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So you’ve been asked to create your first cocktail menu. Congratulations!  Tons of bartenders spend years trying to get this privilege, so it’s definitely something to celebrate. That said, it can also be a challenging project so it’s definitely not something to take lightly.

Here are some tips for your first cocktail menu to help prevent you from being overwhelmed and hopefully make your first menu a success!

By the way, this post was updated and inspired by a post in our Facebook Group. If you’re not already a member, check it out!

By the way, I talked about this several years ago on our YouTube channel – some timeless good advice here!

Tips for Running Your First Cocktail Menu - YouTube

Now on to the tips!

Pump the Brakes

Don’t feel like you have to make dramatic changes right out of the gate. Especially if you are new to the bar, take time to get to know the bartenders, the customers, the processes that are in place, and the environment that you are working in.

I’ve seen a lot of new managers/lead bartenders/consultants walk into a new place and begin changing everything without really understanding what is already working. The whole bar gets turned upside down and then the bar manager/lead bartender/ consultant leaves and the place is in worse shape then before.

Keep in mind what’s already working and don’t throw it all away. Build upon it!

Vary your Glassware

Don’t put everything in a coupe or a flute, look to spread the glassware as much as possible. Not only does this help keep things more visually interesting, but it helps reduce the risk of running out. The last thing you want to do is run out of a particular glass during the busy times because everything is served in a coupe!

House-Made is Not Always Better

Don’t paint yourself into a corner with house made products. There is definitely a time and a place to make your own ingredients, but if you can find a good product on the market that you can use, try that first.

It’s very tempting to make all of your own ingredients, but that’s a great way to find yourself spending all of your time doing exactly that: making ingredients for your beverage program. Don’t forget to include the time-cost of all of the hours of labor creating ingredients. You may save money on product but pay twice as much once you account for your time.

Think of the Margins

I love Green Chartreuse. That should come as a surprise to no-one. But I rarely used it on my cocktail menu because it was an absolute margin killer. If you start your menu development with no regard for cost, you’re just setting yourself up for disappointment later when you get around to running the numbers. (Or worse: when your manager / owner takes back the menu because yours wasn’t profitable!)

Consider product cost from the very beginning and you’ll save yourself the heartache.

Standardize your Pours and Recipes

This sounds silly and obvious, but you would not believe how many bars and restaurants don’t have this simple process down. The difference of a 1.5 oz pour and 2 oz pour may sound trivial, but this can really effect your profitability and your bonus (if it is tied to your cost of goods). The same applies to cocktail recipes and wine pours: make sure everyone knows what they should be pouring!

Systems are your Friend

If you find yourself doing the same process over and over again, whatever the process is, it’s time to think of creating a system for it. Inventory, ordering, ingredient production, etc are all great candidates to begin documenting how you do things so that way each time is repeatable.

The benefit to doing this is once you document the process, you can train other people how to do those tasks and begin to offer them the opportunity to advance their career (and yours)!

Congratulations again – creating the cocktail menu is one of my favorite parts of the job!  Hopefully these tips help you wrap your head around the project and make something that’s both delicious and great for your bar’s bottom line!

Tips for Running Your First Cocktail Menu is a post from: A Bar Above Mixology

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So you’ve been asked to create your first cocktail menu. Congratulations!  Tons of bartenders spend years trying to get this privilege, so it’s definitely something to celebrate. That said, it can also be a challenging project so it’s definitely not something to take lightly.

Here are some tips for your first cocktail menu to help prevent you from being overwhelmed and hopefully make your first menu a success!

By the way, this post was inspired by a post in our Facebook Group. If you’re not already a member, check it out!

Pump the Brakes

Don’t feel like you have to make dramatic changes right out of the gate. Especially if you are new to the bar, take time to get to know the bartenders, the customers, the processes that are in place, and the environment that you are working in.

I’ve seen a lot of new managers/lead bartenders/consultants walk into a new place and begin changing everything without really understanding what is already working. The whole bar gets turned upside down and then the bar manager/lead bartender/ consultant leaves and the place is in worse shape then before.

Keep in mind what’s already working and don’t throw it all away. Build upon it!

Vary your Glassware

Don’t put everything in a coupe or a flute, look to spread the glassware as much as possible. Not only does this help keep things more visually interesting, but it helps reduce the risk of running out. The last thing you want to do is run out of a particular glass during the busy times because everything is served in a coupe!

House-Made is Not Always Better

Don’t paint yourself into a corner with house made products. There is definitely a time and a place to make your own ingredients, but if you can find a good product on the market that you can use, try that first.

It’s very tempting to make all of your own ingredients, but that’s a great way to find yourself spending all of your time doing exactly that: making ingredients for your beverage program. Don’t forget to include the time-cost of all of the hours of labor creating ingredients. You may save money on product but pay twice as much once you account for your time.

Think of the Margins

I love Green Chartreuse. That should come as a surprise to no-one. But I rarely used it on my cocktail menu because it was an absolute margin killer. If you start your menu development with no regard for cost, you’re just setting yourself up for disappointment later when you get around to running the numbers. (Or worse: when your manager / owner takes back the menu because yours wasn’t profitable!)

Consider product cost from the very beginning and you’ll save yourself the heartache.

Standardize your Pours and Recipes

This sounds silly and obvious, but you would not believe how many bars and restaurants don’t have this simple process down. The difference of a 1.5 oz pour and 2 oz pour may sound trivial, but this can really effect your profitability and your bonus (if it is tied to your cost of goods). The same applies to cocktail recipes and wine pours: make sure everyone knows what they should be pouring!

Systems are your Friend

If you find yourself doing the same process over and over again, whatever the process is, it’s time to think of creating a system for it. Inventory, ordering, ingredient production, etc are all great candidates to begin documenting how you do things so that way each time is repeatable.

The benefit to doing this is once you document the process, you can train other people how to do those tasks and begin to offer them the opportunity to advance their career (and yours)!

Congratulations again – creating the cocktail menu is one of my favorite parts of the job!  Hopefully these tips help you wrap your head around the project and make something that’s both delicious and great for your bar’s bottom line!

Building your First Cocktail Menu: Where to Start! is a post from: A Bar Above Mixology

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A Bar Above by Julia Tunstall - 2w ago

Quite Possibly the World’s Most Perfect Sour*

*In my opinion

The margarita is one of the world’s most beloved cocktails – and for good reason. The balance of sweet, tart and spirit is the perfect refreshment year round, whether it’s a hot summer day or a brisk winter evening. After all – what good is Taco Tuesday without a good margarita to wash it all down with?

Origin Story

The origins of this cocktail are probably one of the most contested in the cocktail world. Last I counted there are no less than 9 different references to the creation of this cocktail. The most common explanation suggests that this cocktail was created as a result of prohibition and thirsty Americans quenching their thirst south of the border – and its recipe was an early adaptation from the brandy daisy.

There are as many if not more variations on how to make a margarita as there are origin stories. The classic version, the “Tommy’s” version, a hybrid, Jose Cuervo bucket or margarita mixer, and every fruit”color under the rainbow.

Here is one of my favorite ways to make a margarita, but as always – drink what you like!

Make a Margarita:
Classic Cocktails - How to Make a Margarita - YouTube


Margarita is a post from: A Bar Above Mixology

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The Mixology Talk Podcast, Episode #149

Time to raise prices? Don’t chicken out! Here are some tips for increasing your menu prices in a way that’s good for the bottom line and doesn’t scare away your customers. (I promise!)

Click here to Subscribe on your Smartphone and never miss an Episode!
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  • Click on the “Search” icon and search for “Mixology Talk Podcast
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Watch Now:

Raising your Prices: When and How (without Losing all your Regulars)- Mixology Talk Podcast - YouTube

In today’s Episode, we’re talking about Raising Prices

Maybe you need to raise prices because your rent went up. Or maybe your town passed a law increasing minimum wage. Or maybe you just haven’t done it in years. Either way, at some point you’re going to have to think about increasing the prices at your bar.

Today we’re talking about how to navigate that process (hopefully) without p!ssing everyone off. 

Do you need to raise prices?

In some cases it’s pretty cut-and-dry: a new manager comes in and says you need to raise prices. But other times it may be less obvious. For example, if you’re not tracking your margins and COGS then you may not realize that your suppliers tiny little price increases have whittled away at your profits over the years.

Start with your numbers and see if it’s something you need to do.

How to raise your prices:

OK, now you’ve established that you need to do it. But how?

  1. Look for easy wins. Don’t just increase the price for everything on your menu by X%. You may be able to adjust a small number of prices and make all the difference.
  2. Survey the Competition: What’s everyone else in your neighborhood charging?
  3. Don’t just look at the booze: You might be grossly undercharging for sodas or coffees – don’t forget to look at these non- alcoholic items too!
Avoid an Angry Mob

Now that you’ve planned to increase your prices, how do you roll them out without losing all of your regulars? (Especially the ones who always order the same drink!)  A few suggestions:

  • Warn people 30 days prior, but let them know you’ll honor the existing price until then. This reduces the shock when the “real” price increase happens.
  • And the nuclear option: If there’s a regular you just can’t lose, consider giving them a “lifetime price”. This is hugely risky but something we’ve seen done before.
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Any tips for easing the transition to higher prices? How have you done it at your bar?  Let us know in the comments!

Raising your Prices: When and How (without Losing all your Regulars) is a post from: A Bar Above Mixology

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“Did someone burn their hair at the bar last night?” my manager once asked me.

“Oh yeah,” I replied. “Yes she did.”

I was young, inexperienced, overconfident and certainly believed that my feces smelled like Hypnotiq. I was working a small bar with a service window. I had a candle on the ledge. A long-haired woman leaned in to order and singed a bit of her hair.

She wanted a free drink for her loss. Somehow the buzz-cut kid behind the bar didn’t take her seriously. The next day she called my manager to complain. 

This is not how my manager should have heard about this.

From You First

Managers and owners hate to be unprepared. If a guest is complaining about something, they don’t want to know nothing about it. If they didn’t see it themselves, they at least want the story from their staff.

If you have a problem, or even think you might, it’s best your boss hears it from you first.

That’s one reason you need to keep a bar log. Protect yourself and keep your manager from getting blindsided.

You might have an official book with a year on the front and a page for each day. You might just have a spiral notebook. Whatever.  It’s important for you to make a daily log of events, incidents and even the lack of important action.

For example:

Not long ago a young woman came into my bar drunk. She was with a couple friends and more were joining them. They’d been getting loose at home and she was already too loose. I told her I couldn’t serve her, but got a couple drinks for her friends.

They were sitting around the corner at a table I couldn’t see from the bar. The next time I looked over, one of the drinks was empty in front of the drunk girl. I told the table they couldn’t give her a drink. If anyone else wanted a drink, they could get one from me at the bar.

Their party grew to eight or ten, but I only wanted to serve them at the bar where I could see them. If they didn’t want to come to the bar, never mind. They’d broken my trust.

A half dozen of them left without ordering a thing.

I made absolutely sure to document this in the log. I clearly imagined one of them calling the next day to say I’d ignored a whole party of people and they left upset.

I empowered my manager to say: “Yes, the bartender told me about it. Did any of you give your drink to a woman who was cut off?”

Not Just for Your Manager

A bar log is also a very important tool for staff-to-staff communication. I absolutely read it to see what happened before my shift and on my days off.

Not long ago I read that a regular, who sometimes has too much, fell down in the parking lot, hit her head and had to be driven home by the manager. Suddenly I was even more concerned for this guest and more worried about our liability.

Yet, with this information I was better prepared next time I saw this guest. Plus, next time I saw that bartender in passing, I made sure to ask: “What should we do about her?”

Next time I did see that guest, she was with two friends I knew cared about her. They insisted the were only having one drink. When she asked for another, I reminded her what her friends had said. All was well, but I might not have served her alone.

And yes, I certainly logged the non-incident.

The Log and the Law

In addition to aiding communication with your comrades, a bar log can cover your heinie. If you ever have a situation that involves the police (or you think might), be sure to get your version of the facts in writing. You don’t want the only side of the story coming from a drunk who wrecked their car, hurt some people and insists you over-served them.

To get clarification on the issue, I reached out to my local authority: the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Control Board. Keep in mind, the laws of your state may vary, but what’s a good idea here is a good idea everywhere.

I spoke to Lieutenant Matt Murphy on the phone. I was surprised to learn Washington has no official policy on keeping a log, but he absolutely supports it.

“I legitimizes your operation,” he said. When he is researching an over-service incident, he works backwards. He does his best to recreate the chain of events inevitably involving one or more bars. When bars have an accurate log it makes his job much easier.

He suggests being like a reporter and sticking to the facts. Include physical description, name (if you know it), receipts, approximate time and as much other detail you can. Be specific, especially with signs of intoxication: Don’t say: “He looked drunk.” Rather: “He was wobbly. His speech was slurred. He smelled of alcohol.”

If someone comes in drunk and you serve them nothing, don’t consider this a non-incident. What if they were at a couple other bars, got cut off, came to your place then drove away and crashed? You’ll be very glad to have documented the fact that you poured them not one drop.

Best Practices

To sum things up, I make the following suggestions:

1- Get a book (like this, or even just one of these) and write in it every shift. If nothing exciting happened, note that. I love to be able to say: “Steady night with no problems.” Your managers and teammates will know everyone is diligently using the book.

2- Reach out to your Liquor Board. Ask them what they suggest and require. Don’t dread them. Have a relationship with them. Then if anything does happen, they know you and trust you.

3- Document anything that might come back to bite you. Make sure your version of the facts is in the book while it’s fresh in your mind. Defuse any potential accusations against you.

4- Realize this book is permanent. Don’t joke or gossip. Don’t criticize the work of your teammates here. But it is a good place to leave a post-it note where the next shift will read it.

5- Be very careful with your language. You should never be making sexist, racist or otherwise discriminatory statements. Certainly never log them.

The bar log is your friend. It’s not a chore. It’s a tool to keep you out of trouble. Use it to be sure that your version of the truth is documented and never forgotten.

The Bar Log: What it is and Why you Need One at Your Bar is a post from: A Bar Above Mixology

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A Bar Above by Chris Tunstall - 1M ago

The Martini is one of the most iconic cocktails and is a symbol of sophistication and class. It has been celebrated in films from the Thin Man series from the 30’s and 40’s all the way to present day Bond Films and many more. In fact, there is a glass called the ‘Nick and Nora’ (that Martini’s are often served in) that got its name from the 2 main characters in the Thin Man.

No matter how it’s mixed, the Martini has made a lasting impression on how we drink as a culture. As a result of its ubiquity, everyone seems to have their own particular preferences on how to make their perfect Martini.

Common Martini variations include:
  • Vodka, Gin, or some mix thereof for the base spirit
  • Dry Vermouth (and how much, or none at all
  • Orange bitters or none,
  • Shaken or stirred (Thanks, James Bond…)
  • And a large number of different garnishes, most commonly olive or lemon peel.

While I may have strong feelings on what makes a “correct” Martini, I’ll always fall back on my mantra: Drink what you like!

A (Far too) Brief History of the Martini

The History of this drink, like many others, is not quite clear. Some say that it originated as the cocktail known as the Martinez, (which is Gin, Sweet vermouth, bitters and Maraschino liqueur) during the mid 1800’s in the town of Martinez. Another story says that it was created by the famous bartender Jerry Thomas at the Occidental Hotel in San Francisco, for a gold miner on his way to Martinez.

Either way, there’s no consensus on who originated it or the “correct” recipe. So I’m going to show you my recommendation for the best “classic” Martini recipe, and you are welcome to tweak it to your tastes!

How to Make a Classic Martini
Classic Cocktails - How to make a Gin Martini - YouTube

Martini is a post from: A Bar Above Mixology

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Over the last 5 years, I have had the privilege of working with over 100 different owners and operators to improve their businesses in one capacity or another. Over that time I have had the opportunity to learn some best practices from many operators and have also seen some common issues along the way.

Here are some of the key takeaways from my experience, which I hope you’ll be able to leverage in your own business.

Master the Basics Build regulars, increase revenue and profits, reduce inventory loss and decrease customer complaints

Mastering the basics is a lot less exciting and sexy than implementing the latest mixology technique or trying to get more people in the door with the latest app. But chasing the latest ‘new thing’ is often done at the expense of mastering the basics of running a successful bar/restaurant program. The truth is, this area alone will make the biggest difference for long term customer retention and profitability.

The Basics:
  • Steps of service
  • Wine/beer knowledge
  • Hiring/training programs
  • POS information maintenance and reporting
  • Inventory management
  • Recipe consistency

Often times operators believe that they have a solid handle on all of these areas, but once we take a critical look at each, areas for improvement always appear. Simply asking each bartender, “What is the house pour for spirits and wine?” is often very revealing – answers are usually all over the place!

An easy way to make sure the basics are mastered is to focus on one concept every 2 weeks / months and train the staff until you are happy, then move on to the next area of focus. You can even map out the training topics to correspond to with your business cycles. For example in the time leading up to your busiest season, focus on suggestive selling and increasing check averages. Then during the busy season you can focus on techniques to help build regulars, etc.

Fully Utilize Your POS System Increase revenue and profits, reduce inventory loss, improve inventory and cash flow management

Your POS system is the heart of your data gathering abilities for any bar or restaurant and I’m always surprised to see how few operators have optimized their POS – not only for service but also to collect vital operational data.

Streamlining for Service: On the service side, the less time your staff spends on the POS entering orders, the more time they have on the floor to sell more product or build regulars. So when your staff expresses frustration about how many buttons they have to push to enter a hamburger order or that items in your inventory are not in the POS, make sure you address these issues. This is an easy win!

Collecting Vital Business Data: It’s also important to get the structure of your POS information correct so when you run reports to make improvements to your business, that you have usable data that you can act on. This means:

  • All products are entered into the POS with appropriate pricing
  • Each product is in the correct revenue center
  • The staff is trained on recipe consistency
  • There are no ambiguous items that show up in your reporting (for example, “martini” vs “Tito’s martini”)

Also look at your modifiers to make sure they are clear as well. If you have an “up” button that charges $2 for a martini or spirit forward drink, it will not be clear specifically which product is being depleted from your inventory.

Don’t be afraid to reach out to your POS company or check their website! Often POS companies will have great tutorials on their own website or on YouTube that will help you set up the system correctly. Failing that, don’t hesitate to reach out and ask questions.

Support & Training for the Management Team Decrease in overall employee turnover, increase revenue and profits, decrease inventory loss, improve inventory and cash flow management, and improve basically every part of your business!

Let’s face it, the managers of a bar or restaurant have a lot of responsibility. On a day to day basis the managers have to be masters of negotiating with vendors, conflict resolution (both internally with employees and customer facing with service issues), motivating a diverse staff, system building and communication. And that doesn’t even touch upon social media, basics of data gathering and analysis and then how to effect change in those reports.

My point is that there are a ton of opportunities for the management team to not only enhance their own skills, but also use those skills to improve the business they are managing.

Investing time to improve the skills of your management staff can have profound benefits to your business. Once the management team has a strong foundation of core business skills, you can begin to develop each into a specialist in specific areas of the business that interest them. (More on this later in the “Key Metrics” section.)

Involve Staff in Process Improvements Decrease staff turnover, reduce service issues, improve morale Problem Solving

Problems are going to arise with the day-to-day operation of any business. One-time issues (plumbing backing up, fryer catching on fire during service, etc) then they can be addressed when they arise. But there are other repeating problems that show up time and again, and which indicate there is a systemic issue that needs fixing.

Examples of this type of ongoing problem could be:

  • Inconsistent opening and closing procedures
  • Long fire times on specific items
  • Customer complaints

Involving the staff in problem-solving is a great way to solve these systemic, ongoing problems. Not only does this help bring more eyes on the problem and give more options for a better solution (and from the people who are closest to it), but it also drastically improves buy-in from the staff when it comes time to roll out changes addressing the issue.

Improving Service

Don’t limit your staff involvement to problem solving: it’s also a great idea to involve your team in improving your operations, systems, and service overall. The more your team feels that their ideas for improvement are heard, considered, and perhaps even implemented, the more invested they will be in the success of your business overall.

Great examples include:

  • Developing new cocktails
  • Peer driven wine/beer/spirits education
  • Ideas for improving efficiency during service
  • Reviewing training manuals for possible updates
  • Reviewing side work and opening/closing checklists for updates
  • Updating allergen information sheets/ menu descriptions and distributing them

Discussing topics with your staff and identifying areas that they would like to see improved can go a long way to increasing the engagement of your staff. Getting them involved with creating the solution will also help to reinforce this even further.

Systems are your Friend Increase productivity, increase consistency, reduce staff turnover, decrease service issues, increase staff morale.

A system can be built around almost any recurring task in any business. In the bar and restaurant business, we aim to be as consistent as possible, so developing systems is a great place to focus your management’s time and abilities. (This is even more important when opening a new location.)

Here are some key areas where systems can be developed, documented and trained. Each area may seem like a small process to build out, but as you can see when we drill down into new menu roll outs, these processes can be much more involved than it appears at first glance:

  • Hiring practices, Including interview questions:
  • Training framework for each position which can include training broken down by each day and key competencies that will be tested.
  • Opening/closing and running side work procedures in each department
  • Weekly ordering/inventory
  • Process for new menu roll outs
    • When will new ideas be drafted
    • When will any new ideas be fine tuned for service
    • Pricing with vendors
    • When will final decisions be made
    • Menu printing
    • New order/production sheets
    • Updated opening/closing running side work sheets
    • Staff training
    • Offer new items as a special
    • Finalize items

Getting these processes documented will help to make it easier when the time comes to use the system. You also have the added benefit of being able to train other staff members on how to perform this task and then eventually taking over completely (if it makes sense for their career growth.) This in turn will free you up to put your attention in other areas that need your focus.

Focus on Key Metrics Defining and tracking key business metrics is definitely in the “best practice” category. It allows operators to monitor the financial health of their organization and make course corrections if problems arise.

Some examples of traditional metrics are listed below:

  • Labor Costs/Percentage of sales
  • # of covers
  • Average guest spend
  • Average turn time – 2 top, 4 top, 6 top, etc
  • Cost of goods sold
  • Food (spirit, beer, wine) cost
  • Prime Cost

Depending on the purpose of the establishment there can be additional metrics that are actively being tracked as well. Examples include:

  • Social media likes/shares
  • Number of items sent back to the kitchen
  • Yelp/Google/Facebook review score
  • Customer feedback scores
  • Amount of money raised for charity
  • Number of management hours worked

We talked briefly upon training and supporting the management staff – defining and tracking key metrics would be a great concept to ensure everyone understands well. Knowing how to pull the necessary reports to get the information they need, how to understand the reports that are generated and most importantly, how to effect changes in each area category can create so many positive effects for your business.

Leverage Technology Increase revenue and profits, improve inventory and cash flow management, increase productivity, streamline communications, and consolidate data management

Once the basics have been mastered, the business is running efficiently and your establishment is consistently profitable, introducing new technologies is a great logical next step. There are a lot of areas where technology can be implemented:

  • An inventory/ordering and analytics platform like Avero, Slingshot or Bevspot
  • Hiring platforms like Indeed, Snagajob
  • Handheld POS systems during busy shifts
  • A new reservation system that allows you to more actively manage your waitlist

There is no shortage of technology solutions at our industry’s disposal!

Some of the key benefits of adding new technology are that they can amplify the ability of your team, increase the efficiency and/or give greater detail to make better decisions. Many software solutions come complete with customizable dashboards that help to condense all of the most important information at a glance which will hopefully free up time for you and your team. This can be especially critical when you begin to grow past a single location and need to have all of your information in one easy to navigate platform.

Back to the Basics

We started with the basics and made our way all the way to “newfangled technology”, but I wanted to go back and emphasize: there’s no point in implementing the newest technology solution if you don’t have a solid foundation of a really well run bar. Go back to the basics (above). Make sure your team knows how to run your bar end-to-end and provide a great guest experience. (And make sure your bartenders know your standard pours!)

Once you and your team have the basics down consistently, then you can continue on to these other steps to grow your bar and your team into a profitable and smoothly running business – with satisfied employees and happy, returning customers!

Key Wins: Lessons Learned from Five Years of Bar Consulting is a post from: A Bar Above Mixology

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A Bar Above by Chris Tunstall - 1M ago

The Manhattan cocktail is one of the most popular pre-prohibition cocktails being crafted in bars all around the world. It’s spirit-forward, slightly bitter and beautifully aromatic from the bitters. Like many other classic cocktails, the origin of this drink is not perfectly clear.

The most widely accepted story is that a bartender named Black created the cocktail in the early 1880’s at the famous Hoffman House in New York, but there are no shortages of entertaining stories. My personal favorite (albeit debunked) story was that the cocktail was created for a political event hosted by Winston’ Churchill’s Mother.

No matter who came up with the original recipe, generations of cocktail lovers tip their coupes in gratitude. (Myself included!)

Here’s how to make a classic Manhattan:
Classic Cocktails - How to Make a Manhattan - YouTube

Manhattan is a post from: A Bar Above Mixology

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The Mixology Talk Podcast, Episode #147

It’s great to get creative with your cocktail recipes, but how do prevent your creativity from going too far? This week we’re chatting with Camper English about keeping cocktails safe. 

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How to NOT Poison your Guests, with Camper English - Mixology Talk Podcast - YouTube

In today’s Episode… We’re chatting with notoriously geeky cocktail expert, Camper English, from Alcademics.com Wait, who’s Camper English?

Camper English is a San Francisco-based cocktails and spirits writer, speaker, consultant, and sometimes event bartender. He has written for everywhere from Popular Science to Penthouse, including Details, Saveur, and the San Francisco Chronicle.

Camper has visited over 140 distilleries, blending houses, and bodegas in more than 25 countries, has judged cocktail contests locally and internationally, is a member of the United States Bartenders’ Guild, passed the B.A.R.5-day course, is a judge of the San Francisco World Spirits Competition, and has been the US and Canadian polling coordinator for the World’s 50 Best Bars for several years.

True story: He once gave a talk about ice… in Iceland.

Stuff we Mentioned:

Find Camper’s work at his main website, Alcademics.com. But if you’re interested in his new cocktail safety resource, skip right over to CocktailSafe.org!

You can also find Camper on Twitter and Instagram, and get his book, “Tonic Water: Gin and Tonic WTF” here.

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Thanks for Listening!

Hopefully today’s chat gives you the resources you need to make sure you’re making awesome cocktails that are also safe for your guests!  Don’t forget to check out CocktailSafe.org if you’re not completely sure.

How to NOT Poison your Guests, with Camper English is a post from: A Bar Above Mixology

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