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You hope it won’t happen to you… The Big PR crisis.

And yet you know that it’s lurking round the corner, even though you are doing your best. We’re humans, and humans make mistakes. Sometimes those mistakes are integrated with a perfect combination of societal rage and Twitter posts going viral. Then you’ve got a PR crisis on your hands.

PR crises can sink a business. If you handle the situation correctly, however, you can build customer trust and resolve everything relatively smoothly.

Social media is often going to be where the crisis spreads like wildfire. Ironically enough, it will also be a crucial part of putting that fire out. In this post, we’re going to dive deep into social crisis management, including the role social media plays and how to use saved replies in order to tackle the problem as quickly and efficiently as possible.

Why Does Social Media Play a Part in a PR Crisis?

PR crises have always been a potential threat for businesses, but in the day of the internet (and more aptly, Twitter), it’s the difference between lighting a patch or tossing that lit match into a barrel of kerosene.

This is one reason why social media management plays an important role in handling a PR crisis. You’ll likely get a ton of both public messages and private messages coming to you at rapid fire. Having targeted efforts to bring things from a boil to a simmer can actually help. It shows that you’re taking responsibility and addressing the issue and that you care about everyone who was affected.

Social media is also becoming the medium that increasing numbers of users are relying on to communicate with their brands. 79% of customers prefer live chat options because of the immediacy that offers and nothing screams “urgent” quite like a PR crisis where a lot of people are upset. Handling these huge influxes of messages– both public and private– will be an essential part of mitigating the crisis and ensuring that you don’t sacrifice customer relationships in the process.

Today, PR crisis management often starts with social crisis management.

The 4 Social Management Crisis Saved Replies You Need

When you’re elbow-deep in a social management crisis, managing your inbox properly is going to be one of the most important tasks on the list. This will involve addressing everyone who gets in touch with you, both publicly and privately.

The Agorapulse inbox can help with this overall, giving you a single stream of incoming messages that are happening on a platform. You can assign individual messages and tasks to team members so everyone’s concerns are addressed. This is already an advantage but utilizing tools like the inbox’s saved replies will be a life saver. (Play this video to see saved replies in action.)

You can create saved replies within the inbox management features and then use them to quickly answer common questions or messages you’re receiving. They can be personalized once you pull them up in response to a customer so you can adjust the messaging as needed in each situation, even if it’s just adding the user’s name.


In non-crisis times, these are often used for “When will my order get here” and “what are your store hours.” During a PR crisis, however, you’ll want to have a number of related saved replies ready to go.

Here are the ones that I recommend having on hand.

1. The general apology

A general apology for the situation at hand is always good to have ready in a saved reply. You can be specific or just reference the crisis in passing. If you need to, you can consult a legal team before crafting this reply, but otherwise apologizing to “all of those affected” and letting people know that you’re “working to make it right” can be a good start.

2. “We’ll be with you shortly”

This message can be combined with the apology message. Sometimes no matter how many social media managers and customer service reps you have on the case, it’s too many messages coming in to respond to personally at once. Having a message like the following can let people know that you’ve heard them, and will be with them as soon as possible:

“Thank you for getting in touch with us. We’re sorry to hear about your experience. Due to a high influx of messages, it will take us up to 24 hours to get back to you. If you require urgent attention, please call our customer service line here.”

3. The Olive branch solution

Sometimes, something happens where a large number of users are inconvenienced or hurt at once. If you have a solution in place for anyone affected, like a refund or a free discount, have that ready in a saved reply– even if it can’t be processed through the social media messages.

Something like this can be effective:

“Hi [name], we apologize that you had this experience. In our effort to make things right, we’d like to refund you for your past month’s subscription and offer you 10% off your next purchase. Can you send us a request through the link below? We’re aiming to process all requests by the end of the week.”

4. “Send Info Here”

Sometimes, part of a crisis will involve collecting information about what happened or about who was affected. In many cases, that’s not always best handled through social media. If that’s the case, have a saved reply on hand that contains the links or contact information that users can use to submit that information. Make sure to specify how long it will take to hear back or what to expect, along with an explanation with why users need to go through the process.

How to Get the Most Out of Saved Replies

Saved replies are only as strong as the messages you craft and how you use them. In order to get the most out of them, keep the following tips in mind:

  • Personalize the messages when possible. Whether it’s just a name or altering the message to address specific concerns, this goes a long way. People are already on edge during a PR crisis, so offering personalized messages that show you care about the individual will be important.
  • Don’t use them as a crutch. Saved replies are an important tool to streamline your crisis management but they are not the only tool that you need. Sometimes you won’t be able to use a saved reply at all, so don’t try to make everything fit into a box it doesn’t belong in.
  • Have multiple saved replies ready to go. Typically during a crisis, you may see several types of messages. If you do, you’ll likely need more than one saved reply ready to go. You may need a general apology and a solution and a we’ll be with you shortly message. You might end need a “Thank you again for your understanding and we look forward to working with you moving forward” to end the conversation.
Conclusion

A PR crisis– or any kind of business crisis– is never fun, but nobody is perfect and sometimes mistakes or errors in judgement do happen.

Identifying and tackling the problem head on is the best way to handle it. Hiding it almost never works. Stay accessible to your customers and respond to each of their messages as thoroughly and calmly as possible. Saved replies will help, but don’t forget to add in some empathy and authenticity, too.

What do you think? Have you ever experienced a PR crisis that relied on social crisis management? How did you use social media to extinguish the flames? Share your thoughts, knowledge and questions in the comments below!

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Growing your Twitter presence can seem a little daunting but by scheduling tweets in advance you can optimize your time and see more rapid growth.

Why Should I Be Scheduling Tweets?

If you’re asking yourself this question, I’ve got three main reasons for you.

1. Save time

Scheduling tweets can feel like a lot of work at first, but it can save you so much time on a day to day basis.

With “housekeeping” tweets out of the way, you can make time to interact, join that Twitter chat you’ve been meaning to check out, and search for trending topics or conversations you can be having with industry peers or customers.

2. Reach a wider audience

Scheduling tweets can take the pressure off of having to be glued to your phone or desktop at your optimal times in order to reach your audience.

It also allows you to test tweeting at times when you may not even be awake and reach people on the other side of the world from you.

3. Stay consistent

Last, but not least, scheduling tweets can help you stay consistent. Twitter moves at a faster pace than any other social media network. This means you may have to show up a little more often, which can be more of a challenge to keep up with. Scheduling your tweets in advance takes the pressure off.

What Tweets Should I Schedule?

Scheduling tweets can free up time so you can actively participate in the Twitter community and build a strong brand on the network.

The tweets you end up scheduling should be the ones that will drive traffic or promote your business initiatives. You can also schedule “lifestyle” type tweets to increase your exposure on the social media network. Here is a short list of tweets you can set and forget.

1. Promotional tweets

If you have an upcoming initiative in your business, go ahead and schedule your promotional tweets in advance.

In a recent chat I had with Twitter super star, Madalyn Sklar, she mentioned how helpful it was for her to schedule tweets promoting her weekly #TwitterSmarter Twitter chat ahead of time. Setting up these tweets ensures that the word is out about her chat without the pressure of having to remember to send these tweets out every time.

2. Evergreen content

Evergreen content is great material for scheduling tweets. You can repeatedly drive traffic back to blog articles, contact pages, mailing list sign-ups, products, or any other part of your website. Just make sure that every tweet you schedule is original– that way you can stay on the right side of Twitter’s new rules.

3. User-generated content and retweets

If you want to show extra love to your followers and fans on Twitter, try scheduling shout-outs to people posting about your brand by retweeting or reposting content they are sharing about you.

With the Agorapulse Chrome plug-in, you can schedule re-tweets directly from Twitter. Just click on the “a” symbol at the bottom of the tweet and you’ll be taken to your dashboard. From there, you can schedule your re-tweet for later. This way you can spread out the love over time.

4. Text and quote tweets

Text only tweets are not dead! Remember to sprinkle in some text-only tweets into your scheduling. Text tweets still draw engagement on Twitter, so don’t completely overlook them.

You can also schedule quote tweets in advance. Want to give them an edge? Create an image in Canva and add it to your tweet.

How to Schedule Your Tweets

So we discussed what kind of tweets you should schedule. Now let’s take a look at how to do it.

1. Check your analytics for the best times to tweet

You’re going to start this process by checking your Twitter analytics to see what times of the day your audience is active on Twitter. These peak times will determine when you’ll publish your most important tweets.

Use your peak times to publish value-added tweets, tweets that drive traffic back to your website or landing page, or tweets that help you engage with your audience. You can try tweeting at the general “good times to tweet” but there is nothing like actually getting to know your audience specifically. Each brand and each account is completely different and learning your specific times will only help you reach the most people in your audience.

There are many analytics tools you can use to explore what times are peaks for your particular account. Agorapulse does a great job at aggregating and presenting key information to help you determine when your tweets should go out.

2. Choose a scheduling tool

After creating your tweets, and figuring out your audience peak times, you’ll want to choose a tool to help you with scheduling all those tweets.

You can technically now use Twitter (via the ads> creatives dashboard) to do so, but I love how easy Agorapulse can make the tweet scheduling process. You can schedule your tweets individually, bulk upload tweets and even queue tweets by category.

Queuing tweets into pre-set categories is such a great tool! You can create what I like to call content buckets (more like categories) and queue in tweets to go out based on the category. This lets you ensure you have a good mix of all your content.

Here’s a look at what your calendar might look like. I’ve included tweets promoting my weekly Instagram live Q&A session, links to my blog posts, and link to my Agorapulse blog posts.

You can fill this in with slots for all your quote tweets, engaging questions, and more! Mixing your content up is a key component to scheduling tweets and growing your presence like a pro. Mixing up your content will show variety, and keep your account interesting to your followers.

You can then neatly see and organize your queued tweets. Plus, you can go ahead and edit or rearrange tweets as needed.

My Top Tips for Scheduling Tweets to Grow Your Twitter Presence Like a Pro

Now that we’ve talked about how and why, here are the simple rules I follow when I set up my Twitter schedule.

1. Schedule but don’t forget about live engagement

You don’t want to come off like a robot– so please make time to go in and interact with other accounts. Reply to mentions, participate in Twitter chats, re-tweet in real time, and join conversations.

2. Test different tweet formats

Like I mentioned earlier in the article, make sure to mix up your content. Ask questions, use text-only tweets, use some tweets with GIF’s every once in a while, and lastly try to create tweets with Twitter’s built-in tools like Moments, Twitter Polls and Lists.

3. Test different tweet times

Following your peak times is great but test scheduling tweets for odd hours as well.

4. Mix in some content from others

To have a well-rounded presence you should share content from other sources. This can be other industry experts, influencers, publications that make sense for your industry, and user-generated content.

5. Find the right frequency 

Test different post frequencies to see how well – or not – your account does. Each account is different, so posting less often may actually be more beneficial to your brand or business.

6. Get creative and show your personality! 

Take full advantage of Twitter’s 280 character limit. You can create list posts, include multiple links in one post, or just use all the room to tell longer stories.

I hope this article leaves you feeling more confident when it comes to scheduling tweets to grow your Twitter presence like a pro.

If you have any questions please leave them in a comment below! And I’d love to know how you schedule your tweets!

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Social Quant is Dead!

If you don’t believe me, go to their homepage. You’ll probably see what we did when we went there.

The platform many of us have used for years to help grow our Twitter following is another victim of Twitter’s focus on enforcing their rules.

With Social Quant, you connected your Twitter account to their site, picked keywords (which were likely hashtags) tweeted by people you wanted to follow, and you were done. The tool would start following those lucky people.

The hope was that those that you followed would follow you back– a technique that has been proven to work over and over.

I had my personal Twitter account @scottayres connected to their site for over a year, and more than doubled my following due to their work.

Everything was going great for Social Quant and its users until …

Social Quant Gets Squashed by Twitter

On April 3, 2018, Twitter sent this email was sent to any user they believed had used Social Quant and a few of the other apps that found themselves in their crosshairs.

Then a week or so later Twitter shut down Social Quant’s Twitter account, along with the accounts of several employees (including the founder of the company).

This caused tons of users to immediately disconnect from Social Quant due to fear of being punished themselves.

On Monday May 7, I hopped over to their site to check my account (I was still connected) and got the “winding down operations” screenshot I shared at the beginning of this post.

I reached out to their team and got this reply:

Hi Scott,

Pursuant to Social Quant’s Terms of Service, we may at any time ‘modify or discontinue, temporarily or permanently, the Company Services (or any part thereof) with or without notice.’ Accordingly, Social Quant has decided to discontinue our services permanently. We apologize for any inconvenience.

We have stopped service and billing for everyone.

Like you, I’m now looking for alternatives to do the heavy lifting, just like Social Quant did.

Social Quant Alternatives

Let’s take a look at how you can use a few other apps to do the work Social Quant did.

1. ManageFlitter

ManageFlitter has been in business since 2010 and complies with all of Twitter’s rules.

They also come highly recommended by Twitter power user Madalyn Sklar — if she trusts it, I know I can!

Here are some of the features that the tool offers.

Account management

This tab shows me how many people don’t follow me back and gives me the option to then unfollow each of them (one-by-one) if I so choose.

Filtering options on the left navigation bar allow you to search by these categories:

  • No Profile Image.
  • Non-English.
  • Inactive (haven’t tweeted in the last 30 days).
  • Fake (shows you what accounts you follow that they have deemed fake, not sure on what criteria).
  • Following Ratio (lets you see who has a high/low following ratio. High is bad.)
  • Talkative/Quiet (shows who tweets more than 5 times per day, or less than 1 time per day).
  • Influence (self-explanatory).
  • Never Unfollow/Follow (allows you to whitelist or blacklist users. Only for their Pro plan).
  • Manage Muted Users.
  • Everyone You Follow.

With the free account, you are limited to just 20 follows/unfollows per day, although they present you with few options to increase that limit.

Analytics

The “Analytics” section is only available for paid plans. I don’t have a paid plan so can’t see the analytics, but did find this screenshot from ManageFlitter’s blog:

Engagement

To my surprise, there is a scheduling option inside ManageFlitter called “Powerpost” that picks an “ideal” time to post.

Pricing

ManageFlitter has plans as low as $12 per month if the free plan doesn’t suit your needs. It can get quite pricey if you manage multiple Twitter accounts.

2. Agorapulse

At first glance, Agorapulse might not seem like an alternative to Social Quant, especially when it comes to following and unfollowing automatically.

But the Agorapulse’s “Listening” feature can easily find people tweeting about relevant subjects or mentioning you.

Just choose the social profile you want to build a following for and click “Listening.”

Then click the “Create a new search button”, which shows you the next option.

Here you can see any searches you already created. You can edit them or create new searches.

Click “Create a new search.”

As you can see, you can enter a hashtag to search for and give that search a title. You can also add multiple words, phrases, or Twitter handles to your search. Click “Next” when done.

You can “heart” each tweet, reply to it and open it in Twitter if you’d like. Since in this search it’s from a word or phrase, I can’t choose to follow that person inside our app due to Twitter restrictions. I’d have to open that tweet in Twitter to do so.

But if it was a search that mentioned my username I can follow the account, as in the example below (notice the Follow button on the right):

You could set up multiple searches for different phrases and usernames, and follow anyone not following you.

Granted there isn’t a way to then unfollow anyone that doesn’t follow you back, but it’s a great way to start growing targeted followers based on your searches.

Plus you are in complete control, and can reply to Tweets as well. Those replies and/or retweets are valuable and will get people to notice you.

(And shall I mention that you’d be using a tool that abides by Twitter’s rules?)

You could also add tags (like the “ambassador” tag on the image above) to each person so you could organize who the users are.

Unlike ManageFlitter, Agorapulse works with many other social networks, including Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn, and Google+.

Pricing starts at $49 and offers three social profiles in its intro plan. (Manage Flitter’s starter “Pro” plan only gives you one profile.) All Agorapulse’s plans give you access to all of its publishing and reporting features — whereas you’d have to upgrade to the Manage Flitter “Business” plan to get everything.

To manage 10 Twitter profiles on Agorapulse will run you $99/mo. On Manage Flitter, it’s $199/mo.

3. Other Social Quant Alternatives

I’ve had a hard time finding other Social Quant alternatives that I trusted enough to test. That said, I’ve compiled a list of a few you might consider.

Some require you to download their software, which will keep you from running into issues that Social Quant users had with multiple IP addresses logging into your Twitter account.

But there is no way to know what sort of information that software is taking from you, or what it’s adding to your system.

So use wisely.

Whether you use a tool to grow your followers for you or do it manually on your own, the key is to follow the right people who will in turn engage with you.

Otherwise, you’re basically getting fake and useless followers — which used to fool the boss in say, 2010. Now, a large following of unresponsive followers serves no use whatsoever.

What Social Quant alternative are you considering? Let us know in the comments!

Read Full Article
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Social Quant is Dead!

If you don’t believe me, go to their homepage. You’ll probably see what we did when we went there.

The platform many of us have used for years to help grow our Twitter following is another victim of Twitter’s focus on enforcing their rules.

With Social Quant, you connected your Twitter account to their site, picked keywords (which were likely hashtags) tweeted by people you wanted to follow, and you were done. The tool would start following those lucky people.

The hope was that those that you followed would follow you back– a technique that has been proven to work over and over.

I had my personal Twitter account @scottayres connected to their site for over a year, and more than doubled my following due to their work.

Everything was going great for Social Quant and its users until …

Social Quant Gets Squashed by Twitter

On April 3, 2018, Twitter sent this email was sent to any user they believed had used Social Quant and a few of the other apps that found themselves in their crosshairs.

Then a week or so later Twitter shut down Social Quant’s Twitter account, along with the accounts of several employees (including the founder of the company).

This caused tons of users to immediately disconnect from Social Quant due to fear of being punished themselves.

On Monday May 7, I hopped over to their site to check my account (I was still connected) and got the “winding down operations” screenshot I shared at the beginning of this post.

I reached out to their team and got this reply:

Hi Scott,

Pursuant to Social Quant’s Terms of Service, we may at any time ‘modify or discontinue, temporarily or permanently, the Company Services (or any part thereof) with or without notice.’ Accordingly, Social Quant has decided to discontinue our services permanently. We apologize for any inconvenience.

We have stopped service and billing for everyone.

Like you, I’m now looking for alternatives to do the heavy lifting, just like Social Quant did.

Social Quant Alternatives

Let’s take a look at how you can use a few other apps to do the work Social Quant did.

1. ManageFlitter

ManageFlitter has been in business since 2010 and complies with all of Twitter’s rules.

They also come highly recommended by Twitter power user Madalyn Sklar — if she trusts it, I know I can!

Here are some of the features that the tool offers.

Account management

This tab shows me how many people don’t follow me back and gives me the option to then unfollow each of them (one-by-one) if I so choose.

Filtering options on the left navigation bar allow you to search by these categories:

  • No Profile Image.
  • Non-English.
  • Inactive (haven’t tweeted in the last 30 days).
  • Fake (shows you what accounts you follow that they have deemed fake, not sure on what criteria).
  • Following Ratio (lets you see who has a high/low following ratio. High is bad.)
  • Talkative/Quiet (shows who tweets more than 5 times per day, or less than 1 time per day).
  • Influence (self-explanatory).
  • Never Unfollow/Follow (allows you to whitelist or blacklist users. Only for their Pro plan).
  • Manage Muted Users.
  • Everyone You Follow.

With the free account, you are limited to just 20 follows/unfollows per day, although they present you with few options to increase that limit.

Analytics

The “Analytics” section is only available for paid plans. I don’t have a paid plan so can’t see the analytics, but did find this screenshot from ManageFlitter’s blog:

Engagement

To my surprise, there is a scheduling option inside ManageFlitter called “Powerpost” that picks an “ideal” time to post.

Pricing

ManageFlitter has plans as low as $12 per month if the free plan doesn’t suit your needs. It can get quite pricey if you manage multiple Twitter accounts.

2. Agorapulse

At first glance, Agorapulse might not seem like an alternative to Social Quant, especially when it comes to following and unfollowing automatically.

But the Agorapulse’s “Listening” feature can easily find people tweeting about relevant subjects or mentioning you.

Just choose the social profile you want to build a following for and click “Listening.”

Then click the “Create a new search button”, which shows you the next option.

Here you can see any searches you already created. You can edit them or create new searches.

Click “Create a new search.”

As you can see, you can enter a hashtag to search for and give that search a title. You can also add multiple words, phrases, or Twitter handles to your search. Click “Next” when done.

You can “heart” each tweet, reply to it and open it in Twitter if you’d like. Since in this search it’s from a word or phrase, I can’t choose to follow that person inside our app due to Twitter restrictions. I’d have to open that tweet in Twitter to do so.

But if it was a search that mentioned my username I can follow the account, as in the example below (notice the Follow button on the right):

You could set up multiple searches for different phrases and usernames, and follow anyone not following you.

Granted there isn’t a way to then unfollow anyone that doesn’t follow you back, but it’s a great way to start growing targeted followers based on your searches.

Plus you are in complete control, and can reply to Tweets as well. Those replies and/or retweets are valuable and will get people to notice you.

(And shall I mention that you’d be using a tool that abides by Twitter’s rules?)

You could also add tags (like the “ambassador” tag on the image above) to each person so you could organize who the users are.

Unlike ManageFlitter, Agorapulse works with many other social networks, including Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn, and Google+.

Pricing starts at $49 and offers three social profiles in its intro plan. (Manage Flitter’s starter “Pro” plan only gives you one profile.) All Agorapulse’s plans give you access to all of its publishing and reporting features — whereas you’d have to upgrade to the Manage Flitter “Business” plan to get everything.

To manage 10 Twitter profiles on Agorapulse will run you $99/mo. On Manage Flitter, it’s $199/mo.

3. Other Social Quant Alternatives

I’ve had a hard time finding other Social Quant alternatives that I trusted enough to test. That said, I’ve compiled a list of a few you might consider.

Some require you to download their software, which will keep you from running into issues that Social Quant users had with multiple IP addresses logging into your Twitter account.

But there is no way to know what sort of information that software is taking from you, or what it’s adding to your system.

So use wisely.

Whether you use a tool to grow your followers for you or do it manually on your own, the key is to follow the right people who will in turn engage with you.

Otherwise, you’re basically getting fake and useless followers — which used to fool the boss in say, 2010. Now, a large following of unresponsive followers serves no use whatsoever.

What Social Quant alternative are you considering? Let us know in the comments!

The post Is There a Social Quant Alternative that Twitter Won’t Shut Down? appeared first on Agorapulse.

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There are a lot of big social media changes that have been happening lately across a number of different platforms. The past few months have been extra busy for marketers, to say the least, while we scramble to make sure we understand the new rules and adjust accordingly.

There are, unsurprisingly, a lot of new social media rules that have accompanied these changes, and with everything happening, a few of them have been easy to miss or forget. That doesn’t mean they’re not important though. After the data breaches, every social platform is cracking down hard on users and brands who break the rules they’ve laid out– even if they’re new.

In this post, we’ll take a look at 5 new social media rules that you might accidentally be breaking without even realizing it, and what you should be doing instead.

1. Scheduling the Same Tweet Over and Over Again

This is the first of Twitter’s new anti-spam rules, which we covered in-depth here. In an attempt to improve the quality of posts happening on the platform and reduce the clutter, Twitter now forbids brands from reposting the same tweet multiple times on the same channel.

Many brands have historically used the recycled content strategy to get the most out of their evergreen content, sharing timeless Tweets linking to blog posts, quotes, or fun facts about the business several times over a span of weeks, months, or even years. Now, though, this strategy is out.

What can I do instead?

Instead of scheduling duplicate Tweets, take a few more minutes to schedule multiple similar but ultimately unique tweets on a single topic at once. Even if you’re sharing the same blog post once a month for six months on Twitter, just write six different Tweets and schedule them at the same time. This will save you time but still give you that automated marketing process.

2. Scheduling Tweets to Multiple Accounts

This is the second half of Twitter’s anti-spam rules, and it dictates that a single marketer can’t schedule duplicate tweets to multiple different accounts.

I, for example, manage multiple social media profiles for different B2B  businesses. While they’re all in different areas to avoid conflict of interest, general business quotes do well on each. Previously, I could have scheduled the same quote to go up on these different profiles all at once.

Now, that’s out of the question.

What can I do instead?

Create custom content for each individual channel. Not only will this keep you from breaking Twitter’s rules, it will ensure that the Tweets you post are directly relevant and optimized for each brand. Quality over quantity and all that.

3. Using “Custom Audiences” is in Violation’s of Facebook’s Rules

Facebook has always had rules about their “custom audiences” and how you can create them, specifically when it comes to user data. It’s pretty much always been the case that you were supposed to only create lists to target users who had opted-in to your list.

Unsurprisingly, however, there have been a lot of pretty sketchy practices were brands and advertisers ignored this rule entirely. Some brands and businesses don’t even realize they’re breaking the rules, even though this one has been around in some form for awhile.

Where most people get in trouble is either through bought lists or non-opted in data. Maybe users buy from you but don’t agree to have their email addresses added to your list, and you target them anyway. Maybe you’ve purchased lists from a third party company. Both of these examples can land you in hot water, especially with users worried about privacy and Facebook aggressively cracking down on this.

What can I do instead?

Only create custom audiences from an email list with lists that are valid and follow Facebook’s strict rules. Make sure that the users on your list have all opted in to be on said list, and that you’ve obtained their information with their explicit consent. Read the full Custom Audiences terms of service to make sure that you’re in the clear.

Moving forward, make sure to adopt these practices. If you need to build a list quickly, you can use Lead Gen Ads on Facebook to do so.

4. Placing Pixels on Sites Other Than Your Own

This is a grey area that a lot of brands may have dabbled in. They knew it wasn’t how Facebook wanted the pixels to be used but also knowing that it didn’t technically break the rules.

Facebook now has a rule that expressly forbids this. You can only place the Facebook tracking pixel on the sites it is meant to live on.

Let’s look at an example of how this works. Let’s say I have full access to my site, and to AgoraPulse’s site (I don’t.) I install my brand’s tracking pixel on Agorapulse’s site, so I can retarget users who have visited Agorapulse’s blog and hit them with copy advertising social media consulting packages. This would definitely be effective, but a huge breach of trust on so many different levels and definitely not ok.

What can I do instead?

Keep your pixels to yourself, people. It’s that simple. There are other ways to try to target your competition or users who are interested in complementary businesses. This includes interest retargeting, where you target users who are interested in the business (if it’s large enough) or industry that you were trying to target before.

5. Using Dummy Profiles to Admin Facebook Pages

This last rule is the one that I think is the most innocent and the easiest one to miss and break by accident. It’s also one I’ve had to talk to several clients about already.

A lot of people use dummy profiles to admin Facebook Pages. This does not automatically mean those Pages are spam, and there’s plenty of reasons why people do this. These reasons include:

  • Not having a Facebook account personally, and only creating one just to be able to market on Facebook. I’ve found this to be particularly common for small businesses.
  • Having a single account multiple people can access; this may also be so that consultant or team member could step in to set up the account.

Now, though, that’s not going to fly– at least not for larger pages. Facebook is implementing a rule that will require the admins of Pages will large followings to verify their profiles.

This means that the admins need to have real, working profiles– not dummy accounts– in order to stay compliant.

What can I do instead?

There’s a lot of missing information about this one right now. We don’t know what counts as a “large following” yet and we don’t know what will happen if the rule is broken. It puts you at a direct risk for possibly having your Page suspended, shadowbanned, or who knows what else. Go ahead and address this now.

If you have a Facebook Page, you should have a real account. Take some time to add some friends on Facebook, and post every so often. Be active on the site, even if it’s just thirty minutes a week and your privacy settings are extremely restrictive.

You should also invest in social management software like Agorapulse, where you can grant access to multiple team members easily and securely. You can still be in full control, but there’s no longer a need for dummy accounts to streamline things.

Do I Really Need to Follow These New Rules?

I’ve always been a rule follower– I even come to a complete stop at every single stop sign and never go more than 5 over. And I strongly believe that Twitter and Facebook put these rules in place for a good reason. You’ll never hear me say “yeah, go ahead and blow that one off, it doesn’t matter,” because I don’t believe it’s ever a good strategy.

But for these rules, you really need to follow them. Facebook and Twitter are taking these new updates very seriously; they’re ready to crack down hard on any rule breakers. Facebook is even offering an actual cash bounty for reports of data abuse, so you really don’t want to get caught on the wrong side of this one.

Even if you found some weird loophole to sidestep these rules, don’t do it. They’re put in place to make users’ experiences on the platform the best they possibly can be. If you’re determined to not comply, it means that what you’re putting out may not be good enough to stand on its own. And ultimately, that’s a much bigger obstacle than any new hoops Facebook and Twitter have for us to jump through.

Final Thoughts

While we’re used to social media changing quickly, we’re not used to dealing with this many rule changes all at once. Each of these rules can directly affect us to varying degrees, forcing us to adapt our strategies. That being said, these rules are all good rules. They’ll force us to do better if we aren’t already using the platforms the intended way. Long-term, that will mean better results across the board.

What do you think? Have you accidentally broken any of these new rules? Which rules do you like the most? Share your thoughts and questions in the comments below! 

The post 5 New Social Media Rules You Might Be Accidentally Breaking appeared first on Agorapulse.

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Are you worried about how to avoid Twitter penalties because of the new rules about duplicate tweets? Does it seem like using a content scheduler won’t save you time anymore? Don’t worry, you can still save time and create better content through the smart use of content queues— you just need to be strategic about it.

Understanding Twitter’s “Why”

Twitter didn’t introduce the new rules about duplicate content for the fun of it. If they want to keep us engaged and on the platform, they have to create the best possible user experience. No one wants to see the same content circulating over and over again– especially when so much of it is pushed by bots that don’t care about creating value for the audience.

However, this move does impact social media managers that have used duplicate content responsibly as well, so many of us need to make some adjustments.

Using Content Queues the Smart Way

Up until now, most of us have been using content queues to schedule content in advance. It helps us save time, grow that Twitter following and increase our reach. Even with the changes, there’s no need to abandon content queues completely– we just need to change up the strategy.

Sharing the same article on different accounts

As a social media manager, you are managing a lot of different accounts. Sometimes, the same article might be absolutely perfect for two different clients.

For example, one of my clients is a yoga non-profit, and another is a child and parenting blog. If I find a great article about how mindfulness helps children, or about parents and their kids doing yoga together, it is relevant to both audiences.

In the past, I would have queued the article and not thought about it again. However, because of the new changes, the Agorapulse tool will not let me schedule both of the tweets together, even if they are scheduled to go out at different times.

In this case, I simply need to schedule the content twice. This is where the Agorapulse browser extension comes in handy. When I’m reading the article, I can click on the extension, schedule the content for one specific account, and then schedule it for the other one.

This also gives me the opportunity to customize the text that goes along with the article– a crucial step if you want to avoid penalties in the new Twitterverse. For example, I may adjust this post to focus more on the benefits of yoga for the yoga group, and to focus on parent/child relationships for the second one. 

If you don’t like the idea of adding the same article to your content queue more than once, you can share it organically.

In other words, share it in one place first, and then retweet it from the second account. You can do this manually, or you can do it within the Agorapulse app by setting up your listening tool to find content from one account or another. Create a search that has the hashtag you are using. This makes it super easy to retweet or comment on posts from one account to another.

Scheduling Content

To avoiding Twitter’s penalties, you need to set up your content queues for different times. In order to do this, check each of your publishing calendars and make sure that similar categories are set to post at different times.

For example, if you are posting a #MotivationMonday tweet with an inspirational quote about the start of the week, you will want to schedule this for one account in the morning, and another one in the afternoon.

If your accounts are very different in nature, this will be easier than if you manage accounts in similar niches.

Use Hashtags to Set Tweets Apart 

Another way you can differentiate when you are sharing the same content in more than one place is to use different hashtags for each set of posts.

If you haven’t yet created a list of target hashtags to use for each account, now is a good time to do so!

Hashtags on Twitter are both used as a way to find and organize content, as well as to coordinate chats, and keep up with trending topics. There is more to it than that, but the bottom line is that they should be an important part of your strategy.

Not sure where to start? Create some content queues around routinely trending topics like:

  • #MotivationMonday
  • #TechTuesday
  • #WednesdayWisdom
  • #ThrowbackThursday
  • #FridayFeeling

There are tons of these that you can tap into and there may be some that are specific to your niche. You will want to keep a closer eye on these particular publishing categories than you might on some other evergreen content categories, as hashtags do come and go.

You will also want to keep an eye on your reports to see how the engagement and results that you get from these categories compare. While more people may see your tweets when you use general hashtags, you may attract fewer people that are really in your market.

It’s All About Original Content

You can still share some of the same content if it’s relevant to more than one Twitter account– you just need to do it with a little more finesse and craft original tweets every time.

The good news is that tools like Agorapulse make it easy to stay on Twitter’s good side. And, you might even find that making some tweaks to your content, hashtags, and scheduling, improvs your Twitter engagement and performance.

What about you? Are you using similar content on multiple accounts? What strategies will you use to keep your Twitter accounts fresh and engaging?

The post Stay on Twitter’s Good Side By Smart Use of Content Queues appeared first on Agorapulse.

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The right Twitter listening tips can help you grow your Twitter following right away.

That’s why I’d love to share my favorites, developed from running dozens of Twitter accounts for various brands. These simple tips can be implemented in as little as a few minutes a day and, if you are an agency, you can easily integrate them with your team workflow.

What is Twitter Listening? 

Twitter Listening is a tool within Agorapulse that brings all your Twitter searches into one easy to read inbox you can interact with. While you can use the strategies I’ll share with the Twitter search on Twitter itself, using Agorapulse will save you a ton of time.

With the Agorapulse listening tool, you don’t have to save and repeat your searches and you can see the impact of listening on your goals directly in the reports. That’s why this is a tool I recommend to any of my clients looking to build a Twitter following this way.

But why does it work? Increasing your Twitter interactions makes your profile more visible. It helps you connect with people who are actively looking to buy your products and services and helps build a deeper connection with your existing customers. It can even help you keep tabs on your competitors.

To get started, go to your Agorapulse dashboard and click on “Listening.” Here you’ll be able to create searches. But what should you search for? Here are some tips to get you started with this powerful tool.

Tip 1: Listen for Your Brand

The first and most basic type of Twitter listening to set up is to listen for your own name and/or brand. While people who use your Twitter handle will show up in your mentions, it’s possible that there is social media chatter going on that you are missing. Users may only mention your website, your name and not your Twitter handle, or mention something else altogether.

Think through what different terms people may be using when they are talking about you and set up a search for each one.

This can help you better understand the full reach of your brand on Twitter when you create your reports. Hopefully, these people are singing your praises. However, even if they are dishing out criticism, listening helps you hear it and allows you to respond productively.

Tip 2: Listen for Your Keywords

What are your ideal clients or customers looking for on Twitter? Are you keeping track of the buzz around those things?

The key to setting up keyword listening is to really understand what your clients or customers are looking for and get a good handle on the language they use.

In the example above, the client is a tech conference. Their areas of focus include big data, internet of things, and cloud computing. I created hashtag based searches for all three of these topics. It would probably be good to add more for some of the alternative common hashtags. For example, internet of things is often abbreviated as IoT.

Another example might be a car sales company. If they use the search #newcar they will get some people looking for a new car, but will also hear a lot of people who just bought one and are showing it off. Entering keywords related to car repair, breakdown, or trade-ins might make more sense and yield relevant results.

What are the frustrations your clients have that lead up to buying from you? Include those keywords in your searches. Better yet, when you respond, don’t pitch your product or service. Instead, use the listening opportunity to add a tip or helpful piece of advice, so you can start building your relationship and open the door for next time they are in the market.

Tip 3: Listen for Your Competitors

This tip works especially well if you are a lesser known brand. Many people say “Jello” when they mean gelatin or “Kleenex” when they mean facial tissues because of brand recognition.

Use this to your advantage by creating searches for your top competitors. This will allow you to interact with people discussing their products, as well as see what their social media strategies are in real time.

Be careful with your responses on this one. Be sure that you have clear direction about how aggressively to pursue this audience if you are not the primary decision maker in the business.

How to Be a Better Listener

As you integrate listening into your social media strategies, go ahead and start using some advanced search tips too. This can help you narrow down your results to things that are really useful by eliminating irrelevant searches.

You also want to make sure that you are working with your team (if applicable.) Another great feature of Agorapulse is that you can assign any post to a teammate if it’s a question that you don’t know the answer to, or is better handled by another coworker.

Finally, remember that in order to get more followers, you have to be interesting and engaging. This is what will make people want to follow you in the first place. Take some time to review your Twitter bio, and see if it can be more compelling. Don’t just like posts– take the time to reply with a helpful comment.

Remember that this is another tool to find people who may be a great fit for your product or service. It’s your job to take the first step and say hello. If you do a good job, then you’ll start getting more followers almost immediately. And with a bit of effort, those followers will get to know you and turn into customers.

What are your favorite Twitter listening tips? Send us a tweet, and let us know. 

The post Use These Twitter Listening Tips to Grow Your Following appeared first on Agorapulse.

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Social media keeps on getting bigger and bigger. As it’s done so, it has become both more necessary for our businesses and significantly more complicated for everyone. With some brands trying to post on each platform multiple times per day, both brand and agencies alike have fallen back on marketing automation. Many have started focusing on pumping out as much good (or half-decent) content as possible and recycling the content at a later date.

This trend has been brought to a screeching halt by Twitter’s new spam rules, which were announced last month. It happened just as the dust was settling from the chaos of the Facebook Zero announcement, and in the middle of questions about Facebook’s and Instagram’s API. I can honestly say that I think this is the most I’ve seen actual social media marketers flipping out about what this means for our businesses, and brands are being directly affected, too.

Here’s the thing though. Crying over spilled milk does you no good. All you’ll do is end up wasting a lot of time and energy being frustrated when you should just adapt your strategy now.

We can help you do that. This post will go over actionable ways to deal with the new Twitter spam rules.

What Do The New Twitter Spam Rules Mean, Exactly?

If you’ve missed it, here’s what the new Twitter rules forbid:

  • Social media tools, managers, and brands can no longer post the same tweet to multiple Twitter accounts. If one marketer is handling Red Lobster’s and Olive Garden’s account, they can’t share content between them.
  • Even a single profile on Twitter can no longer re-post the same content over again on their own account. No duplicate content is allowed. This includes scheduling duplicate content far out in advance, which is a feature Twitter’s own TweetDeck had previously offered.

Twitter is doing this in order to crack down on spam and to sort through a lot of what I call “blackhole posting.” This is the phenomenon where brands just dump content onto the platform like people throwing ideas at the wall to see what sticks. The goal of these new rules is to make the platform more enjoyable for users and to cut through some of the clutter.

You should not try to find the smallest of technical loopholes around these rules, or use a tool that claims to be able to trick the system. Twitter marketing has changed, and we need to accept that.

This doesn’t mean, however, that Twitter marketing as we know it is dead. It’s still possible to get great results with Twitter and to even implement some amount of automation, but you need to know how and when to do this while following Twitter’s new rules.

Here’s what you can do…

Create Queued Content

Queued content with social media scheduling tools like Agorapulse is the best way to use marketing automation without breaking any Twitter rules. You can create “queues” of content that are completely ready to be posted, but are evergreen and can be saved for a later date.

Agorapulse takes the queue feature to the next level by allowing you to create categories for different types of queued content, and schedule which categories you want to go live when. This ensures that you don’t accidentally have six links to blog posts go out all in a row, increasing even distribution. It also makes creating a cohesive social schedule easier because you’ll have a better idea of what’s being posted.

When you’re queueing content for Twitter, make sure that you don’t select the option to “re-queue multiple times.” You can still use this feature for other platforms, but this is where you’d end up in violation of Twitter’s rules.

Use Advanced Scheduling to Create Significant Variations

Read this full section completely so that you understand what you can and can’t do because this is where a wrong step with your strategy could land you in big trouble.

If you have an event, contest, new product, or even a great blog post, it’s expected that you’ll post about it more than once. And, if you’re like me, you like to create most of the content for these things all at once so you can make sure that you cover your bases well.

You can still do this. Instead of using the same Tweet over again and again, however, make sure you add a significant variation to it and add it to your social schedule.

Let’s say your original plan was to post the following tweet several times to promote your social contest:

“Don’t forget about our contest! Enter through the link below. #Twittercontest #weloveourcustomers.”

Use this tweet once. Then copy the link into another post, and change the copy to something like this:

“Have you entered our Twitter contest yet? Don’t miss your chance to win! Click the link below to enter. #socialcontest #retweettowin.”

There’s another quick fix around this if you want to use the same image or link multiple times. After creating the first post, duplicate it and schedule it to run at a later date. Then immediately go to edit the second post and change the copy.

Either way, schedule everything at once. You can absolutely share similar content– you just can’t have the copy be the same.

Social media scheduling can save the day.

Scheduling content all at once gives you the convenience and ability to form a cohesive plan, without the rule breaking. Social scheduling software will be the new master, replacing social rescheduling software for Twitter.

Focus on Quality Over Quantity

With a lot of the new, highly restrictive social media changes that have been happening recently, a lot of people panic.

That being said, the new rules are really being implemented to force businesses to use the platforms the way it was intended. Specifically, sharing content not to get clicks to your site, but because you think it’s interesting and relevant to your audience. Social media is social, after all. It’s undeniably an excellent marketing tool, but users don’t log into the site so advertisers can run circles around them.

Create posts and content that you believe your users will want to engage with. It really is all about quality over quantity, now more than ever.  When in doubt about what this looks like, check out Agorapulse’s Twitter analytics data to look for trends in your top performing content.

You can even see which hashtags help to get you the best reach.

This has always been the case, even if some people disagreed about the importance of it.

It’s about fighting reach, they’d say. This was their explanation for why they were churning out 6 mediocre, low-performing posts per day. Meanwhile, other brands had only 4 high-performing posts per week but better results.

Think about what people will share and what they’ll engage in conversation with. This is how you get more visibility with less effort in the long run, not endlessly recycling enormous amounts of content that’s just-ok, hoping someone will see it the fourth time around.

Final Thoughts

The second the news about Twitter’s spam rules broke, people were mumbling (or shouting) how they’d find ways to cheat the system.

Let them go ahead and try, but I don’t recommend trying it for yourself. All that will happen is Twitter will find any potential loopholes that need closing. Oh, and your account could end up in a world of hurt.

Don’t be that guy. Use these white-hat strategies to maintain a streamlined, efficient Twitter posting strategy. You can still take advantage of a certain degree of automation without breaking any of Twitter’s spam rules. You’ll have to adopt new strategies eventually– might as well be now.

What do you think? How do you feel about the new Twitter spam rules? Have you adapted your strategy? Has it affected you? Share your thoughts and questions in the comments below! 

The post What You Can Do Instead of Crying Over Twitter’s New Spam Rules appeared first on Agorapulse.

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You may have heard about the news lately: everyone in social media is crying about the end of the ability to repeat content on Twitter.

Repeating content is probably one of the (if not the only) reason users rushed to tools like Meet Edgar and SmarterQueue. Needless to say, there’s a lot of anxiety and frustration about these kinds of publishing tools.

But is this announcement really news?

Let’s look at the situation with a little more context.

Twitter Rules: What’s New, What’s Not (and Why it Matters)

On February 21, Twitter published a blog post called “Automation and the use of multiple accounts” which said that they now require developers (tools) to stop offering the possibility to post the same tweet on multiple Twitter accounts they control.

They justified this announcement by their willingness to fight spam and enforce their rules more strictly.

Before this blog post, tons of users with multiple Twitter accounts were regularly posting the same tweet on their accounts using various tools. Even Twitter’s own tool, TweetDeck, offered this feature.

After this blog post was published, everyone starting to shake with fear and ask Twitter “Can I still post the same tweet multiple times on one Twitter account“? Invariably, Twitter kept responding “this is also against the rules.”

Posting identical Tweets over multiple hours or days, or scheduling duplicate content for future publication, is still a violation of our rules.

— Twitter Dev (@TwitterDev) March 23, 2018

Panic ensued.

Dozens and dozens of publishing recycling tools like Edgar and SmarterQueue soon announced that they’ve discontinued their “repeat” options for Twitter based on these “new” rules.

But this is where things get interesting.

These rules are NOT new at all.

Actually, they’ve been around since the early days of Twitter. Here’s a screenshot of the Twitter rules in July 2010:

Twitter rules 2010

As you can see yourself, the rules have always contained that same wording.

Truth be told — I was not fully aware of this myself until I used the Wayback Machine.

The rules have been around for a while — it’s just now that Twitter has decided to enforce them.

It feels pretty awkward for a large social network like Twitter to have had a rule like this one for so long, letting tools proliferate despite being solely built to repeat tweets and do or say nothing about it. Edgar alone had 7,000 clients a year ago. SocialOoomph probably has tens of thousands of users thanks to its free plan.

The disturbing thing is that the exact same scenario applied to automatic DMs (direct messages) or tools that allow to follow/unfollow hundreds of users per week automatically. These behaviors have also been against the rules since 2010 as I read them. Still, as of today, hundreds of tools offer auto DMs and auto follow/unfollow features.

If that’s not confusing for the average, non-spamming Twitter user, I wonder what is!

You got the background. Now, let’s look at how tools that focused on repeating content are affected.

How Does This Impact Tools That Repeat Content?

Unfortunately for their users, Edgar has decided to shut down the repeat feature entirely. They are working on an alternative but there’s no release date.

Whatever alternative solution they come up with, it will never be the seamless, “set it and forget it” function that attracted so many users.

As for SmarterQueue, they chose a different path. They didn’t decide to shut down their repeat feature– instead, they decided to tweak it in a pretty unusual way.

They’re claiming that repeating a tweet is not OK but retweeting it over and over again is fine.

If you repeat content with them, the first tweet will be a normal tweet. All subsequent repeats will be a retweet of the first tweet.

I don’t know about you but I don’t feel like retweeting my own tweets again and again. It would feel like sharing my own posts on Facebook or LinkedIn. Weird.

On top of that, one could disagree with their interpretation of the Twitter announcement which was limited to retweeting from other Twitter accounts a tweet posted on one account.

I would be very worried that Twitter would consider these massive retweets as “duplicates” as well eventually.

Long story short, whatever solution they’ve chosen to implement, the initial value proposition is seriously limited now. This is why you should consider alternatives.

What Are Some Decent Alternatives to Meet Edgar and SmarterQueue?

Time to take a look at some alternatives!

Agorapulse

Agorapulse is a comprehensive social media management tool. Unlike Edgar, SmarterQueue, and all the alternatives listed below, it goes beyond offering publishing features. It also provides full listening capabilities, engagement management, and reporting.

If you need to reply to the comments and private messages you receive on your Facebook pages, Twitter profiles, and Instagram accounts, it’s one of the best solutions out there according to thousands of user reviews.

But as we’re writing this to present alternatives to Edgar and SmarterQueue, let’s look at the features that make Agorapulse a serious contender.

Content preview and customization per social network

Agorapulse was the first tool to display a full preview of your content for each social network– a great way to make sure your post will look good once published! You can even see if your tweet will contain a Twitter card on Twitter —  no other tool offers that level of preview.

But more importantly, Agorapulse was also the first tool to let you customize your content for each social network, making sure that you could customize your content to the specificities of Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn or Google+.

Schedule, repeat and reschedule

The scheduling options offered by Agorapulse let you repeat your post at regular intervals or add additional schedule slots. Useful for events that repeat on a regular basis, like a weekly Twitter chat or a monthly Facebook Live!

If you want to stay away from the Twitter police, just make sure you don’t abuse the system and only use this feature on Twitter in moderation (the more time between the repetitions, the better)!

Queue categories

This feature is best for people that queue content and need to maintain a good mix of topics without worrying about the order their tweets were entered into the system.

With queue categories, you create topics that represent the type of content you like to post on a regular basis, define time slots associated with these topics, and add your content in each topic (category) so they’re being posted at the right time while maintaining a balance in your editorial calendar.

For example, based on the the categories below, if you queue 10 podcast-related posts at once, they will be spread other the week and published only once a day at 7PM. This is a big time-saving feature for users who prefer to queue content rather than schedule it.

Queue and re-queue

Once you hit “queue” on the first step of the Agorapulse publisher, you get to a second step with the ability to queue “last” or “next.” Pick the right queue category for your content (see above) and decide if you want to add your post to the queue again after it’s been published.

This is exactly like what Edgar and SmarterQueue used to do.

To make sure this feature cannot be used to spam the Twitter feed, we’ve added a mandatory time gap of 24 hours between each repetition. You can increase the time gap in your settings– we recommend using the 7-day time gap for now.

To help you stay within the spirit of the Twitter Terms of Service (keep in mind that they don’t like repetition — even though they’ve let you (reasonably) repeat content for the last 8 years…), we’re working on a new feature that will allow you to create several variations of the same tweet. This new feature will be announced in the coming weeks. For now, make sure you’re not repeating your tweets too often.

For social networks other than Twitter, there’s no mandatory repeated content limit but always be mindful of your audience. Don’t repeat your posts and links too often and make sure you only do it for content that’s both evergreen and high quality. Repeating content makes no sense if it’s low value or time-sensitive.

Bulk content publishing

Unlike many other tools, Agorapulse allows you to bulk upload up to a 100 pieces of content at once using a pre-populated CSV file, including photos (great for Instagram) and content from any RSS feed! If you like curating content, the RSS bulk publishing option will save you hours of work every month.

Buffer

In a recent statement, Buffer stated its plans to “help you create unique content for multiple Twitter posts in the same composer session and are exploring ways to help you easily schedule retweets for related accounts.”

In the meantime, Pro and Business plan subscribers can make use of the Re-Buffer feature.

Simply go into your “Posts” section of your “Analytics” tab. Find the tweet you want to post again and click the “Re-Buffer” button to the right of it.

Then modify the content to stay out of Twitter jail.

This isn’t as easy as an “auto-repeat” option, but if your needs are solely based on publishing content and you don’t need a full-blown social media management tool– Buffer alone doesn’t let you reply to posts without purchasing Buffer Reply, an additional tool,– then you may want to consider it as an alternative.

CoSchedule

CoSchedule, a blog management and social sharing tool, sent this message to users about its ReQueue feature soon after the discovery of the Twitter rule.

“With ReQueue, all social messages will wait 14 days before sending out again. This way we can be sure to never spam your audience with any of your social profiles. Because of this, ReQueue messages are permitted through Twitter’s changes.”

Not sure how this will work because the tool only schedules up to 14 days of content at one time.

While ReQueue is included in the small, “Essential” plan ($49/mo), it’s considered an add-on for larger plans, with the additional cost running from $50/mo extra for the Growth plan to $300/mo extra for the Enterprise plan.

If you have a significant budget (CoSchedule is the most expensive option for a tool that only focuses on publishing when you want the ReQueue option) and are OK with a 2-week time gap between each repetition, it’s worth trying.

SocialOomph

SocialOomph has always been a pioneer when it comes to content recycling. Despite a user interface that’s complicated to use, it does the job.

Interestingly enough, it has reacted to the Twitter apocalypse in an unexpected way– it’s now forcing a “duplicate content blackout period” of 24 hours. In other words, you won’t be able to repeat the same tweet twice in 24 hours.

Note that in that same blog post, they also advise you to “create unique content for Twitter” as “they hate duplicate content.”

Is a 24-hour time gap between two pieces of identical content good enough for Twitter? It remains to be seen.

How do you plan to keep your flow of content going without getting your wrist slapped by Twitter? Let us know in the comments!

The post What Meet Edgar and SmarterQueue Alternatives Are Out There? appeared first on Agorapulse.

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Are you a social media manager in charge of a gazillion Twitter accounts you need to manage on a daily basis?

How on Earth do you best monitor, listen and respond to multiple Twitter accounts in a timely manner? How can you monitor, listen and respond without missing important messages and not spend all your time on Twitter; logging in, logging out, logging in, logging out?

In this article, you will learn how to easily manage your multiple Twitter accounts both from your phone or your desktop.

You Can Access Multiple Twitter Accounts From Your Phone

Did you know that an easy way to monitor multiple Twitter accounts is from your phone?

The native Twitter app allows you to log in and stay logged in to multiple accounts simultaneously, which is super handy. With this Twitter app, you can monitor all your accounts for incoming direct messages and tweet (or retweet) for instant conversations.

Here’s how to add multiple Twitter accounts to your iOS device.

If you’re an Android user, these instructions will guide you.

All you do to access each Twitter account is log in once. From then on, all you have to do is toggle back and forth between these accounts in the Twitter app. You will stay logged in until you decide to log out. Once you have access to all your accounts on this app, you can have conversations, upload pictures and/or video and participate in Twitter chats in real time.

What you cannot do with the native Twitter app is schedule content to go out to your Twitter accounts.

There is no way a social media manager can spend all their time crafting one tweet at a time! The need to schedule tweets becomes apparent as the Twitter accounts stack up. In order to tweet at regular intervals and/or at set times, it is imperative tweets can be created and then scheduled, in bulk.

I will discuss how to easily manage – and schedule tweets too – to multiple Twitter accounts in the next few paragraphs.

Can You Access Multiple Twitter Accounts on Desktop?

According to Twitter, you can only be logged in to one Twitter account at a time on your desktop. That is, per browser.

In their help section, we found this information on natively accessing multiple Twitter accounts from your desktop:

  • You can only be logged in to one Twitter account at a time, in the same browser, if you’re accessing Twitter via the web.
  • If you’d like to be logged in to multiple accounts at the same time, you can do so by using different browsers.

So how then, does a busy social media manager manage multiple Twitter accounts via the web? With a tool, but not just any tool…

Agorapulse as a Multiple Twitter Account Management Tool

Managing multiple Twitter accounts with Agorapulse makes life so much easier! Instead of using multiple browsers, or logging in and out and in and out over and over, there is just one password to remember, one dashboard to access, and one place to look for notifications.

Once you are logged into Agorapulse on your desktop, you can quickly see your Twitter notifications and respond as needed to each and every tweet.

From the main dashboard, you can easily access each account to schedule out tweets. Want to schedule a tweet? No problem.

Want to bulk upload a bunch of tweets to go in a queue? You can do that for your accounts as well.

This makes your time thinking about Twitter shrink immensely! As in any industry; time = money!

If you do love your phone for social media management, or you travel a great deal and need access from your phone, you can manage your accounts on your phone with the Agorapulse app.

Agorapulse App Makes Managing Multiple Twitter Accounts from Your Phone a Snap!

Now that you know how to use Agorapulse on a desktop to monitor, reply and schedule tweets for all your Twitter accounts, let’s go back to your mobile device. Remember that I stated earlier that the one big flaw with the native Twitter app was that you cannot schedule your tweets?

There is a solution to that problem.

Use the Agorapulse app instead of the native Twitter app on your phone!

The AgoraPulse app can do everything the native Twitter app can do, and then some — including scheduling and queueing!

Here’s how I use the app: I love taking pictures while attending live events and sharing these pictures to Twitter. However, I do not want to overload my Twitter account and send out say, six tweets in rapid succession.

By using the Agorapulse app, I can send out these tweets and pictures in 4, 5, 10 or 20-minute intervals from my phone, whichever I choose!

Your Twitter audience will thank you for spreading out the tweets a bit and you will be so happy to get them one-and-done! Shhh… no one will ever know!

Agorapulse is Your Complete Twitter Management Toolkit

Easily managing multiple Twitter accounts from one dashboard is not all Agorapulse can do for you!

It also gives you a monitoring dashboard for keywords and other searches, a social CRM for your most passionate friends on Twitter, and unlimited reporting on the efforts of all your Twitter accounts.

How do you manage multiple Twitter accounts? Let us know in the comments.

The post How to Easily Manage Your Multiple Twitter Accounts appeared first on Agorapulse.

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