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Albom Adventures

American Samoa is a tropical paradise waiting to be discovered. Situated in the southern Pacific Ocean just east of the dateline, it’s a small unincorporated US territory that many people don’t even know exists. For me, it is the lush green hills, warm turquoise waters, and a blend of traditional Samoan culture with modern American […]

The post Visiting American Samoa: Home to a Tropical US National Park first appeared on Albom Adventures. It is written by Rhonda Albom.

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Albom Adventures

Not your typical tourist attraction, the ruins of the never completed $80 million Sheraton Resort are a series of derelict buildings on the tiny tropical island of Rarotonga in the Cook Islands. While there are plenty of beaches to visit, hiking, watersports and other things to do on the island, we found ourselves strangely drawn […]

The post Sheraton’s Cursed Derelict Buildings on Rarotonga first appeared on Albom Adventures. It is written by Rhonda Albom.

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Rarotonga snorkelling is like swimming in a crystal clear tepid aquarium. Large and small, the colourful tropical fish glide in and out of coral beds, and sometimes appear to pose for our small underwater camera. Rarotonga is the largest of the Cook Islands. It’s a tropical paradise surrounded by a reef that creates protected Rarotonga […]

The post Capturing Rarotonga Snorkelling on the Olympus TG-5 first appeared on Albom Adventures. It is written by Rhonda Albom.

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Albom Adventures

Tropical Rarotonga. If you’re from New Zealand you probably already have a vision of this island paradise with its white sandy beaches, and water so crystal clear you have to wonder if it is there until a gentle wave brushes up against your toes. If you’re from North America, you may be about to discover […]

The post 26 Things to Do in Rarotonga Aside from the Beach first appeared on Albom Adventures. It is written by Rhonda Albom.

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Billed as one of the world’s most spectacular road trips, the Great Ocean Road runs from Torquay to Allansford along the southern coast of Austraila in the state of Victoria. Despite its name and impressive coastal views, much of the drive is inland through temperate rainforest, offering wildlife spotting opportunities. Unlike many of the long stretches of Australian roads, the Great Ocean Road self drive should be savoured, drank slowly like a fine wine.

We took two days, stopping to see each of the Great Ocean Road highlights below.  If you don’t have a car, don’t worry, City Discovery can take you from Melbourne.

⇒ Check out this highly rated Great Ocean Road Day Tour from Melbourne with an overnight stay in Lorne

Key Stops: Great Ocean Road Victoria Australia Day 1: Torquay to Apollo Bay Bells Beach (Australia’s Famous Surf Beach)

Easter weekend brings the world’s best surfers to Bells Beach for the annual Rip Curl Pro. However, on the calm day that we visited it was difficult to imagine that this is one of Australia’s most famous surf beaches. The annual surf event has been held here since 1961, converting to a professional competition in 1973.

Bells Beach was the first stop on our Great Ocean Road self drive adventure. From the carpark, we had two options: Bells or Winkipop Beach (another of the popular Great Ocean Road beaches).

Bells Beach, home to the annual Rip Curl Pro surf competition

There are about 100 steps down to Bells Beach

Views From the Boardwalk at Point Addis Marine Reserve

The short boardwalk at Point Addis leads to expansive views of the Point Addis Marine Reserve. This protected reserve covers 4,600 hectares of ocean and extends from Bells Beach to the town of Anglesea.

View of the Point Addis Marine Reserve from the boardwalk

Split Point Lighthouse

There is something romantic and quaint about a lighthouse, and the one at Split Point was no exception. It was built in 1891 in an area originally called Eagles Nest Point.

Split Point Lighthouse

View from behind Split Point Lighthouse

Memorial Arch at Eastern View

Possibly the most important, yet probably the most obscure fact about the Great Ocean Road is that it is the world’s largest war memorial. It was built between 1919 and 1932 by returned soldiers to honour their fallen comrades. The Memorial Arch at Eastern View is a tribute to the soldiers who constructed the road.

Memorial Arch at Eastern View

Lorne Australia: Erskine Falls and Teddy’s Lookout

There are two must-see stops in Lorne, Erskine Falls and Teddy’s Lookout. Lorne, an artist community, is a popular place to stop for the night.

⇒ Click here to compare accommodation prices at Hotels Combined

While Erskine Falls can be seen from the lookout point, walking the 200+ steps to reach the bottom is well worth the effort. The power of the water cascading 30 metres over one of the Otway’s highest points can’t really be appreciated from the top. I used a tripod to create the flowing water effect in the image below.

Erskine Falls

Read next: How to Photograph Waterfalls 

St. George River outlet viewed from Teddy’s Lookout in Lorne.

Sunset

We enjoyed the sunset as we drove, finally stopping to capture this shot between Lorne and Apollo Bay.

Great Ocean Road Accommodation

We opted to stay in Apollo Bay. If you are travelling in winter, you can fairly easily take the gamble that you will find accommodation wherever you find yourself at sunset. However, in peak season you will probably fail if you try this. There are several great options ranging from resorts to hostels. We highly recommend booking ahead if you are travelling the great ocean road in spring, summer, autumn, or during Australia school holidays.

⇒ Find the best prices for Great Ocean Road accommodations at Hotels Combined 

OR

⇒ Check pricing and availability at Booking.com

Day 2: From Apollo Bay to Point Fairy

If my photos from the first day of our Great Ocean Road self drive adventure didn’t inspire you to hop on a flight to Australia, perhaps the next portion of our journey will. Day two took us from Apollo Bay to Point Fairy, just beyond Allansford, the end of the Great Ocean Road.

Maits Rest Rainforest in Great Otway National Park

Maits Rest in Great Otway National Park is named for the area’s first forester, Maitland Bryant, who rested his horses here between his patrols.

Wild Koala spotted from the road to Cape Otway Lightstation
Wild koalas live in the eucalyptus forest lining the sideroad from the Great Ocean Road to the Otway Lightstation. As Jeff drove, I kept my eyes peeled on the trees. They are not easy to spot, but so exciting to see when we were successful. In total, we were able to spot five wild koalas on this portion of the drive, all from a distance.
TIP: Bring binoculars. It makes the search for the koalas much easier. 

Koala spotted from the road to Cape Otway Lightstation

Read Next: Kangaroo, Koala, Platypus and Other Australian Animals

The Twelve Apostles in Australia

Twelve Apostles in Port Campbell National Park are a quite impressive collection of limestone stacks rising from the sea. They are the most famous site on the journey, however, they were not our favourite. Once called the “Sow and Piglets,” some say the name was changed to increase tourism. I guess it works. This was by far the most crowded destination we came to along the Great Ocean Road.

Twelve Apostles in Port Campbell National Park

The view to the east from Twelve Apostles lookout

Loch Ard Gorge

The Loch Ard Gorge was named after the clipper ship Loch Ard that ran aground at a nearby island in 1878.

Razorback

It was impossible to capture the true magnitude of the Razorback. According to the signage, the sharp edges and bumps along the back are caused by wind-blown spray. It was one of my favourite stops on our Great Ocean Road self drive. 

The Arch

The Arch is another site worth hiking down to see.

The Grotto

The viewing platform is a 350-metre walk from the carpark, but the real magic of the Grotto is seen from down at sea level. There is a labyrinth of stairs and walk paths to bring you there. The Grotto is a sinkhole (although completely different from the sinkhole we saw in Oman). Once at the bottom, it was my favourite of the rock formations we saw on the day.

View from the Grotto viewing platform

The Grotto from sea level.

We went beyond Allansford, the westbound end of the Great Ocean Road to the charming fishing village of Point Fairy. From there we turned inland to the Grampian Mountains. Then we completed the loop heading back to Melbourne.

Read Next: The Grampians to Melbourne: Kangaroos, Skinks, Waterfalls and More

Where is the Great Ocean Road in Australia?

Great Ocean Walk – One of the Great Walks of Australia

If you are into hiking and outdoor adventure, perhaps you should try the 7-day, 104 kilometres Great Ocean Walk. Walking 10 to 15 km per day and sleeping in hike-in campsites, you will travel from Apollo Bay to the Glenample Homestead (near the 12 Apostles, Victoria). The walk meanders through the Otway National Park along high cliff tops and sandy beaches.

Do it yourself, or go with a guide. For an even bigger, yet more luxurious adventure, check out this guided Great Ocean Road Walk including eco-luxe lodging and meals. You’ll walk from Apollo Bay to Cape..

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