Loading...

Follow Travel Blog | All The Ways You Wander on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Travel photography in Iceland during the winter How I came to photograph Iceland in the winter

Iceland is one of those countries that is a mecca for travel and landscape photographers. I have been looking at photos of Iceland for years and wishing to just get there and see, firsthand, the locations of those iconic images, let alone be given the freedom to photograph them myself. So I must start with a massive thanks to Brendan Van Son and Ivan Thor without whom I would never have been given this amazing opportunity. Let me set the stage for you. I am part of a fantastic photography group on Facebook that was set up by Brendan (I encourage you all to join if you are not already part of it!). Recently Brendan reached 100K followers on his YouTube channel, and to celebrate, he did a give-away every day for 10 days. On the 9th day, the short notice give-away was to go to Iceland and assist Ivan with scouting for future Iceland photography trips. Lo and behold, it was my name that was chosen! I couldn’t believe it! I spent about 10 minutes just walking around in a little circle not knowing what to think! I was floored!

And away we go, Dublin to Iceland

I left Dublin in the afternoon and because Iceland is so close to Ireland, it was a very easy and short flight, only about 2 hours and 10 minutes or so. I had been in touch with Ivan before I left and he had arranged to collect me from the airport which was very kind of him. As I walked through the arrival gate I was greeted with a warm smile and a firm handshake from Ivan. I think it is safe to say that we hit it off right away. We had plenty in common and LOADS to talk about. Ivan is also a professional photographer, so it was great to be able to talk shop and geek out over gear etc. Ivan’s two kids were there too, his eldest son and daughter. These two were such a pleasure to meet and spend time with!

Photographing right off the plane

Ivan had talked about the kind of itinerary we had planned and I must say it all sounded amazing! Spoiler alert...it was! On the way to the cabin that Ivan had booked for us we stopped at a well known Instagram favourite, Strankarkirkja Church. The sky was ablaze with golden light as the sun set behind it. If this was the standard of things to come, then I was in my happy place!

This scene had such a big dynamic range that I decided to shoot three bracketed exposures. Being a commercial/architectural photographer in Dublin, I was naturally drawn to put the church in the center of the frame and keep the lines straight. The contrast between the cold blue of the foreground and the golden hue of the sky, when blended together, created this striking image.

The start of something beautiful in Iceland

We continued on to our destination and got to know each other more. When we arrived, I was blown away at the location of the cabin. Tucked under the sheltered embrace of a mountain, it was a perfect place of peace and tranquility. Oh, and it had a hot tub filled with geothermal spring water! We used this every evening to relax and enjoy the clear, starry sky above us.

Pushing through the cold and ice to Hjalparfoss

The following day, Ivan had planned an adventure for us that would involve driving into the highlands a bit. First things first though, we got the car totally stuck in the snow. It was pretty funny and fair play to the two Lithuanian lads that were working on a nearby cabin, who rolled in with their beast of a jeep and pulled our own out of the trench we found ourselves in. Having been rescued, we headed to Hjalparfoss waterfall and it was a beauty. This partially frozen hidden gem was truly a sight to behold. Travelling to Iceland in the winter is beset by its own challenges and the cold is the biggest. The day was cold anyway but when the wind blew, Holy Moly, I thought I was going to be cut in two.



Even as prepared as I was, with layers of clothes, the cold still found its way to penetrate my armour. Remember when I said it can get cold while photographing Dublin? Well, I had no idea how cold things could truly get. The walk from the car was simple enough but the wind was blowing and the cold air battered every inch of me as we pushed through. Taking a shortcut, we headed downhill and we saw it then, frozen in time, and surrounded by ice and snow. It was such a fantastic experience to get the chance to see a waterfall not too many people get to see while on their trips to Iceland.

For me, there was a natural composition for this image and that was using the fallen trees in the foreground and framing the waterfall in the back. I had a very limited filter system - all I had was a screw-in 10-stop ND filter. I popped this on and gave myself a long enough exposure at 2.5 seconds to smooth out the water, both in the river, and the waterfall itself.

The walk back to the car was tough to say the least. As I climbed the hill I felt my lungs burn with the cold. I had never felt anything like it. As we have said on so many blog posts here, we are not the fittest fiddles under the sun, so I found this a challenge. Thankfully the hard part was over and the last leg of the walk was on the flat but walking in snow is like walking in sand. It just saps the energy spent in every step. Needless to say we were all pretty bushwhacked after this excursion so we thought we would head back to the cabin to relax for the day, and of course, soak in the hot tub. Just even getting to drive around Iceland in winter is amazing. The landscape has something majestic to show you around every corner.

Photographing some of the Icons of Iceland

The following day we awoke good early so we could make the most of the day, and what a day it was. Ivan’s thinking was, “You can’t come to Iceland without seeing Seljalandsfoss and Skógafoss”. To which I responded “That’s okay with me Ivan, you lead the way!” These two waterfalls are very famous and very close to each other so it makes for very easy viewing.



The first main stop along the South Coast road is Seljalandsfoss. This waterfall offers visitors a very unique perspective with an accessible trail behind it. Its best times for viewing are early in the morning and at sunset. The sun rises from behind the mountain and casts its light on the landscape beyond. Being behind the waterfall in the morning is ideal, while sunset provides the golden light on the falls themselves. Unfortunately, with the snow and ice, the path behind was closed but we made the most of it any way. This location has a second waterfall, Gljúfrafoss, within walking distance, and is less crowded. The epicness of it is, is that you have to walk up stream into a cave to get to it. It's not too far but in freezing conditions, the “stepping stones” were sometimes iced over as the rushing torrent of water flowed fast. Each step must be carefully calculated or else you are going to have a cold, wet rest of your day. When you make it through the ice water you are greeted with a magnificent waterfall. There is a very iconic shot to be taken here but the big rock was covered in ice so we braved the spray and stood in front of the waterfall to capture some great shots! #doitforthegram







This waterfall, being so high, I shot it vertically. Using a ND filter, we were able to slow down the shutter enough to smooth out the water, but give us a fast enough shutter speed, so the subject matter, me, was still sharp. We got soaked but it was such fun and worth every second.


After we tentatively made our way back out of the mouth of the cave we stopped to take a few shots of the main attraction. There can be lots of tourists here at the best of times so the clone stamp will be your friend if you come here to photograph it.


A journey to find a hidden waterfall

After this waterfall we headed for Ivan’s secret waterfall (he really likes waterfalls!). I can’t divulge the location or the name of it as it’s on private property and you have to be in the know to be allowed go here. You have to hike your way in through the canyon. During the winter,..

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Find ‘the most beautiful place on earth’ in County Kerry, Ireland

Kerry is one of Ireland’s most spectacular counties for scenery and no matter how many times we visit, we’re blown away by its beauty. It’s known as ‘The Kingdom’ for good reason and not just because of the lovely lakes of Killarney National Park and the, now famous, Skellig Islands. Ireland’s tallest peak, Carrantuohill, lies among its majestic MacGillycuddy's Reeks mountain range, while mysterious Mount Brandon guards the Dingle Peninsula and the popular Slea Head coastal drive. National Geographic once tipped the Dingle Peninsula to be ‘the most beautiful place on earth’ and maybe it is! It certainly keeps calling us back and it always will. Our latest visit was a long one, lucky for us, so we returned to some of our favourite spots and discovered some new ones. Neil's family took their holidays here and we got the chance to meet up with them and show off some of our 'local knowledge'!

Ireland's Kingdom of Kerry on the Wild Atlantic Way - YouTube
Irish speaking community

At the end of our trip to County Cork, we decided to head straight to our most beloved area in Ireland, An Clochán (Cloghane) and Brandon, on the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry. We find ourselves returning every year, no matter what the weather, to this tiny Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking) community tucked in at the foot of Mount Brandon. Irish traditions still have their place here with regular music sessions in the local pubs, celebrations and a parade at Lughnasa (the Gaelic festival of the harvest) and of course everyone still speaks Irish fluently. Gaeltacht communities are few and far between in Ireland so it’s lovely to hear the language around us as part of daily life and to practice what little of it we have left in our heads. Here’s some handy phrases you can show off to the locals when you visit:


Dia dhuit (deeya gwit) - How are you?

Go Raibh Míle Maith Agat (Guh rev meela mahagut) - Thank you very much

Le do thoil (leh duh hull) - Please

Slán (Slawn) - Goodbye

Sláinte (Slawntya) - Cheers

Cá bhfuil an siopa (Caw will on shoppa) - Where is the shop?

Cá bhfuil an leithreas (Caw will on Lehris) - Where is the toilet?

Ba mhaith liom pionta Guinness, le do thoil (ba wah lum pyunta Guinness, leh duh hull) - I would like a pint of Guinness, please

Campsite by the ocean

When we first arrived, the weather was wet and windy. We were feeling the need for a hot shower and a bed after our few nights camping in Cork so we were delighted to get a last minute cancellation in one of our favourite hostels in Ireland, Mount Brandon Hostel. The welcome we always receive from Mary is something special. Mary is a kind soul, an extraordinary host and a well-spring of local knowledge and the hostel itself is excellent. It’s very popular with hikers and families, especially during the summer months so on this occasion we only managed to secure one night. Mary kindly offered for us to come back to the hostel any time we needed to cook or sit somewhere comfortable to work on our laptops. We made enquiries at O’Connors Bar & Guesthouse, a few doors down, who had recently started offering camp facilities in the field behind their pub. We booked a pitch for the following three nights and picked a spot right at the edge beside the sea. We were happy little campers, knowing we’d be well fed and well looked after by the lovely staff at O’Connors.





Ireland’s highest mountain pass

Once the tent was set up we headed for Dingle. The route to Dingle from this side of the peninsula is up and over the Conor Pass, one of Ireland's most scenic drives and the highest mountain pass in Ireland. It requires patience and a head for heights because a long section of it is one-way with steep drops off the side, down into the valley below. In order for the traffic to flow, it's best if everyone drives slowly and uses the little lay-bys to enable cars to pass each other. On clear, sunny days, the views (and the road) really are breathtaking. About halfway towards Dingle it’s possible to pull in off the road and enjoy the waterfall pouring from Pedlar’s Lake. We climbed up to the lake high above it and took a break up there for some even better views and photos. It’s well worth the climb and next time we might even bring our swimwear for a quick dip.






Delicious coffee in Dingle

Once we got to Dingle, we went on the hunt for some nice coffee and we couldn't have picked a better place. Bean in Dingle are the first and only coffee roasters on the Dingle Peninsula so they know how to satisfy any coffee-lover's desire! Grab a coffee to go or savour it with one of their homemade brownies and sit by the window. This was our saving grace as the weather had turned again and it was really wet outside.

When the weather changes…

With our shopping done, we headed straight back over the Conor Pass. The difference a couple of hours makes to the weather in Ireland is nuts! Thick, heavy cloud had descended on the route and there was near-zero visibility on the road. There was only one thing for it when we got back to our tent - the pub! Sometimes it's not so bad if the weather drives you indoors! We settled in O'Connors Bar and got some work done on the laptops with one or two pints (Orla likes her Guinness and can wholeheartedly say they do a very good pint!), followed by a lovely meal and a few more drinks chatting with the staff and the locals.

We then had to run through the rain back to our tent and snuggled up for the night listening to the weather getting worse. By the time the morning came, it was nearly gale-force! Here's a little video of our poor tent getting battered!

The joys of camping in Ireland - YouTube
Hiking to new heights

Thankfully, as the morning went on the wind died down and out came the sun - phew! We were excited to see blue skies and thought we'd have a look for a small hike to do for the afternoon. Driving towards the end of the peninsula, we took a turn that was signposted for a grotto and found a few cars parked at a trail head. We decided to chance it and see where it would lead. Thinking that it was just a small trail leading to the grotto we took it slow enough, stopping to look around at the views and then we bumped into some hikers who told us it was actually the pilgrimage trail to the top of Mount Brandon.

Now, as we've made plain in previous posts, we love the outdoors but we're not super fit so we thought we'll just go as far as we can. There was no pressure on us to actually climb the beast! We got a lot further than we expected though, even if our pace was slowed to a crawl at the really steep bits. I actually thought we might even make it to the top but we came to a steep gully on the side of the mountain and the final leg of the hike was revealed. There was absolutely no way we could tackle it! There's a cross that marks the very top of the mountain and even looking up at that made us dizzy!

We met a couple from the Netherlands on their way back down from the top and they said they had started it very early in the morning so we'd be mad to try and make it to the top and back down before dark. We were delighted we had that excuse rather than us having heart palpitations! (Note to ourselves: get fit in 2019!)


Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Find ‘the most beautiful place on earth’ in County Kerry, Ireland

Kerry is one of Ireland’s most spectacular counties for scenery and no matter how many times we visit, we’re blown away by its beauty. It’s known as ‘The Kingdom’ for good reason and not just because of the lovely lakes of Killarney National Park and the, now famous, Skellig Islands. Ireland’s tallest peak, Carrantuohill, lies among its majestic MacGillycuddy's Reeks mountain range, while mysterious Mount Brandon guards the Dingle Peninsula and the popular Slea Head coastal drive. National Geographic once tipped the Dingle Peninsula to be ‘the most beautiful place on earth’ and maybe it is! It certainly keeps calling us back and it always will. Our latest visit was a long one, lucky for us, so we returned to some of our favourite spots and discovered some new ones. Neil's family took their holidays here and we got the chance to meet up with them and show off some of our 'local knowledge'!

Ireland's Kingdom of Kerry on the Wild Atlantic Way - YouTube
Irish speaking community

At the end of our trip to County Cork, we decided to head straight to our most beloved area in Ireland, An Clochán (Cloghane) and Brandon, on the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry. We find ourselves returning every year, no matter what the weather, to this tiny Gaeltacht (Irish-speaking) community tucked in at the foot of Mount Brandon. Irish traditions still have their place here with regular music sessions in the local pubs, celebrations and a parade at Lughnasa (the Gaelic festival of the harvest) and of course everyone still speaks Irish fluently. Gaeltacht communities are few and far between in Ireland so it’s lovely to hear the language around us as part of daily life and to practice what little of it we have left in our heads. Here’s some handy phrases you can show off to the locals when you visit:


Dia dhuit (deeya gwit) - How are you?

Go Raibh Míle Maith Agat (Guh rev meela mahagut) - Thank you very much

Le do thoil (leh duh hull) - Please

Slán (Slawn) - Goodbye

Sláinte (Slawntya) - Cheers

Cá bhfuil an siopa (Caw will on shoppa) - Where is the shop?

Cá bhfuil an leithreas (Caw will on Lehris) - Where is the toilet?

Ba mhaith liom pionta Guinness, le do thoil (ba wah lum pyunta Guinness, leh duh hull) - I would like a pint of Guinness, please

Campsite by the ocean

When we first arrived, the weather was wet and windy. We were feeling the need for a hot shower and a bed after our few nights camping in Cork so we were delighted to get a last minute cancellation in one of our favourite hostels in Ireland, Mount Brandon Hostel. The welcome we always receive from Mary is something special. Mary is a kind soul, an extraordinary host and a well-spring of local knowledge and the hostel itself is excellent. It’s very popular with hikers and families, especially during the summer months so on this occasion we only managed to secure one night. Mary kindly offered for us to come back to the hostel any time we needed to cook or sit somewhere comfortable to work on our laptops. We made enquiries at O’Connors Bar & Guesthouse, a few doors down, who had recently started offering camp facilities in the field behind their pub. We booked a pitch for the following three nights and picked a spot right at the edge beside the sea. We were happy little campers, knowing we’d be well fed and well looked after by the lovely staff at O’Connors.






Ireland’s highest mountain pass

Once the tent was set up we headed for Dingle. The route to Dingle from this side of the peninsula is up and over the Conor Pass, one of Ireland's most scenic drives and the highest mountain pass in Ireland. It requires patience and a head for heights because a long section of it is one-way with steep drops off the side, down into the valley below. In order for the traffic to flow, it's best if everyone drives slowly and uses the little lay-bys to enable cars to pass each other. On clear, sunny days, the views (and the road) really are breathtaking. About halfway towards Dingle it’s possible to pull in off the road and enjoy the waterfall pouring from Pedlar’s Lake. We climbed up to the lake high above it and took a break up there for some even better views and photos. It’s well worth the climb and next time we might even bring our swimwear for a quick dip.






Delicious coffee in Dingle

Once we got to Dingle, we went on the hunt for some nice coffee and we couldn't have picked a better place. Bean in Dingle are the first and only coffee roasters on the Dingle Peninsula so they know how to satisfy any coffee-lover's desire! Grab a coffee to go or savour it with one of their homemade brownies and sit by the window. This was our saving grace as the weather had turned again and it was really wet outside.

When the weather changes…

With our shopping done, we headed straight back over the Conor Pass. The difference a couple of hours makes to the weather in Ireland is nuts! Thick, heavy cloud had descended on the route and there was near-zero visibility on the road. There was only one thing for it when we got back to our tent - the pub! Sometimes it's not so bad if the weather drives you indoors! We settled in O'Connors Bar and got some work done on the laptops with one or two pints (Orla likes her Guinness and can wholeheartedly say they do a very good pint!), followed by a lovely meal and a few more drinks chatting with the staff and the locals.

We then had to run through the rain back to our tent and snuggled up for the night listening to the weather getting worse. By the time the morning came, it was nearly gale-force! Here's a little video of our poor tent getting battered!

The joys of camping in Ireland - YouTube
Hiking to new heights

Thankfully, as the morning went on the wind died down and out came the sun - phew! We were excited to see blue skies and thought we'd have a look for a small hike to do for the afternoon. Driving towards the end of the peninsula, we took a turn that was signposted for a grotto and found a few cars parked at a trail head. We decided to chance it and see where it would lead. Thinking that it was just a small trail leading to the grotto we took it slow enough, stopping to look around at the views and then we bumped into some hikers who told us it was actually the pilgrimage trail to the top of Mount Brandon.

Now, as we've made plain in previous posts, we love the outdoors but we're not super fit so we thought we'll just go as far as we can. There was no pressure on us to actually climb the beast! We got a lot further than we expected though, even if our pace was slowed to a crawl at the really steep bits. I actually thought we might even make it to the top but we came to a steep gully on the side of the mountain and the final leg of the hike was revealed. There was absolutely no way we could tackle it! There's a cross that marks the very top of the mountain and even looking up at that made us dizzy!

We met a couple from the Netherlands on their way back down from the top and they said they had started it very early in the morning so we'd be mad to try and make it to the top and back down before dark. We were delighted we had that excuse rather than us having heart palpitations! (Note to ourselves: get fit in 2019!)

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
How to have the best 4 days in Porto, Portugal

Porto, Portugal stole our hearts! The city of Porto is picture-perfect and it’s a photographer’s dream. Neil expertly captured its pretty palette of colours and graceful architecture during our 4 days here. He had been before, creating content for Ryanair, and he couldn’t wait to explore it with me. He predicted correctly that I’d love Porto and that I might even prefer it to Lisbon. Built on the steep slopes of the winding, Douro river, it’s great exercise exploring it on foot but there are funiculars and lifts for extra help. Its enviable position offers stunning viewpoints overlooking the red-tiled roofs of the old buildings, tumbling down narrow streets to the riverside. I think because of this, and the fact that Porto feels so relaxed and chilled out, it beats Lisbon’s larger and busier vibe. It’s definitely worth your while to spend at least 4 days exploring this beautiful city.

How to get to Porto from Lisbon

We tagged our 4 days in Porto onto the end of our favourite, and by now, regular house sit in Portugal. We got the bus to Lisbon and headed for Oriente Train Station, a major transport hub for the city, which is conveniently connected to the huge shopping mall, Centro Vasco da Gama to grab a bite before a trip. Train travel is definitely our favourite way of getting around, if we can manage it, so we were delighted with the opportunity to see the Portuguese countryside on our way up North. It only cost €15 each (if you book early you get the best discounts) and took just over two and a half hours. It absolutely beats the dead zone of airport security and boarding gate queues! As we approached Porto, the train crossed the Ponte de São João bridge giving us a fantastic view down the river towards the city, bathed in golden sunshine.

One of the best views of Dom Luís I Bridge

We arrived at the Airbnb apartment after a short 15-minute walk from the Metro Station and our friendly host, Inez, met us at the door. It turned out that Inez and two others only use the place as a studio for their design company so we’d be the only ones sleeping there. They had the fridge stocked with beer and told us to help ourselves! We ended up having the entire apartment to ourselves for the 4 days as they weren’t around. We settled in, got the camera gear organised and then went for a walk towards the river. We found ourselves on a steep descent, down winding stairs with one of the best views of the iconic Luís I Bridge. The ornate ironworks of the huge bridge, framed by the lovely old buildings rising either side of the steps is the best 'first glimpse' of Porto you can get. Just head for Muralha Fernandina, a huge medieval fortress overlooking the river and go straight down from there. Keep the easier ride on the Guindais Funicular for your trip back up.







Best wine with a view in Porto

We walked along the waterfront of the Ribeira, the tourist hotspot of the city, and found Wine Quay Bar to indulge in some wine and tapas. It's popular for good reason as their outdoor seating is right by the wall above the quays. Tremendous views of the bridge and across to Vila Nove de Gaia on the other side, paired with gorgeous wine and excellent tapas, might mean it’s a little pricier but it’s so worth it! We sat here for a good while planning our days ahead and trying new Portuguese wines and cheese.



Local Bars in Porto

FC Porto had just won Portugal’s Primeira Liga so the streets were filled with happy soccer fans screaming “PORTOOOOOOO!” and the blue and white team colours were flying everywhere. We slowly walked back towards our Airbnb and found a huge queue outside a little corner cafe at Jardim de São Lázaro (the city’s oldest park). Rather than join the queue of football fans outside that night, we took note of it and planned a return visit for when it was less busy. Instead we headed for a couple of bars across the road which were buzzing with students and locals all enjoying the incredibly cheap beer and lively atmosphere. This became a regular 'end-of-the-night' ritual for us and it was great to find a local hang out for a late-night drink, that felt somewhat off the beaten path.




Oldest cafe in Porto

Our next morning was kind of lazy, given our shenanigans til the wee hours the night before. We decided the best thing for us would be pancakes so we set off looking for O Diplomata. To our disappointment, it was extremely busy with a massive queue down the street outside. It was going to be an hour-long wait so we ditched that plan and let our feet take us to where ever they would. Luckily we stumbled upon Cafe Progresso, the oldest cafe in Porto and tucked into possibly equally as delicious pancakes and coffee in there. Definitely drop in here for a bite or a bica when you get to Porto. It's beautiful inside and out.





One of the best viewpoints for photos of Porto

We ambled afterwards, to Praca de Lisboa, a lovely little park for a snooze in the sun, which I did happily, while Neil took pictures of the nearby Clerigos Church.




We made our way back down to the river via Miradouro Vitória. It's probably one of the finest viewpoints for perfect Instagram shots of the city. There's nothing there but run down buildings and graffiti but there's plenty of space to set up a tripod or just sit on the wall and admire the view.

If you follow the steps down from here towards the river it's a nice walk with some good street art and lovely little alleys and old buildings. We stopped for a snack in Xico Tico, a cafe on a back street not far from the waterfront, rather than picking one of the touristy places on the tram line which looked overpriced and not so inspiring. This little place is friendly and cheap and does Brazilian snacks like Empadinha and Esfiha. We didn't get to have the caipirinhas but they’re supposed to be the best!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Why stunning Cork, Ireland needs to be on every bucket list

The County of Cork, in the South West of Ireland, is fast becoming our favourite place in the whole world! Historic Cork City has oodles of charm with plenty of hidden gems to discover and a foodie scene that holds its own against Ireland’s capital, Dublin. Cork is full of small farms and gourmet producers that are filling plates, coffee cups and beer glasses with the finest ingredients and tastes that can’t be found anywhere else in the world. Out to the coast, the scenery takes your breath away and it’s a great place to start an epic journey on the Wild Atlantic Way. From Dublin, it’s around a three hour drive to Cork city or you can avail of regular train and bus services. Public transport is a fine option if you’re looking to simply explore the city, but if you’d like to venture further afield into the rest of County Cork, you definitely need a car or you can take your pick of tour buses to suit your budget/timetable.

House Sitting in Cork

*Note: This post contains affiliate links. By having affiliate links in our blog posts, we earn a small commission when you click through to book a room or subscribe to a site. It doesn’t cost you extra, it just means we can eat next week!

We took advantage of Neil having a couple of photography contracts in the city by deciding to throw the tent and gear into the car and turn a work stint into an epic road trip after he was finished. We also secured a house sit in the city which worked out perfectly, especially because it was a beautiful old house with two lovely cats, Jasper (perpetually hungry) and Nina (fashionably aloof), to take care of for the week. After our lovely hosts showed us around their stunning home and the amazing view from the back of their house, we were delighted we’d get to spend so much time there. The house is a beautifully decorated, 100-year-old terraced house on Blarney Street which happens to be Ireland’s longest street and only 10 minutes walk from the city centre. We quickly made ourselves at home, as we do, and both cats seemed happy to have us! If you haven’t heard of house sitting yet, we highly recommend it, it’s a great way to travel and cuddle pets! If you want to research it more, read about our first house sitting experience and stories from fellow house sitters. We also recommend you join trustedhousesitters to find the best house sits all over the world.





Eat and Drink around Cork City

It was a tremendous base to have while Neil was working and, in between jobs, we walked the feet off ourselves exploring the city streets. Wandering over beautiful old bridges and down cobbled lanes we found some excellent pubs to hide from the rain and saw great street art. In the world famous English Market, which has a history dating back to 1788, and a gem you can’t miss, we sampled O’Flynn’s Gourmet Sausages. They are out of this world and you cannot come to Cork City without trying one while you amble around the amazing food and craft stalls in the market.








It’s going to sound like we visited a lot of bars and it’s true, we did! In fairness to us, the weather was a bit terrible and these cool pubs were just calling to us as we passed by! It was lovely to take our time with no real agenda and we highly recommend anyone who visits to do the same. It’s a great city to just be spontaneous and come across places by pure chance. We were well fed too! CoqBull on French Church St did the juiciest, tastiest burgers we’ve had in a long time and the place was hopping for good reason. We also had to make a stop into the Franciscan Well Brewery Pub as it was only a short distance from the house. In here we sampled a few of their beers (Archway Lager being our favourite) and tucked in to wood-fired pizzas with gorgeous gourmet toppings (all local ingredients of course). We couldn’t go wrong here with a jazz band playing in the beer garden!







Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Why Autumn is the best time of year to visit Ireland's ancient sites Autumn - The Season of Transition

Being from Ireland and living in Dublin, we count ourselves lucky to be able to frequently revisit amazing ancient sites throughout the whole year. We’ve seen every season in every part of the country and lately, we’ve found ourselves concluding that Autumn is our favourite time to get out and explore our ancient sites. In Autumn, it’s harvest time and we have two very important dates in the ancient Gaelic calendar - the Autumn Equinox and Samhain (Halloween). The celebrations around Autumn/Winter time were held in the highest regard because it was the ending of the old and beginning of a new year and the final harvest was gathered for the coming dark days of winter. Samhain was believed to be the night that the veil between this world and the next was at its thinnest, when the souls of the departed from the year gone by, walked among the living as they passed to the Other world. It’s still a time to honour and remember your loved ones that have died and to be thankful for the past year. With the changing colours of the foliage and the sun lower in the sky, it is remarkable how this season puts you in the mood for reflection. It’s easy to see how the ancient people of this land interpreted the solar cycle and the seasons, incorporating them into their understanding of life, death and rebirth.








Ancient Sites and Ceremonies

The knowledge of people from 5,000 years ago is revealed in the hill-top tombs, adorned with neolithic stone carvings, aligned with the rising and setting of a solstice or equinox sun, that still command a striking presence on the lush green landscape, all over Ireland. The ancient Irish were students of celestial movement and completed amazing feats of engineering, to capture sunlight and moonbeams inside stone chambers of varying sizes. Before the Pyramids were built, they were perfectly positioning the entrances of structures so that they directly linked to each other across hundreds of miles and ensured their sacred carvings were illuminated at specific moments in time each year. It was at these ancient sites that the druids performed sacred rituals and where the celebrations of Samhain (Halloween), Imbolc (first day of Spring), Beltaine (first day of Summer), Lughnasa (first day of Autumn or Harvest season) and the solstices in between, were held.




The Boyne Valley

Some of the most impressive and more well known sites are concentrated in the Boyne Valley in County Meath. It’s here you’ll find the famous complex of monuments built along a bend of the River Boyne, known collectively as Brú na Bóinne (Newgrange, Knowth and Dowth). Also located in the Boyne Valley are the lesser known, Loughcrew Cairns. We camped overnight there so we could witness the rising sun of the Autumn Equinox, shine its first light into the chamber of the Hag’s Cairn (Cairn T). It was our first time to join in an ancient Gaelic ceremony and it was a fascinating event. It gave us an appetite for exploring more of our ancient heritage and the drive to document our experiences. Our most recent trips included the Hill of Tara and the Hill of Tlachtga.

The Hill of Tara

It was a beautiful, sunny, Autumn afternoon when we decided to head for the Hill of Tara. We had been before, years ago, and felt it was time for a rediscovery, since we had learned so much about the area while visiting Newgrange and Loughcrew. The Hill of Tara, standing high above the surrounding landscape, was revered as the entrance to the Other world and later became the seat for the High Kings of Ireland. The Stone of Destiny stands on top, which is considered to be a fertility symbol but legend has it that it roared, once it approved of a newly crowned King.








The oldest monument, among many at Tara, is the Mound of Hostages. This is a passage tomb built 5,000 years ago, aligned with the rising sun of Samhain which is halfway between the Autumn Equinox and the Winter Solstice. The elevation of Tara, makes it possible to see Loughcrew (aligned with the sunrise at the Autumn Equinox) and Newgrange (aligned with the sunrise at the Winter Solstice), which serves to emphasise the importance of the connection between the tombs in the Boyne Valley. The views are simply stunning and we stayed for the sunset, which we highly recommend. The colours of the old trees in the woodland trail around the hill, created the perfect atmosphere for feeling the energy of this most sacred of Irish sites.


Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
We’ve been nominated for the Sunshine Blogger Award


We were delighted to be nominated for the Sunshine Blogger Award by the fantastic GIRL ABOUT EUROPE It was a lovely surprise and it reminded us of how welcoming the blogging community is, especially on twitter. We have been falling behind on our blog posts and everything else that goes into the work behind the blog so this has been a great motivator and confidence boost. So, again, thank you so much to Girl About Europe for the nomination, it couldn’t have come at a better time.

What is Sunshine Blogger Award?


The Sunshine Blogger Award is for bloggers to recognise each other’s hard work and passion that goes into the creative process of blogging. It’s an incredible opportunity to share insights, spread positivity and shine some sunshine on the busy people behind the blogs. First things first. Here are the rules for the Sunshine Blogger Award.


The Questions

We’ve done our very best to answer the questions and we enjoyed how they really made us stop and think.



1. How different is your life compared to one year ago?

In many ways it’s the same. We’re still based at home in Ireland. It’s been a rough year with the loss of Orla’s beloved granny and then her Mam has been really sick but we’ve come through the otherside relatively unscathed. Our blog is just over a year old and we’ve learned absolutely loads on this journey and connected with so many people from the lovely community of travel bloggers. They are a constant source of inspiration and positivity and we’re a little bit more confident now in our lifestyle choices. We’re keeping it simple, house sitting in Ireland and abroad as much as possible. Neil’s photography business is taking off so we feel really lucky that we can continue travelling and growing the blog. So far, so good anyway!



2. If you could live anywhere in the world where would you go and why?

Orla says: I’d go back to Canada in a heartbeat. We spent a year working in a hostel in Jasper National Park and a piece of my heart is still there.

Neil says: It depends on what day you catch me on. I would either toss it up between Japan or Canada. Japan holds a special place for me as I grew up watching Japanese movies and I am fascinated by the history, food and culture. When it comes to Canada, there is nothing more beautiful than standing atop the Rockies, taking in the epic views and getting the chance to meet some of the most friendliest people on the planet.


3. Where’s the funniest place you’ve ever fallen asleep?

Orla: Under a table in a beach bar in Thailand and nobody knew I was there. A search party went looking for me on the beach but I was fast asleep! Wandered out to cries of ‘OOORRRLLAAAA’ and relief I was alive! Woops!

Neil: A barn (it wasn’t pleasant).


4. Have you ever conquered a fear?

Orla: Yes. I got in the water with baby reef sharks. I’ve watched ‘Jaws’ every Christmas since I was 4 years old so I was suitably terrorised by the mere notion of a shark near me!

Neil: Yes. Heights have always been a fear of mine and the first breakthrough was when we visited Peru and we made the dizzying climb up Huayna Picchu. It was well worth it!


5. What’s your personal anthem?

Orla: Brave are the chancers!

Neil: Life in every breath!


6. Can you speak any other languages?

Nope only little bits from a few languages so we always manage somehow!


7. If you could meet your 15 year old self what 1 piece of advice would you give?

Orla: I couldn’t fit it all in here!

Neil: Believe in yourself more.


8. What inspired you to start your blog?

We’ve always loved heading out the door on a new adventure but we’re really crap at diary keeping even though we both loved the idea of it! We relish the opportunity to interact with like-minded people and hope that sharing our experiences will be the inspiration that someone needs to go out and see the world! We strongly believe in being part of a diverse and enriching community where people join us to both inspire and be inspired.


9. Describe your fashion style in 3 words.

Orla: Room. To. Expand.

Neil: Practical. Comfy. Hard-wearing.

10. Are you a procrastinator?

Orla: Yes.

Neil: Yes but less so than I used to be.


11. 3 things you couldn’t live without.

Orla: Music. Hiking Boots. Moisturiser.

Neil: Camera. Hiking Boots. Music.

11 Questions for our nominations

1. What was your favourite place/travel destination this year so far (2018)?

2. If you could recommend one hidden gem from your home city/town what would it be?

3. How old were you when you first went on a plane and where was it to?

4. Have you ever travelled all by yourself? When/where was it and how did it feel?

5. Craziest/weirdest thing you’ve ever eaten?

6. What/who do you miss most when you travel?

7. Have you ever come close to quitting your blog? If so, what inspired you to keep going?

8. What has been the most disappointing travel destination?

9. If your blog isn’t your full time job, what do you work at? What do you spend time on outside blogging?

10. Would you take the one-way journey to be the first travel blogger on Mars? Why?

11. Where do you hope to see yourself/blog in 5 years?


And the Nominations are…

Tales From The Lens

Highlands 2 Hammocks

Wander Her Way

When We Get Home

Roaming Required

Celtic Wanderlust

Stories From A Backpack

The Amazing Stroll

A Wanderlust For Life

Alicia Overseas

Fuel For The Soul

More Adventures Below

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Make time for sensational Sintra: An easy trip from Lisbon How to get to Sintra from Lisbon

It is well worth taking the time to visit Sintra even if only on a day trip from Lisbon.  It is a true escape for the heart and soul from bustling, noisy city streets. Approaching Sintra by train from Lisbon is the best way to appreciate why it has such a reputation for romance and jaw-dropping scenery. You could drive but it’s really a lovely train journey. At first, the apartment buildings and urban sprawl of Sintra pass by the window just like any other major town or city in Europe, providing a glimpse of local everyday life.  But as you get closer, those green forested hills you saw in the distance, moments before, turn out to be immense dramatic mountains that stretch down to cradle Sintra's centre of cobblestoned streets and beautiful old buildings.  Inescapable for your eyes and impossibly high up, emerging from the rocky outcrop of the tallest peak, is an imposing castle, complete with towers and battlements straight out of a medieval fairy-tale. This is Castelo dos Mouros, the Moorish fortress built in the 8th Century to keep a watchful eye over the Portuguese coast and surrounding lands.  Our initial thoughts were "even if we just get up into that castle, we’re delighted we came here"!  Yet it is only a scratch on the surface of what Sintra has to offer.  




Getting around Sintra

A short walk from the train station into Sintra-Vila (Sintra Village), the sights and sounds of nature abound.  There are touts for rickshaws, private taxis and bikes to take you to palaces, castles and gardens but nobody hassles you - a clue to the peaceful and laid back mood of serene Sintra in the off season. However, we did return at the beginning of the high season when it was a lot busier with tourists with more hustle from the vendors and drivers. We’ve definitely been more hassled in other European cities so it’s really not too bad but the biggest drawback in the high season is the traffic. So, if you have the legs and the fitness, it is possible to walk to all of the sites but the hills are very steep and you have to make sure you give yourself ample time, as there is so much to explore.  Take it easy, breath in the mountain air and get used to slowing down in order to take it all in!  It really would be a shame to rush through any of it.  With two or three days to spend in Sintra, it is absolutely possible to see everything and still feel relaxed. If you have only one day, however, then it’s best to get there early in the morning and hit the sights straight away. There is a handy bus route (no. 434) that runs all day between the train station, Sintra-Vila (Sintra Village), Castelo dos Mouros and Pena Palace which are the main tourist sites. Winding its way up into the mountains, this €5 bus journey lets you hop on and off in one direction although it’s a relatively easy and pleasant walk from Castelo dos Mouros to Pena Palace.





A majestic Moorish Castle

A morning walk on the walls of Castelo dos Mouros is sure to shake any Lisbon-related party cobwebs off from the night before! It offers outstanding 360 degree views of Sintra and the surrounds and all the way to the coast. Immerse yourself in its Moorish origins and crusader conquest, explained in the information posts along the ramparts and in each of its towers. Even though it has been extensively renovated, it feels like stepping back in time, 1000 years. The visitor’s centre provides refreshments and you can take the time to peruse the ancient artefacts that have been uncovered over the years. Don’t miss the ancient underground cistern which is purportedly the burial site of a Moorish king.








Pretty as a picture Pena Palace

Pena Palace is next on the route and again the views from its walls are eye-popping! The building itself is quite possibly the most Disneyesque sight we’ve have ever seen. Candy coloured walls, princess turrets, seashell covered gods that guard entrance ways and opulent royal living quarters that seem like they were only just vacated the other day! I really don’t think I can justify this place with words – it literally has to be seen to be believed. Sunset is a must here. The colours of the palace and its lush gardens are only enhanced by the golden hour and it’s very romantic. Don’t miss the mini-palaces for ducks and frogs in the garden’s pretty lakes.









Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Beautiful Malmö and Copenhagen in one easy day trip

From Denmark to Sweden

The Danish capital Copenhagen, and the Swedish city of Malmö, are connected by the mighty Øresund Bridge (star of the hit Nordic Noir, The Bridge) that spans 8 km across the the Øresund Strait. It’s an incredibly easy day trip from one city to the other by rail, bus or a ten minute drive. The bus is the cheapest option starting at €8 each way and it takes approximately 55 minutes. If you want to get there faster, the train takes 35 minutes with tickets starting at €11 each way. You can use GoEuro to search for the cheapest/fastest option. The fact that the train runs on average every 29 minutes and runs all day it really is the most convenient option. From midnight to 5am it runs every hour so you can easily add a long night out to your day trip to Copenhagen and save money by staying in cheaper accommodation in Malmö. The easy access between the two cities has also lead to many Danes choosing to live in Malmö and commute to work everyday so it’s a very busy route. Keep in mind you are crossing a border so have your passport to hand for inspection when you get off the train. This usually happens right on the platform on the Swedish side when you get off the train from Denmark.

House sitting in Malmö

We were lucky enough to visit both cities twice this year because we have family living in Malmö. They’ve a cool cat called Paddy and we looked after him while they were away. Our first trip over was during the winter and wow was it cold! We flew into Copenhagen, got straight onto the train from the airport and Orla’s auntie picked us up from the first stop on the Øresund line in Sweden, Hyllie Station. If you’re staying in the centre of Malmö, it’s only another 2 stops, which takes about 7 minutes, to Centralstation. We were staying in the pretty neighbourhood of Gröndal. When it snows here it’s like walking around in a Christmas postcard!



Getting around

Malmö, like Copenhagen, is a great city for cycling and you can rent them from the many bike stations dotted around the city using this map. It’s incredibly easy to navigate and with no hills, you won’t be too out of breath. You’ll also feel perfectly safe with cycle paths everywhere and plenty of places to park your bike. Orla’s auntie took us out on the bikes to show us the best route into the city centre via some beautiful parks with lovely big trees, lakes and pretty bridges. The only drawback at that time of year is the cold and we weren’t really prepared wardrobe-wise. Between that and shorter daylight hours we didn’t spend too long out every day but we were happy to hang out in their amazingly cozy, warm home, listening to their quality music collection and getting some work done. On days we couldn’t face the bikes, we availed of the excellent bus service that covers the whole city and it’s cheap too. Just be aware that you can’t pay cash on-board the bus so you must buy a ticket beforehand. The Jojo card is the best option and you can download the Skånetrafiken app to navigate the city with timetables and bus routes all at your fingertips.







Best spot for the sunset

We braved the cold one afternoon and took the bus into the city. We were struck by Malmö’s beautiful architecture, from the huge, modern University Library to the city’s oldest church, St. Peter’s and the iconic 16th century buildings in the old town. The old town is achingly pretty with cobbled streets and plenty of instagrammable shots and you’re spoiled for choice when it comes to bars and restaurants to warm your insides. We headed to Gustav Adolfs Torg which is beside the city’s graveyard, a beautiful park with huge old trees and worth taking a walk through. We wanted to be on the coast for the sunset so we caught the number 2 bus out to Daniaparken and the impressive Turning Torso. Daniaparken is a brand new seaside park by the Øresund Strait with luxury apartments, cafés, restaurants and great facilities for swimming. The Turning Torso itself is a really cool piece of architecture. It’s the tallest building in Scandinavia and if you’re travelling across the bridge from Denmark during the day you’ll see it standing out on the Swedish coastline. This area was a perfect spot to take photos during sunset, particularly at this time of year because there was nobody else around and the sun was perfectly positioned between the Øresund bridge and the horizon.






Rural Sweden

The countryside around Malmö is picture-perfect with traditional farmhouses and pastoral vistas. We were taken out on a day trip to Ales Stenar, about an hour’s drive South East from Malmö. It’s the site of a 1400-year old burial ground for King Ale, according to legend, with 59 huge standing stones erected in the shape of a ship. The Swedish Stonehenge is accessed by walking uphill to a high vantage point, it’s position commanding an impressive view of the Baltic Sea and surrounding land. While we were there the snow started to fall, creating a surreal atmosphere that transported us back to the days of Viking long ships and ancient Kings. The temperature was dropping every second the sun was getting lower in the sky so we headed for home before the snow got heavier.



Copenhagen in the cold

*Note: This post contains affiliate links. By having affiliate links in our blog posts, we earn a small commission when you click through to book a room or subscribe to a site. It doesn’t cost you extra, it just means we can eat next week!

When it was time to leave for Ireland we stayed one night in Copenhagen and the weather was worsening. As I mentioned earlier we were completely unprepared for -10oC so we couldn’t take the long walks we normally would when out exploring a new city. After checking in to Annex Copenhagen (located very close to Central Station), a very comfortable and reasonably priced 2-star hotel with kitchen facilities, we headed for the famous Nyhavn waterside to scout for sunset photo spots. We managed to explore on foot for about four hours but once the sun starting dipping lower, my hands and feet started to go numb! We ducked into a bar to warm up and have a drink. I ended up borrowing a couple of blankets to wear as a skirt and poncho! I didn’t care how I looked I was so bloody cold! We hadn’t yet found a place for dinner so we decided to go back towards the hotel to find something nearby, avoiding the outside as much as possible.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
A retrospective journey through Southeast Asia


We’ve been going through all of our old photos from our early travels and we don’t want them to continue sitting on a hard drive with nobody looking at them! In the days before uploading instantly to facebook and instagram we had my beat-up Fuji Finepix camera. Somehow, the CD’s we copied the photos onto, have just about survived nearly two decades of moving constantly! It got us thinking we should document our old travel stories as much for ourselves as for interested readers of the blog. In 14 years of travel we’ve been to Australia, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, Africa, back to Australia again, the U.S., Canada, South America and New Zealand. My God we look so young in all of these photos and a few stone lighter, particularly in the days we travelled around South East Asia over 14 years ago!

How did we end up there?

Well if you’ve read the About Us page, you’ll know we met in Sydney while on Working Holiday Visas and have been together since. When our visas were up we planned on travelling in Asia for as long as our savings lasted before heading back to Ireland. We were lucky that my extremely kind and cool brother, Mícheál, was working in Kuala Lumpur at the time and he welcomed us to his gorgeous apartment for the next couple of months. Neil’s visa had expired only a few day before our flight and the immigration officer who decided to take it very seriously frightened the life out of us. Neil was threatened with imprisonment and fines until I started balling my eyes out! Thankfully my hysterics saved his skin! It was a bittersweet start to our next adventure.

Luxury living in Kuala Lumpur

Mícheál's apartment was stunning, complete with garden pool and our own ensuite bedroom. He really spoiled us rotten and we had a fantastic time with him. By then he knew the city really well and he took us to all the hidden gems and interesting local sights. We had a laugh going out on the town eating delicious food, finding cool bars and occasionally partaking in Karaoke (Neil blew the roof of the place with Metallica’s ‘Enter Sandman’ to the delight of the local band). We got very fond of a great Mexican place with Tom and Jerry cartoons on the TV and of course excellent tequila! The heat though, was excruciating. It’s definitely one of the hottest cities we’ve ever been to. The humidity was unreal. Needless to say a lot of time was spent in the pool which even had a slide so the other residents had to listen to our childish squeals of delight a few hours a day!







We hung out in the apartment, playing music, watching Malaysian copies of new releases and cooked a few of Mícheál's favorite Irish meals. He had loads of 'Lonely Planet' guides for Vietnam and Cambodia and everywhere else in this part of the world and it got us thinking. We decided on Cambodia and take it from there.

Overland through Thailand and Cambodia




We booked a train from Kuala Lumpur to Bangkok. We got a sleeper carriage as it was a 12 hour journey but we were too excited to sleep! Such beautiful scenery and a great atmosphere on the train, it’s one of those unforgettable experiences and one that needs to be repeated. We’re looking for any excuse to get back there! For now, we reminisce (a lot) about our little room on the Khao San Road and getting ‘dressed up’ in new (really cheap) clothes from the stalls, bumping into old friends from Australia to drink Mai Thai’s all day and tuk tuk drivers trying to force us to buy tailor made suits! We walked the feet off ourselves as well visiting the vast amount of temples and Bangkok grew on us.




Yet we were full of excitement to keep exploring more so we booked ourselves a bus across the border to Cambodia with all the naivety of a couple of young, clueless twenty-somethings expecting a normal coach ride on your average highway! Wow, we were so unprepared! squeezed into a van with about 12 other people we bumped and bashed our way across 450 kilometers which took about 10 hours. The border crossing was a shock. The drastic change in conditions within mere feet from one side to the other was palpable. We were immediately confronted with absolute destitution and heartbreaking encounters with landmine victims, mostly children. Pretty sure we were scammed with the visas and money changers but in the grand scheme of things around us we were millionaires. After the border the roads worsened although we didn't think it would be possible! Windows closed meant suffocation so we were head to toe plastered in sweat and red dust when we finally got out of the bus around midnight.

Visiting Angkor Wat

We’d been taken to a ‘tourist approved guesthouse’ just outside Siem Reap and pretty much told "this is where you stay, the bus stops here". Some people opted to walk into town but we just took the scam on the chin and got a room, too tired to fight it. In fairness it could have been worse. We showered and changed and headed into town for a drink or two and ended up getting chatting to a tuk tuk driver who offered to take us around Angkor Wat for the next three days. We were to be ready next morning for 7a.m. but he warned us he wouldn't pick us up at the hostel we were in, alluding to the owner's monopoly on tours for hostel guests. We realised how true this was after four days of constant questioning about where we were going, how we were getting to the temples and why wouldn't we book a tour with them! We just kept saying we were meeting friends everyday in town and that got them off our backs.

Our three days with our saint of a tour guide were heavenly. It was incredibly chilled out and we got to spend as much time as we liked at every temple. He didn't rush us at all and when we'd be ambling back to the tuk tuk after exploring all we could, he'd be there lying down in the back of it, playing a little traditional flute. He took us to the best roadside food stalls where he chatted with his friends and introduced us and we shared laughs and delicious Pot Ang (bbq corn). The time of year we were there seemed to be particularly quiet as we mostly found ourselves alone wandering around the temples.




Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview