Loading...

Follow WordPress News on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
Or

Valid


WordPress News by Hugh Lashbrooke - 11h ago

WordCamps are informal, community-organized events that are put together by a team of local WordPress users who have a passion for growing their communities. They are born out of active WordPress meetup groups that meet regularly and are able to host an annual WordCamp event. This has worked very well in many communities, with over 120 WordCamps being hosted around the world in 2017.

Sometimes though, passionate and enthusiastic community members can’t pull together enough people in their community to make a WordCamp happen. To address this, we introduced the WordCamp Incubator program in 2016.

The goal of the incubator program is to help spread WordPress to underserved areas by providing more significant organizing support for their first WordCamp event. In 2016, members of the global community team worked with volunteers in three cities — Denpasar, Harare and Medellín — giving direct, hands-on assistance in making local WordCamps possible. All three of these WordCamp incubators were a great success, so we're bringing the incubator program back for 2018.

Where should the next WordCamp incubators be? If you have always wanted a WordCamp in your city but haven’t been able to get a community started, this is a great opportunity. We will be taking applications for the next few weeks, then will get in touch with everyone who applied to discuss the possibilities. We will announce the chosen cities by the end of March.

To apply, fill in the application by March 15, 2018. You don’t need to have any specific information handy, it’s just a form to let us know you’re interested. You can apply to nominate your city even if you don’t want to be the main organizer, but for this to work well we will need local liaisons and volunteers, so please only nominate cities where you live or work so that we have at least one local connection to begin.

We're looking forward to hearing from you!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

WordPress 4.9.4 is now available.

This maintenance release fixes a severe bug in 4.9.3, which will cause sites that support automatic background updates to fail to update automatically, and will require action from you (or your host) for it to be updated to 4.9.4.

Four years ago with WordPress 3.7 “Basie”, we added the ability for WordPress to self-update, keeping your website secure and bug-free, even when you weren’t available to do it yourself. For four years it’s helped keep millions of installs updated with very few issues over that time. Unfortunately yesterdays 4.9.3 release contained a severe bug which was only discovered after release. The bug will cause WordPress to encounter an error when it attempts to update itself to WordPress 4.9.4, and will require an update to be performed through the WordPress dashboard or hosts update tools.

WordPress managed hosting companies who install updates automatically for their customers can install the update as normal, and we’ll be working with other hosts to ensure that as many customers of theirs who can be automatically updated to WordPress 4.9.4 can be.

For more technical details of the issue, we’ve posted on our Core Development blog. For a full list of changes, consult the list of tickets.

Download WordPress 4.9.4 or visit Dashboard → Updates and click “Update Now.”

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

WordPress 4.9.3 is now available.

This maintenance release fixes 34 bugs in 4.9, including fixes for Customizer changesets, widgets, visual editor, and PHP 7.2 compatibility. For a full list of changes, consult the list of tickets and the changelog.

Download WordPress 4.9.3 or visit Dashboard → Updates and click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.3:

Aaron Jorbin, abdullahramzan, Adam Silverstein, Andrea Fercia, andreiglingeanu, Andrew Ozz, Brandon Payton, Chetan Prajapati, coleh, Darko A7, David Cramer, David Herrera, Dion Hulse, Felix Arntz, Frank Klein, Gary Pendergast, Jb Audras, Jeffrey Paul, lizkarkoski, Marius L. J., mattyrob, Monika Rao, munyagu, ndavison, Nick Momrik, Peter Wilson, Rachel Baker, rishishah, Ryan Paul, Sami Ahmed Siddiqui, Sayed Taqui, Sean Hayes, Sergey Biryukov, Shawn Hooper, Stephen Edgar, Sultan Nasir Uddin, tigertech, and Weston Ruter.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Things got off to a gradual start in 2018 with momentum starting to pick up over the course of the month. There were some notable developments in January, including a new point release and work being done on other important areas of the WordPress project.

WordPress 4.9.2 Security and Maintenance Release

On January 16, WordPress 4.9.2 was released to fix an important security issue with the media player, as well as a number of other smaller bugs. This release goes a long way to smoothing out the 4.9 release cycle with the next point release, v4.9.3, due in early February.

To get involved in building WordPress Core, jump into the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and follow the Core team blog.

Updated Plugin Directory Guidelines

At the end of 2017, the guidelines for the Plugin Directory received a significant update to make them clearer and expanded to address certain situations. This does not necessarily make these guidelines complete, but rather more user-friendly and practical; they govern how developers build plugins for the Plugin Directory, so they need to evolve with the global community that the Directory serves.

If you would like to contribute to these guidelines, you can make a pull request to the GitHub repository or email plugins@wordpress.org. You can also jump into the #pluginreview channel in the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

WordPress 4.9.2 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

An XSS vulnerability was discovered in the Flash fallback files in MediaElement, a library that is included with WordPress. Because the Flash files are no longer needed for most use cases, they have been removed from WordPress.

MediaElement has released a new version that contains a fix for the bug, and a WordPress plugin containing the fixed files is available in the plugin repository.

Thank you to the reporters of this issue for practicing responsible security disclosureEnguerran Gillier and Widiz.

21 other bugs were fixed in WordPress 4.9.2. Particularly of note were:

  • JavaScript errors that prevented saving posts in Firefox have been fixed.
  • The previous taxonomy-agnostic behavior of get_category_link() and category_description() was restored.
  • Switching themes will now attempt to restore previous widget assignments, even when there are no sidebars to map.

The Codex has more information about all of the issues fixed in 4.9.2, if you'd like to learn more.

Download WordPress 4.9.2 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click "Update Now." Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.2:

0x6f0, Aaron Jorbin, Andrea Fercia, Andrew Duthie, Andrew Ozz, Blobfolio, Boone Gorges, Caleb Burks, Carolina Nymark, chasewg, Chetan Prajapati, Dion Hulse, Hardik Amipara, ionvv, Jason Caldwell, Jeffrey Paul, Jeremy Felt, Joe McGill, johnschulz, Juhi Patel, Konstantin Obenland, Mark Jaquith, Nilambar Sharma, Peter Wilson, Rachel Baker, Rinku Y, Sergey Biryukov, and Weston Ruter.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Activity slowed down in December in the WordPress community, particularly in the last two weeks. However, the month started off with a big event and work still pushed forward in a number of key areas of the project. Read on to find out more about what transpired in the WordPress community as 2017 came to a close.

WordCamp US 2017 Brings the Community Together

The latest edition of WordCamp US took place last month in Nashville on December 1-3. The event brought together over 1,400 WordPress enthusiasts from around the world, fostering a deeper, more engaged global community.

While attending a WordCamp is always a unique experience, you can catch up on the sessions on WordPress.tv and look through the event photos on Facebook to get a feel for how it all happened. Of course, Matt Mullenweg’s State of the Word talk is always one of the highlights at this event.

The next WordCamp US will be held in Nashville again in 2018, but if you would like to see it hosted in your city in 2019 and 2020, then you have until February 2 to apply.

WordPress User Survey Data Is Published

Over the last few years, tens of thousands of WordPress users all over the world have filled out the annual WordPress user survey. The results of that survey are used to improve the WordPress project, but that data has mostly remained private. This has changed now and the results from the last three surveys are now publicly available for everyone to analyze.

The data will be useful to anyone involved in WordPress since it provides a detailed look at who uses WordPress and what they do with it — information that can help inform product development decisions across the board.

New WordPress.org Team for the Tide Project

As announced at WordCamp US, the Tide project is being brought under the WordPress.org umbrella to be managed and developed by the community.

Tide is a series of automated tests run against every plugin and theme in the directory to help WordPress users make informed decisions about the plugins and themes that they choose to install.

To get involved in developing Tide, jump into the #tide channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and follow the Tide team blog.

Further Reading:

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

For many years, we’ve invited folks to tell us how they use WordPress by filling out an annual survey. In the past, interesting results from this survey have been shared in the annual State of the Word address. This year, for the first time, the results of the 2017 survey are being published on WordPress News, along with the results of the 2015 and 2016 survey.

So that information from the survey doesn’t reveal anything that respondents might consider private, we do not publish a full export of the raw data. We’d love to make this information as accessible as possible, though, so if you have a suggestion for an OS project or tool we can put the data into that allows people to play with it that still protects individual response privacy, please leave a comment on this post!

Major Groups

This survey features multiple groups, dividing respondents at the first question:

Which of the following best describes how you use WordPress? (Mandatory)

Those who selected “I’m a designer or developer, or I work for a company that designs/develops websites; I use WordPress to build websites and/or blogs for others. (This might include theme development, writing plugins, or other custom work.)” were served questions from what we’ll call the “WordPress Professionals” group.

This “WordPress Professionals” group is further divided into WordPress Company and WordPress Freelancer/Hobbyist groups, based on how the respondent answered the question, “Which of the following best describes your involvement with WordPress? (2015) / Do you work for a company, or on your own? (2016-17).”

Those who selected “I own, run, or contribute to a blog or website that is built with WordPress.” were served questions in what we’re calling the “WordPress Users” group.

The relevant survey group is noted in each table below. In the case of questions that were served to different groups in 2015 but then served to all respondents in 2016 and 2017, the group responses from 2015 have been consolidated into one set of data for easier comparison between years.

Survey results

Jump to answers from WordPress Professionals

Jump to answers from WordPress Users

Jump to answers from All Respondents

Which of the following best describes how you use WordPress? (Mandatory)
2015 2016 2017
Number of responses (since this question was mandatory, the number of responses here is the total number for the survey) 45,995 15,585 16,029
I’m a designer or developer, or I work for a company that designs/develops websites; I use WordPress to build websites and/or blogs for others. (This might include theme development, writing plugins, other custom work.) 26,662 58% 8,838 57% 9,099 57%
I own, run, or contribute to a blog or website that is built with WordPress. 16,130 35% 5,293 34% 5,625 35%
Neither of the above. 3,204 7% 1,460 9% 1,306 8%
WordPress Professionals Which of the following best describes your involvement with WordPress? (Mandatory, 2015) / Do you work for a company, or on your own? (Mandatory, 2016-17)
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Professional
Number of responses 26,699 8,838 9,101
My primary job is working for a company or organization that uses WordPress. 9,505 36% 3,529 40% 3,660 40%
My primary job is as a self-employed designer or developer that uses WordPress. 9,310 35% 3,188 36% 3,440 38%
I earn money from part-time or occasional freelance work involving WordPress. 5,954 22% 1,633 18% 1,590 17%
Work that I do involving WordPress is just a hobby, I don’t make money from it. 1,930 7% 491 6% 411 5%
How does your company or organization work with WordPress?
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Company
Number of responses 9,342
Build/design and/or maintain websites or blogs for other people, companies, or organizations. 7,772 27%
Develop or customize themes. 5,404 19%
Build/design and/or maintain websites or blogs for my own use. 4,733 16%
Host websites for customers. 4,397 15%
Develop or distribute plugins. 3,181 11%
Provide educational resources to help others to use WordPress. 1,349 5%
Sponsor and/or attend WordCamps. 1,127 4%
Contribute bug reports and/or patches to WordPress core. 914 3%
Other Option 182  1%
Number of responses 3,457 3,598
We make websites for others. 2,695 24% 2,722 23%
We make websites for ourselves. 2,355 21% 2,470 21%
We develop or customize themes. 1,866 16% 1,910 16%
We host websites for others. 1,564 14% 1,595 14%
We develop or distribute plugins. 1,283 11% 1,342 11%
We provide educational resources to help others to use WordPress. 581 5% 631 5%
We sponsor and/or attend WordCamps. 561 5% 579 5%
We contribute bug reports and/or patches to WordPress core. 444 4% 468 4%
Other Option 98 1% 96 1%

How would you describe the business of your typical client(s)? (2015) / How would you describe the business of your typical client/customer? (2016, 2017)

2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Company
Number of responses 9,154 3,317 3,498
Small business 6,893 32% 2,398 31% 2,510 31%
Large business or Enterprise 3,635 17% 1,361 18% 1,447 18%
Non-profit 2,644 12% 934 12% 992 12%
Individual 2,600 12% 888 12% 1,022 12%
Education 2,344 11% 854 11% 966 12%
Website development (sub-contracting) 2,065 10% 637 8% 677 8%
Government 1,410 6% 524 7% 552 7%
Other Option 127 1% 66 1% 64 1%

How does your company or organization use WordPress when developing websites? (2015) / When making websites, how does your company or organization use WordPress? (2016, 2017)

2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Company
Number of responses 9,078 3,369 3,552
Mostly as a content management system (CMS) 6,361 70% 2,482 74% 2,640 74%
About half the time as a blogging platform and half the time as a CMS 1,222 13% 370 11% 383 11%
Mostly as a blogging platform 721 8% 137 4% 129 4%
Mostly as an application framework 629 7% 303 9% 303 9%
Other Option 145 2% 78 2% 97 3%
How much is your average WordPress site customized from the original WordPress installation?
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Company
Number of responses 9,054 3,302 3,473
A lot of work has been done, the front end is unrecognizable, but the Dashboard still looks like the usual WordPress interface. 5,651 62% 2,025 61% 2,105 61%
There’s a different theme and some plugins have been added. 2,230 25% 799 24% 905 26%
Not at all, it’s still pretty much the same as the original download. 756 8% 302 9% 298 9%
You’d never know this was a WordPress installation, everything (including the admin) has been customized. 417 5% 177 5% 165 5%
Roughly how many currently active WordPress sites has your company or organization built?
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Company
Number of responses 8,801
200 + 1,074 12%
51 – 200 1,721 20%
21 – 50 1,718 20%
11 – 20 1,284 15%
6 – 10 1,109 13%
2 – 5 1,418 16%
1 390 4%
0 87 1%
Number of responses 3,358 3,540
Thousands. 291 9% 331 9%
Hundreds. 770 23% 894 25%
Fewer than a hundred. 1,144 34% 1,177 33%
Just a few, but they are really great. 926 28% 896 25%
Prefer not to answer. 228 7% 242 7%
How many person-hours (of your company’s work) does the typical site take to complete?
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Company
Number of responses 9,091 3,353 3,522
More than 200 939 10% 309 9% 325 9%
100 – 200 1080 12% 329 10% 367 10%
60 – 100 1541 17% 527 16% 513 15%
40 – 60 1854 20% 583 17% 620 18%
20 – 40 2066 23% 691 21% 685 19%
Fewer than 20 1611 18% 479 14% 519 15%
Prefer not to answer (2016, 2017) 436 13% 493 14%
Roughly what percentage of your company or organization’s output is based around WordPress (as opposed to other platforms or software)?
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Company
Number of responses 8,950 3,345 3,503
100 % 1,089 12% 438 13% 480 14%
90 % 1,043 12% 417 12% 459 13%
80 % 955 11% 367 11% 424 12%
70 % 831 9% 305 9% 344 10%
60 % 534 6% 246 7% 226 6%
50 % 973 11% 335 10% 338 10%
40 % 613 7% 245 7% 202 6%
30 % 877 10% 335 10% 310 9%
20 % 806 9% 242 7% 280 8%
10 % 1,039 12% 344 10% 348 10%
0 % 190 2% 72 2% 92 3%
In which of the following ways do you work with WordPress?
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Freelancer/Hobbyist
Number of responses 17,009 5,221 5,425
Build/design and/or maintain websites or blogs for other people, companies, or organizations 15,342 34% 4,795 34% 5,064 34%
Develop or customize themes 10,549 24% 2,997 21% 3,021 20%
Host websites for customers 8,142 18% 2,466 17% 2,728 18%
Develop or distribute plugins 4,125 9% 1,395 10% 1,416 9%
Provide educational resources to help others to use WordPress 3,276 7% 1,187 8% 1,308 9%
Sponsor and/or attend WordCamps 1,559 4% 648 5% 724 5%
Contribute bug reports and/or patches to WordPress core 1,107 2% 381 3% 393 3%
Other Option 389 1% 243 2% 299 2%
How would you describe the business of your typical client(s)?
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Freelancer/Hobbyist
Number of responses 16,863 5,151 5,353
Small business 14,185 35% 4,342 35% 4,622 36%
Individual 8,513 21% 2,581 21% 2,583 20%
Non-profit 6,585 16% 2,004 16% 2,113 16%
Website development (sub-contracting) 4,301 11% 1,258 10% 1,216 9%
Education 3,458 8% 1,049 8% 1,139 9%
Large business or Enterprise 2,391 6% 805 6% 857 7%
Government 1,150 3% 300 2% 329 3%
Other Option 173 0% 101 1% 99 1%
How do you use WordPress in your development?
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Freelancer/Hobbyist
Number of responses 16,768 5,145 5,372
Mostly as a content management system (CMS) 11,754 70% 3,641 71% 3,959 74%
About half the time as a blogging platform and half the time as a CMS 2,825 17% 812 16% 721 13%
Mostly as an application framework 1,012 6% 343 7% 344 6%
Mostly as a blogging platform 992 6% 246 5% 226 4%
Other Option 185 1% 105 2% 122 2%
How much is your average WordPress site customized from the original WordPress installation?
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Freelancer/Hobbyist
Number of responses 16,699 5,131 5,317
A lot of work has been done, the front end is unrecognizable, but the Dashboard still looks like the usual WordPress interface. 9,457 57% 2,837 55% 2,998 56%
There’s a different theme and some plugins have been added. 5,526 33% 1,694 33% 1,781 34%
Not at all, it’s still pretty much the same as the original download. 977 6% 341 7% 310 6%
You’d never know this was a WordPress installation, everything (including the admin) has been customized. 739 4% 261 5% 228 4%
How many currently active WordPress sites have you built? (2015) / Roughly how many currently active WordPress sites have you built? (2016, 2017)
2015 2016 2017
Group: WordPress Freelancer/Hobbyist
Number of responses 16,690
200 + 514 3%
51 – 200 1,728 10%
21 – 50 3,000 18%
11 – 20 3,146 19%
6 – 10 3,405 20%
2 – 5 3,838 23%
1 698 4%
0 361 2%
Number of..
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The WordPress project recently released WordPress 4.9, “Tipton” — a new major release named in honor of musician and band leader Billy Tipton. Read on to find out more about this and other interesting news from around the WordPress world in November.

WordPress 4.9 “Tipton”

On November 16, WordPress 4.9 was released with new features for publishers and developers alike. Release highlights include design locking, scheduling, and previews in the Customizer, an even more secure and usable code editing experience, a new gallery widget, and text widget improvements.

The follow up security and maintenance, v4.9.1, has now been released to tighten up the security of WordPress as a whole.

To get involved in building WordPress Core, jump into the #core channel in the Making WordPress Slack group, and follow the Core team blog.

Apply to Speak At WordCamp Europe 2018

The next edition of WordCamp Europe takes place in June, 2018. While the organizing team is still in the early stages of planning, they are accepting speaker applications.

WordCamp Europe is the largest WordCamp in the world and, along with WordCamp US, one of the flagship events of the WordCamp program — speaking at this event is a great way to give back to the global WordPress community by sharing your knowledge and expertise with thousands of WordPress enthusiasts.

Diversity Outreach Speaker Training Initiative

To help WordPress community organizers offer diverse speaker lineups, a new community initiative has kicked off to use existing speaker training workshops to demystify speaking requirements and help participants gain confidence in their ability to share their WordPress knowledge in a WordCamp session.

The working group behind this initiative will be meeting regularly to discuss and plan how they can help local communities to train speakers for WordCamps and other events.

To get involved in this initiative, you can join the meetings at 5pm UTC every other Wednesday in the #community-team channel of the Making WordPress Slack group.

Further Reading:

If you have a story we should consider including in the next “Month in WordPress” post, please submit it here.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

WordPress 4.9.1 is now available. This is a security and maintenance release for all versions since WordPress 3.7. We strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.

WordPress versions 4.9 and earlier are affected by four security issues which could potentially be exploited as part of a multi-vector attack. As part of the core team's ongoing commitment to security hardening, the following fixes have been implemented in 4.9.1:

  1. Use a properly generated hash for the newbloguser key instead of a determinate substring.
  2. Add escaping to the language attributes used on html elements.
  3. Ensure the attributes of enclosures are correctly escaped in RSS and Atom feeds.
  4. Remove the ability to upload JavaScript files for users who do not have the unfiltered_html capability.

Thank you to the reporters of these issues for practicing responsible security disclosure: Rahul Pratap Singh and John Blackbourn.

Eleven other bugs were fixed in WordPress 4.9.1. Particularly of note were:

  • Issues relating to the caching of theme template files.
  • A MediaElement JavaScript error preventing users of certain languages from being able to upload media files.
  • The inability to edit theme and plugin files on Windows based servers.

This post has more information about all of the issues fixed in 4.9.1 if you'd like to learn more.

Download WordPress 4.9.1 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and click "Update Now." Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update automatically.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to WordPress 4.9.1:

Alain Schlesser, Andrea Fercia, Angelika Reisiger, Blobfolio, bobbingwide, Chetan Prajapati, Dion Hulse, Dominik Schilling (ocean90), edo888, Erich Munz, Felix Arntz, Florian TIAR, Gary Pendergast, Igor Benic, Jeff Farthing, Jeffrey Paul, jeremyescott, Joe McGill, John Blackbourn, johnpgreen, Kelly Dwan, lenasterg, Marius L. J., Mel Choyce, Mário Valney, natacado, odyssey, precies, Saša, Sergey Biryukov, and Weston Ruter.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free year
Free Preview