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A website developer came up with a test site in which people can see different types of text input effects. This is a basic form that allows the user to enter information into three short fields. They could put in their name or just a word into each box. When they enter information, the field responds in a specific way. That way might be popping out, changing a shade or two in color, increasing in size or moving slightly with an animation.

One website developer wanted to know what other people thought about these different text effects and whether or not they would do something like this on their own sites in the places where they collect information from users. One person remarked that they thought the effects were cool and that they planned to bookmark the site for future reference. The same person noted that they have a habit of doing this and forgetting to use any of the design ideas that they have saved.

Another person noted that the site with those effects is old and has been shared in the website design community for a long time. They added that since this is still being shared, the information bust be evergreen in its nature. The design ideas are not dated or aged, so they may still be a good option for anyone creating a new form or designing a new website.

A person wondered how these text effects were coded. Another reviewer mentioned that they are coded using the CSS language. That first person wondered why they were coded in CSS, and the second replied that the reason was for efficiency. The first person answered back that CSS formatting sometimes has usability issues.

Several people noted problems with these text effects. They noted that in the English-speaking countries and many other nations around the world, people read from left to right. Some of these text effects have animations that go from right to left, making reading difficult. Another person noted that some of the effects make the contrast between the text and the form or background worse. For more information click here https://tympanus.net/Development/TextInputEffects/.

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In the era of extensive front-end frameworks, advanced JavaScript and overly complex CSS, is there a place for websites mostly designed in HTML5? Should a web designer include a plain-vanilla HTML5 site as part of her portfolio? Is there life after React, Vue and Bootstrap?

To all the questions above, the answer is yes. A lot has changed since Sir Tim Berners-Lee published the first HTML web page, but the spirit of being able to do whatever you want can still be enjoyed on the web, even if it means doing it on an individual basis. Web designers seem to have taken things to extremes; if you are skilled with HTML and CSS, it is perfectly fine to design a simple blog without using a framework and calling up countless elements from libraries.

What is interesting about the direction that web design has taken in recent years is that we now have simplified frameworks that run on top of more complex frameworks; case in point, Gatsby, which is based on React but keeps things extremely simple and static websites. Gatsby can be used to make very stylish sites that load extremely fast, and it has been noticed by big names such as Airbnb. There is even a competitor to Gatsby; it is called Jekyll, and it breaks things down to just HTML.

There is a good chance that pure HTML design could be making a comeback, and this is not a hipster trend among web developers. If you are using your bare hands to code websites in 2019, you do not have to be a Luddite or a student, you could just be an old-school type of designer who agrees with many others that things are getting too complicated when they do not need to be.

We all know that progressive web apps play an important role, but they do not need to be 500 MB files if they only show lists of data elements that need some sort of XML requests. If you are coding in pure HTML5 in 2019, you are part of a movement that realizes things could always be simpler. For more information click here https://www.reddit.com/r/webdesign/comments/c01l06/isitallthatbadtomakeapurehtml5_website/.

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Authors of web copy and digital artists alike understand firsthand that the relative sizes of separate stretches of text content are an important factor to take into account. It is an important consideration for SEO's sake because Google's spiders detect whether certain text strings are enclosed in header tags, and the crawlers ascribe different kinds of significance to the contents of differently sized tags. In general, header tags that are associated with smaller numbers, like "h1," are understood to be headers for massive segments of a given page's overall content. Meanwhile, header tags representing smaller font sizes are seen to represent individual section headers within those larger segments.

The sizes of header tags go some way toward improving the chances that Google's ranking algorithms will award a web page a healthy position in SERPs. However, web designers and artists who are working on informational graphics find that the relative sizes of text elements are far more directly relevant to how successful the graphics are at engaging their intended consumers.

The human eye is naturally inclined toward reading the largest letters among those populating a piece of content it is parsing for the first time. This means that the creator of any image that features its most prominently enlarged text in the center can generally expect much smaller text existing above that not to be the first line of text that audiences will actually read. In fact, if the text beneath the most prominent words is only slightly smaller but still larger than the text at the top, the average reader will instinctively proceed to read that text and will likely save the small text at the top for last.

The phenomenon that larger words are the first words the average reader is inclined to parse is also taken into account by authors and designers who work on printed media such as newspapers and digital media such as emails and web advertisements. Newspapers are a fairly extreme case of this pattern at work because stories' titles are meant to inform readers at a glance what the smaller text describes in detail. For more information click here https://i.imgur.com/UqPKZ96.jpg.

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A common method of allowing animated images to appear on web pages is to include image files that support separate frames of animation that are cycled through by clients' browsers. The role of this sort of infinitely looping animated image has historically been associated with the ".gif" file format since the early days of the Internet. In the eyes of many professional web designers, however, this format for animated media has been deprecated for good reason: GIF files tend to boast large file sizes, which make clients' browsers sluggish while loading them. This is an SEO issue because Google will penalize the rankings of a website if its content pages are laden with heavy footprints that make its pages slow to load for its potential audiences.

The technology governing video file formats has progressed to the point that video files can offer superior fidelity to GIFs while occupying far smaller file sizes. The most recently popularized codec used by web browsers to interpret the contents of video files is one that comes into play when the video file is saved in the ".av1" format. At present, Adobe Firefox and Google Chrome's most recent versions for desktop computers can decode this file format, but mobile devices currently lack this on the hardware level and require the appropriate software to be installed on them.

This means that a website's animated aesthetics being delivered through videos that are encoded for the AV1 format can make it difficult for some users' browsers and devices to interpret. Nevertheless, the small file sizes that the format achieves means that it is only a matter of time before all browsers and devices conform to it as a standard, so the website in this scenario can expect to benefit from using AV1 files in the long term. For the site to avoid causing problems for its audiences until then, though, it should use syntax that detects whether the current client supports the format. If the client does not, the syntax should instead load a separate version of that file that has been saved to an older format. For more information click here https://www.singhkays.com/blog/its-time-replace-gifs-with-av1-video/.

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In 2005 when email marketing was at its peak, a lot of people enjoyed getting emails from their favorite sites and brands. After a while, people often chose to unsubscribe because those emails generated too much inbox clutter. Some of those companies sent responses to unsubscribe requests. Those responses were often described as "manipulinks" or "confirmshaming" as a reflection of the seemingly broken relationship between the consumer and the brand. Those messages were meant to guilt the reader into not confirming to cancel the subscription, much like a mother or mother-in-law would send an adult child or son or daughter-in-law on a guilt trip.

Some of those confirmshaming messages were to the effect of "Please don't go!" or "You're going to miss us!" This trend is still in place more than 10 years later. Many sites will ask the visitor to subscribe to emails in order to save 10 percent on a future purchase. Those who choose not to subscribe might see a message such as "No thanks, I prefer to pay full price."

This is a negative opt-out strategy meant to guilt and shame the user into sharing information or sticking around. Several blogs and websites are dedicated to this dark pattern of retail marketing. In the world of user experience, dark patterns are veiled attempts to trick web visitors into an action that they did not intend to do. They are meant to capture the viewer's attention.

As a psychological approach, it is still in use because it works. Shame is still a taboo. It holds a lot of power on the human mind. However, this strategy can backfire on companies. People do not like to feel bad about themselves. Nobody wants to feel guilty, stupid or foolish. With so many companies online vying for limited consumer dollars, people can simply go elsewhere with their money. Consumers may become desensitized to the approach or annoyed with the retailers who persist with this pattern. People who design websites for a living note that they actively avoid doing business with sites that continue to use manipulinks and confirmshaming as strategies. For more information click here https://www.uxbooth.com/articles/ux-dark-patterns-manipulinks-and-confirmshaming/.

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It is a sad fact that a lot of developers end up not getting paid by their clients after they start doing a project. While some of these people did not have contracts or agreements in place, many of them did. It is possible for a client to walk away even after making a partial payment, even up to a 50 percent down payment to the developer. The developer is left with time that they cannot get back and a piece of work that it is unlikely they can use for anything else.

One developer who had this happen to them decided to make the most of the situation. They chose to take the platform that they built and make it an open source for anyone to use. This developer is happy to at least be able to give something away that other developers.

A person wrote back saying that even though they require a 50 percent deposit on their web design services, the same thing has happened to them. They have decided to make the most of these situations by saving the template and making a preview of it available on their website. When someone wants to have that layout for their site, they get to have it at a discounted rate. This person is able to recoup most of their money and time investment by offering the pre-built site at a discount. Clients like it because they get the site faster.

Another person replied with a compliment to the person who came up with this idea. Turning lemons into lemonade reduces resentment. This person also liked the discounted rate idea for the partially built site that would allow the client to just drop their content into the framework. This commentator noted that the people who have come up with these solutions should include that statement in their contracts. Then the clients would know that the work they partly paid for would benefit someone else, even potentially a competitor of theirs. Developers will continue facing this in the future, and these are good solutions to recoup some lost money. For more information click here https://github.com/TrillCyborg/onefraction.

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A CSS programmer recently reached out to their fellow programmers for some help with a problem. Their problem is associated with creating a form and using labels instead of placeholders for the field. When input is received, the field fills in and moves up and out of the way. The problem is that the attributes do not take into account when the user hovers over the auto-fill form. It does not put the text into the field, and the field just stays where it is. The programmer wants some help to correct that. The programmer has only found this issue in Chrome.

One person replied with a similar experience when using auto-fill fields in Chrome. They noted that their Chrome setup did not trigger an event, so the field did not move up and out of the way. They did find a way to work around it, but they had to use JavaScript in order to do it. A link offering a tutorial to use JavaScript was shared to the original poster.

Another person replied with a line of code for the original poster to try. They noted that no JavaScript should be necessary unless the original poster is coding in IE version 11. The person said that they would create a tutorial to show how that works.

One additional person noted that this can be solved in CSS, with no JavaScript required. The person gave two detailed explanations and lines of code on how the original poster could attend to their issue. Another person replied with a link to a website that offers tricks and tips for coding in CSS.

Several other people had ideas on how to fix the problem without resorting to JavaScript. One person wondered if the original poster had tried detecting values in the fields. Finally, a respondent noted that those types of floating labels can be a problem for people who use a screen reader. They can also be an issue in the mobile environment and for anyone else who has accessibility issues. The original poster could use any of the offered CSS solutions. For more information click here https://www.reddit.com/r/webdesign/comments/by89k2/cssfloatinglabelschrome_autofill/.

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A web designer can never have enough good palette tools, as creating color palettes is in many ways the foundation of any good web design. ColorKitty is a new web app that provides web designers with a wealth of features within a simple and easy-to-use UI.

When creating a new palette with the app, you can assign this palette with a name and choose to fill the palette with anywhere from a single color to 6 of them. After selecting one of these colors, you can assign a color in one of the following ways:

A color spectrum A hex color code An RGB value An HSL value
The app further lets you adjust colors through the following means:

Shades Harmony Contrast
You can also import a set of colors from an existing image. To do this, simply click the Upload button on the palette widget and select an image, and the app will then fill the palette with the colors it finds in the image.

Another neat feature of the app is the ability to copy to the clipboard the hex color code of any color of the palette by clicking on it.

After you have created your palette, the app lets you export it. All you have to do is click the Export button, and the app will give you the option to export your palette to one of the following formats:

URL PNG SCSS JSON HEX
You can also export shade information along with the colors by clicking Include Shades prior to clicking the Export button. You can further tweet your new palette by clicking the Tweet button.

Finally, while ColorKitty is completely free to use, the developer provides the option to tip him or her. To do this, click the "Buy me a coffee" on the bottom left-hand corner of the app. For more information click here https://colorkitty.com.

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There is a new website offering up art and digital images for any one to use, free of charge. The images range from stylized food to people and abstract art. The site is called Mixkit. The images and art have a range of colors, and there are many themes available. Some of the other subject areas include feelings, animals, house and home, relationships and activities. The site promises to offer a new collection of art free for anyone to use every month. People can submit their email in order to get notified of additions to the collection.

The use of this type of art and images is desirable on websites. Site owners often use images to add to the meaning of the text. This is especially true in blog posts. Not all site owners have the time or skills to take their own images and get releases from models. Small-time site owners may not have the budget to pay for every image that they want to use, but they may also not want to violate the artist's copyright. This site offers a great deal to site owners and anyone else who wants to make use of copyright-free artwork and digital images.

Many people wondered if the whole thing was too good to be true. After all, if it seems like it is too good to be true, then there usually is some kind of a catch to it. Nobody could find any catches. There are a few attributions of the hand-drawn work, so anyone who wants to use them would be wise to include the artist's name and the date and location of where they obtained the image. This would also be a good idea just for protecting oneself in case of questions about copyright in the future.

One person noticed that when they refresh the page, the menus change in order. This is a common thing in some websites, and it does not indicate any faulty programing. Users should be aware of any potential for automatic subscriptions or sale of their email address and should ensure updated security features. For more information click here https://mixkit.co/art/.

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Images that are royalty-free are distributed on websites that aim to help their owners assemble aesthetically pleasing pages without the need to hire artists who can create custom illustrations. There are aesthetic elements that can be purchased on websites so that web designers can create websites that appear far more professional than what those designers might be capable of creating on their own. However, there are many options for relatively simplistic images that can be made use of without having to worry about either financial costs or the need to credit the source that provided the image. Depending on the designer's artistic talent, these images can make smaller websites highly pleasing to look at and navigate in their own right.

Programs and applications that are open-source are those that have been released by their creators alongside the source code that was used to compile them. Since it is not feasible to reverse-engineer a software program, programmers who willfully share the uncompiled source code behind their projects do other programmers a large favor because other programmers can study and borrow the code and make their own adjustments and expansions to the programs.

The distinction between royalty-free media and open-source software is apparent on a website named unDraw, which claims to offer "open-source illustrations." The "Illustrations" page contains many hundreds of technically simplistic yet aesthetically striking drawings that can be freely downloaded as SVG files. The website's "License" page explains how users can include them in their own projects without the need to credit the resource. This is very much how these images can be claimed to have been provided royalty-free if an audience member recognizes that an image on a web page may also be on a completely unrelated website.

On the other hand, these images cannot be accurately described as open-source because they are not themselves programs that offer the tools necessary to create, modify, and export other images. The confusion from unDraw appears to have stemmed from how the image files are technically SVG files made out of syntax that can be manually adjusted "at the source." For more information click here https://undraw.co/illustrations.

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