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Two sets of pitches, ten finalists across the competitions. The first five are finalists in the 2018 Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit Business Plan competition. The Business Plan Competition features companies pitching their ideas to a diverse panel of judges for feedback, funding and a $10,000 prize.  The second five are finalists in the AARP Innovation Labs Pitch Competition for companies focused on providing peace of mind to family caregivers through the use of VR, AI and other disruptive technologies. The winning team will go on to the AARP Innovation Pitch Event in Washington, DC, in October of 2018.

Kytera. Behavior monitoring for aging-at-home, allowing better care services, improved emergency detection and predictive analytics. Companion offers System is based on Contextual Activity Analysis technology and it consists of a wristband and easy-to-install sensors. Learn more at KyteraTech.

LifePod. Virtual caregiving, providing peace of mind to caregivers and improving the quality of life of their loved ones with voice-initiated, intelligent and connected services to support the elderly as they age-in-place. Learn more at LifePod.

Tomeah Health.  On-Demand platform for agencies to drive greater efficiencies and improved transparency in the delivery of care. Learn more at Tomeah Health.

Raivan. More accurate lung cancer diagnosis by enabling live visualization of the airways.  More when there is more.

Wavelet Health. Implantable stroke monitor for high risk atrial fibrillation to reduce time to treatment after an ischemic stroke. Learn more at Wavelet Health. Winner of the Venture Summit $10K prize.

Evolution Devices. A sleeve that uses electrical stimulation to regenerate muscles and prevent falls for the elderly. Learn more soon at Evolution Devices.

Loop. A family communication device for the home that allows you to seamlessly share video, photos, and video chat. Pre-order. Learn more at JoinLoop.

Embodied Labs.  The intersection of healthcare training and virtual reality storytelling to provide a culture shift solution that empowers every member of the care team to share their expertise and value one another. Learn more at EmbodiedLabs. Winner of the AARP Innovation Labs Competition. 

MyndVR. MyndVR is a national health and wellness company providing Virtual Reality solutions to Assisted Living, CCRCs, Veterans homes, 55+ living communities and home-health care providers. Learn more at MyndVR.

Ohmni Robot. Designed specifically for seniors to enable them to continue their independent living in a comfortable and worry-free environment. Learn more from OhmniLabs.

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The more things change… Life expectancy is long – tech attention span from investors and innovators can be short.  Reviewing the past 10 years of blog posts (from 2008 until 2018), in the beginning, consider the categories and innovations. To mitigate social isolation, for example, note the video phone and the printing mailbox. The objective was to communicate with grandma or grandpa, who might be bereft of email – or for that matter, WiFi, Skype, tablet, smartphone, PC or MAC. Imagine the blissful simplicity or those times -- for the grandparents.  Largely forgotten now --  Mailbug, BigKeys – and printing mailboxes Presto and fax-machine based MyCelery. But the PERS market, around since 1975 in the US, has repeatedly been predicted to be obsolete and about to be replaced with something else.

As time passed, how to categorize?  Way back, optimistic offerings from innovators took shape into problem-opportunity clusters – mapped out in the first Market Overview in the spring of 2009 (attached to this blog post). There has been plenty of forward motion in the past decade towards the objective of improving or maintaining quality of life. And the sub-topics of categories -- Communication & Engagement, Safety & Security, Health & Wellness, Learning & Contribution – remain as the collective elements of a framework that can make it so. 

From a baseline of tech non-use, some saw opportunity.  Looking back at the pre-smartphone time, PointerWare and Big Screen Live were two ways to bring computers and email to seniors. The Jitterbug phone was available beginning in 2006, but there were no tablets on the market, and it would be several years before GreatCall (and others) offered a smartphone for seniors in 2012. The iPad was introduced in 2010, and was debated as having senior appeal, according to a 2010 AARP article. Of course, what did the interviewees know?  The iPad turned out to be a hit with the elderly – and the bright, shiny glass, as these links demonstrate, was not a deterrent.

…Categories persist, entrants may morph – but not as much as VCs might think. Today, the PERS market heads north past $3 billion in the US. Despite that, some venture capitalists believe that the penetration of smartphone use among seniors, coupled with the ‘potential’ for an all-day smartphone battery means that mobile PERS has a limited future.  Just as investors believed before 2009 that PERS could never be used outside the home – oops, wrong, then came MobileHelp.  Is there a VC today that thinks that on-the-body, voice-activated PERS (available today), with multiple days of battery life is not a market? There are investors that think the Apple Watch will eliminate the PERS device and its remarkable recurring revenue market. They believe this despite knowing that the Apple watch has $400 price tag and it lacks a call center. And only 20% of boomers and 5% of seniors are buying them.  

 

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The hearing aid industry offers pricey hearing aids for people with ‘defined’ hearing loss.  The FDA wants you to understand that it regulates hearing aids – which it defines as helping the medical condition of hearing loss. The FDA then observes that Personal Sound Amplification Products (PSAPs) are “sound amplifiers for consumers with no hearing loss who want to make environmental sounds louder for recreational use.“ Recreational? Hearing aids that they do regulate are now made by a small number of companies and are sold with audiologist services for $1000 up to $4000 per device – most people need two – they have a lifespan of up to 7 years.   That price includes a hearing test, fitting, initial batteries and more.

Why do hearing aids cost so much? According to hearing industry experts, the price differential is based on the inclusion of audiologist services. And in a few other words from AARP, a very few companies control the bulk of the market.  And although it has been recommended to decouple the product from services, so far, that has not happened, perhaps related to the efforts of those few companies. Retailers like Walmart and Costco all sell hearing aids – coupled with Costco-provided audiologist services – Costco’s site offers its own branded for $1600 per pair. Best Buy sells PSAPs.

As hearing aid prices are disrupted, the PSAP and other hearables disrupt the industry.  If Costco is pushing the hearing aid industry price down, at some point that price meets the upper end of the PSAP market of $500/pair of PSAP maker like Clarity, SoundWorld Solutions or Tweak Focus. The underlying technology in hearing aids and that of Personal Sound Amplification Products (PSAPs) is not different. The go-to-market channels, however, are quite different.  Retail stores, online websites offer PSAPs for buyers who adjust the device themselves – the which the FDA calls the ‘audio version of reading glasses.’ And Consumer Reports calls them ‘hearing helpers.’ But are they really? Or are they hearing aids in disguise because the FDA does not currently regulate them? Maybe they are hearing aids that you adjust yourself? How do they sync up with the more recently introduced 'hearables' which encompass a plethora of firms?

Consider that the terminology dance must mystify consumers.  Note that hearing aids are not covered by Medicare – nor are PSAPs. Note that one in three between age 65 and 74 has hearing loss and nearly half of the 75+ have some level of hearing loss. Note that hearing loss has been linked to dementia, to social isolation – which has been linked to poorer health outcomes.  (Further, wearing hearing aids has been linked to fewer hospital visits.)

Cut to the chase – the FDA should get out of the consumer’s way. Regardless of what it is called and how defensive the government agencies are, improving ability to hear among older adults is a health and quality-of-life positive, and could be related to lowering healthcare costs. The companies in this industry (Hearing Aid and PSAP) need to help the FDA help the older consumer who lacks either device. Decouple the product from the services, allow consumers to make their own choice of where to buy and with what service they need, and track price and competition – and measure the numbers of people who report improvement in quality of life, health status, and social engagement.

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It’s Not About Your Grandmother – 10 Steps Before Launching! You want to launch a boomer/senior, home health tech, caregiving, product or service. Or other. Your new company gets ready to travel into battle for west coast networking, or you're back from San Francisco or Silicon Valley, consider this guidance, now that cards have been exchanged and follow-up emails sent. Soon your new or existing company will officially launch a new product or service, or a much-anticipated offering will finally ship. You read AARP and Pew survey research reports. Now look over this 6-month-old updated checklist.  And you look back on the 2009 advice – which is still valid, especially about creating community around the product – more important than ever. And as for item 6 in this post, THIS MEANS YOU!   Really now, are you ready?

Let’s Talk – What’s Happening With Voice First Adoption? Smart speakers – they seem to be the new, new thing.  According to eMarketer’s new report , 40.7 million people will use a ‘smart speaker’ at least once in any given month. Because there is competition now, primarily from Google, the market share projection for Amazon (which ‘shipped tens of millions of devices at Christmas’) will drop from 66.6% to 60.8% share by then – and Google Home-related will rise to 30%. Other than Amazon and Google – “Other” will grow from 8.3% to 14%, which presumably includes Sonos, JBL, Harmon Kardon and other entrants. Does this matter? The split is less important than the growth in overall adoption, not because this is the coolest of new gadgetry, but because the user interface is finally improving and matching the way we think -- after many years of deteriorating screen-based UIs that, on a good day, are just plain annoying.

Too much road noise, no self-driving information.  So how safe are self-driving cars for us, those pesky consumers who are also the victims of this tech for tech's sake?  Ask yourself – how would you know? Even the NTSB doesn’t want you to know details of accidents involving Tesla’s Autopilot.  Let’s remember the so-called problem being hustled into the market -- to reduce deaths from auto accidents. They are astonishingly low already, according to a Rand study, at 1 per 100 million miles traveled. According to the Wall Street Journal article, Tesla promised to release safety data on its self-driving tech regularly starting next quarter, though they have not said what sort of data and what could be gleaned from it -- perhaps in advance of another series (see link) of crashes.

For a Chief Medical Officer, what role does technology play? Recently there was an opportunity to query executives in senior care, including Dr. Arif Nazir, Chief Medical Officer, Signature HealthCARE, who was asked about the technology impact on long-term care jobs.   The insights quoted here could be generalized, not just to Skilled Nursing Facilities, but to all types of care delivery – and are particularly notable in the context of last week’s New York Times article: "How Tech Can Turn Doctors into Clerical Workers.” As Dr. Nazir notes, it’s not just doctors who can be frustrated by over-emphasis on technology. Here are the questions and few observations about the work and the workers.

Skip the tech – listen to the experts interviewed – first robots.  The good news – this week’s Health Care Technology supplement transcended the limits of doctors and hospitals – and dabbled in the dilemmas of elder care – included technology to assist those with dementia and mitigate loneliness.   The bad news -- another in a long line of ‘robots and chatbots look after the elderly,’ with promotions of those oft-promoted Care.coach and ElliQ, adding Catalia Health’s cute Mabu. These are worthy experiments – and not wanting to be left behind, there are always health organizations eager to see what the fuss is about. Says USC researcher, Maja Mataric: "Robots give patients the illusion of having a physical companion…it isn’t actually very hard to project empathy (Mabu)...Empathy is what you do, not what you feel."   Really?  How comforting.

 

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Senior Living organizations are eager to try new technology.  Over the years, consider the pilots of Rendever (virtual reality) at Brookdale, Benchmark’s pilot of Google Home and Samsung tablets, or  CarePredict in LifeWell facilities – just a few of the many. Some pilots are even documented in the form of case studies – about what worked – or what might not have worked.  Pilots are typically newsworthy at their start. And they may produce a list of lessons learned upon completion – or a set of considerations for future pilots. So where does Voice First technology fit into the senior living equation?

The newest of technologies – voice first – sparks interest.  Credit Front Porch for being one of the first in voice first – piloting and writing up the results – empowering the participants to both speak requests and control their environment with smart home commands.  But pilots of Voice First technologies are widespread today – see Commonwealth Care Alliance and Orbita.  AARP Foundation, and Libertana Home Health, WebMD. or Answers by Cigna. And new entrants are emerging to tackle Voice First in healthcare – see Suki’s recent raise of $20 million – perhaps hoping to beat Amazon to the behemoth’s own healthcare punch.

Senior living companies have launched Voice First pilots and projects.  Carlsbad by the Sea (including smart home features), The Branches of North Attleboro (including smart home), and Park Creek Independent Living (pilot just launched – including a free device).  There are numerous others – some with press releases like the Park Creek one, or noted in senior living publications, as with Front Porch. Expect more pilots of Google Home, Samsung SmartThings and wearables that can respond to voice command.

Senior living - please report successes and lessons learned.  For senior living organizations, many questions, not so many answers just yet. Who buys the device – the resident or the community on behalf of the resident? How are they managed and deployed – by an IT staffer? Remotely set up or in person?  WiFi upgraded before deployment?  Who receives notifications from smart home technology?  Are concierge services part of the plan – initiated at the front desk?  Or in apartment? Integrated with other senior living technology? And is Voice First now a mandatory feature of resident engagement solutions?  If not now, then by when and with what caveats? What are the biggest concerns, for example, might they be protection of user security and privacy?

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The boom in home care has side effects -- turnover and risk. We want to trust home care workers with aging parents.  After all, most cannot afford private pay assisted living – which can exceed $3000/month in most locations – and assisted living occupancy is projected to be flat -- likely because people see the cost and defer move-in. Given expanding life expectancies at age 65 – an average of 20 more years for men and more for women, the possibility of ‘aging in place’ in a private home may be growing.  As a result, the demand for private home care will grow, but so will the costs – especially for finding workers willing to do this difficult work for low pay. As of 2017, median home care turnover was 66.7% (compared to 30% for CNAs in assisted living).  With so many workers coming and going, especially for care recipients with the most taxing care requirements, what technologies may assist families and agency management for monitoring care?

Cameras.  It is possible that having an in-home security camera can deter issues with home care aides if the aide knows that the camera is there. In New Jersey, a law called "Safe Care Cam", the first in the US, enables family members to borrow a camera for free for 30 days if they suspect abuse.  Home security cameras and security systems (which have cameras) can enable both monitoring and the possibility of a two-way audio conversation with the worker. For those who want to monitor without a caregiver knowing, the camera could be mounted inside an alarm clock or a smoke detector.  

Motion sensors.  These low-cost items can detect movement and alert whoever is monitoring – as well as be part of a larger ‘smart home’ solution.  These technologies can include ‘bed exit’ alerts as well as fall detection – useful in circumstances when the care recipient is left alone at the end of a day or for a period of time.  Fall detection, for example, is increasingly likely to be part of a Personal Emergency Response System (PERS) offering – or medical alert market. Either way, detection of motion (or absence of motion) via well-placed sensors with well-placed sensors can be important in monitoring whether a worker is paying attention to care.

Voice reminders and voice ‘drop-in.’  A growing number of families may be willing to use a Voice First technology – like a smart speaker -- for communicating with in-home seniors or caregivers. This might mean setting up an Amazon Echo (Dot or Show) for in-home use.  In those cases where an Amazon device is at two locations, one person can 'drop in' to check on another.  It is feasible to integrate a calendar of reminders for paid workers, for example, a schedule, to please give a medication at a certain time.  This can be done with the Echo line or the Google Home/Google Assistant environment.

Electronic visit verification (EVV).  2018 is the year of the electronic visit verification, subject to compliance with a CMS mandate by January 2019. EVV answers the key agency supervision question -- did the worker arrive it at the appropriate place and at the right time to provide care? This technology will be commonplace, despite efforts to delay making it mandatory, in situations in which a service is reimbursed by government. Because agencies have a mix of reimbursed and private pay business, plus struggling with high turnover among workers, private pay home care work is likely to be tracked with EVV technology -- whether or not it is subject to the mandate.

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Skip the tech – listen to the experts interviewed – first robots.  The good news – this week’s Health Care Technology supplement transcended the limits of doctors and hospitals – and dabbled in the dilemmas of elder care – included technology to assist those with dementia and mitigate loneliness.   Another in a long line of ‘robots and chatbots look after the elderly,’ with promotions of those oft-promoted Care.coach and ElliQ, adding Catalia Health’s cute Mabu. These are worthy experiments – and not wanting to be left behind, there are always health organizations eager to see what the fuss is about. Says USC researcher, Maja Mataric: "Robots give patients the illusion of having a physical companion…it isn’t actually very hard to project empathy (Mabu)...Empathy is what you do, not what you feel."   Really?  How comforting.

On to dementia – those assists from technology – starting with the smart home.  So the tech like home sensors, smart phone apps, tablets, smart pill boxes – aim in this article to help a person living independently (presumably alone).  There’s a sizable graphic from the University of Montreal that shows the placement of smart sensors in a home to track the movements of a person with dementia.  Possibilities? Says Dr. P. Murali Doraiswamy from Duke: "Tech has the potential to help preserve independence…Ultimately we want nursing homes to disappear. We want people to live peacefully in their own home."   But says Dr. Jeffrey Kaye of ORCATECH, "The reality is the evidence that any of this helps or works is very thin."  Okay.

Keeping in touch – smart phones and tablets.  Research often reinforces the utility of technology already on the market and applied to the topic.  Consider that a British consortium is testing whether a smart phone app that launches several times per day and asks how a person is doing. Dr. Martin Orell, head of the project: "The goal is to examine not just what people are doing, but how they are coping." And in Amsterdam, tech that reminds people about which day it is helps to better orient them in the present and keep in touch with relatives. "We must be cautious about the role of technology," says Dr. Melland in Amsterdam, because "often a caregiver still may be needed to help the patient use it."   Yes, and also to provide care.

The problems, the tech, the pioneering university researchers?  Sadly, nothing has changed -- just the names of the university programs.  As for the categories, the tech in this article may be useful for the alert elderly and/or their in-home caregivers. But nursing homes, locked units in assisted living – they will continue to exist, despite Dr. Doraiswamy’s hope. Why? None of the tech referencing dementia care tackles the disorientation, wandering and self-care decline of actual dementia. Medication dispensing tech has been around forever – and must be managed by someone who knows what the dosages should be.  Meanwhile, there are commercially available offerings (no research university needed) to manage a smart home, monitor and manage meds, issue reminders, and even provide in-home social interaction through a tablet, a smartphone, or even by speaking and playing music.   

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For a Chief Medical Officer, what role does technology play? Recently there was an opportunity to query executives in senior care, including a Chief Medical Officer of a multi-state group of skilled nursing facilities who was asked about the technology impact on long-term care jobs.   The insights quoted here could be generalized, not just to SNFs, but to all types of care delivery – and are particularly notable in the context of last week’s New York Times article: "How Tech Can Turn Doctors into Clerical Workers.” As this CMO notes, it’s not just doctors who can be frustrated by over-emphasis on technology. Here are the questions and few observations about the work and the workers:

How is technology enhancing job performance? "We must talk about the team. The most important people are the front line aides -- CNAs (Certified Nursing Assistants). They are struggling to keep up with the tasks they have to do, which is to build bedside relationships with patients and families. Documentation requirements take them away. We are using wall-mounted kiosks. So teaching others, incentives, making more money with that skill -- those would be steps in the right direction. Checklists are a stone-age phenomenon – helpful in organizing tasks, but they slow the care process down."

 Are there jobs being replaced in five years or simply eliminated due to technology?  "In post-acute care, robots will cause older people to freak out – these need to improve 100,000-fold.  Our aides need smart lifts – their processes are resulting in too much harm.  And the time spent dispensing medication?  That is a mindless activity – the nurse does not know the pill.  Automated med-fillers could spit out the container and an LPN dispenses. That would enable the LPN to spend more time with the patient."

Do you see new kinds of jobs developing as a result of new technologies?  "We need innovative ways to train people.  LPNs and NPs see such complexity among these patients -- their competencies are falling short. We must follow the economic models -- in an academic setting, each opportunity to provide care is an opportunity to teach. Gone are the days where nurses can sit down at PowerPoint sessions -- instead, sessions must be interactive -- or AI-based -- to know who needs more in-depth training versus superficial.  I chair an innovation council in our organization -- we have a 17-year-old kid on our council who has a company training seniors on the use of computers and IT. This is a gap with our older generation of nurses and staff -- where the pushback about new tech comes from. Infection control is an issue with tablets or smartphones.  As for Voice Recognition, the only thing left is to add better security and passwords."

What drives your organization to find and adopt new technologies?    "Physicians have been unable to solve the problem of providing good care, despite ‘big data and population health’ initiatives.  And physician behavior has not changed in the last decade, despite investment in education.  What are the right treatment options?  How can they be more individualized?  How can AI help us figure out which people are at high risk, cutting down unnecessary calls to physicians? We must talk about the team. Mastery, autonomy and purpose -- if you do these things, they are the only things that will prevent burnout.  Every day, passion is sucked out of them -- they are not able to excel at what they do. I want the team to be effective -- we need to keep our eyes open to hear new solutions, ones that we haven't thought about." 

 

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Too much road noise, no self-driving information.  So how safe are self-driving cars for us, those pesky consumers who are also the victims of this tech for tech's sake?  Ask yourself – how would you know? Even the NTSB doesn’t want you to know details of accidents involving Tesla’s Autopilot.  Let’s remember the so-called problem being hustled into the market -- to reduce deaths from auto accidents. They are astonishingly low already, according to a Rand study, at 1 per 100 million miles traveled. According to the Wall Street Journal article, Tesla promised to release safety data on its self-driving tech regularly starting next quarter, though they have not said what sort of data and what could be gleaned from it -- perhaps in advance of another series (see link) of crashes.

Despite media exposure, Facebook is opaque. Facebook suspended 200 apps today that may have collected boatloads of user data.  What apps?  Oh, well, Facebook won’t say.  The inability to leave (or de-activate) Facebook following the so-called scandal has been as much about what others do -- or don’t. But have people really left?  Or have they just read websites telling them how to leave?  Even though half of people in a recent survey said they might leave, it’s still very popular among all age groups.  Not unreasonably, that could be because, as Mark Zuckerberg observes, it has no real competition.  And no, Instagram doesn’t count – since that is also a Facebook business.  Does it matter who deletes?  As the earnings announcement shows – so far, not really.

Digital health tech for providers and consumers, current status is bleak. The hype masks your experience at the doctor’s office, where the waiting room is likely still clipboard-intensive, with multiple pages of profile questions -- after all these years. We may have online access to our tests results – but only those that are from the same system. And the adoption of digital health by providers – 44 % non-adoption in hospitals.  As for consumers, 82% do not use telehealth, explaining why patient depart hospitals with CDs of the medical record.  Could it be because there is no interoperability between health systems used by doctors and multiple hospital systems?  Now consider those older adults with dementia, rushed to an emergency room and note the quantified poorer care they are likely to receive.     

Online banking – the service ledger for consumers is still out of balance.  As banks pick up the pace of branch closures, surprise, people still need to periodically visit a bank. More to the point, they may WANT to visit the bank. Watch workers line up on Friday at a bank to cash their paychecks. And no, they are not doing online banking photo deposits.  For those who note their branches are disappearing, there may be hope.  Millennials like going to banks – so some banks are opening more of them.  Note the trend towards Do-It-Yourself Fraud controls – turning off your credit or debit card from your phone. Will fraudsters buy in to this, uh, trend?   

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April showers, daffodils and other flowers.  Depending on where you went in April you could experience spring multiple times – each time buds and birds emerging. With them, much news about technology, the good, the bad, the ugly, and the smug – not sure that so much time to look at and listen to Mark Zuckerberg’s confession felt like a positive.   It did make one wonder how long Facebook has known which of its “2 billion users” are the 87 million fake profiles – and are those counted in the data used by advertisers?  At any rate, here are the four blog posts from the month of April.

Time to worry much more about data privacy and profiles. The irony, the irony – everyone saw Europe’s data privacy initiatives.  Why has this taken so long here? In a word – lobbying. The congressional hearing droned on. Mark Zuckerberg tried so hard not to sound condescending towards his techno-light questioners about the so-called ‘Facebook Scandal.’ Which could have been the Google scandal, the Twitter scandal, or eve Amazon -- consolidation of industry players and using the data to sell them (or make ads ‘more effective’) or as with Amazon, sell them more stuff. The real scandal? Not the Cambridge Analytica role, which didn’t exactly sneak around in the long-time and paid analysis of Facebook data. The real scandal might be last year's $30 million of lobbying spent to avoid controls (and user protection) actions like those in process in Europe. Learn more.

Moving beyond the pilot -- technology, services, organizations. Search for the word ‘pilot’ on this siteThat is an interesting search – pages and pages of Start Me Up pilots in tech, programs, initiatives large and small, all linked, no doubt to corresponding media spend and press releases.  Think back on the cycles of tech deployment.  Remember the Alpha test, when the product barely worked at all.  After those bugs were uncovered by testers who had scripts designed for successful outcomes, it is time for the Beta test – where selected prospective users are identified, put the offering through its paces, under an assumption that the pilot will be converted to permanent deployment. Learn more.

Technology design for all -- predicted in 2011, in-market in 2018.  A long time ago (7 years this month) in a tech world far, far away, a report sponsored by then-AARP executive Jody Holtzman predicted that technology change would deliver a new user experience. The concept was referred to as "Technology Design for All" -- defined as 'User experiences that appeal to all age groups, persisting across versions and devices.'  According to the report Connected Living for Social Aging, which was published 7 years ago this month, the future was predicted. It is worth a look back -- note that it did happen just as described. Consider smart speakers (the Echo was launched in 2014), IoT boxes, phones, tablets, PCs, Macs and all cloud-based software.   These work without the need to download and upgrade on Patch Tuesday, though privacy improvements are the next big technology hurdle.  From the report, with the chart giving an italicized nod to tech of 2018. Learn more.

Five Technology Offerings for Older Adults. Tech companies and their partners continue to propel forward, with new ideas, innovations, products. Consider that April offered up the winners of the Stanford Design Challenge – a computer-integrated bicycle handle with blind spot warning and fall detection and emergency alert. Stay tuned for more innovation events upcoming, including the new business plans presented at the 2018 Silicon Valley Boomer Venture Summit in June. Learn more.

 

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