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Jamming to your favorite songs on the road is a great way to stay awake, but podcasts could be even better. Whether you have a playlist or the radio playing, eventually songs are going to be repeated and you’ll get tired of belting out the same lyrics over and over. There are a ton of podcast categories out there for you to browse through such as news, comedy, drama, and even some specific trucking podcasts related to the industry. It’s time to take a look at the best trucking podcasts of 2018. These podcasts are great for passing the time while on the road or just catching up with some trucking information after-hours.

You might be thinking that a podcast would be boring and that you’d prefer to listen to an upbeat tune you can sing along to, but don’t knock it ‘til you try it! They’re a great way to keep up with industry trends and can also provide some crazy stories and humor for your drive. While you probably have a favorite radio show, it’s not guaranteed that you’ll be driving when it’s airing. With podcasts, you choose when it plays. To get you started, we’ve put together a short list of trucking podcasts to check out.

Best Trucking Podcasts of 2018 1. Trucker Dump

Todd McCann has been trucking for about 20 years, and he sure has a lot to say about the industry. He has the experience of driving solo, as a team, and also with his wife who he refers to as “The Evil Overlord.” McCann has great insights to the professional side of the career as well as the personal side. Todd has even made guest appearances on other trucking podcasts (like BigRigBanter but we’ll get into that later). When it comes down to the best trucking podcasts of 2018, Todd’s blend of road knowledge and warm personality make for a great podcast.

2. TalkCDL

When we’re talking about the best trucking podcasts of 2018, you want a podcast host that feels like he or she is in the truck with you. This trucking podcast is funny and entertaining, but also valuable for truckers. Veteran Ron Henderson discusses topics ranging from news in the industry such as self-driving trucks to lighter subjects such as “you might be a trucker if…” He takes callers from all over the country to get other opinions and stories to make his show more relatable and fun. This is exactly what alot of truckers want, Ron Henderson is raw, authentic, honest, and is very entertaining. If you want a companion on the road who understands your gripes, Ron Henderson is your guy.

3. BigRigBanter

Podcasts are gaining so much traction and attention, that we decided to create our own. BigRigBanter, sponsored by alltruckjobs.com, is hosted by Troy Diffenderfer. While he’s trucker, Troy strives to deliver all things trucking while putting a new spin on some aspects. He’s currently on his 18th episode and covers a wide variety of topics, including finding love on the road, marijuana and trucking, and a recap of the Great American Truck Show. He’ll often have a few guests on the show to help cover the topic, including fellow podcasters like Todd McCann. You can expect much more from Troy as the show continues to evolve.

4. Ask the Trucker

Allen Smith, a 34-year veteran of the trucking industry, is the kind of person who wants to help others and the industry. He talks about the truths of trucking, and won’t skip over the ugly parts. Smith and his followers have made the forward movement “raising the standards of the trucking industry” a real thing. Check out his informative and motivational podcasts for trucking regulations, driver health, and career development. Allen is also extremely active on twitter and is always happy to engage fans. He’s a veteran of the industry and offers great insight into the life of the trucker. He’s also an advocate for truckers rights and is always willing to offer his opinion on some of the controversial issues within the industry.

5. Red Eye Radio

RER was originally targeted at long-haul truckers, airing overnight Monday – Friday from midnight to 5 am Central time. It has now broadened its audience to include all those who “embrace the new 24/7 lifestyle.” The show covers headlines, weather forecasts, pop-culture, and other topics. Although they explore many subjects, hosts Gary McNamara and Eric Harley have managed to keep the key focus of being part of the trucking industry and creating a positive in-cab experience. This is one of the best trucking podcasts of 2018 because it perfectly fits the lifestyle of many truckers. If you’re looking for something to listen to during the overnight hauls, Red Eye Radio is a great option.

6. Good Job, Brain!

You might be wondering how this one landed on the best trucking podcasts of 2018 list, but hear us out. While not exactly related to the industry, this is still a great podcast on trucking that will keep you alert. If you have a knack for trivia or love to test your brain, this one is for you! Nothing keeps you awake better than engaging your brain in some interesting realities. By not only preventing boredom, you are also improving your cognitive health. You’ll learn some fun facts that could be conversation starters with those back home or anyone you meet on the road.

7. The Talk of Shame

Again, not specifically categorized with trucking podcasts, but still hilarious! Hosted by Streeter Seidell, a comedian on Saturday Night Live, The Talk of Shame reveals the most humiliating stories from real people. Although Seidell is currently taking a break from the show, there are over 40 episodes available for your entertainment. If you get enjoyment out of others’ disgrace, this would be a great show to check out. Sometimes when you’re feeling down while out on the road, you just want to to feel like you can relate to someone. That’s why The Talk of Shame is a great podcast to listen to.

What are some of your favorite podcasts? Comment below!

The post Best Trucking Podcasts of 2018: Better Than the Radio appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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Failing the CDL Test is a new trucker’s nightmare. The written portion is one thing, but the road test is a whole other monster. What if your truck malfunctions? What if you hit a curb? It’s easy for your mind to get carried away by all the “what if’s.” However, don’t panic! Test anxiety is completely normal for truckers, but it can become detrimental if you’re too nervous. Luckily, we’ve got some tips below on passing the CDL Test with flying colors. Keep reading!

Tips for Passing the CDL Test

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Know the Automatic Failures

Right off the bat, it’s important to know which mistakes are an automatic failure on the road test. Sure, there are the obvious ones like running a red light or hitting another vehicle, but some aren’t so obvious. In his article on TruckingTruth.com, Brett Aquila notes that smaller mistakes like hitting a curb, forgetting your turn signal, rolling backward before a stop, or not checking mirrors properly before changing lanes can result in an automatic failure. Why are these automatic failures? Well, these mistakes, although minor, can have potentially serious consequences. Truckers must always be aware of these safety-related issues and make sure to execute them properly every time.

Know What Mistakes are Acceptable

In his article, Aquila also discusses what he calls “acceptable mistakes.” These are things that aren’t serious safety hazards, like grinding a gear, missing a shift, or taking a turn too wide. It’s important to know that making mistakes like this once or twice during your road test probably won’t result in failure. However, if you are consistently grinding gears or making wide turns, the CDL examiner may consider failing you so you can practice more. That said, as long as you keep your composure and limit the little mistakes, it’s no big deal.

Maintain Your Composure

Aside from physically driving the truck, another factor that can make or break your road test is your composure. It’s no secret that trucking can be very high-pressure and stressful. So, during your test, it’s crucial that you demonstrate your ability to keep cool under pressure. Aquila notes that “taking the CDL road test will be the most pressure you’ve been under so far in a tractor-trailer. It feels like your life, your career, your everything depends upon whether or not you can pass this exam and get your CDL. And the CDL Examiners want it that way.” That’s right, the examiners want you to feel the pressure so they’re able to see how you handle it. If you freeze up and panic after making a small mistake, the examiner will take note of it. It’s normal to be nervous during your road test, but don’t let anxiety get the best of you. If you do make a mistake, take a breath, relax, recover, and continue driving.

Be Confident

I know, it’s easier said than done, but being confident makes a big difference when it comes to passing the CDL Test. Even if you have to “fake it till you make it,” confidence is key. Try as best you can to stay calm, relaxed, and positive. Act like you’ve done it a thousand times before. The CDL examiners know that you’re new to truck driving, so they’re not going to be scrutinizing your every move. They expect you to make some minor mistakes. However, making a big, safety-related mistake or cracking under pressure could result in failure. At the end of the day, passing the CDL test will depend on whether or not the examiner believes you’re able to safely handle the rig and maintain your composure.

Do you have any tips for passing the CDL test? Share them in the comments section below!

The post Passing the CDL Test | Tips for Success appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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Independence Day is just around the corner. Aside from fireworks, food, and celebrations, this holiday is also marked by a huge increase in traffic. According to WalletHub.com, 46.9 million Americans will travel 5o or more miles from home this Fourth of July; a record high. With more vehicles on the road, there’s also a greater risk for traffic accidents. In fact, the Fourth of July is considered one of the most dangerous holidays of the year. Despite the risks, truckers must continue to do their jobs, which is why we’ve compiled a list of Fourth of July safety tips for truckers. Keep reading!

Fourth of July Safety for Truckers

Stay Alert

This one applies to truckers all year long, but it’s especially important during periods of heavier traffic. Make sure you’re well-rested and not distracted. The number of drunk driving accidents increases significantly on the Fourth, so it’s crucial for truckers to be careful and attentive. That said, if you’re feeling tired, get some rest. Many studies show that drowsy driving is just as dangerous as drunk driving. Lastly, stay aware of other drivers on the road as well. No matter how safely you’re driving, one reckless driver is a danger to everyone else on the road.

Watch Your Speed

If you find yourself outpacing the traffic around you, slow down. Additionally, remember to reduce your speed if you’re driving in areas where there may be families and large groups of people. Also, remember to keep a safe following distance between you and the vehicle in front of you.

Be Mindful of the Weather

The Fourth of July falls smack-dab in the middle of thunderstorm season, so severe weather safety is a must for truckers. We all know that the weather can change quickly in many parts of the country, so it’s important to check the weather for your route ahead of time. If there’s a chance of severe weather, consider taking an alternate route. If you can’t monitor the weather closely and pull over if conditions get too dangerous to drive.

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Expect Delays

Like we said before, almost 47 million people will be on the road this Fourth of July. With all the hustle and bustle, it’s very possible for truckers to get caught in a traffic jam or two. So, it’s best to plan your route ahead of time and account for potential delays. While many people can afford to be late to their destinations, truck drivers often cannot.

Limit Distractions

Many truckers like to talk to their loved ones on the phone while driving, but this might not be such a good idea this time of year. While it’s possible to talk while keeping your eyes on the road, it still requires your mind to focus. In addition, try not to eat while you’re driving. One second of looking away from the road to open a bag of chips could have big, potentially dangerous consequences.

Maintain Your Truck

Summertime can really take a toll on trucks, so make sure your rig is road-worthy and well-maintained. During the summer, it’s a good idea to check your tire pressure more regularly to avoid blowouts. If your tires are underinflated, fix the problem as soon as you can!

While many – if not all – of these tips apply to truckers year-round, it’s never a bad idea to offer suggestions for staying safe on the road. Remember, implementing small safety procedures can make a big difference for you, and everyone else on the road.

Do you have any more Fourth of July safety tips for truckers? Feel free to let us know in the comments below, or reach out to us on Facebook or Twitter!

The post Fourth of July Safety Tips for Truckers appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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In the great wide world of trucking, there are all sorts of different jobs commercial drivers can take advantage of. Once you get your CDL you’ll always be able to find the solid paying jobs you need. Still, sometimes drivers want to expand their skill sets and take on other types of driving jobs. If this sounds like you, the next question is probably over which trucking jobs are paying the best right now! In many companies throughout the industry, lots of drivers are switching to flatbed trucking as a means of earning extra cash for the foreseeable future. Let’s dive in:

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Switching to Flatbed Trucking

In 2017, the several reports showed an increase in the net income flatbed clients brought in. Some of these drivers from the American Truck Business Service made over $10,000 above their yearly average to reach $70,477! Other reports from Overdrive found flatbed volumes were up 10 percent this past May. This followed a national average of $2.65 per mile in April which was a record high.

Additionally, several flatbed fleets actually announced pay increases for their drivers in 2018. Specifically, Smokey Point Distributing in Washington increased their flatbed drivers’ salary of $65,000 to a competitive $75,000, taking effect June 1. Along with many other companies across the nation, this seems to be a trend in the driving industry. It’s no wonder that lots of drivers are considering switching to flatbed trucking. However, one of the main reasons these jobs are on the rise is the skills involved with being an efficient flatbed trucker…

Skills Needed for Flatbed Trucking

While there are many financial indicators suggesting switching to flatbed trucking is a wise move, it’s all about having the right skills. Drivers comfortable with dry van, reefer, and other types of hauling that have fewer physical requirements need to increase their knowledge to land flatbed jobs. In most cases, flatbed trucking requires specialized tarping skills to secure loads safely and efficiently. Similarly, drivers entering into the world of flatbed trucking must have skills hauling oversized freight. While wide loads may not constitute too many loads, having the ability to take these jobs will certainly increase your net income!

Another critical aspect of switching to flatbed trucking is the amount of physical labor involved with each haul. Compared to working a dry van job, flatbed drivers must complete all of the same tasks in addition to load securement. This also means keeping the entire load dry through the use of tarps and chains. In that way, these jobs demand more physical strength and knowledge on how to properly secure loads to these types of trailers.

Once a load is completely secured, flatbedders also need to consider how loads shift throughout a haul, especially during bad weather conditions. One of the worst mistakes rookies switching to flatbed trucking make is having their tarps fly up like parachutes in the wind! Because you’ll be hauling a wide range of different loads, it’s up to you to learn how best to shield the freight from the elements during your route. This also means you’ll need to dress for the weather you’ll encounter each haul. Flatbedding can require you to get out of your truck to check on a load during your time driving. Always be sure to pull off in a designated and safe area!

Technology Improvements and Lag

Like most of trucking, technology constantly shapes the future of flatbed driving jobs. Some of what experts expect to see include things like roll top or curtain van type configurations for increased safety. These can also serve to reduce the time it takes to tarp a load. Additionally improvements in aerodynamics look to eliminate bad fuel mileage in this specialty to really make it efficient to haul flatbed loads. Still, due to the fact that there some things just don’t fit in traditional trailers, flatbedding is only going to remain a great type of trucking job you can take advantage of today!

Are you a flatbed trucker? What are some of the main challenges? Let us know in the comments below!

The post Switching to Flatbed Trucking | Main Considerations appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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Move over, AllTruckJobs. BigRigBanter is changing lanes and it’s driving fast! BigRigBanter is taking a break from its headquarters in Lancaster, Pa. and it is headed for Dallas, TX. For the first time since the podcast launched in 2017, BigRigBanter is going to the Great American Trucking Show. AllTruckJobs and BigRigBanter will be at GATS August 23-25 in booth 2822.

Not familiar with BigRigBanter? BigRigBanter is a trucking podcast powered by AllTruckJobs. During its first year at GATS, BigRigBanter will be conducting interviews, hanging out with whoever comes by our exclusive Long-Haul Lounge, and giving away a $200 Amazon gift card to one lucky winner. This means if you’re not familiar with BigRigBanter now, you will be after you hang out with us in Texas.

Win Prizes and Take a Load Off with BigRigBanter at GATS

Alright. Let me guess. Right now, you’re probably wondering – how do I win this $200 Amazon gift card? It’s easy! All you’ll have to do is come to hang out with us in our Long-Haul Lounge, have a seat on one of our comfy couches, and fill out a card with some basic info about you. Toss the card into a bucket, and we’ll draw one lucky winner after the show. We will announce the winner on our very next episode of BigRigBanter, so make sure you listen to the September podcast to hear if you won!

What’s this long-haul lounge we speak of? It’s essentially a place, as our slogan goes, to take a load off with BigRigBanter. There will be couches, free giveaways, and lots of fun people to chat with. If you’re not shy and you want to be featured on our show, ask to be interviewed! We love to chat with anyone in the trucking industry, from non-profits with a good cause to truck drivers to company executives.

Don’t like to be recorded? That’s fine. You can also snap a picture with us and use our Snapchat filter for a fun way to remember BigRigBanter at GATS. Tell all your trucker friends to come by the Long-Haul Lounge and tell us a fun trucking story for our podcast!

Meet our Team – BigRigBanter at GATS!

Here’s who you’ll get to meet from BigRigBanter at GATS!

Margaret is the boss lady. She keeps us all in line but still knows how to have fun. You’ll see her at GATS organizing interviews, posting on social media, and recruiting people to sign up for our Amazon gift card.

Connor is our video/audio guru. At GATS he will be busy taking pictures, recording interviews, and making sure we all look and sound as good as possible in the material he captures. Want him to visit your booth? Let us know!

Lenay just wanted a free trip to Texas. Just kidding. That’s me! I’ll be capturing some awesome footage for Facebook Live, helping Connor conduct interviews and assisting Margaret with social media.

We’ll all be accompanied by our co-workers at AllTruckJobs. You’ve probably seen them at GATS before.

From left to right: Sean, Tara, Oliver, and Brett

Now that you know what we look like, we expect you to say hi! We are all looking forward to hanging out with you in the Lone Star State! See you in August!

The post BigRigBanter Take Over: AllTruckJobs’ Podcast to Record at GATS appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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If you’ve been truck driving for a while, chances are, you know what truck driver burnout is. If you don’t, you may not have been driving long enough. Truck drivers’ jobs are very demanding, tiring, and isolating. After years of sitting behind the wheel, it’s possible for a trucker to get beaten into that lifestyle, which could lead to burnout. Not only is truck driver burnout dangerous for a trucker, it’s also a hazard to others on the road. If you’re wondering how to identify, avoid, or handle trucker burnout, keep reading!

What is Truck Driver Burnout?

Essentially, truck driver burnout refers to when a trucker becomes so physically and mentally exhausted from their job that they become a hazard to themselves or others on the road. Truck driving is a lifestyle and, if they’re not careful, it’s very possible for this lifestyle to completely consume a trucker. They may start to feel guilty when they are not driving since they’re paid by the mile. The more often a trucker is on the road, the more money they make. So, it’s possible for a trucker to fall into this dangerous cycle, and this could lead to burnout.

What Are the Signs of Burnout?

Not every trucker shows the same signs of being burnt out. In fact, many truckers don’t even realize that they are starting to burn out. The following are a few signs of trucker burn out to watch out for:

  • Exhaustion. A burnt-out trucker may start to lag and become lazier. They may stay at truck stops longer than usual to waste time.
  • Loss of motivation/enthusiasm. If a trucker has no motivation or enthusiasm to drive, it could be a sign of burnout. Truckers suffering from burnout start to dislike the trucking job that they once loved. They can barely force themselves to get into their rig and become disinterested in driving.
  • Doing the bare minimum. If a trucker is burnt out, they may find themselves doing as little driving as possible. When they’re behind the wheel, it’s not for very long, and they frequently find excuses to stop and take a break. Procrastination is also common, as a trucker may take longer to get things done.
  • Poor eating habits. Burnt-out truckers have a tendency to have poor eating habits. Their lack of motivation to drive leads to a lack of motivation to take care of their health.
  • Substance abuse. If a trucker starts using drugs or alcohol to cope, it may be an indication of burnout.

Another important thing to keep in mind is that truck driver burnout is often confused with trucker fatigue. However, burnout is more than feeling tired or having trouble concentrating. Driver burnout is serious and could lead to depression.

Dealing With Burnout

If you think that you or a trucker you know may be suffering from burnout, don’t ignore it! It’s important to take steps to resolve it right away. Here are a few ways to handle truck driver burnout:

  • Maintain a healthy work-life balance. As a trucker, this isn’t always easy, since you know that if you’re not driving truck, you aren’t making money. However, having a proper work-home balance is crucial for all truckers.
  • Similarly, make use of vacation time. Some truckers find themselves feeling guilty for taking their vacation time because they aren’t getting paid. Still, vacation time is necessary for truckers to recharge their batteries and rest.
  • Keep some regularity. If possible, getting on a regularly scheduled run with a more predictable schedule is a good way to avoid burnout. That way, your sleep pattern will be more regular and you won’t risk falling asleep behind the wheel.
  • Embrace the ELD. As much as truckers are opposed to the new electronic logs, they help prevent drivers from overworking. They force truckers to take more breaks, get more rest and will force them off the road after 70 hours.

What are some healthy ways that you avoid and/or deal with truck driver burnout? Drop us a comment below!

The post Identifying and Avoiding Truck Driver Burnout appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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John’s a senior in high school, and everyone is pressuring him about college. He knows he has to choose a career path, but he doesn’t like the idea of going to school for any longer. Although his parents have their heart set on him going to college, it’s so expensive. John wants to earn money now – he doesn’t want to put his life on hold for another four years or more He sits alone in his room, wondering what trade he could learn where he’d make a decent living. A semi-truck barrels down the city street outside his window, interrupting his thought. Then he wonders, how much can you make driving truck? He finds a recent news article about how truckers are making more money than they did last year, and that growth is expected to continue. He also learns that there are lots of trucking jobs available.

So, how much money are we talking about and what things impact the salary potential for truck drivers?

How Much Can You Make Driving Truck? Factors That Impact Trucker Salary

There are many things that affect how much money a truck driver makes. Here are the top six factors to consider when wondering how much can you make driving truck.

  1. Mileage

The number of miles you’re driving and the cost of fuel can affect how much you earn as a truck driver. For example, long-haul drivers tend to make more money than those who drive for smaller, local companies.

  1. Education and licensing

If you earn your Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) you’ll make more money than if you don’t have a CDL.

  1. Location

Some regions of the country have a higher salary rate for truckers than others. This one isn’t a major influencer, but you may make more money in certain states.

  1. Experience

The longer you drive the more money you will make. Many companies are searching for experienced drivers, and they’re willing to pay more for people who know what they’re doing.

  1. Bonuses

Depending on what company you’re driving for, you might get some pretty good bonuses or incentives. This gives you the potential to earn money beyond your base salary.

  1. Specific Role

Certain trucking positions pay better than others. For example, if you’re a specialty driver, such as in hazmat hauling, you will make more money than traditional drivers. Owner-operators also have the potential to make more money, although they do have more responsibility.

Although these six points are important to consider, there’s enough research out there to give you a ballpark trucker salary potential.

How Much Can You Make Driving Truck? Average Trucker Salary

Each year there are various estimates on average truck driver salaries. The most recent number provided by Indeed.com is $78,678 per year. This number is based on what truckers in the United States report as their annual salary. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports an annual wage of $43,590 for heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers. When you consider those averages and the factors listed above the impact trucking, it’s safe to say you can earn anywhere from $26,920 to $63,140 or more. Again, that number depends on your location, bonuses and years of experience.

For someone like John, who is graduating from high school, a truck driving job would be a lucrative option. He can attend a trucking school, which doesn’t take near as long as going to college, and quickly start earning an annual income. Plus, he will earn more money the longer he drives. There’s also plenty of opportunities to move up and around in the trucking industry.

How much can you make driving truck? Find out by browsing open positions and applying online today!

The post How Much Can You Make Driving Truck? appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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As a trucker, it may be pretty tough to maintain a proper work-life balance, especially with a spouse and/or children. Being on the road for days on end can leave truckers feeling lonely and homesick. So, why not make trucking a family affair? If you’re thinking about trucking with family, keep reading! Below, we have some great tips for bringing your loved ones with you on the road.

Tips for Trucking with Family

First things first, it’s important to note that not all trucking companies allow drivers to bring their family members on the road with them. Make sure to check with your company about their specific rules on passengers. If you’re lucky enough to have a trucking job that allows family passengers, there are still many factors to consider before taking your spouse or kids with you on the road.

Trucking with Children

Even if your company has a family rider policy, you may find that there are still restrictions and guidelines for taking a child on the road. Every company’s rules are different, but the average age at which a child may ride along is around eight to ten. This may sound like a no-brainer, but children must have proof that they are your offspring. Bringing a child on the road that isn’t directly related to you is usually not allowed.

Check Out Your Cab

After making sure that your family members are allowed to ride as a passenger, it’s important to think about your in-cab setup. Is it suitable for more than one person? Is it safe for children? Keep in mind that bringing your family on the road isn’t just a matter of whether or not they are allowed to ride. It’s also about making sure they will be comfortable and safe in your cab.

Make Sure Your Route Works

As a driver, it’s up to you to determine whether or not your route is suitable for your family. For example, if you’re trucking through a state with potentially severe weather, it may not be a good idea to bring your family along. Aside from that, think about your daily activities as a driver. Will having family with you make your job harder? Keep in mind that trucking is an occupation. While bringing your family on the road sounds great, you still need to be able to do your job as best you can.

Additionally, truckers should consider the type of places they may need to stop during their route. Are the truck stops family-friendly? Some rest areas may include family-friendly restaurants, but others may not be suitable for your loved ones, especially children.

Perks of Trucking with Family

While there are a number of factors involved in bringing your family on the road, it is usually a rewarding experience for everyone involved. Many truckers enjoy bringing their family on the road because it allows them to bond and share new experiences together. Some truckers bring their family along as a way of providing them with a “vacation” of sorts. While it isn’t a typical family getaway, trucking with family is a great way to show your loved ones parts of the country they may have never seen before. Not only that, but the presence of family members is beneficial for a driver’s overall mood. Having loved ones on the road will most likely cause truckers to feel more at ease, happier, and less lonely.

All in all, trucking with family can be a great way to keep in touch and create lasting memories. There’s nothing quite like being on the open road with the people you love most! Have you ever brought your spouse or children along with you on the road? Comment your experiences below!

The post Useful Tips for Trucking with Family appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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Every year, hundreds of lifelong truck drivers grow nearer to their retirement. After clocking thousands of miles driving all across the United States, it comes time to consider what’s next. For many drivers, retiring from trucking is exciting, although it can also bring certain challenges and anxieties. Like many different professions, trucking also requires a significant amount of planning before retirement is within reach. So what are the main things truckers need to know? We’ll discuss that here today!

Find Trucking Jobs

Of course retirement something most everyone considers at some point, although the earlier you do the better! Although it’s the end of your career, retiring from trucking is the beginning of a new phase of life. According to a Gallup poll, the average age for retirement in the United States is now 61, up from 59 a decade ago. Today, people are waiting several more years to retire and the reasons are simple.

Most people aren’t ready to stop working, they need financial security, and the healthcare benefits many company-driving jobs provide are invaluable. As very common thoughts for most retirees, truck drivers end up considering a lot of the same things.

5 Considerations When Retiring From Trucking: 1. Financially Secure Enough?

For each year spent working, most experts say you should have two to three years of retirement coverage. Being able to cover all of your expenses with enough left over to continue living a healthy and comfortable life are the main goals. So long as your nest egg remains intact until your actual retirement date, you should be in a good place financially. In some trucking company situations, benefits rise an additional 8% for each year you delay taking these benefits between 62 and 70.

2. Is my Nest Egg Enough?

In order to tell whether your nest egg is truly prepared for retirement, you’ll need a balance sheet. This will help you break down your assets and liabilities to determine your net worth. Taking into account all of your personal possessions of value like jewelry, real estate, automobiles, and other valuables helps to determine what non-monetary wealth you have. Generally speaking, figuring out what debt and legal obligations you have constitute your liabilities. Next, you’ll need to generate a list of your monthly expenditures in order to calculate how much you need to live comfortably each month. Be sure to account for any and all expenses, especially those emergency funds!

3. Estimate Out-of-Pocket Medical Expenses

Years of wear and tear from trucking have probably made you acutely aware of what medical costs you’ll want to consider in retirement. Although it’s incredibly difficult to predict exactly how much money you’ll need to dedicate to medical expenses, this can’t be overlooked. As more and more costs shift to consumers, it could be wise to take a close look at this area of your expenses in the coming years.

4. Do You Have a Clean Slate?

Once retiring from trucking is finally within reach, debt can often put a damper on things… If you have high balances on your credit cards, loans, or any other outstanding debts it might be wise to visit a financial counselor. Discussing objective ways to bring your debt down before retirement is extremely important to lead a sustainable life. In many cases, credit cards usually have the highest interest rates, followed closely by automobiles. Most experts will recommend dealing with your mortgage last because it usually has the lowest interest rate.

5. Do You Have Life Insurance

At the age of retirement, term and permanent life insurance are commonly expensive. If you have the opportunity to purchase this insurance before you actually retire, it’s possible that you’ll get a better rate. If you believe that it’s possible you’ll need long-term care in the future, there is also a specific type of insurance for this. Overall, if you can afford it this type of insurance will cover what’s necessary if you’re unable to provide for your family.

These are just some of the main things people retiring from trucking will want to consider. Are you thinking about your retirement? What considerations are you making? Let us know in the comments below!

The post Retiring From Trucking | 5 Main Considerations appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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Your company spends thousands of dollars on advertising for trucking jobs. You share open positions on social media, list them on various online job boards, and publish ads in trucking magazines. When you finally do get a lead, all of your competitors already called that driver. Then, when you want to make changes to your advertising, you can’t get a person on the phone to help you. Sound familiar? AllTruckJobs has heard it all.

Reduce Cost Per Hire

That’s why we developed a cutting-edge recruitment tool for trucking that is paired with resources for a package designed to reduce your cost per hire and enhance your existing marketing initiatives.

We have a dedicated support team available to help clients with everything from changes to search criteria to creating banner ads. AllTruckJobs represents the next-generation in online driver recruitment, yet our technology is old-school simple.

For example, Michael Coble, who currently works as a director of recruiting, has worked in trucking for 30 years. He is a former driver in his fifties who said he wouldn’t touch a computer just a few years ago. Now, he’s learning to use technology. “AllTruckJobs is one of the easiest programs,” Coble said. “The dashboard in real time is an amazing tool, and not a lot of other job boards have that kind of stuff. You can see all your metrics right there.”

Direct Point of Contact

Not only does Coble like AllTruckJobs’ easy-to-use recruitment tool for trucking, but he likes the fact that the software is continually updated and adjustments are made depending on what the market dictates.

“I’ve always appreciated the fact that AllTruckJobs will look at what’s going on and not just charge the money and say ‘well, we didn’t get you the hires, sorry,’” Coble said. He’s on a first-name basis with his point-of-contact at AllTruckJobs and knows they can have a straightforward conversation about what’s going on. “You buy from your friends, so there’s more of a personal deal there too,” Coble said.

Consistent Quality Driver Leads

AllTruckJobs knows that trucking companies face a grim reality in their search for drivers. Fewer people are pursuing their CDL because somewhere along the line society steered away from blue collar work and toward tech jobs. However, the truth is, trucking is a lucrative career that deserves attention.

“Computers can only drive a truck so far. We still have to have truck drivers,” said Gractia Wilburn of Arkansas-based Loggins Logistics, Inc. Wilburn is a recruiter who worked in various sectors of the trucking industry throughout the past 25 years. Wilburn and Coble both feel the strain of the driver shortage. With that said, Wilburn believes that the worst thing trucking companies can do in the current climate is to pause job advertising to save a buck. It takes at least two months to build up a pipeline of leads once you start advertising, she says. When companies pause that pipeline “it’s not helping, because it takes their name out of the market,” Wilburn said.

Call Anytime

AllTruckJobs can’t invent the hundreds of new truck drivers the industry needs. (We’re still troubleshooting that!) We can, however, keep your brand in the market. We will deliver you direct apps and real-time metrics with our recruitment tool for trucking. We’ll keep your pipeline of leads full. And when you’re frustrated or have questions, you’ll get a real-live person on the phone every time you call. If you don’t believe us – call now!

The post AllTruckJobs Boasts Next-Generation Recruitment Tool for Trucking appeared first on AllTruckJobs.com.

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