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I think most people would agree that Hasbro hit it out of the park with the recent Marvel Legends Sauron build a figure release. Initially, I had no plans to do anything with Sauron other than enjoying it but once I had it in my hand and saw all the detail, I knew I had to do a repaint.

I did a few small custom modifications but this was mostly just another BAF repaint!

Check out the complete repainting tutorial for Sauron here and if you want to see how I take my photos, check out the Studio Photography for Action Figures Tutorial!

Thanks for checking out Action Figure Toronto and my tutorials! Let me know what you think and if you have any questions feel free to ask, I don’t keep secrets!

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Like a lot of people, I love the Sauron build a figure. In my opinion, it’s one of the best BAF’s Hasbro has ever made and the sculpt work is just fantastic. I never really had any plans on doing anything with it but once I had it in my hand and saw all the detail, I knew I had to give it a repaint.

The plan is to simply repaint the figure in a more realistic way. I’m going to do a few small custom modifications but it’s mostly just going to be another BAF repaint!

Check out the completed figure here and please feel free to ask questions if I missed something! For information on what tools I use, take a look at my toolbox article here!

Thanks for reading and let’s get started!

Here is the Sauron BAF! Normally I like to break a figure down and sand joints to help with paint rub, but for this repaint I won’t need to. I’m going to be using the green plastic colour as the main colour so it won’t have to worry about paint rub.

I’m also not going to be priming most of the figure for the same reason. The only part I will be priming is the raw-hide loincloth.

The only thing I do is give the whole figure a good wash with some soapy water to remove any oil or dirt and it’s ready to go.

For the majority of the figure, these are the paints I used.

From left to right:

The dark green is used to add definition in the recessed areas of the scales and also used to create a bit of spot patterning like dinosaurs have.

Next is a custom paint I mixed that matches the green of the plastic. I will be using this to even out the differences in the plastic green as well as mixing it with a bit of white to do highlights.

The white is mixed with the custom green to create the highlight colour. About 50/50 of each colour.

For the yellow areas I already had a paint that matched almost perfectly. So again, I will be using this to even out some of the yellow areas and also add some yellow highlights to the arms and legs.

Finally, I am using a raw umber oil paint for the wash and I will go into that in more detail next!

1: Here is the starting point for the legs. Again, no primer or prepping just a light wash to remove any oils or dirt. These steps are what I will be using to paint all the green scale areas on the figure.

2: First, using my airbrush, I use the dark green to add definition on recessed areas and add spotting on the back of the legs.

I then use the yellow paint and hit the scale areas. I also painted the nails but I end up going over this later by hand with a brush.

3: Next both legs get a heavy wash with the oil paint. The first thing I do is spray both legs with a gloss varnish. This is going to let me protect the base colours and use a thinner on my oil paints.

I’m going to be applying the oil paint as a wash. To thin the oil paints for the wash, I’m using Turpenoid which is an odourless turpentine substitute. I apply the wash in the recesses and creases.

I like using oil paints because the 24 hour drying time gives you tons of time to work, make corrections and clean up the effect. You can basically rub it all off hours after putting it on.

The drying time can be a bit annoying but the results and ease of use are worth the wait.

One thing to keep in mind if you are using artist quality oil paints is they have linseed oil in them which is not good for weathering effects. It can greatly extend the drying times and it can also cause weird drying patterns.

I remove some of the linseed oil by letting the oil paints sit on cardboard for 15-20 minutes before painting. You will start to see a dark spot forming under your paint, that’s linseed oil.

Once it’s dry a give the legs a spray with a satin varnish to seal it in.

4: Now it’s time for highlights with the green/white paint mix. I do all of this work by hand with a brush which can take a bit of time but the end results look great. I also didn’t dry brush anything on this figure. Dry brushing is fast but I don’t really care for the effect you get from it.

The idea is to hit the tops of raised areas. I like to imagine a light pointing down from the top of the figure then I just paint the things that light would hit.

1: Nails are up next. Earlier I painted them yellow but I decided to first paint them brown using a brush.

2: Next I painted “lines” from the base to the tip of the nails using the yellow paint. I wanted the nails to have a rough appearance. Finally, I add a highlight to the tops of each nail.

That’s it for the legs!

1: Now its time for the body. Again, I’m painting this exactly the same way as the legs.

2: Shading and highlighting with my airbrush.

3: Followed by the oil paint wash.

4: Finally I hand paint highlights.

Next up is the raw-hide loincloth.

1: I was looking forward to painting these blue pouches more than anything on the figure. I’m not really sure why they cast these blue but it seems very odd. This is probably the most difficult part of the whole project as well.

2: This is the only part of this project that I primed. I primed it black then followed it up with a dark brown base coat using my airbrush which you can see here.

3: Next I used a slightly lighter brown and hit some of the higher areas to start creating highlights.

4: I did this one more time with an even lighter brown and refined the highlights. Then using the same lighter brown, I paint in some of the more obvious highlights by hand with my paintbrush.

1: Next I apply the dark brown oil wash into the recessed areas.

2: Finally I take the last brown we used on the loincloth, mix it 50/50 with white and hand paint wear and scratches over everything. For this, I just ask myself, if this was worn what would be getting scratched and worn. So I focus mostly on edges.

3: The pouches are separately cast and glued onto the main part of the loincloth so they can be pulled off to making painting easier. The pouches were painted in a similar way to the loincloth. I started with a dark brown and built up highlights with an airbrush, used the dark brown wash, and then highlighted areas by hand.

4: Finally I add some wear and scratches just like with the loincloth.

This was a ton of fun to paint and I just love how it turned out. I honestly feel like just repainting this one part of the figure makes a massive difference.

On to Saurons head!

1: This is the first of two custom modifications I am making on this figure. This one is pretty simple, I want to improve the head movement of the figure so he can more easily look up and down.

To do this I shaved down some of the areas under the head and then extended the neck peg. To extended the peg I first cut the neck peg in half, then drilled a hole in each side, and glued it in place. It’s not a huge length increase but it makes a big difference.

2: Lastly I use some Procreate clay to cover up the rod just for aesthetics.

1: The head is being painted basically the same way as the body just with more attention to detail when it comes to highlights. Here is the basic head.

2: First I even out the yellow areas then do a bit of shading and spotting with the dark green paint using my airbrush. Then I apply the same oil wash.

3: Then I highlight just like before using my brush.

4: Using my brush I touch up the base paint in the mouth, give everything a red wash, then highlight raised areas like the tongue.

The last thing to do is to paint the eye. This is actually pretty simple and the most difficult part is making sure your paint is thinned properly. You want the paint to be thin enough that it takes multiple coats of paint to get your desired colour, but not thin enough that it becomes almost a wash. With a properly thinned paint you just slowly build up the colour starting from the edges of the eye and working toward the middle.

The eye is done in four steps which you can see on the right. The first is the base red eye followed by an orange blend, then a yellow blend. The last step is doing the black eye slit and white reflection dots.

The finished head! Very happy with how this turned out. The sculpt on this head is out of this world and it’s a shame it’s mostly hidden due to the lack of paint.

The arms and wings are up next!

The wings are made out of two different plastics, the normal green plastic for the hands and shoulders but the wings and arms are cast with a translucent yellow plastic that is painted green.  You can see the colour difference pretty easily.

This was the part of this repaint I was the most unsure about. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to keep some of the translucent yellow plastic or repaint the whole wing. I ended up doing a bit of both.

Using my airbrush, I even out the green in the arms, add the shading and highlights like before. Next, I do a bit of work on the webbing of the wings. I ended up doing three things to all the wings. First I add a bit of vertical striping in yellow to give the wings some variation. Then I very lightly add some red to the edges of the webbing. Finally, I very lightly add a white highlight to the very bottom of the wings.

For all of these things subtlety is very important.

Finally, I added the wash and highlights like before. The last thing I do is very lightly paint the veins onto the wings. Again, subtlety is key.

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I can still remember the first time I saw Magneto on the cover of Jim Lee’s X-Men and just being mesmerized by it. That series of comics was my first introduction to the X-Men and my absolute favourite X-Men villain Magneto!

This one has been a long time coming and I’m excited to share my custom made Magneto action figure with you all! Including two sets of hands, three heads, a custom made base, and magnetic helmet floating powers!

Check out the complete making of tutorial for Magneto here and if you want to see how I take my photos check out the Studio Photography for Action Figures Tutorial!

Thanks for checking out Action Figure Toronto and my tutorials! Let me know what you think and if you have any questions feel free to ask, I don’t keep secrets!

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He’s been on my to-do list for a very long time, and I’m excited to finally share my custom action figure tutorial for Magneto with you all!

The plan is to make a Jim Lee style Magneto with a few swap-able heads and a totally custom made base. This is also going to be the first project using my new 3D printer, so I’m very excited about that!

Check out the completed figure here and please feel free to ask questions if I missed something! For information on what tools I use, take a look at my toolbox article here!

Thanks for reading and here we go!

The base figure I am going to be using is the Marvel Legends UK Spider-man from the Sandman build a figure wave. I’m sure this body will eventually be used for Hasbro’s official Magneto but who knows!

For Magneto’s heads I made casts of the Mezco Punisher heads. These heads are some of the best 1/12 scale head sculpts I’ve ever seen and I love them. I always felt that they looked a little old for Punisher and thought they would make great Magneto heads!

The helmeted head is a cast from The Casting Cave. I’m just going to be using this just for outer helmet.

Finally, I’m using the open hands from the Thor Ragnork two pack.

1: Before working on a figure, I like to break them apart so they are easier to work with.

I use a hairdryer to heat up the whole figure until the plastic is soft enough that the arms and legs will just pop out. It normally takes a minute or so and should easily come off. 

Separating the torso is a bit more difficult. I’m going to do something called “cracking” the torso.

To crack a torso you can jam a screwdriver in and lever the two sides apart. You need to be careful doing this as it’s easy to damage the figure. You can actually see I left a little mark on the crotch from bending the plastic too much. Eventually, you will hear a crack and the two parts of the torso will separate.

For some figures, you may need to drill a hole into the seam to get enough leverage to pop the two sides apart.

I like to break down figures for easier sanding and dremeling. You have to sand down joints to prevent the joints from rubbing up against one another. If they rub together the paint will get worn away. This is called “Paint Rub” and its very important to avoid if you want your final figure to be pose-able without damaging the paint job.

I’ve marked all the areas I sand in red. You basically want to make sure no plastic is rubbing on another piece of plastic.

2: Once I sand everything down I reassemble all the parts and get ready to sculpt!

3: The first thing I do is use my dremel to remove a ton of material around the neck and create a little nook that Magneto’s cloak will eventually sit in. I want the cloak, and eventually magneto’s mantle, to sit flat on the final figure. At this scale, the only way to do that is to hide the bulk of the cloak in the figure.

Next, I drill holes and glue magnets to the front and back of the figure that I will use to connect Magneto’s mantle and help hold the cloak in place.

Finally, I sculpt on his belt and collar using Aves Apoxie Sculpt. Aves is a two part air dry clay with about a two hour work period. After about 24 hours it dries hard enough to be sanded or drilled into. I’m going to be using this for most of my sculpting.

4: This is the view from the back. You can really see how much I removed from the base figure. I also added a bit of clay into the area to smooth things out and fill in any holes.

1: Next, I’m going to make the mantel. For this I will use Procreate which is another two part clay I like to use when I need a clay with a bit of flex. Once it dries its going to act more like a soft plastic rather than a hard dried clay.

To form the general mantel shape I cover the figure in cling wrap then rough out the general shape and let it dry. I put down the cling wrap so the clay doesn’t stick to the figure as the mantel will come on and off. This also makes the mantel fit the contours of the body perfectly.

2: Next I used an exacto knife and sand paper to sculpt the final shape.

3: Then I sculpt on the edge detail. I use an exacto knife on the wet clay to cut out the trim and get hard clean lines.

4: Finally, I roll little balls, let them dry, then cut them in half to make the mantel adornments.

I glue on the balls and the second set of magnets and the mantel is finished!

1: Like with the body, I break down the arms, sand them, and finally reconstruct them. I also make sure to remove any mold lines or other imperfections on the base figure.

2:  Using the Aves clay, I cover up the peg holes. Before the clay dries you need to move the joints their full motion to clear out any clay that may dry and restrict the joint moving.

I also sculpt on the bracer details and the arms are finished!

3: Again, I break down the feet and sand to avoid paint rub.

4: Magneto’s final feet after sculpting the boot details!

1:  Next, the hands get a general sanding. I then like to remove the bumps on the wrist pegs to make the hands swap-able.

2: Last I fill in a bit of the hand detail because these are technically gloved hands and I don’t want too much hand anatomy showing.

Here are the heads I’m using, these are all going to be heavily modified.

Two of the Punisher heads are going to be trimmed down to just faces that will pop in and out of the helmet. The helmeted head will be hollowed out to just the helmet. The last Punisher head will be used to make a no helmet head with hair.

Helmet’s up first!

1: I use my dremel to remove the head inside the helmet cast to leave me with a shell to work on.

2: I sculpt on some detail to better match the Jim Lee reference and also fix some problems with the helmet’s structure. The two sides of the helmet peaked at different points and it bugged me!

3: My first 3D print on my Anycubic Photon 3D printer! On the left you can see my digital model and on the right you can see the final 3D print! The print is tiny at 10mm and has zero sanding or primer. It’s really something else from such a cheap 3D printer.

To model the crest I used a program called 3ds Max. This is a very expensive program but I have access to it because I work in the 3D industry. I’ve been using 3ds max for a long time and it’s my go-to for anything 3D.

For people that don’t have access to Max I suggest downloading Blender. It’s an open source 3D software that is totally free. It has limitations with higher end 3D tasks but will work well for simple 3D tasks.

This would have been a huge pain to do with traditional sculpting!

4: The final helmet! I’m very happy with how this turned out! I also glued a magnet into the top of the helmet on the inside that I will talk a bit about later!

1: These are the in helmet heads. I dremel the head down to just the faces then I take a big ball of Aves clay, smoosh the face into the ball of clay and push both into the helmet. Then I can position the face correctly and get a perfect fitting shape to fit into the helmet.

You can see I did the same plastic wrap trick to make sure the clay doesn’t stick inside the helmet.

Getting the head ball joint right can be a bit tricky. I just dremel out the hole in the head, test it, adjust, test and so on until it fits.

2: I do some general clean up with sand paper, fill in any casting mistakes, and fix the cuts on the face as I don’t really want him all beat up like The Punisher.

Originally I was going to put magnets on these heads so they would snap into the helmet, but because the fit is so good they pop in and hold from friction. Here is a video from my Instagram of how the heads work!

3: This is the base head for the no helmet head. I’m not doing anything to it other than adding some messy hair. I wasn’t totally sure where I was going with this but again I wanted to try something similar to how Jim Lee draws Magneto’s hair.

4: I’m going to do a few different layers of hair that will slowly build up and this is the first layer! This is sculpted with Aves.

1: For the next layer I use Procreate to make some loose strands. To make these I roll out long pieces, lightly press them into the general area then position them.

2: I then do a little blending with some more regular clay.

3: Finally I want to do some really wild loose curls like the Jim Lee reference. For these pieces I make a bunch of random strands the same way as before but I let them dry before attaching them to the head.

4: I try different curls until I like the way one looks, then I glue it in place. That’s it for the heads!

Now it’s time for a bit of magic!

I wanted to do a cool helmet levitation effect and this is what I ended up doing. Its just piece of overhead paper cut into a strip with a hole at the bottom that the wrist will plug into. At the very top I glued a magnet that will attach to the magnet in the helmet!

Very simple but it works great! Obviously, you could use any sort of clear plastic for this.

It’s a bit of a pain to take of a picture of but it looks unbelievable in person! Much better than an awkward rod or obvious sculpted detail.

1: Now for the cloak! I wanted to make a pretty big flowing cloak so it’s almost a full circle and 12 inches across. The hole in the center is roughly two inches but I will be pleating this edge.

I’m not exactly sure what type of fabric this is, but its a sort of thin broadcloth I found at the fabric store. This is going to be a two piece cloak but we won’t cut out the second side until we pleat the edge. Pleating the edge will change the shape of the cloak and we want the second piece to match.

I’m very new at sewing so I’m not exactly sure the proper way to make pleats but I’ll tell you what worked for me!

2: To make the pleats I use fabric glue and fold the edge of the cloth over itself and glue. Once all the pleats are done, I’ll get another piece of fabric, trace an outline of the pleated side, and cut it out. That will give me both sides of the cloak, one pleated and one just flat.

3: Next I use a sewing machine and sew the two halves together. I sew together everything except the circle area that goes around the neck. I also am sewing the two sides together inside out so I can flip them and hide the wire and stitching on the inside of the cloak.

I’m trying something a bit different this time and used a stitch that I can weave a piece of wire through to make the cloak poseable.

Finally I use some scissors and trim the excess edges from my cloak.

4: Here is the piece of wire I weaved into the cloak stitch. I make sure a little a little extra wire at both ends as I..

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Thanks to Goat Guns for sending me two of their 1:3 scale replica firearms to take a look at! Goat Guns make incredibly detailed, full metal replica’s of all sorts of different real-life rifles.

I was sent their AR15 and a Bullpup! Let’s take a look!

The guns are packaged very well and come disassembled. Right away I was blown away at how heavy the guns are. As I said, they are made almost completely out of metal and weight almost a pound each.

The Bullpup has some plastic parts which match the gun in real life.

The detail on these are really out of this world and almost everything that would be adjustable on the real rifle is adjustable on the replicas. The triggers work, the bolts work, magazines are removable, the AR15 has an adjustable stock, and they even come with miniature metal rounds.

The clips are even spring loaded so you can load them!

Assembly of the guns is very simple as they mostly snap together with the Bullpup needing a few screws tightened. The gun’s come with clear instructions but they aren’t really needed, it took me maybe 10 minutes to put both of them together.

The full constructed guns are roughly 11” long and come with metal stands for you to display them with. Again, it’s amazing how much detail there is to these and how great they feel in your hand because of the metal construction.

Goat Guns range in price from $34.99-$44.99 per gun and offer free shipping when you spend more than $50. To pick up your own Goat Gun or to check out their entire line, click here!

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I can still remember the first time I saw Magneto on the cover of Jim Lee’s X-Men and just being mesmerized by it. That series of comics was my first introduction to the X-Men and my absolute favourite X-Men villain Magneto!

This one has been a long time coming and I’m excited to share my custom made Magneto action figure with you all! Including two sets of hands, three heads, a custom made base, and magnetic helmet floating powers!

Check out the complete making of tutorial for Magneto here and if you want to see how I take my photos check out the Studio Photography for Action Figures Tutorial!

Thanks for checking out Action Figure Toronto and my tutorials! Let me know what you think and if you have any questions feel free to ask, I don’t keep secrets!

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He’s been on my to-do list for a very long time, and I’m excited to finally share my custom action figure tutorial for Magneto with you all!

The plan is to make a Jim Lee style Magneto with a few swap-able heads and a totally custom made base. This is also going to be the first project using my new 3D printer, so I’m very excited about that!

Check out the completed figure here and please feel free to ask questions if I missed something! For information on what tools I use, take a look at my toolbox article here!

Thanks for reading and here we go!

The base figure I am going to be using is the Marvel Legends UK Spider-man from the Sandman build a figure wave. I’m sure this body will eventually be used for Hasbro’s official Magneto but who knows!

For Magneto’s heads I made casts of the Mezco Punisher heads. These heads are some of the best 1/12 scale head sculpts I’ve ever seen and I love them. I always felt that they looked a little old for Punisher and thought they would make great Magneto heads!

The helmeted head is a cast from The Casting Cave. I’m just going to be using this just for outer helmet.

Finally, I’m using the open hands from the Thor Ragnork two pack.

1: Before working on a figure, I like to break them apart so they are easier to work with.

I use a hairdryer to heat up the whole figure until the plastic is soft enough that the arms and legs will just pop out. It normally takes a minute or so and should easily come off. 

Separating the torso is a bit more difficult. I’m going to do something called “cracking” the torso.

To crack a torso you can jam a screwdriver in and lever the two sides apart. You need to be careful doing this as it’s easy to damage the figure. You can actually see I left a little mark on the crotch from bending the plastic too much. Eventually, you will hear a crack and the two parts of the torso will separate.

For some figures, you may need to drill a hole into the seam to get enough leverage to pop the two sides apart.

I like to break down figures for easier sanding and dremeling. You have to sand down joints to prevent the joints from rubbing up against one another. If they rub together the paint will get worn away. This is called “Paint Rub” and its very important to avoid if you want your final figure to be pose-able without damaging the paint job.

I’ve marked all the areas I sand in red. You basically want to make sure no plastic is rubbing on another piece of plastic.

2: Once I sand everything down I reassemble all the parts and get ready to sculpt!

3: The first thing I do is use my dremel to remove a ton of material around the neck and create a little nook that Magneto’s cloak will eventually sit in. I want the cloak, and eventually magneto’s mantle, to sit flat on the final figure. At this scale, the only way to do that is to hide the bulk of the cloak in the figure.

Next, I drill holes and glue magnets to the front and back of the figure that I will use to connect Magneto’s mantle and help hold the cloak in place.

Finally, I sculpt on his belt and collar using Aves Apoxie Sculpt. Aves is a two part air dry clay with about a two hour work period. After about 24 hours it dries hard enough to be sanded or drilled into. I’m going to be using this for most of my sculpting.

4: This is the view from the back. You can really see how much I removed from the base figure. I also added a bit of clay into the area to smooth things out and fill in any holes.

1: Next, I’m going to make the mantel. For this I will use Procreate which is another two part clay I like to use when I need a clay with a bit of flex. Once it dries its going to act more like a soft plastic rather than a hard dried clay.

To form the general mantel shape I cover the figure in cling wrap then rough out the general shape and let it dry. I put down the cling wrap so the clay doesn’t stick to the figure as the mantel will come on and off. This also makes the mantel fit the contours of the body perfectly.

2: Next I used an exacto knife and sand paper to sculpt the final shape.

3: Then I sculpt on the edge detail. I use an exacto knife on the wet clay to cut out the trim and get hard clean lines.

4: Finally, I roll little balls, let them dry, then cut them in half to make the mantel adornments.

I glue on the balls and the second set of magnets and the mantel is finished!

1: Like with the body, I break down the arms, sand them, and finally reconstruct them. I also make sure to remove any mold lines or other imperfections on the base figure.

2:  Using the Aves clay, I cover up the peg holes. Before the clay dries you need to move the joints their full motion to clear out any clay that may dry and restrict the joint moving.

I also sculpt on the bracer details and the arms are finished!

3: Again, I break down the feet and sand to avoid paint rub.

4: Magneto’s final feet after sculpting the boot details!

1:  Next, the hands get a general sanding. I then like to remove the bumps on the wrist pegs to make the hands swap-able.

2: Last I fill in a bit of the hand detail because these are technically gloved hands and I don’t want too much hand anatomy showing.

Here are the heads I’m using, these are all going to be heavily modified.

Two of the Punisher heads are going to be trimmed down to just faces that will pop in and out of the helmet. The helmeted head will be hollowed out to just the helmet. The last Punisher head will be used to make a no helmet head with hair.

Helmet’s up first!

1: I use my dremel to remove the head inside the helmet cast to leave me with a shell to work on.

2: I sculpt on some detail to better match the Jim Lee reference and also fix some problems with the helmet’s structure. The two sides of the helmet peaked at different points and it bugged me!

3: My first 3D print on my Anycubic Photon 3D printer! On the left you can see my digital model and on the right you can see the final 3D print! The print is tiny at 10mm and has zero sanding or primer. It’s really something else from such a cheap 3D printer.

To model the crest I used a program called 3ds Max. This is a very expensive program but I have access to it because I work in the 3D industry. I’ve been using 3ds max for a long time and it’s my go-to for anything 3D.

For people that don’t have access to Max I suggest downloading Blender. It’s an open source 3D software that is totally free. It has limitations with higher end 3D tasks but will work well for simple 3D tasks.

This would have been a huge pain to do with traditional sculpting!

4: The final helmet! I’m very happy with how this turned out! I also glued a magnet into the top of the helmet on the inside that I will talk a bit about later!

1: These are the in helmet heads. I dremel the head down to just the faces then I take a big ball of Aves clay, smoosh the face into the ball of clay and push both into the helmet. Then I can position the face correctly and get a perfect fitting shape to fit into the helmet.

You can see I did the same plastic wrap trick to make sure the clay doesn’t stick inside the helmet.

Getting the head ball joint right can be a bit tricky. I just dremel out the hole in the head, test it, adjust, test and so on until it fits.

2: I do some general clean up with sand paper, fill in any casting mistakes, and fix the cuts on the face as I don’t really want him all beat up like The Punisher.

Originally I was going to put magnets on these heads so they would snap into the helmet, but because the fit is so good they pop in and hold from friction. Here is a video from my Instagram of how the heads work!

3: This is the base head for the no helmet head. I’m not doing anything to it other than adding some messy hair. I wasn’t totally sure where I was going with this but again I wanted to try something similar to how Jim Lee draws Magneto’s hair.

4: I’m going to do a few different layers of hair that will slowly build up and this is the first layer! This is sculpted with Aves.


1: For the next layer I use Procreate to make some loose strands. To make these I roll out long pieces, lightly press them into the general area then position them.

2: I then do a little blending with some more regular clay.

3: Finally I want to do some really wild loose curls like the Jim Lee reference. For these pieces I make a bunch of random strands the same way as before but I let them dry before attaching them to the head.

4: I try different curls until I like the way one looks, then I glue it in place. That’s it for the heads!

Now it’s time for a bit of magic!

I wanted to do a cool helmet levitation effect and this is what I ended up doing. Its just piece of overhead paper cut into a strip with a hole at the bottom that the wrist will plug into. At the very top I glued a magnet that will attach to the magnet in the helmet!

Very simple but it works great! Obviously, you could use any sort of clear plastic for this.


It’s a bit of a pain to take of a picture of but it looks unbelievable in person! Much better than an awkward rod or obvious sculpted detail.

1: Now for the cloak! I wanted to make a pretty big flowing cloak so it’s almost a full circle and 12 inches across. The hole in the center is roughly two inches but I will be pleating this edge.

I’m not exactly sure what type of fabric this is, but its a sort of thin broadcloth I found at the fabric store. This is going to be a two piece cloak but we won’t cut out the second side until we pleat the edge. Pleating the edge will change the shape of the cloak and we want the second piece to match.

I’m very new at sewing so I’m not exactly sure the proper way to make pleats but I’ll tell you what worked for me!

2: To make the pleats I use fabric glue and fold the edge of the cloth over itself and glue. Once all the pleats are done, I’ll get another piece of fabric, trace an outline of the pleated side, and cut it out. That will give me both sides of the cloak, one pleated and one just flat.

3: Next I use a sewing machine and sew the two halves together. I sew together everything except the circle area that goes around the neck. I also am sewing the two sides together inside out so I can flip them and hide the wire and stitching on the inside of the cloak.

I’m trying something a bit different this time and used a stitch that I can weave a piece of wire through to make the cloak poseable.

Finally I use some scissors and trim the excess edges from my cloak.

4: Here is the piece of wire I weaved into the cloak stitch. I make sure a little a little extra wire at both ends as I will use these to attach the cloak to the figure. This ended up being a bit of a pain to do but it actually works very well.

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My custom Captain Morgan action figure that I made for a Captain Morgan Rum advertising campaign! Fully poseable with all the rum, swords and equipment a pirate would need! I even made a little case for him!

I also had the pleasure of working with fellow Torontonians CJESIM Custom Action Figure Clothing.  They are the ones responsible for making all of the Captains amazing clothing!

Check out the complete making of tutorial for Captain Morgan here and if you want to see how I take my photos check out the Studio Photography for Action Figures Tutorial!

Thanks for checking out Action Figure Toronto and my tutorials! Let me know what you think and if you have any questions feel free to ask, I don’t keep secrets!

The post Captain Morgan Action Figure appeared first on Action Figure Toronto: Action Figure Customs, Tutorials and More!.

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Last year, I was asked by Captain Morgan Rum to make them a custom action figure based on their brand character.  The plan was to make a very poseable figure that they could photography in fun situations for different advertisements.

One of the big things that attracted me to this project was iv never done a historical reality based figure.  My figures tend to be based on comics so I was looking forward to something a bit different.

Check out the final figure here and thanks for checking out Action Figure Toronto!

So come on board and bring along, all your paint and clay!

Captain Morgan has had a lot of different versions throughout the years. For this figure, I’m using the most up to date version of the Captain which you can see above.

The goal is to get as close to this as I can while taking scale and poseable into consideration.  More specifically I knew the figure had to be able to do the iconic barrel pose perfectly.  This is the first time I ever made an action figure with one specific pose in mind but its obviously very important in this case.

With those things I mind I knew the jacket had to be cloth.  I could have sculpted a jacket but the tail portions under the belt would have limited the amount the leg could move up.  The barrel pose would have been impossible using anything other than cloth.  I’m also going to be using cloth for the pants, cloak, and collar.

Everything else will be traditional plastic components and customs sculpts.

I used the Marvel Legends Hulkbuster wave Blizzard as the base figure.  Really im just using that for the structure and size because everything will be covered up by our cloth components.

The boots are from Marvel Legends Arnim Zola Series Heroic Age Captain America.

The head is a cast of the Magus head from the Marvel Legends Mantis Wave Adam Warlock figure.

The hands are my favourite Odin Wave Marvel Legends Iron Fist hands.  I ended up switching one of the sets of hands to the spell casting hands from the Marvel Legends Dormammu Dr Strange.  I also used the open holding hands from this figure.

The black sword is a cast I got from the Casting Cave and the silver sword is from an Assassins Creed pirate action figure.

The new Captain Morgan no long has the pistol on his belt but I ended up adding this anyways.  The Assassins Creed pirate had one with him already and its a really great prop for an action figure.

1:  Like I said before I’m using the Magus head from the new Marvel Legends Adam Warlock.  The smile and facial expression on this head is almost perfect but it needs to be less sinister and more cocky/playful to match our Captain Morgan reference.  To do this I sanded down some of the features on the brow to soften them up.  I specifically focused on the area in the corners of the eyes to make the brow not so angular.

2:  Here you can see our new soften brow and our sculpted facial hair! I used Miliput Yellow/Grey for this part of the sculpting.  Miliput is a two part air dry clay with about a two hour work period. After about 24 hours it dries hard enough to be sanded or drilled into.

You can check out my tools article for more information on the sculpting tools I use.

Lastly I dremel off the top of the hair and keep the hair that will be sticking out from under his hat.

3:  Then I sculpt the dew rag he has sticking out.  The hat wont be removable so we don’t have to worry about the top of the head.

4:  Here is the side view and we are reading to start sculpting the hat.

1:  For clay I’m mixing Milliput with Procreate clay.   Procreate is another two part clay I like to use when I need a clay with a bit of flex.  Mixing the two does something cool.  Its going to make the clay more rubbery while its not dry and let it support its own weight better.  Once it dries its going to act more like a soft plastic rather than a hard dried clay.

First I roll out my clay, cut it into a circle then put a piece of plastic wrap on either side of the clay.  This is going to make it easier to form the shape of the hat without it sticking to anything.  This is a great way to manipulate the clay and it also creates some interesting natural folds.

2:  Here’s our shaped hat!  Now we just wait for it to dry.

3:  Once its dry you peel off the plastic wrap and bam hat!  I’m going to do a bit of sanding and filling on this to tone it back a bit but its close.

4:  Last did some heavy sanding and I dremeled out the center of the hat so it sits properly on the head.  Time to attach this bad boy to our pirate.

1:  Next I glued the hat onto the head.  I actually did two rounds of gluing just to make sure it was on there well.  Next up is the hair.

2:  I’m going to sculpt the hair with Procreate.  Like I said before, Procreate dries with a bit of flexibility so it helps the hair sculpts not break as easily.  To sculpt the hair I roll out a thin tube the length I want the hair to be then press it into the head one piece at a time.

Normally, I then run one of my sculpting tools up the center of the tube so it gives the hair a bit of definition.  Then I just shape it to whatever shape I would like it to be.

I sculpt the hair in layers so you can build up the volume.  This image has the first two layers that make up the top and bottom for the general shape of the hair.

3:   Adding another layer to the bottom of the hair and the mid section.

4:  I then add the final bits of hair sticking out of the hat and I add a dew rag detail as well.  I made this using one of the Marvel Legend Iron fist belts then made them a bit tattered at the ends with my exacto knife.

1:  Here’s the front view of the head!  You can see how I tried my best to blend the different layers of hair.

Next I sculpted the fringe on the hat.  I tried to match the fringe on the arm sections of the jacket.  You can also see that I filled in some of the more extreme folds on the hat to smooth it out a bit.

2:  Same thing on the back then I sculpt the middle bump in the center of the hat.

Heads all done for now!

1:  Here are the boots!  Not a ton needs to be done to these but I do have to sand down joints to prevent the joints from rubbing up against one another.  If they rub together the paint will get worn away. This is called “Paint Rub” and its very important to avoid if you want your final figure to be pose-able without damaging the paint job.

I normally use a 200 grit sandpaper followed by a 400 then maybe 800 depending on how smooth I need the area to be.  You can get away with a bit of a rough surface as priming before painting will cover it up.

On these boots I sand down the two sides on the joints marked in red.  I also give them a general sanding to remove mold lines left from the factory casting.

2:  Here are the sanded boots.  The only other thing I did to these was dremel out a channel around the edge of the boots so that the cloth pants will sit in them.  This is the best way to blend the cloth with the plastic boots and make the pants look tucked into the boots.

Hands next!

1:  Like I mentioned before, this is one of the open holding hands from the Marvel Legends Dormammu Dr Strange figure.  This hand holds the sword and also the rum bottles I’m going to be making later.

Now one thing about these open hands is the joint moves left and right rather than up and down.  It makes more sense for posing if the joint moves up and down.  It would let him point the sword better and position the bottle straight towards the camera.

So what I’m going to do is cut off the joint and reattach it so it moves up and down.

2:  Here is the first cut.  Its not important if you end up cutting into the joint a little.

Next I drilled holes at the points marked in red to insert pins to strengthen the join.  These hands will be articulated a lot so every little bit of added strength helps. To make the pin holes I use my pin vise to drill then I glue in a piece of paperclip one side at a time.

3:  Then I glue the two sides together.  Make sure to keep moving the wrist joint up and down for severally minutes or the glue will glue the joint in place.

Now we just have to take care of the overhang.

4:  To do that I just dremel down the excess and try to blend it into the lower hand the best I can.  Now we are going to finish the blending the two sides of the hand with some sculpting.

Here is the final hand after I filled in the gaps and sculpted the blend.  Finally I sand everything down and its time to prep the other hands.

Nothing to crazy is going to happen with these hands.  First I do a general sanding to remove mold lines and other imperfections from the factory.  Next I shorten the pegs and remove some material from the shafts to make it easier to swap out the hands.

This is the most hands iv ever done for a single figure but its going to give the guys at Captain Morgan plenty of options!

Rum bottles up next!

1:  Originally I was planning to order some miniature doll house bottles but I couldn’t find anything that would work.  I knew how important getting the bottles close was so I ended up making my own!

First I sculpt the general shape of the bottle around a tooth pick and refine it with sand paper.  I sculpted it on a tooth pick to give me something to hold while sculpting but it also helps to support the clay while its soft.

2:  Once the main body is dry, I sculpt the cap and prepare to make a cast!

To make the mold of the bottle I used Smooth On Mold Star 16 fast.  Normally I use Smooth On’s No Vacuum mold but I had some of this left over from casting my barrel (Which I’ll talk about later on) and figured I would give it a try.  It worked ok but I did have some bubbles in the mold.

This is the first time I every tried to do clear casts.  I was worried that I wouldn’t be able to do clear casts without a pressure pot to pull out bubbles from inside the cast.  I did a bit of googling for no vacuum clear resins and ended up with Castin’ Crafts Clear Casting Resin.

Its also very easy to get, I got mine from a local art supply store but its pretty expensive stuff.  This bottle was almost $40 but fortunately I will get a lot of uses out of it.  One thing to note about this stuff is it has a terrible terrible chemical smell.  I opened it up in my apartment not realizing how bad it smells and it took days for the smell to go away.

The other thing I dont like about this stuff is its not 100% clear how much of the catalyst you need to mix in.  I had casts that stayed flexible when too little catalyst went in and casts that were brittle because too much went in.  I ended up having success with 3 drops for 10g of resin which would make me two bottles.

Time to cast!

Tada!  I was very happy with how clear these turned out.  I never had issues with bubbles inside the resin.  Getting the colour right was the next hurdle and I wanted to get it perfect.

For colour I used Smooth On’s SO-Strong Tints which took me a bit of fine tuning to figure out the mix that worked.  You can see the progression here and in the end, it ended up being a mix of yellow, red and brown.

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A groundbreaking project that is set to be released this month, The World of Springfield Encyclopedia is the best encyclopedia that will refer to any and all information pertaining to the Simpsons show, an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening and produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company.

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The post The World of Springfield Encyclopedia is the Greatest Database of Simpsons Information appeared first on Action Figure Toronto: Action Figure Customs, Tutorials and More!.

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