wild strawberries or blueberries, using a needle and thread to string them into a vibrant edible necklace to be eaten immediately (after rinsing).

 

Enjoy other editions from the Why Don't You... series below ~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

 


Illustration by Cerise Zelenetz

 

~ On rainy days, sport your favorite Araks swimsuit indoors while painting or drawing in hues of the same color-blocked palette you have on.

 

~ Blot your favorite summery lipsticks shades on a cream-colored silk scarf and wear as a hair tie to seal your outfit with a kiss.

 

~ Next time you get a meal to go, enjoy your food outdoors while listening to a podcast on your dish's country of origin. The Silk Road for example is a fascinating topic to discover, especially while enjoying chow fun.

 

~ Choreograph a simple synchronized swimming routine with your significant other to be rehearsed with each beach trip.

 

~ Bring your children to a quiet concrete court for their next homework session, giving them brightly colored chalk instead of laptops or paper to write out their arithmetic equations on the pavement.

 

~ Host a weekend gathering of friends, instructing everyone to bring along a single application of their favorite face mask. Swap masks at random and spend the afternoon comparing benefits and effects over mimosas and crudité.

 

~ Have each of your family members pick out a unique leash for your family dog.  Attach all of them to his collar and walk him together in stride.

 

~ Write down the first word that comes to mind upon waking, each day for the entire month. String them together in poetic form, collecting new stanzas throughout the year.

 

~ Go pick wild strawberries or blueberries, using a needle and thread to string them into a vibrant edible necklace to be eaten immediately (after rinsing).

 

Shop our curated selection of pieces that work well for summer days spent leisuring and lounging.

Enjoy other editions from the Why Don't You... series below ~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This weekend I am excited to introduce you to Reese Blutstein, aka @double3xposure, one of fashion’s most favorite style bloggers and also one of this year’s Lingerie On Film contributors. 

I became familiar with Reese’s work on Instagram as she was getting shot in several of my pieces for various editorials. I love her approachable style, her sense of color, and her IG handle - Making the most out of the clothes I have since 1996.  I was particularly struck by her way of styling pieces over and over again into new looks instead of showing pieces only once in a seemingly never ending cycle of new clothes. I find that to be the most eco-friendly thing we can all do in terms of fashion–buy less and be more creative with what we have.

Below the Atlanta based style star shares with us how she has created her distinct personal style that inspires over 200K followers on Instagram and some tips for keeping your looks fresh without shopping all the time. ~ Araks

 

 

Can you tell us a little about growing up in Atlanta and how that has influenced you and your style?
Atlanta is an old school southern city that lacks a certain kind of fashion scene. There is a more uniform type of style in the south that is all about blending in with others. I always felt the need to reject this idea. I didn’t want to wear clothes everyone else was wearing so I was constantly experimenting with clothes. I think Atlanta is the reason I have a distinct style, because I tried so hard to dress the opposite way from what I saw here. It made me think about what I really wanted to say with my clothes, which was that I don’t want to look like everyone else around me.

 

What excited you as a child, and what did you want to be when you grew up?
This is going to sound odd but also explains a lot about me since I think I am an old soul, but I always enjoyed filing papers. I always thought I wanted to be a secretary because I loved filing cabinets and all the things that come along with organizing papers. Wow, I just made myself sound like the most boring child haha!  But when I was a child I always wanted to be a grown up.

 

When did you realize that you loved fashion
Ever since I was little I was obsessed with bags and shoes and designer brands. It has always been something that interests me!

 

 

 

The tagline on your IG account is “Making the most out of the clothes I have since 1996” – We love that! Can you share the idea and sentiment behind this statement?
When I first started posting on Instagram pretty much everything I wore was thrifted or pieces I had lying around. I didn’t have the money to buy new clothes so I had to create new outfits with the same clothes. I began reinventing pieces in new and interesting ways, which I still do even though my wardrobe has grown a lot.

 

You refer to yourself as a “style” blogger, not a “fashion” blogger. Why the distinction
Style is something you have to have an eye for and create for yourself, whereas fashion is something that is created by someone else. Fashion to me is so broad. Anyone can wear clothes created by the industry but to be able to style it is a different thing. I guess I just feel like the word fashion is also kind of a cliché and I don’t relate to it as much as I relate to the word style.


 

“Style is something you have, fashion is something you buy.”

 

Describe your style in three words.
Structured, colorful, and unintentionally methodical.

 

What are the defining elements of your Instagram aesthetic?
I try not to overthink what I post, but still take the time to create content that isn’t something I see every day. I post things I truly love and would want to see on my feed.



What other objectives you are trying to achieve through your work other than amazing looks?

To be confident in what you wear. If you truly love what you’re wearing you won’t care if others stare at you or think your outfit is weird.

 

 

 

How can consumers become more sustainably minded when shopping?
Only buy things you know you will want to wear for a long time. Or, find pieces that you can style multiple ways, so you don’t get bored of the look and want to buy something new! Invest in classic pieces you will always love.

 

It is common to see fashion influencers in different outfits every single day, but you often repeat the same pieces. It seems like you put effort into utilizing the clothing that you have instead of purchasing new things all the time – what is your thinking behind that?
I don’t really put much forethought into it because in real life I actually do repeat items I own constantly, just like most other people on this earth! I can’t relate to someone who wears new clothes every single day and never styles the same piece twice. I am certain most people can’t relate to that. The idea of being a style blogger or “influencer” is to help inspire people and show people that they don’t need an endless supply of clothes or money to have style. The idea that you always need to have new pieces of clothing is just not realistic for most people, and not sustainable. I also don’t think that idea is very inspiring. Instead, it makes people think the clothes they have aren’t good enough, which is definitely not true.

 

 

“You have to keep looking at your clothes in a new light and come up with new ways to wear the same clothes, which is way more impressive to me than someone buying new clothes every day.”

 

 

I am standing in my closet and I have seen all my clothes a million times. How do I keep my wardrobe fresh looking?
Look for inspiration. I look on Tumblr every morning and pull inspiration from there. I obviously won’t have the same pieces as the people in the pictures, but I can always find similarities in my closet and that’s how I start to create a new look. If you see someone style a pair of shorts in a cool way that you never thought of, you can use that to idea to reinvent a piece most people have in their closet. So I would say always try to find a source of inspiration that helps you look at your clothes in a new light.

 

You are inspiring over 200k people each day – what is your favorite thing about being a style influencer? 
That I get to help inspire people every day!  I find it so cool that I could be the one who changes someone’s mind about a piece in their closet they thought they could never wear again. It's a lot of fun to put ideas out into the world and see people respond to them in a positive way.

 

What advice would you give to other young women who want to pursue this path?
Do it because you truly want to not because you want to be known or want to make money. I have people DM me all the time asking how I got to where I am, and I think they are waiting for a magical answer that will make them successful overnight, but that’s not how it works. The only difference between a successful person and a not successful person is that the successful person did it. You just have to try!  You can talk about all the things you want to do, but at the end of the day you actually have to do them -- even if they don’t work out!

 

Thank You, Reese!

All photography by Reese Blutstein

Follow Reese ~ @double3xposure

Shop Reese's Style Edit

Discover more Lingerie On Film profiles.

Georgia Hilmer

Brittany Asch

Nathalie Agussol

Olivia Kim

Sonia Boyajian

Daphne Javitch

Lexie Smith

How the series began ~ A conversation with Araks

 

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

To kick off the new edition of our annual project Lingerie On Film, we are excited to introduce you to photographer and model Georgia Hilmer.  Below Georgia talks with us about searching for her path at age twenty-four while staying true to her passions, her unabashed bookishness, and her love of taking photographs.


 

Can you tell us about your upbringing and childhood?  
I grew up in Jersey City, just across the Hudson from lower Manhattan, fantasizing about New York City (where my parents worked) and convinced I experienced the best of both worlds, city and pseudo-suburbia: proximity to movies that only played at the Angelika or Sunshine Cinemas and the luxury of a backyard. 


How do you think this location has shaped you? 
Growing up so close to New York gave me a sense of possibility and expanded my imagination in terms of career prospects (hello modeling, college) and cultural engagement (new foods, fancy theater, intimidating museums, parks, music). At the same time, living in Jersey City, which itself is a really ethnically and socioeconomically diverse place, brought me into contact with so many different kinds of people. 

What excited you as a child?  What did you want to be when you grew up? 
I was awkward (socially and physically), excited by school and sports, perennially reading. I wanted to be near books, inside of them if possible, at all times. It took me a while to figure out how my relationship with stories could be the central obsession of my life and not just a hobby.  

What were you into as an adolescent?  What were your ambitions? 
I was obsessed with books and magazines and crossword puzzles—a full blown nerd. I took a lot of photographs and thought I might become a journalist. Mostly I wanted to continue learning: by senior year of high school it felt like I’d been waiting my whole life to get to college and express my true bookishness unabashedly. 

 


Photo by Georgia Hilmer 

 


You recently graduated from NYU?  Can you tell us about what you studied and how you are going to use what you've learned? 
I went to Gallatin, the school of individualized study within NYU, which means I designed my own degree and shaped by major to fit my interests and needs. My thesis was about the politics of narrative, how the specifics of place and power shape stories. I studied postcolonial literature (reading novels from the Middle East, West Africa, and Latin America) and used the theory I learned from that experience to reexamine the notion of the Great American Novel: What do we expect from our national myths? Who do they harm and help, whose voices do they amplify and whose do they silence? How does ideology shape our cultural narratives?  


You are/were a model?  What kinds of things have you learned from this experience? 
I’m still modeling, though less now than ever before — I started modeling so that I could pay for college, worked throughout my university years to keep tuition covered, and now, post-graduation, I’m renegotiating my relationship to the fashion industry. I’ve learned so much about myself and the world since signing my first contract at 16 and am eternally grateful for the dumb luck of my looks affording me an expensive education.  

 

"At 24 I’m trying to figure out how I want to participate in this universe that can be at once exhilarating and infuriating."

 


Who has been your favorite designer / stylist / photographers to work with? Can you share a story?
For a few years I worked a lot with the designers at Margiela (before John Galliano took over) on shows and as an occasional fit model. The experience was so wonderful: everyone was gentle, kind, and thoughtful. I felt like a part of the team, in conversation with some very wonderful and funny creatives. Those experiences in Paris were some of my most positive and mind-expanding as a model.  I came to appreciate the high level of craft and care that can be applied to the art of clothes-making.  

 


Photos by Georgia Hilmer 


We read that you read a lot. What are you currently reading? What books have had a big impact on you?
I’m Zadie Smith’s biggest fan, a fact that is secret to no one who has spent more than an hour talking books with me. Lately I’ve been doing a deep dive into Rebecca Solnit’s books (strange, special, hybrid animals of ferocious dynamism) and hunting down all of her essays online (her work for LitHub is so full of grace and rage). I ardently follow Jia Tolentino and Alice Gregory’s magazine work, I love reading Ligaya Mishan and Tejal Rao on food. Ottessa  Moshfegh is driving me nuts, I’m trying to break into her brain. Alexander Chee is a delight.  


Film or Digital? 
For now, film forever! I prefer the textural and tonal effects you get shooting analog: colors melt, focus softens, a moment glows with internal light and energy when captured on celluloid rather than in pixels. I find that when I shoot digital I have to work harder to get the aura I want in post-production anyway, so I might as well take the extra effort of using film at the outset to save time and energy later.  


What are your favorite things to photograph? 
It’s undeniable that I am most drawn to photographing flowers, scenes washed in that special summer sunlight that glows softest between five PM and sunset, and my close friends.  

"I try to capture moments that lend themselves to poetic interpretation, that evoke a sense of wonder." 

 


Can you share with us one of your favorite photographs that you have taken? 

 
Photo by Georgia Hilmer 


 

 

What part of the shooting process excites you the most? 
To my own detriment, my favorite part of a shoot when I am the photographer is the conversation that happens between me and my subject. I often have to remind myself to start taking pictures because I’ve gotten us so far out into left field in whatever dialogue we are having and forgotten all about the assignment before me. I end up having more outtakes to wade through because I’ll start shooting while my subject is speaking but that’s a low price to pay for some of the really captivating discussions I’ve experience while making portraits. 

 

How do you prepare for a shoot? What are you thinking when you walk on a set?
I clean up my home studio if we are shooting there, shuffling plants around and out of the spot near the front windows where I like the light best. If I’m meeting someone in their own space I try to psyche myself up with music on the walk over. My goal is always to make the person I am photographing feel as comfortable as possible.  

  

“I am always more interested in creating a safe environment on set than in putting someone in a forced position to make a photo “work.” I care more about people than images, so the priority is to take care of the person before me as best I can. The photo comes second.” 

 



Photo by Georgia Hilmer 

 

Is there anyone you would like to collaborate with? Is there anyone you consider a current collaborator of sorts? 

My best friend Lexie is one of my closest collaborators—in life and work and art—though I know she’d resist that label. We work well side by side, we are gentle with each other when we need to be and rough other times. We’ve grown both together and apart; our curiosity and mutual admiration keeps us coming back to each other, I think. I probably take the most photos of her of anyone I know. 


Can you describe your personal style in three words? 
Practical, unfussy, soft. 


Is there a particular time period in fashion or sub culture that you feel a special kinship with stylistically? 
More than any era or movement, I identify with that particular tomboy feeling of being a woman who inhabits the tension, in her clothes, between freedom and femininity. For me, I treat clothes as tool that either inhibit or enable. I’m so familiar with that sense of feeling too big for your body and my style, if you could call it that, addresses that nagging twinge of discomfort by being all about comfort and practicality and ease.  


What piece of clothing makes you feel most like yourself and why? 
Jeans or Dickies, worn down so they’re soft to the touch, and any t-shirt of my boyfriend’s, oversized. 


What is something you've loved for a long time? 
I’ve played soccer since I was five and it has always been such a sweet release for me, mentally and physically. I don’t get the chance to play often now but I am still thrilled by the speed and grace of the game.  


What time of the day do you feel most energetic and what do you do in those moments? 
An hour after I wake up, halfway through my first coffee and before I’ve opened my email, I feel most energetic and optimistic. I try to read in that window when the dread (of productivity, of expectation) hasn’t set in yet and the day seems full of potential.  


What is the best gift you have ever given someone? 
I gave a better-photographer friend of mine a camera I had inherited that was beyond my technical abilities and he gave it a better life than I ever could have.  


What is the favorite gift you have received? 
The first film camera I owned was a 20th birthday present; it might be the material gift that changed my life. 


What is your favorite Instagram account? 
@vivianesassenstudio, @ifyouhigh  


What are you currently… 

Coveting? Viviane Sassen’s new book Heliotrope

Wanderlusting? I want to go to Mexico City and Oaxaca this winter

Watching? Starting The Sopranos from Season 1, Episode 1

Listening? “The Mexican” by Babe Ruth and “Don’t Leave Me This Way” by Thelma Houston

Reading? These Truths by Jill Lepore and Wanderlust by Rebecca Solnit

Dreaming? Strange panicky nightmares about emails … 

 

Follow Georgia ~ @georgiahilmer

Shop Georgia's style selection.

 

 

Discover more Lingerie On Film profiles.

Brittany Asch

Nathalie Agussol

Olivia Kim

Sonia Boyajian

Daphne Javitch

Lexie Smith

How the series began ~ A conversation with Araks

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

For this installment of our Lingerie On Film Profile series, we are happy to introduce you to Brittany Asch, an authentic voice and true pioneer in the field of floral design and a Lingerie On Film contributor.  Below is our conversation with Brittany about her otherworldly creations that are a mix of beautiful colors, textures, energies, and magic. 

  

 

We became aware of your work through your uniquely beautiful and inspiring Instagram account, @brrch_floral,  and messaged you to see if you would want to participate in the Lingerie On Film project.  Was there something in particular that made you want to be a contributor?
<3 I was so happy that you were asking for my perspective beyond a flower arrangement. Though they are largely (understatement perhaps) a part of my life, it has felt strange to be reduced to that only. I love documenting and I loved the previous project and the lingerie (especially the iconic Lost in Translation moment) - it was sort of a no brainer for me.


Where did you grow up?  Do you think the location has shaped you in anyway?
I grew up about an hour north of the city (NY), just south of Harriman State Park. A part of me romanticizes the place I grew up in, purely in regards to its accessibility to nature. The amount of green you see there in comparison to the city is in such stark contrast. It wasn't rural, but I could go for a hike or camp in wood cabins within a 15-minute drive from the house I grew up in, and there were some ranches and farms nearby as well. My memories of my hometown are filled with the distillation of the usual suburban characterizations we've seen in entertainment media over the decades. Those Edward Scissorhands, Wonder Years, Freaks and Geeks, Virgin Suicides scenarios. Even though the depictions are heightened, at their cores there are still themes that ring true to life growing up outside of a city. There was no room for being unconventional in a small town without eyes gazing upon you. Even though I know it is a dream of others, personally, I couldn't bear the idea of being a domestic housewife and so I consciously built a life that would allow me certain freedoms. I had a lot of time as a kid to just run around outside, making things out of mud, eating flowers, drawing on my body with dandelions, watching caterpillars, collecting cicada shells and rocks-- a lot of playing. I walked around with a video camera a lot filming my brother too. My longing for those visceral memories has definitely played a role in shaping my current life and me.  The place definitely contributed to my development but not singularly; there are many other factors.


 

"There's a certain kind of playfulness I find imperative to both my life and work that likely stems from those hours I was left to imagine worlds in my backyard."



What was your childhood like, and how was creativity and self-expression cultivated in your adolescence?

I had a really active childhood. My parents always encouraged creative exploration and were pretty hands off in that way, allowing me to discover a lot on my own. My father worked 7 days out of the week during some seasons and it became my job to help him at flea markets on the weekends. I would help him sell things and mostly look out for people trying to steal things. I was probably there to keep him company and make him laugh. I sold my Pokémon cards and would run around looking at antiques and eating pickles on a stick in whatever location we were in, old empty airplane lots or horse tracks. When I wasn't doing that, I was either on a sports team, in dance classes, voice lessons, acting classes, or in a play. My first dream was to be a ballerina and then I wanted to be Whitney Houston. My mom came from a family where she was forbidden from pursuing an arts degree so she was always encouraging of my pursuits and never told me to be quiet no matter how many high notes I tried to belt or how many walls of our house I turned into a drum kit. 

My grandma's house was basically a time capsule of the 70's so every time we visited I would always try to imagine all of the stories that house held and even more so what that time held. I was always imagining alternate realities, the classic daydreamer, drawing in my notebook. 

In High School, I did a bit of acting, voice-overs and commercials that sort of thing, I was in about 3 plays per year and pretty serious about it all. Eventually, I took up songwriting as that had peaked my interest more at the time and then I attended Berklee College of Music and now here we are.

 


Photo by Brittany Asch 


What excited you as a child, and what did you want to be when you grew up? 
I wanted to win an EGOT (Emmy, Grammy, Oscar, Tony) and I wanted to help people. I saw how making people laugh and performance were a kind of medicine. I also went through an astronaut phase until I did the space launch simulator in Florida and that was a good lesson in dreams vs. reality. Other than that, I was a big Challenger Learning Center fan. 
 

Is there a part of your childhood that gives context to who you are today as a person?
All of the previously mentioned applies. I was also bullied pretty badly by this group of girls for 2 years before middle school. Morally, that has been a huge marker in who I am and what I won't stand for in treatment of people. I was really shy- so the way I learned to deal with the harassment was to go inwards and study. My defense mechanism and way of coping, was to imagine everything going differently than it was, and to throw myself into training. I remember telling my dad at the time that dance was the only thing that made my life feel bearable. I would dread going to school every day- which turned my focus and interests to life outside of academia. Other than that, all of the strange myriad of activities I was involved with were pretty influential to my constitution- my parents thankfully made sure I was interacting with all walks of life. 


You trained to be a musician. What kind of music did you create?  Do you feel a connection between your music and your floral work?
Not directly but there is probably similar brain activity happening. I gave up music before truly discovering my musical identity when my father passed away. Any kind of vulnerability at that point was not an option for me, so I just sort of shut off that valve. That's when I started to work with flowers.

You founded BRRCH in 2013.  What inspired you to become a floral designer and start your own company?
After my dad passed away and I had sort of turned my back on everything I had been raised to do, I was pretty lost. I was working at a restaurant with the intention of having the time to think about my next steps in life. There was a girl bringing in flowers every week and I had a moment. I had grown up going to nurseries with my parents–they loved plants and landscaped our yard as a hobby. It became very clear all of a sudden that it was something I should at least try. A loud but gentle voice I couldn't ignore. 


photos by Brittany Asch


Can you share with us how you learned your craft?
The work I create now is very different than what I learned when I started but I think that's because I've changed quite a bit. I found my style as I started to understand myself more- and in breaking away from everything I had learned and everything I thought I had to be. As a result of my upbringing, at the time I had the mentality that you have to train at something in order to pursue it, so I took classes, freelanced under a bunch of people randomly for 2 years and then took the leap. I followed the models of success that existed before me until I realized they did not apply to my life or me. Arranging flowers and making a living working with flowers are two entirely different things.  

 

"I don't know...I like to make people feel, I guess. You know that sense of wonder you feel as a kid? I try to bring people back to that place."


 

A wonderful sense of color exists in your compositions.  What is your approach to building a color palette?
I just like certain things together. It's all intuitive, my whole process. I could not tell you anything about the color wheel, except for primary colors. 

What qualities attract you to a particular flower or plant?
It’s a feeling, the same thing that attracts you to certain people. 

You have produced flower pieces for music videos, short films, instillations, album covers, royalty, and His Holiness the 14th Dali Lama (whoa!) Which project has been the most interesting to you thus far? 
Working on a feature film. So interesting, and informative.


What is most gratifying to you about your work?
How much joy it brings people. I’ve received messages of people telling me it helps them cope with the world and depression and gives them hope in their lives. It makes me feel like a flower nurse, and that makes me happiest. 


Can you walk us through your process of planning an arrangement? 
Every place has different needs. I try to tune in to what they are. 


Are there any special secrets to putting together a satisfying arrangement?
 
Haha, no. No special secrets there. That's a personal journey, I'd say. There is no one way for all and some people are insatiable by nature, myself included.

 


Photo by Brittany Asch 


The New York Times recently called you one of the most forward thinking florists right now - what do you think is on the horizon for your craft? 
I have no idea, I don't think about things in that way. I just focus on what I need to be doing day to day to produce the work that I want to produce.
 

When you are getting dressed do you think about color the same as you do when you are working with flowers and plants?
Sometimes. I am always thinking about color just not always acting upon the thought. I often like to hide so that I can observe rather than be the observed. At night though, I don't care, anything's game.


What piece of clothing makes you feel most like yourself? 
My shiny green Molly Goddard dress, an oversized T-shirt or my opera style kimono.  


What is your approach to style? And do you have a daily uniform? 
My style for work is very different than how I prefer to dress recreationally. For work, it is comfort first and often a sweatshirt and jeans, always loose fitting so I can move easily. I don't like to be aware of my physical presence when I am working- all of my bodily functions typically shut down and I have to remind myself to eat and drink. For life outside of work, I really enjoy experimenting the way I do with flowers. 
 

Can you share any favorite IG accounts? 
@subwayhands
@thisispattismith
@michelgaubert


What is something you've loved for a long time?
 
My dog and solitude. 


What’s something you wish you knew how to do or that you’re currently trying to learn more about? 
Filmmaking. 


What are you most passionate about lately? 
Film 
 

Are there any principles that help guide your day, actions, or lifestyle? 
I try to be a more improved version of myself than I was the day before. 


What is the favorite gift you have received?
 
An ancient love potion from Mexico. It has a gilded sacred heart. I haven’t opened it. 


Can you share a favorite quotation, lyric, or line from a book or song that has stuck with you?
 
"It costs a lot to be authentic and one can't be stingy with these things. Because you are more authentic the more you resemble what you've dreamed you are." Excerpt from All About My Mother, Pedro Almodóvar

"Don't be a hard rock when you really are a gem." - Ms. Lauryn Hill


What is something that you feel is overrated?  
The french fries at In 'N' Out

 
Underrated?
Scars


Is there anything you could recommend to us?
 
Plenty. Depends on what ails you. An ocean dip is usually a cure all. That and fall in love with somebody. 


Can you fill in the blank? - Beauty is_______.
I really love John O'Donohue's thoughts on beauty, which he elaborates on in conversation with Krista Tippett on her podcast 'On Being'. He said, "Beauty is that in the presence of which we feel more alive."  

He also notes how beauty and glamour are separate. I agree. Beauty is often arresting, extracting you from space and time. When I am in the presence of something truly beautiful, my whole being is swallowed- and in that moment I become part of whatever it is my senses are engaged in. It encompasses far beyond the visual for me. 


What are you currently.
Coveting?  My bed, time to sleep.
Watching?  1-3 films a day
Listening?  A playlist I made for summer rain. It opens with "One" by Aimee Mann. There's also Aretha and Fiona and Kate Bush. 
Reading?  Murakami
Dreaming?  Of love, always

 

Thank You, Brittany!

You can follow Brittany at ~ @brrch_floral and www.brrch.com

Shop Brittany's selection.

 

Discover more Lingerie On Film profiles.

Nathalie Agussol

Olivia Kim

Sonia Boyajian

Daphne Javitch

Lexie Smith

How the Series began ~ A conversation with Araks

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

 


Illustration by Cerise Zelenetz

 

~ On rainy days, sport your favorite Araks swimsuit indoors while painting or drawing in hues of the same color-blocked palette you have on.

 

~ Blot your favorite summery lipsticks shades on a cream-colored silk scarf and wear as a hair tie to seal your outfit with a kiss.

 

~ Next time you get a meal to go, enjoy your food outdoors while listening to a podcast on your dish's country of origin. The Silk Road for example is a fascinating topic to discover, especially while enjoying chow fun.

 

~ Choreograph a simple synchronized swimming routine with your significant other to be rehearsed with each beach trip.

 

~ Bring your children to a quiet concrete court for their next homework session, giving them brightly colored chalk instead of laptops or paper to write out their arithmetic equations on the pavement.

 

~ Host a weekend gathering of friends, instructing everyone to bring along a single application of their favorite face mask. Swap masks at random and spend the afternoon comparing benefits and effects over mimosas and crudité.

 

~ Have each of your family members pick out a unique leash for your family dog.  Attach all of them to his collar and walk him together in stride.

 

~ Write down the first word that comes to mind upon waking, each day for the entire month. String them together in poetic form, collecting new stanzas throughout the year.

 

~ Go pick wild strawberries or blueberries, using a needle and thread to string them into a vibrant edible necklace to be eaten immediately (after rinsing).

 

Shop our curated selection of pieces that work well for summer days spent leisuring and lounging.

Enjoy other editions from the Why Don't You... series below ~

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview