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Difficult roads often lead to beautiful destinations. Can any statement be more fitting for Pretty Kitty, the gorgeous, young cat who spent the first three years of her life at North Shore Animal League America.

Neurological deficiencies that left her unable to control her bladder and a propensity to shy away from interactions with potential adopters led to Pretty Kitty becoming a long-term resident at Animal League America’s Port Washington campus. Her disabilities and issues with anxiety led to difficult times filled with struggle and adversity, but it didn’t stop her from building strong relationships with trusting friends along the way. Although she built unbreakable bonds with many of the shelter staff and volunteers in our Adoption Center, this captivating domestic longhair couldn’t seem to connect with the right adopter. Many inquiries came through the inbox of Animal League America’s Feline Enrichment Manager Dorit Shani, but none seemed to pan out.

“Because of her condition and the potential for urine scalding, her legs, tail and rear need daily upkeep to keep her clean and dry. It’s just not an easy condition to handle and takes a really special person to commit to this type of daily care,” Dorit said. “Despite all she’s been through- the numerous homes, surgeries, hospitalization- she’s maintained such a docile and sweet nature.  A lot of cats with her history would lose trust in people but Pretty Kitty never did.

It wasn’t until repeat adopter Chre Genao inquired about Pretty Kitty in early December that the excitement started to build. Although she had known about her for quite some time and regularly visited her while bringing her other animals to the medical center for checkups, the timing just never worked – until one day during the Christmas holiday –  when the Genaos gave Pretty Kitty the greatest gift of all.

“I feel like I’ve known Pretty Kitty forever. For three years I visited whenever I had the chance. I inquired about her the first time my family and I were looking to adopt a cat, but I just fell so hard for Rico, a handsome Persian with special needs. My cat of ten years, who was also a Persian rescue, passed away not too long before, so it was just a perfect fit,” Chre said. “It may have taken a while for the pieces to fall into place, but thankfully Pretty Kitty is right where she belongs now. Our entire family is so in love with her.”

Pretty Kitty enters a home already inhabited by multiple special needs pets, including Louie, a blind Schnauzer with no teeth rescued from a Midwestern puppy mill, and Mickey, a 14-year old diabetic cat who had been adopted and returned multiple times throughout his life. Chre and her family have developed a seamless routine that begins bright and early at 6 AM each day when all the animals eat breakfast and ends when it’s time to say goodnight. Filling food bowls, cleaning litter boxes, administering medications, grooming, going to doctor appointments, play time, and a lot of TLC, there are certainly no uneventful days in the Genao home these days, but Chre wouldn’t have it any other way.

“I think I got so used to being on a strict schedule caring for Baby Girl for eight months, that I kind of missed it when she passed away,” she said of the beautiful Calico who recently passed away. “She was older and had advanced renal disease, so there was a lot that went into caring for her. When she passed I felt an emptiness inside. The love and gratitude you receive from a pet with special needs is unmatched. I only wish that more people would realize that it’s not that difficult if you truly want to change the world of that animal.”

On the day Pretty Kitty went home with Chre, all of Pretty Kitty’s human friends gathered in The Lewyt Ark to say their heartfelt goodbyes. The room was filled with everyone who loved her, tears flowing and plenty of hugs shared. Even though she couldn’t understand what all the fuss was about, there was no question she could feel the love and warm wishes. Animal League America Volunteer Kate Haslbauer, who dedicates the bulk of her time on campus to tirelessly working on finding homes for the long-term felines, said Pretty Kitty’s long, tumultuous journey should serve as inspiration to people interested in adopting.

“Rescuing any animal is a life changing moment in itself, but if you find it within yourself to adopt an animal with special needs you are going a step beyond. You are giving that animal a chance that they might have never gotten if it wasn’t for you,” Kate said. “For Pretty Kitty, Rico, Mickey, Baby Girl, and all of the other cats with special needs who have gotten the chance to feel what it’s like to have a family of their own – thank you.”

The post Three Years and a Lifetime of Love: Pretty Kitty Finally Finds Her Perfect Match appeared first on Animal League.

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It’s not uncommon for our Rescue Team to coordinate with other rescue groups in various parts of the world to help rescue homeless animals in need. With access to more than 2,000 shelter partners worldwide at our fingertips, Animal League America remains at the forefront of animal rescue no matter the magnitude of the rescue mission. Recently, we teamed up with Elephant Nature Park Dog Sanctuary in northern Thailand to save the lives of three 5-month-old puppies who were abandoned at the gates of the facility with no food, water, or shelter.

Formed in 2011 after catastrophic flooding tore through Bangkok, Elephant Nature Park Dog Sanctuary has played a major role in rescuing dogs and puppies from surrounding communities who have suffered malnutrition, disease, abuse and neglect. Even many of the poor dogs destined for the illegal meat trade in Laos or Vietnam were rescued by this life-saving organization. These particular pups would have never survived without the help of this heroic group. Now with the help of the world’s largest no-kill rescue and adoption organization, these puppies will have the chance to live their happiest, healthiest lives as highly adoptable Animal League America Mutt-i-grees.

“We were made aware of these puppies by Massachusetts-based Veterinarian, Dr. Amy Shroff. Originally from Long Island, Dr. Shroff is very familiar with our organization and knows that we have assisted with several rescues in Thailand in the past. She often makes trips to Elephant Nature Park to offer her veterinary services, so the connection with our organizations seemed like the perfect fit. Once she was made aware of these abandoned puppies, she immediately reached out to us to see if we would be able to take them in,” said Karla Agostinello, Animal League America Rescue Coordinator. “It’s certainly a tall task for everyone involved, but when precious lives are on the line we always do all we can to make a difference.”

After an 18-hour plane ride from Thailand to New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport and a quick ride aboard one of our Mobile Rescue Units to our Port Washington, N.Y. campus, these little survivors are safe and sound in the care of our veterinary staff here at Animal League America. Once medically examined inside our Pet Health Centers, all three of these lucky pups will be spoiled by our in-house grooming staff before being evaluated by pet behavior training team. They will be provided with only the highest quality of care and nutritional support as they patiently await for the day when they are adopted by responsible, loving families who will cherish them.

With continued support from our generous donors, we will continue to do all we can to improve the lives of animals from both near and far – sparing no expense if it means saving innocent lives. Please donate today to our Rescue Fund to ensure other homeless animals like these three international rescues receive the chance at life they so desperately deserve.

The post Animal League America Helps to Save the Lives of Abandoned Puppies in Thailand appeared first on Animal League.

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March is Special Diagnostic Lab Work Awareness Month

Your pet’s health needs sometimes extend beyond basic examinations and blood screening. When disorders of the endocrine system or specific organs are suspected, more specialized tests can shed light on the disease and how best to manage it.

During the month of March, if your veterinarian recommends special diagnostic testing to diagnose or manage your pet’s illness, you can receive 10% off that testing at our Alex Lewyt Veterinary Medical Center.* This includes testing for bile acids, ACTH stimulation, LDDST, and others.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, call (516) 883-2000 or email us at phc@animalleague.org.

*The exam, basic lab work, and any other diagnostics or treatments will be at normal cost. Special offer is by appointment only.

The post Special Diagnostic Lab Work Awareness Month appeared first on Animal League.

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Question

Hello I am asking for help with our neighbors two small dogs who are left outside all day in all weather conditions in which they are not sheltered, and left without any food or water. The owners leave all day to go to work and do not leave any water or food. I have reached out to the owners and asked if they would give the dogs up. They do not. I have called and complained 4 different times with the Humane Society, they have stated that they have been out to check on the dogs, but they have not due to the fact they are still without food and water. Now the dogs are placed behind a wooden fence in which they cannot be seen. I need someone to help me help these dogs.

Answer

I suggest that you contact the SPCA (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals), police, local rescue groups, and animal control to check on the dogs again. Sometimes (but certainly not always) while conditions are not ideal, they do not reach the level of a violation of the animal cruelty laws, leaving investigators to try to educate the “owner” about humane care. Keep on following up since sometimes one officer views a situation in a different way from another officer. So while one may not take action, another will. Changed conditions (for example, inclement weather or appearance of animals) can also trigger further investigations and action.

PLEASE NOTE: Responses to legal inquiries are not meant to replace seeking legal advice from an attorney in your state. The materials in this website and any responses to questions are for informational purposes only and are not intended, nor should they be construed, as legal advice. This website, the information contained herein, and any responses to questions directed to this column are not intended to create and do not establish an attorney-client relationship. You should not rely or act upon any information provided on this website or in any response to your inquiry without seeking the advice of an attorney in your state regarding the facts of your specific situation.

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Elinor will field as many questions as she can and they will be posted here on this site. Due to the volume of questions received, not all questions are answered. However, many individuals have similar questions. You may find helpful information in the categories listed below.

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The post My neighbors neglect their two small dogs in their yard. appeared first on Animal League.

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By now most of us are aware of the tragic devastation suffered by the people of Puerto Rico and the surrounding areas at the hands of Hurricanes Irma and Maria. The catastrophic storms tore through the area, wiping away homes, business and shelters, crippling the economy and cutting short the lives of too many innocent humans and animals. Since then North Shore Animal League America has taken part in the relief efforts, providing several of our shelter partners in the area with a safe haven for so many animals, who would otherwise have no place to go.

As Puerto Rico continues to slowly recover, Animal League America has also stood steadfastly by in order to assist in any way necessary. Recently, we collaborated with Save A Gato, a non-profit organization based in Old San Juan, which dedicates its rescue efforts to saving the lives of the cats of the old city. Irma Podesta, a volunteer and public relation representative of the organization, reached out to our Rescue Team in hopes we could open our doors to several homeless kittens in desperate need.

Please support our rescue relief efforts. Your donation today will help fund our life-saving work tomorrow.

“Unfortunately, adoptions on the island after the hurricanes are non-existent, and our PetSmart and Petco centers haven’t re-opened yet. This has made everything harder for our organization. We are now on our lowest adoptions ever. We have so many adoptable cats/kittens that could be enjoying a loving home rather than be out on the streets,” said Irma. “Currently in San Juan and in Puerto Rico overall, we are facing high abandonment and low sterilization rates. The current economic climate is not very positive and many residents are moving to the states and abandoning their pets in the process. We try our absolute best to find loving and responsible homes for our adoptable cats, but the feline population far supersedes the families looking to adopt.”

Without hesitation, our Rescue Department organized the transport of eight older kittens, all ranging from six to nine months old, to our Port Washington, N.Y. Adoption Center, where they will receive everything they need to find the perfect homes. These kittens have been fighting for a happy, healthy life since they were born into a world of chaos and disaster, but now they are safe and sound in the care of the world’s largest no-kill rescue and adoption organization. Although these kittens are now living the lives they were always meant to live, it doesn’t mean our work in Puerto Rico is finished. We need your support to continue to be able to improve the lives of dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens from all over the world. With your help we will continue to do everything in our power to be there for the people and animals of Puerto Rico, as well as those right here in our own backyard.  

The post Animal League America Continues to Aid in Recovery in Puerto Rico appeared first on Animal League.

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A Good-Neighbor Message for Valentine’s Day

Few things haunt me more than the sight of a cat huddled in the freezing cold, alone, hungry, and afraid — or a shivering dog, tethered to a stake, trapped and helpless, with nothing but a bowl of frozen water nearby.

Every season presents its own hardships for homeless pets, but right now winter seems like the cruelest. So many animals stranded in the relentless cold and wind. How hopeless they must feel.

But as brutal as this is, it’s not hopeless, not if we realize there’s something each of us can do to help animals like these. As a friend said to me recently, “Many are the tethered dogs and ‘outdoor’ cats who were saved because of a good neighbor.”

I know from experience that feral cats sometimes refuse to be helped. Many are so trap-savvy and afraid that any attempt to help them backfires. From their point of view, your help is an all-out attack. Take Muffin, for example.

For the past 10 years, Howard and I have been caring for this particularly determined feral, the beautiful grouch shown above. She’s gorgeous, all right, a feline princess, with long, luxurious hair, the bushiest tail, and delicate grey and white markings. She’s perfect, except for one thing: she hates us!

Muffin has been spayed, has five heated kitty houses on our property, and is fed two times a day. We’ve tried repeatedly to bring her indoors, but no way. She is clearly much happier outside. When I hand-deliver her food, the best I get is a hiss. And she always waits until I’m at least 10 feet away from her food bowls before she’ll even consider eating. Muffin is truly feral, and after such a long time caring for her and loving her from a distance, I appreciate and respect her for who she is. I’m grateful we can feed her and keep her warm on these frigid days.

But most feral cats are not nearly as lucky as Muffin. Right now, my colleagues at North Shore Animal League America are working very hard to save Magoo, a cat found frozen in a snowbank in Upstate New York on one of the coldest days of the year.  I’m sorry to have to show you such a graphic image, but Magoo is a prime example of the cruelties animals endure when they’re left with no shelter!

A good Samaritan discovered this boy unresponsive and suffering terribly from severe frostbite to much of his tiny body. The kind stranger rushed him to a nearby veterinary hospital, which fortunately works with our Adirondack Region Cat Rescue and Adoption Center, in Glens Falls, N.Y. Magoo suffered not only frostbite and serious nerve damage to his back legs, he was also so dehydrated that his kidneys began to fail. The worst part, though, is the damage to his sweet face. He lost part of his nose and much of his upper lip on the right side. It breaks my heart to think about how much he suffered.

Magoo began his recovery in Glens Falls, where, miraculously, with IV fluids and critical veterinary care, he began to eat on his own and his kidney values improved.

Once he was able to travel, he came to the ICU at North Shore’s Alex Lewyt Veterinary Medical Center. He has a lot of surgery and healing ahead of him, but we’re committed to doing whatever we can for this courageous cat.

As awful as it is, you can bet there are cats like poor Magoo in your communities, too. The problem is so common that some towns have taken a constructive approach to this situation. For one thing, they don’t call these precious animals “ferals” — they prefer the more positive term, “community cats.” Nonprofit trap/neuter/release (TNR) programs are springing up across the country, staffed by volunteers who can show you how to build safe, inexpensive, insulated kitty houses. These good people can also trap and evaluate cats to determine if they might eventually be able to find responsible, loving homes. Many cats who act feral are just horribly frightened strays. All they need is time at a no-kill shelter, a foster home, or a rescue organization to rediscover their inner house cat.

Post-eye surgery, little Merry Bug can enjoy the snowflakes and never have to feel the cold.

For house cats, love is a warm lap shared with friends. Just ask my little girls Jeff and Larry.

And I really want to stress the term “house cat,” because if you have a cat, or if your neighbor, cousin, or friends have cats, remember, there’s no such thing as a safe outdoor cat. For all we know, Magoo belonged to someone who thought he could take care of himself outside. And then he got disoriented in a snowstorm. And then he almost froze to death.

(There’s something else: Strays or cats left to roam in winter will seek spots away from the wind and cold. Often, they climb into warm car engines to escape the weather. If you see strays or roamers in your neighborhood, be sure to check around your car, honk the horn, and bang your hand on the hood a few times before starting the engine.)

If you can’t become directly involved, do what you can to support your community’s T/N/R programs with supplies and donations. They’re providing a vital and humane service and need your help to save lives. And with kitten season soon approaching — once again — the “N” in T/N/R is essential to preventing more animals from enduring the pain, loneliness, and fear that Magoo experienced.

As for neighborhood dogs staked outdoors and left to suffer the bitter cold, there’s something you can do about that, too. First talk to the owners, if possible, and let them know how dangerous this is for their pets. Twenty-two states, plus Washington, D.C., have recognized the cruelty in tethering and passed laws that describe what’s acceptable and what is illegal. Don’t hesitate to contact animal control about a tethered dog. Even where no anti-tethering laws exist, tying a dog outside and leaving him/her there to suffer in the cold is animal cruelty, and your animal control officers should hear about it!

I truly believe that “love your neighbor” applies to our nonhuman neighbors, too. Cats and dogs who don’t enjoy the ideal warmth and companionship of hearth and home need and deserve our attention and help. Whatever you can do to make them more comfortable and safe will mean everything to them — and will warm your own heart this Valentine’s, too.

xo
Beth

P.S. To follow Magoo’s story and get some expert advice about protecting neighborhood strays from the cold, please visit animalleague.org/helpmagooheal.

Kitten Bowl Sunday Recap

Some people know it by another name, but for millions of animal fans from coast to coast, Sunday, Feb. 4, was Hallmark Channel’s Kitten Bowl Sunday. In fact, it was Kitten Bowl V, and once again it was an honor to host this hilarious, adorable, lifesaving event.

This year was extra special because we featured the rescue journeys of several kittens, including Star, one of my own foster nuggets. Animal League America rescued Star and many other kittens from a shelter in Florida just after Hurricane Irma. The shelter had lost power and the heat was becoming dangerous, with many of the cats and kittens needing medicine and care. Our Rescue Team collected all of these felines, just as they had in Texas after Hurricane Harvey, and brought them to New York.

That’s how Star came to live with me, and ultimately how we found this precious little one the perfect home.

I have to admit, I became emotional giving Star to her adopters during the braodcast, but I know she’s found the perfect family. And adoption is what it’s all about.

As usual, Hallmark Channel made everything work beautifully, and my incredible colleagues at Animal League America coodinated Kitten Bowl Parties at 500 shelters and rescue groups across the country, generating thousands of adoptions, in addition to the 32 cat-letes who all found responsible, loving homes.

Kitten Bowl V was a win-win-win-win, and I thank everyone involved for making me part of it. We did it again!

J.J. Swatts catching some zzzzzs.

The post Pets and the Perils of Winter appeared first on Animal League.

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Valentine’s Day is the most romantic day of the year – we treat our loved ones to extra affection, beautiful flowers and…of course…candy. But what about our pets? While a new Valentine chew toy or some extra belly rubs would not be out of the question, we must be aware of the hazards that our Valentine gifts can present to our four-legged friends. Learn how spread the love while keeping pets safe from potential Valentine’s Day hazards.

Chocolate: The number one danger for pets on Valentine’s Day is chocolate since it’s so readily available. Depending on the amount ingested, chocolate is potentially poisonous to many animals. A good rule of thumb to remember is the less sweet the chocolate, the more toxic it could be. These particular chocolates contain theobromine, which is a substance similar to caffeine. Even in small, non-toxic doses, chocolate can still cause stomach upset, diarrhea, vomiting, hyperactivity, dehydration and seizures.

Candy and Gum: Many sugar-free candy, gum and baked products today contain xylitol. Xylitol is a sweetener found in plants that is used as a sugar substitute and is highly toxic to dogs. Dogs ingesting significant amounts of gum or candies solely or largely sweetened with xylitol may develop a sudden drop in blood sugar, resulting in depression, vomiting, loss of coordination, seizures and even liver failure. Symptoms come on very quickly. If you suspect that your pet has ingested any amount of xylitol, call your veterinarian immediately.

Plants and Flowers: Many different varieties of flowers and plants are poisonous or harmful to pets. Different plants and flowers have varied effects. Some of the more popular varieties that may be found around Valentine’s Day are: Baby’s Breath, Chrysanthemums, Daffodils, various Lilies, Ferns, Hyacinth, Hydrangea, Impatiens, Lily-of-the-Valley, Rubber plants, and Tulips. Cats, especially, find grass-like plants irresistible and have access to just about everywhere. There are many more flowers and plants that can cause upset and even death to your pet, so please be aware to keep all varieties of flora and fauna away from them.

Candles: While they set a romantic mood, candles attract the curiosity of your pets. Don’t leave candles unattended – and be sure the fire is out in your fireplace before calling it a night.

Wine: Alcohol and pets don’t mix. Period. Don’t leave any unfinished glasses sitting on counters or tables.

Gift Wrapping: After the gifts are opened, be sure to discard the ribbons, bows, tape and other leftover materials which can cause choking if swallowed.

Pamper Your Pets This Valentine’s Day

A new bone or toy mouse is always a welcome surprise, but there are much better ways to show your pets how much they mean to you—not only on Valentine’s Day, but everyday. Instead of opening your wallet and doling out the dough, spend some extra special time with your dog or cat engaging in some of these fun activities. There’s no better treat you could give them than you!

A Walk On The Beach: Before you head out on that romantic Valentine date, make a date with your dog for a walk to the beach or park. Bring a camera and draw a little heart with your names in the sand—or sandbox, if you don’t happen to live on the coast. Then have your dog run right through it and snap a picture. That way, your dog will literally leave footprints on your heart.

Time for Some Games: Cats love to play, but you don’t need to hit the pet store to give them some great toys. Move your fingers under a blanket (not the precious keepsake Grandma made) for a quick game of catch the mouse, or use a flashlight for a game of tag (just be careful not to point the light directly in your kitty’s eyes).

Happy Valentine’s Day to you and your pets!

The post For the Love of Your Pet: Valentine’s Day Safety Tips appeared first on Animal League.

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Founded by Liz Keller as a branch of her Glen Wild Animal Rescue in Cherry Valley, N.Y., Rescue Dogs Rescue Soldiers trains and pairs shelter dogs with vets suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other debilitating ailments. Liz has a soft spot in her heart for all the dogs in her program, and often finds they change her life as much as she is changing theirs. In this special blog post, Liz talks about 12 dogs that have made her year very, very special.

At Christmas time I like to reflect on all of the things I’m thankful for. I have been blessed with a beautiful property and the ability to help dogs who needed someone to find their untapped potential and bring it to light. While everybody is spending time with family, friends, and the ones they love, I thank my lucky stars that my team and I at Rescue Dogs Rescue Soldiers are able to be family for 12 very special rescue dogs.

In honor of these animals, who I’ve grown to love and care for with all of my heart, I created my very own version of the Twelve Days of Christmas with a little twist to introduce you to all of my four legged friends. All of these dogs came to our sanctuary from North Shore Animal League America’s no-kill campus where they were rescued from lives of uncertainty and loneliness. For one reason or another, these dogs didn’t find their adoptable matches, but they have been thriving here, living fulfilling lives of love and joy.

The first dog, Violet, was very nervous and had a difficult time acclimating to new people. I knew I would be able to help her with this anxiety, but I never knew how much she would help me too. Violet has become the four-legged love of my life and the smiles and happiness I see from her every day, leaves me speechless. She makes me smile, helps me sleep through the night, and is just a calming companion. She was the first gift brought to me during my Twelve Dogs of Christmas.

Then came Oakley, a tough gal, who knows what she wants. She’s not ready to give up her top dog status, but in cold days she opts to stay inside where it’s nice and warm. She reminds me of me – I hate getting old, but I still appreciate all of the love and support I receive from my true friends!

On the third day of Christmas, Daisy came to me. She is the Energizer Bunny – in the door and up the stairs before I can even close the door behind me. Daisy took a while to get to know everyone and feel comfortable, but now that she trusts us and knows she’s safe and sound in our care. I truly cherish her for the amazing, fun-loving animal she is.

The fourth dog of Christmas always sings to me. His name is Oskar, and he loves to howl. Oskar loves the great outdoors and can’t get enough of the grass under his paws and the fresh air in his snout. He became trusting very quickly and loves attention. He has a big personality and is always watching what we are up to.

Number five is Max the Cattle dog. He’s another one who took some time to warm up to us, but he builds strong bonds once he adjusts. He loves Isaiah, our manager and seeks his attention whenever he can. If you let him fall for you, you’ll have a friend for the long haul. Max is one of those dogs who is loyal to the end, and who doesn’t like that in a companion?

The sixth dog of Christmas is Buster, who is as happy and peppy as can be! He loves to play each and every day, only stopping to cuddle up with those he adores. This guy has so much love to give and makes all of us light up when he’s being his silly self.

The seventh dog of Christmas is King Louie. We call him that because he is majestic and a regal sight to behold when he is running free. Trust me, when you meet this guy, you’ll want nothing more than to make him the king of his very own castle. Thee King Louie has been nothing but royalty since he came to us, and we certainly wouldn’t have it any other way.

The eighth dog of Christmas could only be Cooper. He’s a smart one and keeps me on my toes. He learns quickly and likes to change things up from time to time. Cooper is one of those dogs who is more human like than he is dog, which makes all of us appreciate him even more for his loyal companionship.

The ninth dog of Christmas, his story got to me. Fable rescued from a bad situation by North Shore Animal League America, needed time to build trust when he first came to us. Thankfully he trusts us and is very happy to be part of the gang. I couldn’t be more proud that together with Animal League America, we were able to change Fable’s life for the better and provide him with a family who loves him.

The tenth dog of Christmas just so happens to be Denver. This dashing gent is a real celebrity around these parts. A local Pre-K class writes to him weekly and they are so happy to be his PawPals. Although he gets so much love and attention from his new friends, nothing makes me happier than seeing him build relationships with the people who care for him on a daily basis. He’s made remarkable strides from when I first met him.

The eleventh dog of Christmas is Max the shepherd mix. He is a great four legged companion, especially if you consider lounging around the house at night, snacking on chips to be your ideal date. Although he loves hanging indoors when it’s time to relax, bring him outside and let him run and you’ll see true speed and athleticism at its finest. He’s truly the best of both worlds.

Cody is the twelfth dog of Christmas. Last but certainly not least, Cody is handsome as can be. He is aloof and sweet, and totally enjoys the easy-going country lifestyle. He’s the perfect dog to for quiet, lazy days, or long walks in the woods.

To read more about Rescue Dogs Rescue Soldiers click here.

The post The 12 Dogs of Christmas appeared first on Animal League.

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Collaborative Rescue Saves Dogs from Yulin “Festival”

On Saturday evening, January 20th, North Shore Animal League America’s Rescue Team joined in the efforts to prevent six Shepherd mix puppies from suffering horrific ends before their lives even began at the Yulin Meat Trade “Festival” in China.

These adorable little survivors only had the chance to be part of this lifesaving rescue mission because of the valiant work of Animal Hope and Wellness Foundation in Sherman Oaks, California. The 501(c)3 non-profit organization, which focuses solely on rescuing abused and neglected animals, rescued two pregnant female dogs directly from the “festival” last summer, affording them the opportunity to birth their litters in the safety of their rescue facility. Almost eight months later, six of their puppies are here at Animal League America’s no-kill campus, ready to begin their journey to adoption day thanks to this collaborative rescue effort.

Because of this intricate rescue, which spanned more than 10,000 miles, these puppies will never have to suffer. Never will they be forced to cower in the back of an overcrowded wire cage as they are paraded through the streets on their way to a celebrated demise. Now, nestled safely in their spacious cages with full bellies and even fuller hearts, all six of these bright eyed pups will be provided with everything they need to grow and mature in to the highly adoptable pets they were always meant to be. From high quality veterinary care by our medical team and warm baths by our professional groomers, to socialization and play time at our Adoption Center, these dogs are now free to enjoy the lives they were destined to have.

“We are so proud to call Animal Hope and Wellness Foundation a partner in rescue. Without their tireless efforts to save animals in desperate need of saving, so many helpless animals like these two momma pups and their unborn puppies would never have a chance,” said Cindy Szczudlo, Animal League America Director of Rescue Services. “Thousands of animals are mindlessly slaughtered during this event – a statistic that we still can’t fathom. Anything we can do to help prevent more animals from suffering the same fate, we’re going to do it.”

Although these dogs are now safe, thousands of other dogs in Yulin and countless others around the world still need our help. Animal League America partners with more than 2,000 shelter and rescue groups from across the United States and around the globe in order to position ourselves in the ideal place to save as many lives as we can. By donating to our Rescue Fund, you enable us to expand our reach to save the lives of even more dogs, cats, puppies, and kittens from all over the country, as well as in our own backyard.

Please donate today and help us to provide better lives for more animals in need of saving.

The post Collaborative Rescue Saves Dogs from Yulin “Festival” appeared first on Animal League.

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We all know that moving from one home to another can be a difficult transition – and the transition from a shelter to a home can also be very difficult for cats and dogs. When bringing home a new pet it’s always good to remember that Fido or Fifi will need time to adjust to the changes in their environment and daily routine. Here is some helpful information to help ease your pet’s transition into your loving family.

Bringing Home a New Cat:

Have a room set up for your cat when you get home.

  • It should be a relatively quiet, low traffic area where your cat can slowly get used to his/her new surroundings.
  • The litter box, water & food bowls, toys, beds, etc. should all be placed in the room before you bring in the cat so they can explore the room as they enter.
  • Cats love to hide and play so create some hiding places – such as cardboard boxes, or large blankets – so your cat has a place get away too, if needed.
  • Block off any areas that are difficult for you to get to, without moving large obstacles or making lots of noise.

Keep in mind that the move from a shelter to a home, although beneficial, can cause some temporary behavior changes.

  • Your cat may hide for the first few days, or may run from you when approached.
  • Give your cat time to get to know you, offer lots of patience and love and your pet will surely come around.

Closely monitor your new cat’s eating patterns.

  • Be sure to pay close attention to behavior, and eating patterns during the first week after you bring your cat home.
  • Some cats, under stressful situations will refrain from eating, and retaining proper nutrition.
  • Try to place food as close to your cat as possible, show him/her where you place it, and offer food with strong smells to encourage him/her to eat.
  • Call your veterinarian if you feel your cat is not eating enough to receive proper nutrition, or having other problems eating.
Bringing Home a New Dog:

Try not to overcompensate for any hard times you feel that your dog may have experienced in the past by being too permissive.

Don’t feel that you need to constantly entertain your new pet. Moving from a cage into your home is stimulating enough for the time being.

Try to limit the amount of company you have for the first few weeks, to make the process less stressful for FIDO.

Give your dog time to adjust. Like any new relationship, this one also requires time, patience and understanding and each dog warms up at their own pace, which may differ from expectations.

A change of environment can trigger temporary behavioral problems. For example, some dogs will urinate in unexpected places, while others might to want to chew things. Some dogs may feel overwhelmed at first and want to hide or run away while others take a more defensive position. As “pack animals,” dogs will test you to find out where they stand in the social hierarchy of your family. Living in a cage provides little stimulation. In a new environment, a dog may become over-stimulated and become “”testy”” or hyperactive.

Ask for help. The team at North Shore Animal League America is committed to making your adoption a success. We offer support with behavioral issues through orientation classes, low-cost group training classes, private training, and educational literature and phone support. For more information on our Pet Behavior services visit animalleague.org/behavior or call 516-883-7900 ext. 342.

The most important thing to remember, whether you’re welcoming a new dog or cat, is to be patient. All animals are different and adjust at their own speed. Give yourself time to get to know your pet, and soon you’ll have a loyal and loving companion for years to come.

The post Tips for Bringing Home Your New Pet appeared first on Animal League.

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