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We conduct most of our business via emails so we should make an effort to become better at writing them. If we do, we will be able to communicate our message and we stand a better chance of getting a response.

A while ago, I wrote a detailed article on 10 tips to help you write more effective emails. I created this infographic as a summary (and a reminder). I hope you find it useful.

If you want to read the full article, please click here: 10 Tips To Help You Write More Effective Emails

Learn how to write for business. Join us for The Plain Language Programme

 by Amanda Patterson

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If you want to get into the habit of blogging, we suggest you try our 20-day blogging challenge. This is ideal for beginner bloggers or bloggers who want to gain more followers.

You may eventually decide to blog once a week or three times a week, but to get you comfortable with blogging, let’s post a blog every day for 20 days.

[TOP TIP: If you want to learn how to blog, join us for The Complete Blogging Course in Johannesburg or sign up for the online version.]

We can always come up with excuses not to blog. The usual suspects are time, family, work, and friends. The truth is you need to make a decision to do it if you want to become a blogger.

I have come up with a list of 30 things you can post on your blog. Some will be longer posts, others will be a simple quotation. Remember to create graphics for your blog posts. Suggested reading: 3 Fabulous Free Design Tools For Bloggers

My aim is to get you to become more confident about blogging, to have some fun, and to show you that you can become a better blogger.

The 20-Day Blogging Challenge For Beginners
  1. Where I Work. Take a photograph of your work space.  Share it as a blog post with a short post on why you like it and what you do there.
  2. My Favourite Quote. Share your favourite quotation. It could be inspirational or motivational or amusing. Or all three. If your blog is about a specific subject, try to share one about that subject.
  3. My Story. Write a blog about why you’ve started blogging. This does not have to be long. Just tell us about the moment you decided to write. The blog could be a way to tell us the entire story.
  4. An Interview With… Interview somebody who your readers may find interesting. Make a list of 10 questions and use this as a template for all the people you will be interviewing on your blog.
  5. My City. Write about your town or city. Tell us a little bit about why you like (or dislike) it. Post a few photographs that you have taken.  Share links to other people who blog about the area if you know of any.
  6. My Favourite Influence. Write about somebody who has influenced you.  Name the 10 things you love most about them. Link to their website or blog.
  7. A Question Answered. Answer a question that somebody has asked you online or in-person.
  8. My Opinion. Write an opinion piece about something that matters to you. Remember that you may create enemies as well as gain followers when you do this.
  9. My Sense Of Humour. Share a comic or a meme that you find funny. Once again, if your blog is about a specific subject, try to share one about that subject. We share a writing comic every day on Writers Write.
  10. My Review. Write a review of a product you use in your work or a book you’re reading (How To Write A Great Book Review) try to write it as a template for future reviews. You can add a review to your site every week or every month.
  11. My Predictions. Write about a prediction or a trend that interests you in your work or personal life.  Or write a post about five trends for the coming year.
  12. Create A Quiz. You can create your own on platforms like playbuzz and quzzr. Even if you don’t have many followers and nobody completes it, it’s great practice for when you do have followers.
  13. What I Learnt. Write an informative post about something that happened to you.
  14. 5 Ways To... Write a list post. People love reading list posts more than any other type of post. Choose a number and write about your subject. Good examples on this site are The 17 Most Popular Genres In Fiction – And Why They Matter and 7 Really Good Reasons To Write A Memoir
  15. My Diary. Write a post about your schedule. What are you planning for the next month or year?
  16. Things I Know. Share your expertise and knowledge. Tell people what you know about your subject. Back it up with research and examples. At Writers Write, we may talk about sub-plotspacing, or inciting moments.
  17. Before And After. Write a before and after post about something you’ve created or a place you’ve noticed that is changing. You could write about yourself. Include photographs of the before and the after.
  18. My Social Media Profiles. Promote your social media profiles in a post. Let your followers know where they can find you. Mention the ones you like most.
  19. Start A Series. You may want to create a series of posts about a particular subject. Choose a day of the week and promise your readers they will find the second post there next week.
  20. Share An Infographic. Even if you have not created it. Choose one that suits your blog and your audience. Ask the creator if you can share it and link back to their website, crediting them.

Source for Calendar

I hope that you take up the challenge and post something every day for the 20 days. At the end of the challenge, you will feel that you have achieved something tangible. You will also know if you enjoy blogging – and how many times you would like to blog a week. Use our blogging calendar guidelines to set up your own blogging timetable.

TOP TIP: If you want to learn how to blog, join us for The Complete Blogging Course in Johannesburg or sign up for the online version.

© Amanda Patterson

If you enjoyed this post read:

  1. The Ultimate Cheat Sheet For Writing Blog Post Titles
  2. 10 SEO Copywriting Tips For Beginners
  3. 40 Types Of Content To Inspire Any Blogger
  4. Everything You Need To Know About Blogging

Become a Writers Write patron:

If you’re inspired, educated, or entertained by our posts, please show your love with a donation.

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Mary Sues have become a catch-all insult for poorly written characters. People will often accuse a character of being a Mary Sue, especially when they don’t like the book or movie, instead of examining what is actually wrong with the writing.

So, let me show you what a Mary Sue is and how they can be used well, or badly, in writing.  

You Don’t Know What A Mary Sue Is – Nobody Does 

This is because it doesn’t appear as a term until 1997 in the article Star Trek Myth and Legends, and it doesn’t get its footing by ‘famous’ media scholar Henry Jenkins until 2009.[1]

In writing terms, this means every academic is still hot and bothered about what it actually means. Give it another 20 years and we’ll all agree, right?

Well, regardless, the origin story of Mary Sue is well known. So let us dissect that and produce a five point plan. Sound good? Good.

Paula Smith, an editor for Menagerie, a Star Trek fan magazine created a 309-word story as a joke.

It was titled “A Trekkie’s Tale” (1987)

It begins:

“Gee, golly, gosh, gloriosky,” thought Mary Sue as she stepped on the bridge of the Enterprise. “Here I am, the youngest lieutenant in the fleet – only fifteen and a half years old.”   

This was meant to encapsulate the numerous bad fan fiction submissions she received from young girls.

It goes on:

Captain Kirk came up to her.

“Oh, Lieutenant, I love you madly. Will you come to bed with me?” “Captain! I am not that kind of girl!” “You’re right, and I respect you for it. Here, take over the ship for a minute while I go get some coffee for us.”

Clearly, playing to the wish-fulfilment of adolescent readers and fan fic writers.

Mary Sue then goes on to save the crew from some green androids and cure them of a fatal illness as well as win the Nobel Peace Prize, the Vulcan Order of Gallantry and the Tralfamadorian Order of Good Guyhood[2]

But, she dies tragically, like every angst-ridden teenager fantasises will happen to them, and her birthday becomes a celebrated holiday.

Also she is half Vulcan, like Spock. Which she hides from the crew.

So What Do We Have?

We have a protagonist

  1. Who outshines everyone.
  2. Who can solve any problem.
  3. Who is an idealised version of a young writer’s perception of themselves.
  4. Who may have a secret, like being half Vulcan
  5. Who has a perfect flaw. For example, Mary Sue could save everybody but herself.[3]

This is obviously an intentionally poorly written story with no redeeming qualities. I mean read this:

“In the Sick Bay as she breathed her last, she was surrounded by Captain Kirk, Mr. Spock, Dr. McCoy, and Mr. Scott, all weeping unashamedly at the loss of her beautiful youth and youthful beauty, intelligence, capability and all around niceness. Even to this day her birthday is a national holiday of the Enterprise.”

Such a perfectly awful sentence deserves to be framed. Then perhaps burnt in a cleansing ceremony.

Ignoring all this, they are, mostly, very good qualities for your protagonist to have.

For example this is a nice fit for children’s fiction. Where you really should not have a needlessly dark tone and your hero should win the day. After overcoming some adversity obviously.

Famous Mary Sues Children’s Books: Harry Potter and The Hunger Games

Your Harry Potters and Katniss Everdeens are toe-tappingly tragic.

They have special powers no one else can compete with.

They have secrets and overcome all their tasks with help or alone.

Finally, they have bitter-sweet victories that save the world but at some personal cost.

Importantly, both are employed very gracefully in their respective world’s logics to make their achievements not feel hollow.

This style had produced a variety of very good book and characters. Think of comic book heroes for example. Spiderman, Wonder Woman, and Ironman are all interesting examples of how to write a Mary Sue with substance while keeping a light tone.

Adult Mary Sues: James Bond, Pride and Prejudice, and Star Wars James Bond

James Bond is a perfect man’s man. He is deadly and irresistibly sexy. He swoops in to save the day just in the nick of time, every time.

This trope of the perfect “Super Man” is a long standing tradition dating at least back to Edgar Rice Borroughs’ Tarzan and Princess of Mars novels.

It is highly marketable. It is an acceptable power fantasy men have allowed themselves to indulge in. Yet, you never hear vocal fans calling for Bond to fail more often or be less capable.

I think that is largely because that is how this fiction is marketed. If you are up-front with the nature of your fiction, it’s difficult for people to argue it should be something else.

Which is why Bond films that lean in too heavily into drama and realistic action are often less successful. We want style not salt.

If we look at Sterling Archer from the FX television show Archer. He is a spy who always ruins his missions through the abuse of Bond tropes, like excessive alcohol consumption, it would feel wrong if he suddenly became dependable after 9 seasons of failing.

We like Archer because he is a fun train wreck of a man. We love Bond because he is a well-oiled villain killing steamroller. A compromise between the two simply ruins both genres.

Elizabeth Bennet

Jane Austen’s Elizabeth from Pride and Prejudice is another wonderful example of a Mary Sue.

Jane Austen, a notable recluse and spinster, created a fictional Jane who despite her, at times, off putting and judgemental nature still manages to find and marry a rich, educated and gentle gentleman. With whom she lives happily ever after. A perfect example of a Mary Sue wish fulfilment scenario.

Unlike Mary Sue, Elizabeth is clever, witty, and complex. Her personality is well-balanced and her achievements are more reasonable although of course she still shines in all areas she in talented in.

Additionally, the lovely tentative relationship that grows in the book, between her and Darcy, is contrasted with the abused nature of Mary Sue’s “relationship” with Kirk.

Luke Skywalker

Luke Skywalker is my favourite Mary Sue. He is of course based off the legend of King Arthur the original “Artie Stu”, if you will.

A common boy born to a legend. He will bring balance to the force.

Blows up the Death Star the first time he gets into his X-Wing.

George Lucas reportedly wished he was Flash Gordon as a child.

He has a big hulking farther figure of a secret.

And, his darling flaw is that he just can’t kill his dear old dad because he sees the good in him.

This poster boy of a Mary Sue has captured the hearts of generations of fans. Fans who cried out in rage and were silenced when Disney decided to reverse these traits in an unfortunate set of events.

If I see another gif of that green milk drinking scene…

You know that one.

Regardless for decades Luke has been a shining example of good to the world and we were all made a little bit brighter by his shining light[4].

The Many Talents Of Mary Sue: How To Employ Her Gainfully

By using Luke as an example, we can see just how this trope should be implemented: As the basis for strong, dynamic, fast-paced story.

Having a very competent protagonist who can solve problems quickly will cut down on dead space in your writing. It should not be used in every situation. Flawed protagonists are interesting.

For example, Arthur Dent from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams never really passes any sort of test. However, it is possible to have your ‘hero’ fail as a way to progress the plot.

Important Tip: What a perfect Mary Sue should not do is create cringe-worthy moments.

In the latest Harry Potter universe movie, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, the leader of the wizard world says to Dumbledore:

“It pains me to say because well I don’t like you. But you are the only wizard who is his equal. I need you to fight him.”

It makes for a moment akin to A Trekkie’s Tale where only Mary Sue can save the day. “You and only you Dumble-Sue can save us!” would be how A Trekkies Tale might put this.

The plot should always have the illusion of choice. A book can only have one outcome but several choices should be made available for it not to seem contrived.

For example, in the Star Wars movies we have seen that not only the main characters can save the day. Luke only blows up the first Death Star. The next two planet killing weapons in Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens are dealt with by side characters.

In fact Luke largely fails at tasks in Return of the Jedi. His friends would have won the battle even if he had not turned his father against the Emperor. But, he still achieved a task only he could do.

This style of writing promotes a Mary Sue that is not obnoxious. A bad example would be Anakin Skywalker from the prequel Star Wars trilogy.

He is even called the chosen one; given a destiny; the power to save anyone except his wife. On top of all of this, his dialogue is stunted and contrived and his character is neglected at the expense of a rapidly paced plot.

Sueing it All Together

I hope I have shown you that a Mary Sue can be a positive term and even the best way of handling a main character. It is more than just a complaint or an example of bad writing.

Writing a Mary Sue does not make you a bad writer. Being bad at writing a Mary Sue does.

Top Tip: If you want to learn how to write a book, join our Writers Write course in Johannesburg or sign up for our online course.

 by By Christopher Mary Sue Dean – perfect in every way.

Christopher has been starting flame wars for the better part of two decades.  Follow him on Twitter.

Please consider supporting our articles by supporting this kind of work on Patreon.

If you enjoyed this post, read:

  1. Harry Potter And The Not Very Good Writing
  2. 3 Things Authors Of The Golden Age Of Sci-Fi & Fantasy Did Better
  3. How To Edit Your Podcast

P.S. For some more bad Star Trek fan-fiction why not try Star Trek Discovery? It’s my go to this-is-so-stupid watch of the week.

Things to read or watch herein contained:
  1. Paula Smith’s ‘A Trekkie’s Tale
  2. Star Trek: The Original Series
  3. Harry Potter
  4. The Hunger Games
  5. Iron Man (2009)
  6. James Bond
  7. Pride and Prejudice
  8. Star Wars: I,II,III,IV, VII and VIII
  9. Archer (2009)
  10. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
  11. Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald

_________________________

[1] For the academics, read Textual Poachers
[2] Please let this be a real Star Trek thing, someone comment if it is.
[3] She’s the Darth Plageus of fan fic in that regard. “Have you ever heard the tragedy of Darth Sue the Wise?”
[4] Sabre

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Tired of annoying typos in your emails?

Let’s be honest, email really isn’t designed to help you write better, and the integrated error-checking features of Gmail, Yahoo Mail, and Outlook won’t catch every error.

The following infographic has a solution for you.

With these easy steps, you’ll be composing messages with confidence in no time.

See the infographic here: Grammar Check

by Jennifer Frost

If you are looking for more infographics, you might like these:

  1. How Meditation Can Improve Your Writing
  2. 7 Secrets Of Advanced English Writing
  3. Breaking Down Writer’s Block

Become a Writers Write patron:

If you’re inspired, educated, or entertained by our posts, please show your love with a donation.

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It doesn’t matter if you are a corporation selling shoes or a prospective sci-fi writer, social media presents you with a way to generate a following.

To get people interested in what you have to say or show, you have to be able to push engaging content on a weekly basis. Off course, that is easier said than done.

The good news is that there are a lot of tools that can help you stay active and enhance your social media presence. Today, we are going to take a look at 6 different browser extensions that can help you grow and manage your social media profiles.

1. Bitly

A post is almost always incomplete without a link. After all, most social media posts on Facebook and Twitter are just previews that lead you to a bigger piece of content.

With that in mind, it’s easy to understand how important it is that the link you post works -and Bitly is here to help. It allows you to post links with ease and ensure they work across different social media platforms.

While Bitly started out as simple link shortener, it has evolved since then. Now it provides users with analytics to determine how these shortened links perform.

Get the extension here: Bitly Browser Extension

2. Social Analytics

Keeping up with the analytics for your social profiles can be tough. But Social Analytics can make this mundane task a bit easier. It does that by giving you instant access to important metrics such as likes and shares your posts receive across different platforms.

You will have all the statistics in front of you once you click on the extension tab in your browser. For Facebook, it even displays the number of comments received.

Since you can compare statistics from every platforming one window, this makes it easier to keep track of all your social profiles without the need to open them separately.

Get the extension here: Social Analytics Extension

3. Giphy

Social media posts that incorporate interesting or funny visuals tend to engage the audience much more than their text-only counterparts. The problem is that most users don’t have the time to create animated posts or custom visuals each time they want to share something.

This is where resources like Giphy bust in to save the day. The Giphy extension gives you quick access to thousands of GIFs from the Giphy library to choose from and help your message stand out.

Get the extension here: Giphy Browser Extension

4. Ritetag

When it comes to Twitter, you NEED to know how to use hashtags properly if you want to maximise the reach of your post. But who wants to waste time researching what is the best hashtags for each and every post?

To streamline this part of your social media management, you can use a tool like Ritetag. It analyses your post and suggests hashtags that you can use. It doesn’t stop there though; it also tracks the performance of the hashtags you decided to use and presents the metrics in an easy to understand format.

Get the extension here: Ritetag Browser Extension

5. Hootsuite Hootlet

Hootsuite Hootlet is a neat platform you can use to control all of your social profiles. It lets you schedule and post on different platforms at the same time. What makes it a little bit different from some other tools we already mentioned is its capability that help you manage and respond to comments.

If you do not have a lot of time to build your social media presence, a tool like this can help you automate and speed up different actions which helps you concentrate on more creative tasks.

Get the extension here: Hootsuite Hootlet Browser Extension

6. Mention

Tracking whenever someone mentioned you or your brand can be quite challenging. Mention makes this a breeze. You can enter the keywords/phrases you want to track, and Mention will notify you every time someone uses them. This gives you the opportunity to respond in time, don’t miss out on potential collaborations, give out timely “thank you”, and makes sure you spot time-sensitive information early so you can join the discussion while it is still relevant.

Get the extension here: Mention Browser Extension

And that is it. These six extensions can help you not only save time, but also improve how and what you post. If you want to take this a step further, you can often link these extensions with tools like DrumUp or Crowdfire for an even greater impact on your social media presence.

 by Deana Kovač

Deana Kovač is an internet marketing specialist. In her free time, she enjoys listening to music and singing karaoke. Also, her day just can’t start without a hot cup of coffee.

###

If you enjoyed this post read:

  1. 10 SEO Copywriting Tips For Beginners
  2. 3 Things To Know About Podcasts When You Know Nothing
  3. 3 Easy Ways To Improve SEO For Your Blog
  4. Everything You Need To Know About Blogging

P.S. If you want to learn how to blog, join us for The Complete Blogging Course in Johannesburg or sign up for the online version.

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Guest Post

If there’s one essential ingredient for writing, it’s motivation. If you can’t get yourself to the blank page, it doesn’t matter how many beautiful words you have trapped inside you. So if you find your motivation wavering, here are 6 simple ways to keep you productive.

1. Make writing a priority

Your writing has to be a non-negotiable. It’s too easy to say, ‘I don’t have time’ and that’s definitely one of the main reasons people give as a reason to not write or give up when they hit a tough spot. But finding time is making time. Writing has to be a non-negotiable necessity: like staying hydrated and nourished. The only solution here is to be ruthless, and make a commitment to yourself.

2. Make it consistent

You need to make your writing sessions regular, and set in stone. The more consistent you are, the more ‘the muse’ will show up for you. The muse is not an imaginary fairy creature, but a reality. Your subconscious learns to show up at the prescribed time each day, and the more consistent you are, the more ideas will show up for you. To keep a regular writing appointment, it also helps to have an accountability partner. That sense of commitment and external accountability that comes with enlisting someone to help you stay true to your goals.

3. Choose a writing space

A dedicated writing space is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself. Even if you don’t have a room that’s entirely yours, you can set aside a spot for your writing whether it’s a corner of your kitchen or a table at the local library. The act of dedicating a space to your writing works because there’s a sense of ritual involved, it gets you into the rhythm of writing regularly, and it gets you away from the distractions of daily life.

4. Use dead time to ponder

A writer is always writing. Story ideas are everywhere, and although you might not always have a pen and paper, a laptop or even on your phone on you, you can always be thinking about your characters and what they might do next. Driving, preparing dinner, doing the washing up – these are all valuable times to creatively stew. In doing this, you’ll increase your writing productivity, because you’ll spend more of your writing time getting words down on the page, rather than working out plot problems.

5. Plan each writing session

While you don’t have to plan out every session down to the smallest detail, it’s a good idea to have some kind of plan about what you want to do that day. This will ensure you optimise your writing time for getting words on the page. That said, sometimes a blank is as good as a plan – it can be an invitation to continue. Ernest Hemingway advised writers to stop for the day when writing is going well and the writer knows what will happen next. Some writers even advocate stopping in the middle of a paragraph or sentence. That makes it easier to dive in the next day.

6. Set some writing goals

Your writing goal can be as detailed as an Excel spreadsheet to track daily word counts or as general as making notes in a writing journal, but it’s a good plan to set realistic goals that you can reach. Even if that’s just 250 words or one page per day: after a year, you’ll have more than 300 pages. Also take note of how you work best, and when you get significant writing done. You might write more productively in a noisy or quiet spot, with or without a cup of coffee, or before or just after exercising.

Staying motivated to write every day is tricky, but essential if you want to be a productive writer… And don’t we all? Writing productivity is a combination of making sure you have the time and space to write, setting concrete goals, and being conscious about your methods and how effective they are in bringing your goal closer. Happy writing!

by Bridget McNulty

Bridget is a published author (Strange Nervous Laughter), journalist, and content strategist who loves helping people start – and finish! – their novels. You can find out more on her blog.

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Writers have a lot to learn from our favourite books. Authors from different genres and time periods teach us new themes, literary devices, and other techniques that inspire our writing. Catch-22 is an example of a book that introduced a new approach to satire when describing Yossarian’s story and his catch 22s that plagued him several times throughout the book.

Books are also a great example of how writers and storytellers impact the world simply with the written word. Roots is one novel that illustrated the effects of slavery from a personal perspective. This, and other books like Things Fall Apart, allowed us a first-hand look into the horrors of slavery and the things people went through at that time.

These works span across different genres, eras, and many different topics. Look through this list to learn about the impact these books had and draw inspiration for your own writing projects!

Largest created this infographic of the books that have made the biggest impact over time. Put them on your must-read list and dive into an intimate conversation with the most revolutionary minds throughout history.

If you are looking for more infographics, you might like these:

  1. 100 Iconic Love Stories From Around The World
  2. How To Use A Fountain Pen
  3. 11 Public Libraries Invaluable to World History
  4. Breaking Down Writer’s Block

If you enjoy our posts, please consider this:

If you’re inspired, educated, or entertained by our posts, please give us a donation.

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Writers have a lot to learn from our favourite books. Authors from different genres and time periods teach us new themes, literary devices, and other techniques that inspire our writing. Catch-22 is an example of a book that introduced a new approach to satire when describing Yossarian’s story and his catch 22s that plagued him several times throughout the book.

Books are also a great example of how writers and storytellers impact the world simply with the written word. Roots is one novel that illustrated the effects of slavery from a personal perspective. This, and other books like Things Fall Apart, allowed us a first-hand look into the horrors of slavery and the things people went through at that time.

These works span across different genres, eras, and many different topics. Look through this list to learn about the impact these books had and draw inspiration for your own writing projects!

Largest created this infographic of the books that have made the biggest impact over time. Put them on your must-read list and dive into an intimate conversation with the most revolutionary minds throughout history.

If you are looking for more infographics, you might like these:

  1. 100 Iconic Love Stories From Around The World
  2. How To Use A Fountain Pen
  3. 11 Public Libraries Invaluable to World History
  4. Breaking Down Writer’s Block

If you enjoy our posts, please consider this:

If you’re inspired, educated, or entertained by our posts, please give us a donation.

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If you want to write a memoir you need to learn how to focus on what you need to include. You need to limit extraneous storylines and narrow your focus.

Narrow Your Focus & Stick To Your Theme

As I explained in a previous post, a memoir is not an autobiography. A memoir focuses on a time, or an event, or series of events, or a choice, that is tied together with a theme. It is not your entire life story.

If you remember this, you will be able to focus on what is important to the book you are writing. Every scene you include in the memoir should have something important to show about this part of your life.

For example, Julian Barnes focuses on the period of grief following his wife’s death in Levels of Life. It is a memoir of grief and he ties it together with a theme of ballooning. He asks what happens when you put two things together and then tear them apart? It is a powerful book that is only 140 pages long.

A memoir can have a short or long time span. The events could happen in days or over a lifetime, but the focus must remain on those events and be tied to the theme.

If you can narrow your focus and figure out what your theme is, you will be able to ask:

  1. Is this scene important to my theme?
  2. Does this person show anything new about the theme? Have I already shown this via another person in my story?
  3. Does this conversation relate to the theme?

This will help you to decide what is important and what is superfluous to your story.

P.S. If you want to learn how to write a memoir, enrol for our Secrets of a Memoirist course.

Click here to join:

 by Amanda Patterson

If you enjoyed this post, read:

  1. What’s The Difference Between An Autobiography And A Memoir?
  2. How Your Characters’ To-Do Lists Can Help You Plot Your Book
  3. Why Writing A Memoir Is All About The ‘How

Become a Writers Write Patron:

If you’re inspired, educated, or entertained by our posts, please show your appreciation with a monthly donation.

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Every month, we look at the posts that people read the most. These were the new Writers Write posts you enjoyed most in February 2019:

  1. Harry Potter And The Not Very Good Writing
  2. 3 Things Authors Of The Golden Age Of Sci-Fi & Fantasy Did Better
  3. Why You Don’t Need To Put Everything In Your Book
  4. 10 SEO Copywriting Tips For Beginners
  5. How To Write The Tragic Love Story – A 10-Step Formula
  6. What’s The Difference Between An Autobiography And A Memoir?
  7. How Meditation Can Improve Your Writing
  8. Joy Williams’ 8 Essential Attributes Of The Short Story
  9. Richard Ford’s 10 Rules For Writing Fiction
  10. 28 Writing Prompts For February 2019

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